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Sample records for accelerated cerebral white

  1. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  2. Impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics are associated with cerebral white matter damage

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fadar, Otite; Mehregan, Aujan; Salat, David H; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik S; Guttmann, Charles RG; Fisher, Naomi DL; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Sorond, Farzaneh A

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) in elderly individuals with vascular diseases are presumed to be due to ischemic small vessel diseases; however, their etiology is unknown. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between cerebrovascular hemodynamics and white matter structural integrity in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors. White matter hyperintensity volumes, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained from MRI in 48 subjects (75±7years). Pulsatility index (PI) and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was calculated from transfer function analysis (phase and gain) of spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations in the low (LF, 0.03 to 0.15 Hz) and high (HF, 0.16 to 0.5 Hz) frequency ranges. Higher PI was associated with greater WMH (P<0.005). Higher phase across all frequency ranges was associated with greater FA and lower MD (P<0.005). Lower gain was associated with higher FA in the LF range (P=0.001). These relationships between phase and FA were significant in the territories limited to the middle cerebral artery as well as across the entire brain. Our results show a strong relationship between impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics (PI and dCA) and loss of cerebral white matter structural integrity (WMH and DTI metrics) in elderly individuals. PMID:24129749

  3. Microvasculature of the human cerebral white matter: arteries of the deep white matter.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michio; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2003-06-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebral deep white matter was studied using soft X-ray and diaphanized specimens, achieved by intra-arterial injection of barium and vascular stain respectively, and also by electron microscopic examination of the corrosion cast of arteries in normal adult brains. The deep white matter arteries passed through the cerebral cortex with a few branches to the cortex and ran straight through the white matter. The arteries concentrated ventriculopetally to the white matter around the lateral ventricle. Anastomoses were noted around the ventricular wall at the terminals of the deep white matter arteries. No centrifugal branches irrigating the periventricular white matter from the lenticulo-striate arteries were observed in the present study. The presence of anastomoses among the terminal branches of deep white matter arteries protects against ischemic change or infarction in this area from an occlusion of a single deep white matter artery. This may lead to development of terminal zone infarction from ischemia or vascular diseases, affecting multiple deep white matter arteries. The subcortical and deep white matter arteries had thick adventitial sheaths and large adventitial spaces in the white matter but not in the cortex. The presence or absence of the adventitial space is regarded as another characteristic difference between the arteries in the white matter and cortex. This difference may influence pathological changes in vascular lesions in these respective areas. PMID:12777099

  4. Cerebral white matter deficiencies in pedophilic men.

    PubMed

    Cantor, James M; Kabani, Noor; Christensen, Bruce K; Zipursky, Robert B; Barbaree, Howard E; Dickey, Robert; Klassen, Philip E; Mikulis, David J; Kuban, Michael E; Blak, Thomas; Richards, Blake A; Hanratty, M Katherine; Blanchard, Ray

    2008-02-01

    The present investigation sought to identify which brain regions distinguish pedophilic from nonpedophilic men, using unbiased, automated analyses of the whole brain. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were acquired from men who demonstrated illegal or clinically significant sexual behaviors or interests (n = 65) and from men who had histories of nonsexual offenses but no sexual offenses (n = 62). Sexual interest in children was assessed by participants' admissions of pedophilic interest, histories of committing sexual offenses against children, and psychophysiological responses in the laboratory to erotic stimuli depicting children or adults. Automated parcellation of the MRIs revealed significant negative associations between pedophilia and white matter volumes of the temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry corroborated the associations and indicated that the regions of lower white matter volumes followed, and were limited to, two major fiber bundles: the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the right arcuate fasciculus. No significant differences were found in grey matter or in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Because the superior fronto-occipital and arcuate fasciculi connect the cortical regions that respond to sexual cues, these results suggest (1) that those cortical regions operate as a network for recognizing sexually relevant stimuli and (2) that pedophilia results from a partial disconnection within that network. PMID:18039544

  5. Radioactive microsphere study of cerebral blood flow under acceleration. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlees, K.J.; Yoder, J.E.; Toth, D.M.; Oloff, C.M.; Karl, A.

    1980-11-01

    A study using radioactive microspheres for the investigation of cerebral blood flow during acceleration is described. Details of a technique for the blunt dissection of cerebral tissues are included. Results of flow studies at 3 and 5 G sub z acceleration stress indicate there is no selective regional preservation of cerebral tissue. (Author)

  6. Early onset West syndrome with cerebral hypomyelination and reduced cerebral white matter.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Jun; Akasaka, Noriyuki; Osaka, Hitoshi; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Naka; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Ohno, Kousaku

    2008-05-01

    Numerous numbers of pre-, peri- and postnatal damages cause West syndrome in early infancy, however, etiology in many cases are not still elucidated despite intensive biochemical and neuroradiologic investigations. We described four patients having early onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe hypomyelination and reduction in cerebral white matter. The clinical symptoms of these patients are impaired visual attention, acquired microcephaly, spastic tetraplegia, profound psychomotor delay and infantile spasms since early infancy. All patients had striking hypomyelination of cerebrum, reduced volume of white matter and cortical atrophy on MRI. Serial MRI investigations in three patients showed absence of myelination of the white matter. On EEG, one patient revealed suppression-burst and other three had hypsarrhythmia. Despite having intractable seizures, no patient showed deterioration of neurological development. The group of these findings is mimicking to clinical manifestations of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, and has some overlap with progressive encephalopathy with edema, hypsarrhythmia, and optic atrophy (PEHO) like syndrome, however it is not compatible with these two conditions. The findings observed in our patients can be regarded as a new clinical condition associated with early onset West syndrome. PMID:18065176

  7. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  8. Cerebral white matter correlates of delay discounting in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Koeppel, Julie A; Barry, Amy B

    2016-05-15

    The adolescent brain undergoes extensive structural white matter (WM) changes. Adolescence is also a critical time period during which cognitive, emotional and social maturation occurs in transition into adulthood. Compared to adults, adolescents are generally more impulsive with increased risk-taking behaviors. The goal of this study is to examine whether adolescent impulsivity may be related to cerebral WM maturation. In 89 healthy adolescents, we assessed impulsivity using the delay discounting task, and MRI WM volumes in brain regions previously implicated in delay discounting behaviors. We found that smaller delay discounting AUC (area under the curve) was associated with larger WM volumes in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortices (PFC) and motor cortex. There were no significant effects of AUC on WM volumes within somatosensory brain regions. In our sample, younger age was significantly associated with greater WM volumes in orbitofrontal and dorsolateral PFC subregions. Even after accounting for age-related effects, preference for immediate rewards (or greater impulsivity) still correlated with larger WM volumes in prefrontal regions known to mediate cognitive control. Our findings lend further support to the notion that reduced brain WM maturity may limit the ability in adolescents to forgo immediate rewards leading to greater impulsivity. PMID:26946275

  9. Increased Number of White Matter Lesions in Patients with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Michael J.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Kim, Helen; Hart, Blaine L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGKROUND AND PURPOSE Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3TMR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 yearsof age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score

  10. MELAS with diffuse degeneration of the cerebral white matter: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Teruo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Obama, Runko; Ishihara, Tadayuki; Yagishita, Saburou

    2010-02-01

    Up to now diffuse white matter demyelination of the cerebrum has been reported in only a few cases of mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Here we document an autopsy case with this rare neuropathology. Most MELAS cases are diagnosed antemortem by A3243G transition of mitochondrial DNA. While cerebral damage including necrotic foci in the cerebral cortex are common findings in MELAS, prominent white matter involvement best characterizes this MELAS case. There were numerous necrotic foci, varying in size and chronological stage, in the cerebral white matter. In the areas of the white matter without necrotic foci, there was diffuse fibrillary gliosis with the loss of axons and oligodendrocytes. The gliosis was dominant in the deep white matter, sparing the U-fiber. The cerebral cortex showed diffuse cortical atrophy with few scattered necrotic foci. Distribution of the cerebral lesions does not coincide with the territory of blood supply. The vascular wall presented only slight to mild hyalinosis. We assumed a common pathogenesis to the cortical lesions and the white matter change. The pathogenesis of the present diffuse cerebral lesions may not be just secondary to circulatory disturbance but partly due to metabolic abnormality. PMID:19496942

  11. Accelerator Center: National symbol or white elephant?

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-02

    This article discusses the possible future of the National Accelerator Center facility in South Africa. This state of the art facility with a 200-megaelectrol-volt proton cyclotron, carries out important nuclear physics research but takes a huge part of South Africa`s total science research budget.

  12. Cerebral White Matter Integrity Mediates Adult Age Differences in Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Costello, Matthew C.; Bucur, Barbara; White, Leonard E.; Cabeza, Roberto; Davis, Simon W.; Dennis, Nancy A.; Provenzale, James M.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has established that age-related decline occurs in measures of cerebral white matter integrity, but the role of this decline in age-related cognitive changes is not clear. To conclude that white matter integrity has a mediating (causal) contribution, it is necessary to demonstrate that statistical control of the white…

  13. Association of Rotavirus With Seizures Accompanied by Cerebral White Matter Injury in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ki Won; Moon, Chang Hoon; Lee, Kyung Yeon

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to identify whether rotavirus, human parechovirus, or enterovirus are causative or associated viral pathogens of seizures accompanied by diffuse cerebral white matter injury in neonates. Thirty neonates who presented with seizures and diffusion-restriction in the widespread bilateral cerebral white matter on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. All patients were tested for rotavirus, human parechovirus, and enterovirus by using reverse transcription PCR. Stool, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum samples were examined in 30, 25, and 20 patients, respectively. Rotavirus was detected in stool samples from all 30 patients (100%). Stool samples from 5 patients (16.7%) were also positive for enterovirus. Rotavirus or human parechovirus were not detected in any cerebrospinal fluid samples from 25 patients, but 1 patient tested positive for enterovirus. No virus was detected in any of 20 patient sera. This study indicated an association between rotavirus and seizures accompanied by diffuse cerebral white matter lesions in neonates. PMID:25637646

  14. APOE/TOMM 40 genetic loci, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Donald M.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Harris, Sarah E.; Bastin, Mark E.; Murray, Catherine; Lutz, Michael W.; Saunders, Ann M.; Roses, Allen D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Two markers of cerebral small vessel disease are white matter hyperintensities and cerebral microbleeds, which commonly occur in people with Alzheimer's disease. Aim and/or hypothesis To test for independent associations between two Alzheimer's disease‐susceptibility gene loci – APOE ε and the TOMM 40 ‘523’ poly‐T repeat – and white matter hyperintensities/cerebral microbleed burden in community‐dwelling older adults. Methods Participants in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 underwent genotyping for APOE ε and TOMM 40 523, and detailed structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at a mean age of 72·70 years (standard deviation = 0·7; range = 71–74). Results No significant effects of APOE ε or TOMM 40 523 genotypes on white matter hyperintensities or cerebral microbleed burden were found amongst 624 participants. Conclusions Lack of association between two Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene loci and markers of cerebral small vessel disease may reflect the relative health of this population compared with those in other studies in the literature. PMID:26310205

  15. Cerebral white matter integrity during primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Patrick W.; Vaida, Florin F.; Fernández, Ricardo J.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Price, Richard W.; Lee, Evelyn; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shimony, Joshua S.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Walter, Rudolph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Spudich, Serena; Ances, Beau M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inflammation and infection within the central nervous system is initiated during primary HIV infection (PHI), but the association of these processes with the integrity of brain white matter during PHI is unknown. Design We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in this prospective cross-sectional neuroimaging study to determine the extent of white matter involvement in early HIV infection. Methods Antiretroviral-naive PHI (defined as <1 year after infection, n = 62), chronic HIV infection (CHI, n = 16), and HIV-uninfected (n = 19) participants had DTI, laboratory, and neuropsychometric performance assessments. DTI metrics were examined using region of interest and whole brain voxelwise analyses. Linear mixed-effects models assessed correlations between DTI measures and laboratory and neuropsychometric performance values. Results PHI participants were assessed at a median 4.1 months after estimated infection, and had median CD4+ cell count of 573 cells/µl, and HIV-1 RNA viral load of 4.5 log10 copies/ml in plasma and 2.6 log10 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). DTI metrics in PHI individuals were similar to HIV— participants and correlated with disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (indicated by CSF/plasma albumin ratio and CSF protein). CHI participants had significant loss of white matter integrity that correlated with biomarkers of infection and inflammation (blood viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and neopterin, and CSF white blood cell). Within the PHI group, DTI metrics inversely correlated with increasing days since infection. Conclusion In individuals assessed during PHI, group DTI measures suggested relative preservation of white matter microstructural integrity, but were associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier and estimated duration of infection. PMID:25513818

  16. Portal-systemic shunt encephalopathy presenting with diffuse cerebral white matter lesion: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Toshihide; Hanaoka, Takuya; Nakamura, Kenichiro; Hazama, Yusuke; Arakawa, Ryuki

    2008-12-01

    We report herein an autopsy case of portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) presenting with diffuse tissue rarefaction in the cerebral deep white matter. Clinically, the patient showed recurrent episodes of unconsciousness, abnormal behavior and urinary incontinence, as well as flapping tremor. Cognitive impairment and peripheral neuropathy developed following recurrent episodes. Although conventional arterial portography revealed a small portal-systemic collateral vessel of a left gastro-renal venous shunt, abdominal CT and liver biopsy showed no evidence of liver cirrhosis and serum ammonia level showed a mild increase. T2-weighted MRI demonstrated symmetrical signal hyperintensities in the deep white matter. Neuropathological findings showed Alzheimer type II astrocytes in the deep layers of the cerebral cortices and severe tissue rarefaction with no or slight reactive astrocytosis in the subcortical and deep white matter. These white matter changes have been reported infrequently in patients with PSE. The present case suggests that chronic PSE without liver cirrhosis may develop diffuse white matter lesions. PMID:18384515

  17. Microstructure and Cerebral Blood Flow within White Matter of the Human Brain: A TBSS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Fisler, Melanie Sarah; Soravia, Leila Maria; Andreotti, Jennifer; Walther, Sebastian; Wiest, Roland; Dierks, Thomas; Federspiel, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background White matter (WM) fibers connect different brain regions and are critical for proper brain function. However, little is known about the cerebral blood flow in WM and its relation to WM microstructure. Recent improvements in measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL) suggest that the signal in white matter may be detected. Its implications for physiology needs to be extensively explored. For this purpose, CBF and its relation to anisotropic diffusion was analyzed across subjects on a voxel-wise basis with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and also across white matter tracts within subjects. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging and ASL were acquired in 43 healthy subjects (mean age = 26.3 years). Results CBF in WM was observed to correlate positively with fractional anisotropy across subjects in parts of the splenium of corpus callosum, the right posterior thalamic radiation (including the optic radiation), the forceps major, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. Furthermore, radial diffusivity correlated negatively with CBF across subjects in similar regions. Moreover, CBF and FA correlated positively across white matter tracts within subjects. Conclusion The currently observed findings on a macroscopic level might reflect the metabolic demand of white matter on a microscopic level involving myelination processes or axonal function. However, the exact underlying physiological mechanism of this relationship needs further evaluation. PMID:26942763

  18. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  19. [Cerebral white matter bundle measurements by magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yoshii, F; Duara, R

    1989-04-01

    The width of the anterior whole white matter bundle (AWM), interhemispheric (AWM-TER), and intrahemispheric (AWM-TRA) components at the level of the foramen of Monro on horizontal inversion recovery (IR) magnetic resonance (MR) scans were measured in 32 healthy males. The mean age of subjects were 54.4 +/- 18.8, ranged 25 to 83 years old. MR scans were performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconductive magnet, with inversion time of 400 msec, repetition time of 2.1 sec and echo time of 35 msec. The slice thickness was 10mm. Horizontal maximum internal skull diameter (HISD) at the same level was also measured and normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA were calculated by dividing the width of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA by the width of HISD. When absolute values of each AWM width were compared between right and left sides, there were no differences in AWM and AWM-TER. However, AWM-TRA of the right side was significantly wider than that of the left side (t = 4.28, p less than 0.001). The width of AWM was not correlated with age, but the width of AWM-TER showed a significant decline in the left (r = -0.36, p = 0.04) and non-significant trend to decline in the right side (r = -0.33, p = 0.07). The width of AWM-TRA of the left side was tended to decrease with age. Normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA showed a similar results as that of the absolute values. The measurement of the white matter bundle width provide some insights into the connectivity of the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2612107

  20. Disconnected aging: cerebral white matter integrity and age-related differences in cognition.

    PubMed

    Bennett, I J; Madden, D J

    2014-09-12

    Cognition arises as a result of coordinated processing among distributed brain regions and disruptions to communication within these neural networks can result in cognitive dysfunction. Cortical disconnection may thus contribute to the declines in some aspects of cognitive functioning observed in healthy aging. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is ideally suited for the study of cortical disconnection as it provides indices of structural integrity within interconnected neural networks. The current review summarizes results of previous DTI aging research with the aim of identifying consistent patterns of age-related differences in white matter integrity, and of relationships between measures of white matter integrity and behavioral performance as a function of adult age. We outline a number of future directions that will broaden our current understanding of these brain-behavior relationships in aging. Specifically, future research should aim to (1) investigate multiple models of age-brain-behavior relationships; (2) determine the tract-specificity versus global effect of aging on white matter integrity; (3) assess the relative contribution of normal variation in white matter integrity versus white matter lesions to age-related differences in cognition; (4) improve the definition of specific aspects of cognitive functioning related to age-related differences in white matter integrity using information processing tasks; and (5) combine multiple imaging modalities (e.g., resting-state and task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) with DTI to clarify the role of cerebral white matter integrity in cognitive aging. PMID:24280637

  1. Early treatment of minocycline alleviates white matter and cognitive impairments after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Wei Wei; Wu, Xiao Hua; Liao, Ru Jia; Chen, Ying; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Xiang Nan; Zhang, Li San; Zhou, Yu Dong; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Wei Wei

    2015-01-01

    Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion develops with progressive white matter and cognitive impairments, yet no effective therapy is available. We investigated the temporal effects of minocycline on an experimental SIVD exerted by right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO). Minocycline treated at the early stage (day 0–3), but not the late stage after rUCCAO (day 4–32) alleviated the white matter and cognitive impairments, and promoted remyelination. The actions of minocycline may not involve the inhibition of microglia activation, based on the effects after the application of a microglial activation inhibitor, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and co-treatment with lipopolysaccharides. Furthermore, minocycline treatment at the early stage promoted the proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in subventricular zone, increased OPC number and alleviated apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes in white matter. In vitro, minocycline promoted OPC proliferation and increased the percentage of OPCs in S and G2/M phases. We provided direct evidence that early treatment is critical for minocycline to alleviate white matter and cognitive impairments after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which may be due to its robust effects on OPC proliferation and mature oligodendrocyte loss. So, early therapeutic time window may be crucial for its application in SIVD. PMID:26174710

  2. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Sabin, Noah D.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Ogg, Robert J.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jane, John A.; Hua, Chiaho

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  3. Intranasal administration of aTf protects and repairs the neonatal white matter after a cerebral hypoxic-ischemic event.

    PubMed

    Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Paez, Pablo M; Campagnoni, Anthony T; Pasquini, Laura A; Pasquini, Juana M

    2012-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that the intracerebral injection of apotransferrin (aTf) attenuates white matter damage and accelerates the remyelination process in a neonatal rat model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury. However, the intracerebral injection of aTf might not be practical for clinical treatments. Therefore, the development of less invasive techniques capable of delivering aTf to the central nervous system would clearly aid in its effective clinical use. In this work, we have determined whether intranasal (iN) administration of human aTf provides neuroprotection to the neonatal mouse brain following a cerebral hypoxic-ischemic event. Apotransferrin was infused into the naris of neonatal mice and the HI insult was induced by right common carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to low oxygen concentration. Our results showed that aTf was successfully delivered into the neonatal HI brain and detected in the olfactory bulb, forebrain and posterior brain 30 min after inhalation. This treatment successfully reduced white matter damage, neuronal loss and astrogliosis in different brain regions and enhanced the proliferation and survival of oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs) in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum (CC). Additionally, using an in vitro hypoxic model, we demonstrated that aTf prevents oligodendrocyte progenitor cell death by promoting their differentiation. In summary, these data suggest that iN administration of aTf has the potential to be used for clinical treatment to protect myelin and to induce remyelination in demyelinating hypoxic-ischemic events in the neonatal brain. PMID:22736466

  4. Neurovascular coupling, cerebral white matter integrity, and response to cocoa in older people

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Shelley; Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Fisher, Naomi D.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors and to determine whether neurovascular coupling could be modified by cocoa consumption. Methods: Sixty older people (aged 72.9 ± 5.4 years) were studied in a parallel-arm, double-blind clinical trial of neurovascular coupling and cognition in response to 24 hours and 30 days of cocoa consumption. Cognitive measures included Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Test A and B. Neurovascular coupling was measured from the beat-to-beat blood flow velocity responses in the middle cerebral arteries to the N-Back Task. In a subset of MRI-eligible participants, cerebral white matter structural integrity was also measured. Results: Neurovascular coupling was associated with Trails B scores (p = 0.002) and performance on the 2-Back Task. Higher neurovascular coupling was also associated with significantly higher fractional anisotropy in cerebral white matter hyperintensities (p = 0.02). Finally, 30 days of cocoa consumption was associated with increased neurovascular coupling (5.6% ± 7.2% vs −2.4% ± 4.8%; p = 0.001) and improved Trails B times (116 ± 78 seconds vs 167 ± 110 seconds; p = 0.007) in those with impaired neurovascular coupling at baseline. Conclusion: There is a strong correlation between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function, and both can be improved by regular cocoa consumption in individuals with baseline impairments. Better neurovascular coupling is also associated with greater white matter structural integrity. PMID:23925758

  5. White matter tract and glial-associated changes in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Tsenkina, Yanina; Ruzov, Alexey; Gliddon, Catherine; Horsburgh, Karen; De Sousa, Paul A

    2014-12-10

    White matter abnormalities due to age-related cerebrovascular alterations is a common pathological hallmark associated with functional impairment in the elderly which has been modeled in chronically hypoperfused mice. 5-Methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidized derivative 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) are DNA modifications that have been recently linked with age-related neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular pathology. Here we conducted a pilot investigation of whether chronic cerebral hypoperfusion might affect genomic distribution of these modifications and/ or a Ten-Eleven Translocation protein 2 (TET2) which catalyses hydroxymethylation in white and grey matter regions of this animal model. Immunohistochemical evaluation of sham and chronically hypoperfused mice a month after surgery revealed significant (p<0.05) increases in the proportion of 5hmC positive cells, Iba1 positive inflammatory microglia, and NG2 positive oligodendroglial progenitors in the hypoperfused corpus callosum. In the same white matter tract there was an absence of hypoperfusion-induced alterations in the proportion of 5mC, TET2 positive cells and CC1 positive mature oligodrendrocytes. Correlation analysis across animals within both treatment groups demonstrated a significant association of the elevated 5hmC levels with increases in the proportion of inflammatory microglia only (p=0.01) in the corpus callosum. In vitro studies revealed that 5hmC is lost during oligodendroglial maturation but not microglial activation. Additionally, TET1, TET2, and TET3 protein levels showed dynamic alterations during oligodendroglial development and following oxidative stress in vitro. Our study suggests that 5hmC exhibits white matter tract and cell type specific dynamics following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in mice. PMID:25305569

  6. Clusterin/Apolipoprotein J immunoreactivity is associated with white matter damage in cerebral small vessel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, Lucinda; Taylor, Julie; Slade, Janet Y.; Chen, Aiqing; Hagel, Christian; Kuhlenbaeumer, Gregor; Borjesson‐Hanson, Anne; Viitanen, Matti; Kalimo, Hannu; Deramecourt, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Brain clusterin is known to be associated with the amyloid‐β deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed the distribution of clusterin immunoreactivity in cerebrovascular disorders, particularly focusing on white matter changes in small vessel diseases. Methods Post‐mortem brain tissues from the frontal or temporal lobes of a total of 70 subjects with various disorders including cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and AD were examined using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. We further used immunogold electron microscopy to study clusterin immunoreactivity in extracellular deposits in CADASIL. Results Immunostaining with clusterin antibodies revealed strong localization in arterioles and capillaries, besides cortical neurones. We found that clusterin immunostaining was significantly increased in the frontal white matter of CADASIL and pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy subjects. In addition, clusterin immunostaining correlated with white matter pathology severity scores. Immunostaining in axons ranged from fine punctate deposits in single axons to larger confluent areas with numerous swollen axon bulbs, similar to that observed with known axon damage markers such as non‐phosphorylated neurofilament H and the amyloid precursor protein. Immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy experiments showed that whereas clusterin immunoreactivity was closely associated with vascular amyloid‐β in CAA, it was lacking within the granular osmiophilic material immunolabelled by NOTCH3 extracelluar domain aggregates found in CADASIL. Conclusions Our results suggest a wider role for clusterin associated with white matter damage in addition to its ability to chaperone proteins for clearance via the perivascular drainage pathways in several disease states. PMID:25940137

  7. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusion properties along 18 major cerebral white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm (n = 27) and full term (n = 19), using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. We found that compared to the full term group, the preterm group had significantly decreased FA in segments of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and anterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Additionally, the preterm group had significantly increased FA in segments of the right and left anterior thalamic radiations, posterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the right and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased FA in the preterm group was generally associated with decreased radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that prematurity-related white matter differences in later childhood and adolescence do not affect all tracts in the periventricular zone and can involve both decreased and increased FA. Differences in the patterns of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity suggest that the tissue properties underlying group FA differences may vary within and across white matter tracts. Distinctive diffusion properties may relate to variations in the timing of injury in the neonatal period, extent of white matter dysmaturity and/or compensatory processes in childhood. PMID:26560745

  8. Photoperiodic Regulation of Cerebral Blood Flow in White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Teplitsky, Seth; Gnyawali, Surya; Nelson, Randy J; Rink, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Individuals living outside the tropics need to adjust their behavioral and physiological repertoires throughout the year to adapt to the changing seasons. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) reduce hippocampal volumes, hippocampal-dependent memory function, long-term potentiation, and alter neurogenesis in response to short (winter-like) day lengths (photoperiods). During winter, these mice putatively shunt energy away from the brain to maximize peripheral thermogenesis, immune function, and survival. We hypothesized that these changes in brain function are accompanied by alterations in brain vasculature. We maintained white-footed mice in short (8 h light/16 h dark) or long (16 h light/8 h dark) photoperiods for 8-9 weeks. Mice were then perfused with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin to visualize the perfused cerebrovasculature. Short-day mice reduced hippocampal and cortical capillary density (FITC(+) area); vessels isolated from short day-exposed mice expressed higher mRNA levels of the gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Additionally, short-day mice reduced cerebral blood flow ∼15% compared with their long-day counterparts, as assessed by laser speckle flowmetry. Immunohistochemistry revealed higher levels of MMP2 in the hippocampus of mice maintained in short days compared with long days, potentially contributing to the observed vascular remodeling. These data demonstrate that a discrete environmental signal (i.e., day length) can substantially alter cerebral blood flow in adult mammals. PMID:27570829

  9. Risk factor analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van der Land, Veronica; Mutsaerts, Henri J M M; Engelen, Marc; Heijboer, Harriët; Roest, Mark; Hollestelle, Martine J; Kuijpers, Taco W; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Majoie, Charles B L M; Nederveen, Aart J; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is complicated by silent cerebral infarcts, visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both local vaso-occlusion, elicited by endothelial dysfunction, and insufficiency of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been proposed to be involved in the aetiology. We performed an explorative study to investigate the associations between WMHs and markers of endothelial dysfunction and CBF by quantifying WMH volume on 3.0 Tesla MRI. We included 40 children with HbSS or HbSβ(0) thalassaemia, with a mean age of 12.1 ± 2.6 years. Boys demonstrated an increased risk for WMHs (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2-17.4), unrelated to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. In patients with WMHs, lower fetal haemoglobin (HbF) was associated with a larger WMH volume (regression coefficient = -0.62, R2 = 0.5, P = 0.04). Lower ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) levels were associated with lower CBF in the white matter (regression coefficient = 0.07, R2 = 0.15, P = 0.03), suggesting that endothelial dysfunction could potentially hamper CBF. The findings of our explorative study suggest that a high level of HbF may be protective for WMHs and that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the development of WMHs by reducing CBF. PMID:26492630

  10. Photoperiodic Regulation of Cerebral Blood Flow in White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Teplitsky, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Individuals living outside the tropics need to adjust their behavioral and physiological repertoires throughout the year to adapt to the changing seasons. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) reduce hippocampal volumes, hippocampal-dependent memory function, long-term potentiation, and alter neurogenesis in response to short (winter-like) day lengths (photoperiods). During winter, these mice putatively shunt energy away from the brain to maximize peripheral thermogenesis, immune function, and survival. We hypothesized that these changes in brain function are accompanied by alterations in brain vasculature. We maintained white-footed mice in short (8 h light/16 h dark) or long (16 h light/8 h dark) photoperiods for 8–9 weeks. Mice were then perfused with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin to visualize the perfused cerebrovasculature. Short-day mice reduced hippocampal and cortical capillary density (FITC+ area); vessels isolated from short day-exposed mice expressed higher mRNA levels of the gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Additionally, short-day mice reduced cerebral blood flow ∼15% compared with their long-day counterparts, as assessed by laser speckle flowmetry. Immunohistochemistry revealed higher levels of MMP2 in the hippocampus of mice maintained in short days compared with long days, potentially contributing to the observed vascular remodeling. These data demonstrate that a discrete environmental signal (i.e., day length) can substantially alter cerebral blood flow in adult mammals. PMID:27570829

  11. Cerebral Amyloid and Hypertension are Independently Associated with White Matter Lesions in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Braskie, Meredith N.; Tosun, Duygu; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen T.

    2015-01-01

    In cognitively normal (CN) elderly individuals, white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are commonly viewed as a marker of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). SVD is due to exposure to systemic vascular injury processes associated with highly prevalent vascular risk factors (VRFs) such as hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes. However, cerebral amyloid accumulation is also prevalent in this population and is associated with WMH accrual. Therefore, we examined the independent associations of amyloid burden and VRFs with WMH burden in CN elderly individuals with low to moderate vascular risk. Participants (n = 150) in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) received fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI at study entry. Total WMH volume was calculated from FLAIR images co-registered with structural MRI. Amyloid burden was determined by cerebrospinal fluid Aβ1-42 levels. Clinical histories of VRFs, as well as current measurements of vascular status, were recorded during a baseline clinical evaluation. We tested ridge regression models for independent associations and interactions of elevated blood pressure (BP) and amyloid to total WMH volume. We found that greater amyloid burden and a clinical history of hypertension were independently associated with greater WMH volume. In addition, elevated BP modified the association between amyloid and WMH, such that those with either current or past evidence of elevated BP had greater WMH volumes at a given burden of amyloid. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that cerebral amyloid accumulation and VRFs are independently associated with clinically latent white matter damage represented by WMHs. The potential contribution of amyloid to WMHs should be further explored, even among elderly individuals without cognitive impairment and with limited VRF exposure. PMID:26648866

  12. Fractional Anisotropy of Cerebral White Matter and Thickness of Cortical Gray Matter across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    P., Kochunov; DC, Glahn; J., Lancaster; P.M., Thompson; V., Kochunov; B., Rogers; P., Fox; J., Blangero; D.E., Williamson

    2011-01-01

    We examined age trajectories of fractional anisotropy (FA) of cerebral white matter (WM) and thickness of cortical gray matter (GM) in 1,031 healthy human subjects (aged 11-90 years). Whole-brain FA and GM thickness values followed quadratic trajectories with age but the relationship between them was linear, indicating that a putative biological mechanism may explain the non-linearity of their age trajectories. Inclusion of the FA values into the quadratic model of the whole-brain and regional GM thickness changes with age made the effect of the age2 term no longer significant for the whole-brain GM thickness and greatly reduced its significance for regional GM thickness measurements. The phylogenetic order of cerebral myelination helped to further explain the intersubject variability in GM thickness. FA values for the early maturing WM were significantly better (p=10−6) at explaining variability in GM thickness in maturing (aged 11-20) subjects than FA values for the late maturing WM. The opposite trend was observed for aging subjects (aged 40-90) where FA values for the late maturing WM were better (p=10−16) at explaining the variability in GM thickness. We concluded that the non-linearity of the age trajectory for GM thickness, measured from T1-weighted MRI, was partially explained by the heterogeneity and the heterochronicity of the age-related changes in the microintegrity of cerebral WM. We consider these findings as the evidence that the measurements of age-related changes in GM thickness and FA are driven, in part, by a common biological mechanism, presumed to be related to changes in cerebral myelination. PMID:21640837

  13. Pharmacological Effects of Erythropoietin and its Derivative Carbamyl erythropoietin in Cerebral White Matter Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is the predominant form of brain injury in the premature infant and the most common cause of cerebral palsy, yet no therapy currently exists for this serious human disorder. As PVL often occurs in preterm infants suffering from cerebral hypoxia/ischemia with or without prior exposure to maternal-fetal infection/inflammation, we used hypoxia/ischemia with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection, to produce clinically relevant PVL-like lesions in the white matter in postnatal day six (P6) mice. We studied the white matter pathology under different conditions, such as different durations of hypoxia and different doses of LPS, to evaluate the effects of those etiological factors on neonatal white matter injury. Distinct related pathological events were investigated at different time points during the progression of PVL. We used immunohistochemistry, histological analysis, and electron microscopy (EM) to study demylination that occurs in the white matter area, which is consistent with the pathology of human PVL. Previous studies have shown that erythropoietin (EPO) and its derivative carbamylated EPO (CEPO) are neuroprotective in various experimental models of brain injury. However, none of these studies investigated their efficacy against white matter injury using appropriate animal models of PVL. We produced unilateral or bilateral white matter injury in P6 mice using unilateral carotid ligation (UCL) followed by hypoxia (6% oxygen, 35 min) or by UCL/hypoxia plus LPS injection, respectively. We administered a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of EPO or CEPO (5000 IU/kg) immediately after the insult, and found both drugs to provide significant protection against white matter injury in PVL mice compared to vehicle-treated groups. In addition, EPO and CEPO treatments attenuated neurobehavioral dysfunctions in an acute manner after PVL injury. EPO and CEPO have relatively few adverse effects, and thus may be a therapeutic agent

  14. Unbiased Stereological Analysis of Reactive Astrogliosis to Estimate Age-Associated Cerebral White Matter Injury.

    PubMed

    McNeal, David W; Brandner, Dieter D; Gong, Xi; Postupna, Nadia O; Montine, Thomas J; Keene, C Dirk; Back, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral white matter injury (WMI) contributes to cognitive dysfunction associated with pathological aging. Because reactive astrocyte-related factors contribute to remyelination failure after WMI, we sought accurate, cost-effective, and reproducible histopathological approaches for quantification of morphometric features of reactive astrogliosis in aged human white matter in patients with vascular brain injury (VBI). We compared 7 distinct approaches to quantify the features of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-labeled astrocytes in the prefrontal white matter of brains from patients with VBI (n = 17, mean age 88.8 years) and controls that did not exhibit VBI (n = 11, mean age 86.6 years). Only modern stereological techniques (ie, optical fractionator and spaceballs) and virtual process thickness measurements demonstrated significant changes in astrocyte number, process length, or proximal process thickness in cases with VBI relative to controls. The widely employed methods of neuropathological scoring, antibody capture assay (histelide), area fraction fractionator, and Cavalieri point counting failed to detect significant differences in GFAP expression between the groups. Unbiased stereological approaches and virtual thickness measurements provided the only sensitive and accurate means to quantify astrocyte reactivity as a surrogate marker of WMI in human brains with VBI. PMID:27142644

  15. Comparison of the Relationship between Cerebral White Matter and Grey Matter in Normal Dogs and Dogs with Lateral Ventricular Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin J; Laubner, Steffi; Kolecka, Malgorzata; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Ondreka, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Large cerebral ventricles are a frequent finding in brains of dogs with brachycephalic skull conformation, in comparison with mesaticephalic dogs. It remains unclear whether oversized ventricles represent a normal variant or a pathological condition in brachycephalic dogs. There is a distinct relationship between white matter and grey matter in the cerebrum of all eutherian mammals. The aim of this study was to determine if this physiological proportion between white matter and grey matter of the forebrain still exists in brachycephalic dogs with oversized ventricles. The relative cerebral grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume in dogs were determined based on magnetic-resonance-imaging datasets using graphical software. In an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using body mass as the covariate, the adjusted means of the brain tissue volumes of two groups of dogs were compared. Group 1 included 37 mesaticephalic dogs of different sizes with no apparent changes in brain morphology, and subjectively normal ventricle size. Group 2 included 35 brachycephalic dogs in which subjectively enlarged cerebral ventricles were noted as an incidental finding in their magnetic-resonance-imaging examination. Whereas no significant different adjusted means of the grey matter could be determined, the group of brachycephalic dogs had significantly larger adjusted means of lateral cerebral ventricles and significantly less adjusted means of relative white matter volume. This indicates that brachycephalic dogs with subjective ventriculomegaly have less white matter, as expected based on their body weight and cerebral volume. Our study suggests that ventriculomegaly in brachycephalic dogs is not a normal variant of ventricular volume. Based on the changes in the relative proportion of WM and CSF volume, and the unchanged GM proportions in dogs with ventriculomegaly, we rather suggest that distension of the lateral ventricles might be the underlying cause of pressure

  16. Comparison of the Relationship between Cerebral White Matter and Grey Matter in Normal Dogs and Dogs with Lateral Ventricular Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Martin J.; Laubner, Steffi; Kolecka, Malgorzata; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Ondreka, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Large cerebral ventricles are a frequent finding in brains of dogs with brachycephalic skull conformation, in comparison with mesaticephalic dogs. It remains unclear whether oversized ventricles represent a normal variant or a pathological condition in brachycephalic dogs. There is a distinct relationship between white matter and grey matter in the cerebrum of all eutherian mammals. The aim of this study was to determine if this physiological proportion between white matter and grey matter of the forebrain still exists in brachycephalic dogs with oversized ventricles. The relative cerebral grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume in dogs were determined based on magnetic-resonance-imaging datasets using graphical software. In an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using body mass as the covariate, the adjusted means of the brain tissue volumes of two groups of dogs were compared. Group 1 included 37 mesaticephalic dogs of different sizes with no apparent changes in brain morphology, and subjectively normal ventricle size. Group 2 included 35 brachycephalic dogs in which subjectively enlarged cerebral ventricles were noted as an incidental finding in their magnetic-resonance-imaging examination. Whereas no significant different adjusted means of the grey matter could be determined, the group of brachycephalic dogs had significantly larger adjusted means of lateral cerebral ventricles and significantly less adjusted means of relative white matter volume. This indicates that brachycephalic dogs with subjective ventriculomegaly have less white matter, as expected based on their body weight and cerebral volume. Our study suggests that ventriculomegaly in brachycephalic dogs is not a normal variant of ventricular volume. Based on the changes in the relative proportion of WM and CSF volume, and the unchanged GM proportions in dogs with ventriculomegaly, we rather suggest that distension of the lateral ventricles might be the underlying cause of pressure

  17. Cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculation rarefaction precede white matter lesions in a mouse genetic model of cerebral ischemic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Joutel, Anne; Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Gosele, Claudia; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Hammes, Annette; Schmidt, Sabine; Lemaire-Carrette, Barbara; Domenga, Valérie; Schedl, Andreas; Lacombe, Pierre; Hubner, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic small vessel disease (SVD) is the leading cause of vascular dementia and a major contributor to stroke in humans. Dominant mutations in NOTCH3 cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic archetype of cerebral ischemic SVD. Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of this disease and developing effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a good animal model. Here, we report the development of a mouse model for CADASIL via the introduction of a CADASIL-causing Notch3 point mutation into a large P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC). In vivo expression of the mutated PAC transgene in the mouse reproduced the endogenous Notch3 expression pattern and main pathological features of CADASIL, including Notch3 extracellular domain aggregates and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits in brain vessels, progressive white matter damage, and reduced cerebral blood flow. Mutant mice displayed attenuated myogenic responses and reduced caliber of brain arteries as well as impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation and functional hyperemia. Further, we identified a substantial reduction of white matter capillary density. These neuropathological changes occurred in the absence of either histologically detectable alterations in cerebral artery structure or blood-brain barrier breakdown. These studies provide in vivo evidence for cerebrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory failure as key contributors to hypoperfusion and white matter damage in this genetic model of ischemic SVD. PMID:20071773

  18. Intranasal Insulin Prevents Cognitive Decline, Cerebral Atrophy and White Matter Changes in Murine Type I Diabetic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, George J.; Martinez, Jose A.; Liu, Wei Q.; Xu, Kevin; Ayer, Amit; Fine, Jared; Tuor, Ursula I.; Glazner, Gordon; Hanson, Leah R.; Frey, William H., II; Toth, Cory

    2008-01-01

    Insulin deficiency in type I diabetes may lead to cognitive impairment, cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities. We studied the impact of a novel delivery system using intranasal insulin (I-I) in a mouse model of type I diabetes (streptozotocin-induced) for direct targeting of pathological and cognitive deficits while avoiding potential…

  19. Outcome of cerebral arteriovenous malformations after linear accelerator reirradiation

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Paulo L.; Dias, Rodrigo S.; Weltman, Eduardo; Giordani, Adelmo J.; Benabou, Salomon; Segreto, Helena R. C.; Segreto, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients undergoing single-dose reirradiation using the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Methods: A retrospective study of 37 patients with brain AVM undergoing LINAC reirradiation between April 2003 and November 2011 was carried out. Patient characteristics, for example, gender, age, use of medications, and comorbidities; disease characteristics, for example, Spetzler–Martin grading system, location, volume, modified Pollock–Flickinger score; and treatment characteristics, for example, embolization, prescription dose, radiation dose–volume curves, and conformity index were analyzed. During the follow-up period, imaging studies were performed to evaluate changes after treatment and AVM cure. Complications, such as edema, rupture of the blood–brain barrier, and radionecrosis were classified as symptomatic and asymptomatic. Results: Twenty-seven patients underwent angiogram after reirradiation and the percentage of angiographic occlusion was 55.5%. In three patients without obliteration, AVM shrinkage made it possible to perform surgical resection with a 2/3 cure rate. A reduction in AVM nidus volume greater than 50% after the first procedure was shown to be the most important predictor of obliteration. Another factor associated with AVM cure was a prescription dose higher than 15.5 Gy in the first radiosurgery. Two patients had permanent neurologic deficits. Factors correlated with complications were the prescription dose and maximum dose in the first procedure. Conclusion: This study suggests that single-dose reirradiation is safe and feasible in partially occluded AVM. Reirradiation may not benefit candidates whose prescribed dose was lower than 15.5 Gy in the first procedure and initial AVM nidus volume did not decrease by more than 50% before reirradiation. PMID:26110078

  20. Cerebral White Matter Lesions and Affective Episodes Correlate in Male Individuals with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Birner, Armin; Seiler, Stephan; Lackner, Nina; Bengesser, Susanne A.; Queissner, Robert; Fellendorf, Frederike T.; Platzer, Martina; Ropele, Stefan; Enzinger, Christian; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Mangge, Harald; Pirpamer, Lukas; Deutschmann, Hannes; McIntyre, Roger S.; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Reininghaus, Bernd; Reininghaus, Eva Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter lesions (WML) have been found in normal aging, vascular disease and several neuropsychiatric conditions. Correlations of WML with clinical parameters in BD have been described, but not with the number of affective episodes, illness duration, age of onset and Body Mass Index in a well characterized group of euthymic bipolar adults. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the associations between bipolar course of illness parameters and WML measured with volumetric analysis. Methods In a cross-sectional study 100 euthymic individuals with BD as well as 54 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled to undergo brain magnetic resonance imaging using 3T including a FLAIR sequence for volumetric assessment of WML-load using FSL-software. Additionally, clinical characteristics and psychometric measures including Structured Clinical Interview according to DSM-IV, Hamilton-Depression, Young Mania Rating Scale and Beck’s Depression Inventory were evaluated. Results Individuals with BD had significantly more (F = 3.968, p < .05) WML (Mdn = 3710mm3; IQR = 2961mm3) than HC (Mdn = 2185mm3; IQR = 1665mm3). BD men (Mdn = 4095mm3; IQR = 3295mm3) and BD women (Mdn = 3032mm3; IQR = 2816mm3) did not significantly differ as to the WML-load or the number and type of risk factors for WML. However, in men only, the number of manic/hypomanic episodes (r = 0.72; p < .001) as well as depressive episodes (r = 0.51; p < .001) correlated positively with WML-load. Conclusions WML-load strongly correlated with the number of manic episodes in male BD patients, suggesting that men might be more vulnerable to mania in the context of cerebral white matter changes. PMID:26252714

  1. Neuropathological investigation of cerebral white matter lesions caused by closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Onaya, Mitsumoto

    2002-12-01

    In order to ascertain whether there is widespread axonal disruption of cerebral white matter in the so-called 'diffuse axonal injury' (DAI), a type of closed head injury, proposed by Adams et al. the author investigated his own cases clinicopathologically. Twenty-six male autopsied cases of head injury, aged between 19 and 84, 15 of which had sustained road traffic accidents, were examined; the others were due to falling from heights and so on. The study group all belonged to non-missile head injuries and included 12 cases of diffuse brain injury, as well as 14 cases of focal brain injury, according to the classification of Gennarelli et al. The survival time ranged from 2 h to 21 years. Formalin-fixed brains were cut coronally so as to make paraffin-embedded hemispheric sections. Then these sections were stained conventionally (HE, Bodian, Kluver-Barrera and Holzer) and immunohistochemically (GFAP) to assess axonal decrease, myelin pallor and gliosis by the use of light microscopy. In the 13 chronic cases that died more than 1 month after the accidents, the intensities of gliosis, myelin pallor and axonal decrease tended to correlate with each other. In the 13 acute cases who died less than 1 month after their accident, the degree of axonal decrease in white matter seemed to correlate with the severity of myelin pallor. Regardless of types of trauma, however, axonal retraction balls, the so-called hallmark of DAI, were found only with myelin pallor suggesting the presence of brain swelling after the injury. Therefore these findings indicate that it may be difficult to accept the notion of DAI, that is, the presence of axonal retraction balls without brain swelling. In addition, diffuse vascular injury (2 cases) as well as rarefaction of subcortical white matter (6 cases) were presented and their pathogenesis individually discussed based on a literature review. PMID:12564763

  2. Characterizing the white matter hyperintensity penumbra with cerebral blood flow measures

    PubMed Central

    Promjunyakul, N.; Lahna, D.; Kaye, J.A.; Dodge, H.H.; Erten-Lyons, D.; Rooney, W.D.; Silbert, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are common with age, grow over time, and are associated with cognitive and motor impairments. Mechanisms underlying WMH growth are unclear. We aimed to determine the presence and extent of decreased normal appearing white matter (NAWM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) surrounding WMHs to identify ‘WM at risk’, or the WMH CBF penumbra. We aimed to further validate cross-sectional finding by determining whether the baseline WMH penumbra CBF predicts the development of new WMHs at follow-up. Methods Sixty-one cognitively intact elderly subjects received 3 T MPRAGE, FLAIR, and pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL). Twenty-four subjects returned for follow-up MRI. The inter-scan interval was 18 months. A NAWM layer mask, comprised of fifteen layers, 1 mm thick each surrounding WMHs, was generated for periventricular (PVWMH) and deep (DWMH) WMHs. Mean CBF for each layer was computed. New WMH and persistent NAWM voxels for each penumbra layer were defined from follow-up MRI. Results CBF in the area surrounding WMHs was significantly lower than the total brain NAWM, extending approximately 12 mm from both the established PVWMH and DWMH. Voxels with new WMH at follow-up had significantly lower baseline CBF than voxels that maintained NAWM, suggesting that baseline CBF can predict the development of new WMHs over time. Conclusions A CBF penumbra exists surrounding WMHs, which is associated with future WMH expansion. ASL MRI can be used to monitor interventions to increase white matter blood flow for the prevention of further WM damage and its cognitive and motor consequences. PMID:26106546

  3. Cerebral gray and white matter changes and clinical course in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    í Dali, Christine; Clas, Philipp; Böhringer, Judith; Duno, Morten; Krarup, Christian; Kehrer, Christiane; Wilke, Marko; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare metabolic disorder leading to demyelination and rapid neurologic deterioration. As therapeutic options evolve, it seems essential to understand and quantify progression of the natural disease. The aim of this study was to assess cerebral volumetric changes in children with MLD in comparison to normal controls and in relation to disease course. Method: Eighteen patients with late-infantile MLD and 42 typically developing children in the same age range (20–59 months) were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. Patients underwent detailed genetic, biochemical, electrophysiologic, and clinical characterization. Cerebral gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes were assessed by multispectral segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted MRI. In addition, the demyelinated WM (demyelination load) was automatically quantified in T2-weighted images of the patients, and analyzed in relation to the clinical course. Results: WM volumes of patients did not differ from controls, although their growth curves were slightly different. GM volumes of patients, however, were on average 10.7% (confidence interval 6.0%–14.9%, p < 0.001) below those of normally developing children. The demyelination load (corrected for total WM volume) increased with disease duration (p < 0.003) and motor deterioration (p < 0.001). Conclusion: GM volume in patients with MLD is reduced when compared with healthy controls, already at young age. This supports the notion that, beside demyelination, neuronal dysfunction caused by neuronal storage plays an additional role in the disease process. The demyelination load may be a useful noninvasive imaging marker for disease progression and may serve as reference for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22993277

  4. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  5. DTI Study of Cerebral Normal-Appearing White Matter in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Song, Chun-Li; Huang, Liang; Song, Qing-Wei; Liang, Zhan-Hua; Wei, Qiang; Hu, Jia-Ni; Miao, Yan-Wei; Wu, Bing; Xie, Lizhi

    2015-10-01

    The majority of previous studies on hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) were focused on peripheral nerves, whereas cerebral alterations in HNPP have been less attended to. In this work, Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to detect the changes in WM, especially in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in HNPP patients for its sensitivity in probing the microstructure of WM, the sensitive metric was searched for probing cerebral alterations and the regional distribution of cerebral abnormalities was identified. Twelve HNPP patients and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent the conventional MRI, DTI scan, and electrophysiological examination. The conventional MRI images were first analyzed to identify abnormal intense regions and the NAWM regions. NAWM refers to the white matter regions that do not include the lesions on conventional MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the NAWM were then measured and compared between patient and control groups. The sensitivity and specificity of 3 methods and the cerebral regional distribution of MR signal abnormalities were further analyzed. Hyperintense foci were observed on T2 weighted image and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in 6 patients. Compared to the controls, FA values of the patients were significantly lower in bilateral frontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal NAWMs; whereas the electrophysiological examination results of patients and controls exhibited no statistically significant difference. The sensitivity of FA value was higher than that of electrophysiological examination and conventional MRI. The majority of abnormal signals on conventional MRI images and abnormal FA values were located in the frontal and temporal lobes. The results of our study show cerebral WM changes in HNPP patients. FA value in DTI has been shown to be sensitive to the cerebral microstructural changes in HNPP. The frontal lobe is the

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cathy R.; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Devan, William J.; Parsons, Owen E.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Gregory, Sarah; Cloonan, Lisa; Falcone, Guido J.; Radmanesh, Farid; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Barrick, Thomas R.; Moynihan, Barry; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Lemmens, Robin; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Wardlaw, Joanna; Rothwell, Peter M.; Meschia, James F.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Furie, Karen L.; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S.; Rost, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: For 3,670 stroke patients from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Belgium, and Italy, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis of white matter hyperintensity volumes (WMHV) on data imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference dataset to provide insights into disease mechanisms. Methods: We first sought to identify genetic associations with white matter hyperintensities in a stroke population, and then examined whether genetic loci previously linked to WMHV in community populations are also associated in stroke patients. Having established that genetic associations are shared between the 2 populations, we performed a meta-analysis testing which associations with WMHV in stroke-free populations are associated overall when combined with stroke populations. Results: There were no associations at genome-wide significance with WMHV in stroke patients. All previously reported genome-wide significant associations with WMHV in community populations shared direction of effect in stroke patients. In a meta-analysis of the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci (p < 5 × 10−6) from community populations (15 single nucleotide polymorphisms in total) and from stroke patients, 6 independent loci were associated with WMHV in both populations. Four of these are novel associations at the genome-wide level (rs72934505 [NBEAL1], p = 2.2 × 10−8; rs941898 [EVL], p = 4.0 × 10−8; rs962888 [C1QL1], p = 1.1 × 10−8; rs9515201 [COL4A2], p = 6.9 × 10−9). Conclusions: Genetic associations with WMHV are shared in otherwise healthy individuals and patients with stroke, indicating common genetic susceptibility in cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:26674333

  7. Cilostazol reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction, white matter lesion formation and motor deficits following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Edrissi, Hamidreza; Schock, Sarah C; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine M; Thompson, Charlie S

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathological process leading to lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and cerebral microbleeds. Dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression cerebral small vessel disease. A rodent model commonly used to study some aspects of CSVD is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in the rat. In the present study it was determined that gait impairment, as determined by a tapered beam test, and BBB permeability increased following BCCAO. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to have anti-apoptotic effects and prevent white matter vacuolation and rarefaction induced by BCCAO in rats. In this study the protective effect of cilostazol administration on the increase BBB permeability following BCCAO was determined as well as the effect on plasma levels of circulating microparticles (MPs), cerebral white matter rarefaction, glial activation and gait disturbance. The effect of cilostazol on in vitro endothelial barriers was also evaluated. Cilostazol treatment improved BBB permeability and reduced gait disturbance, visual impairment and microglial activation in optic tract following BCCAO in vivo. It also reduced the degree of cell death and the reduction in trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in artificial endothelial barriers in vitro induced by MP treatment of in vitro barriers. PMID:27350079

  8. APOL1 renal-risk variants associate with reduced cerebral white matter lesion volume and increased gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Bryan, R Nick; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Ma, Lijun; Rocco, Michael V; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Whitlow, Christopher T; Wagner, Benjamin C; Langefeld, Carl D; Hawfield, Amret T; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lerner, Alan J; Raj, Dominic S; Sadaghiani, Mohammad S; Toto, Robert D; Wright, Jackson T; Bowden, Donald W; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-08-01

    To assess apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk-variant effects on the brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral volumes and cognitive function were assessed in 517 African American-Diabetes Heart Study (AA-DHS) Memory IN Diabetes (MIND) and 2568 hypertensive African American Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) participants without diabetes. Within these cohorts, 483 and 197 had cerebral MRI, respectively. AA-DHS participants were characterized as follows: 60.9% female, mean age of 58.6 years, diabetes duration 13.1 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 88.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and a median spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 10.0 mg/g. In additive genetic models adjusting for age, sex, ancestry, scanner, intracranial volume, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, statins, nephropathy, smoking, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, APOL1 renal-risk-variants were positively associated with gray matter volume (β = 3.4 × 10(-3)) and negatively associated with white matter lesion volume (β = -0.303) (an indicator of cerebral small vessel disease) and cerebrospinal fluid volume (β= -30707) (all significant), but not with white matter volume or cognitive function. Significant associations corresponding to adjusted effect sizes (β/SE) were observed with gray matter volume (0.16) and white matter lesion volume (-0.208), but not with cerebrospinal fluid volume (-0.251). Meta-analysis results with SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) participants who had cerebral MRI were confirmatory. Thus, APOL1 renal-risk-variants are associated with larger gray matter volume and lower white matter lesion volume suggesting lower intracranial small vessel disease. PMID:27342958

  9. Prenatal ischemia deteriorates white matter, brain organization, and function: implications for prematurity and cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Coq, Jacques-Olivier; Delcour, Maxime; Massicotte, Vicky S; Baud, Olivier; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of neurodevelopmental disorders of posture and movement that are frequently associated with sensory, behavioral, and cognitive impairments. The clinical picture of CP has changed with improved neonatal care over the past few decades, resulting in higher survival rates of infants born very preterm. Children born preterm seem particularly vulnerable to perinatal hypoxia-ischemia insults at birth. Animal models of CP are crucial for elucidating underlying mechanisms and for development of strategies of neuroprotection and remediation. Most animal models of CP are based on hypoxia-ischemia around the time of birth. In this review, we focus on alterations of brain organization and functions, especially sensorimotor changes, induced by prenatal ischemia in rodents and rabbits, and relate these alterations to neurodevelopmental disorders found in preterm children. We also discuss recent literature that addresses the relationship between neural and myelin plasticity, as well as possible contributions of white matter injury to the emergence of brain dysfunctions induced by prenatal ischemia. PMID:27027601

  10. Heritability and genetic correlation between the cerebral cortex and associated white matter connections.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Doré, Vincent; Rose, Stephen; Fripp, Jurgen; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Thompson, Paul M; Wright, Margaret J; Salvado, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic influence on the cerebral cortex, based on the analyses of heritability and genetic correlation between grey matter (GM) thickness, derived from structural MR images (sMRI), and associated white matter (WM) connections obtained from diffusion MRI (dMRI). We measured on sMRI the cortical thickness (CT) from a large twin imaging cohort using a surface-based approach (N = 308, average age 22.8 ± 2.3 SD). An ACE model was employed to compute the heritability of CT. WM connections were estimated based on probabilistic tractography using fiber orientation distributions (FOD) from dMRI. We then fitted the ACE model to estimate the heritability of CT and FOD peak measures along WM fiber tracts. The WM fiber tracts where genetic influence was detected were mapped onto the cortical surface. Bivariate genetic modeling was performed to estimate the cross-trait genetic correlation between the CT and the FOD-based connectivity of the tracts associated with the cortical regions. We found some cortical regions displaying heritable and genetically correlated GM thickness and WM connectivity, forming networks under stronger genetic influence. Significant heritability and genetic correlations between the CT and WM connectivity were found in regions including the right postcentral gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus, right middle temporal gyri, suggesting common genetic factors influencing both GM and WM. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2331-2347, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27006297

  11. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  12. Children with New Onset Epilepsy Exhibit Diffusion Abnormalities in Cerebral White Matter in the Absence of Volumetric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pulsipher, Dalin; Dabbs, Kevin; Myers y Gutierrez, Adan; Sheth, Raj; Jones, Jana; Seidenberg, Michael; Meyerand, Elizabeth; Hermann, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this investigation was to examine the diffusion properties of cerebral white matter in children with recent onset epilepsy (n=19) compared to healthy controls (n=11). Subjects underwent DTI with quantification of mean diffusion (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (Dax) and radial diffusivity (Drad) for regions of interest including anterior and posterior corpus callosum, fornix, cingulum, and internal and external capsules. Quantitative volumetrics were also performed for the corpus callosum and its subregions (anterior, midbody and posterior) and total lobar white and gray matter for the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The results demonstrated no group differences in total lobar gray or white matter volumes or volume of the corpus callosum and its subregions, but did show reduced FA and increased Drad in the posterior corpus callosum and cingulum. These results provide the earliest indication of microstructural abnormality in cerebral white matter among children with idiopathic epilepsies. This abnormality occurs in the context of normal volumetrics and suggests disruption in myelination processes. PMID:20044239

  13. Multi-Ethnic Genome-Wide Association Study of Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Verhaaren, Benjamin F.J.; Debette, Stéphanie; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Ikram, M. Kamran; Adams, Hieab H.; Beecham, Ashley H.; Rajan, Kumar B.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Barral, Sandra; van Buchem, Mark A.; van der Grond, Jeroen; Smith, Albert V.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Aggarwal, Neelum T.; de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Beekman, Marian; Beiser, Alexa S.; Blanton, Susan H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brickman, Adam M.; Bryan, R. Nick; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Christopher P.L.H.; Chouraki, Vincent; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Crivello, Fabrice; Deary, Ian J.; Deelen, Joris; De Jager, Philip L.; Dufouil, Carole; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Evans, Denis A.; Freudenberger, Paul; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Guðnason, Vilmundur; Habes, Mohamad; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heiss, Gerardo; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Knopman, David S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C.M.; Luciano, Michelle; van der Lugt, Aad; Martinez, Oliver O.; Mayeux, Richard; Mazoyer, Bernard; Nalls, Mike; Nauck, Matthias; Niessen, Wiro J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Schmidt, Helena; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Schuur, Maaike; Sidney, Stephen S.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Slagboom, P. Eline; Stott, David J.M.; van Swieten, John C.; Teumer, Alexander; Töglhofer, Anna Maria; Traylor, Matthew; Trompet, Stella; Turner, Stephen T.; Tzourio, Christophe; Uh, Hae-Won; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Wang, Jing J.; Wong, Tien Y.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Windham, B. Gwen; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Wright, Clinton B.; Yang, Qiong; Zhao, Wei; Zijdenbos, Alex; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sacco, Ralph L.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Amouyel, Philippe; Mosley, Thomas H.; Longstreth, W. T.; DeCarli, Charles C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Launer, Lenore J.; Grabe, Hans J.; Seshadri, Sudha S.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is associated with an increased risk of stroke, dementia, and death. WMH are highly heritable, but their genetic underpinnings are incompletely characterized. To identify novel genetic variants influencing WMH burden, we conducted a meta-analysis of multi-ethnic genome-wide association studies. Methods and Results We included 21,079 middle-aged to elderly individuals from 29 population-based cohorts, who were free of dementia and stroke and were of European (N=17,936), African (N=1,943), Hispanic (N=795), and Asian (N=405) descent. WMH burden was quantified on MRI either by a validated automated segmentation method or a validated visual grading scale. Genotype data in each study were imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference. Within each ethnic group, we investigated the relationship between each SNP and WMH burden using a linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, intracranial volume, and principal components of ancestry. A meta-analysis was conducted for each ethnicity separately and for the combined sample. In the European descent samples, we confirmed a previously known locus on chr17q25 (p=2.7×10−19) and identified novel loci on chr10q24 (p=1.6×10−9) and chr2p21 (p=4.4×10−8). In the multi-ethnic meta-analysis, we identified two additional loci, on chr1q22 (p=2.0×10−8) and chr2p16 (p=1.5×10−8). The novel loci contained genes that have been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (chr2p21, chr10q24), intracerebral hemorrhage (chr1q22), neuroinflammatory diseases (chr2p21), and glioma (chr10q24, chr2p16). Conclusions We identified four novel genetic loci that implicate inflammatory and glial proliferative pathways in the development of white matter hyperintensities in addition to previously-proposed ischemic mechanisms. PMID:25663218

  14. In vivo study of cerebral white matter in the dog using diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Anaya García, Mitzi Sarahí; Hernández Anaya, Jael Sarahí; Marrufo Meléndez, Oscar; Velázquez Ramírez, José Luis; Palacios Aguiar, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows investigators and clinicians to observe the anatomy and injuries of the cerebral white matter (CWM) in dogs. However, dynamic images based on the diffusion tensor (DT) technique are required to assess fiber tract integrity of the CWM. Diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) produces a three-dimensional representation in which data are displayed on a colored map obtained from the anisotropy of water molecules in the CWM tracts. Fractional anisotropy (FA) is a value that measures changes in water diffusion, which can occur if the CWM tracts are displaced, disrupted, or infiltrated. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of DTT for in vivo examination of the normal appearance of CWM in dogs through visual and quantitative analysis of the most representative CWM tracts. Nine tractographies were performed on healthy dogs using a 3T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images and DTI were acquired at different planes. Using DTT, three-dimensional reconstructions were obtained. Fractional ansisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the right and left corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum, cingulum, and right and left fronto-occipital fasciculus were determined. Tract reconstructions were similar in 8/9 healthy dogs. Values for FA and ADC were similar in all the dogs. In one dog, tract reconstructions were inhomogeneous; these were displaced because it had larger lateral ventricles. Findings indicated that DTT is a feasible technique for in vivo study of CWM in dogs and that it complements information from conventional MRI. PMID:25288360

  15. IN VIVO STUDY OF CEREBRAL WHITE MATTER IN THE DOG USING DIFFUSION TENSOR TRACTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Anaya García, Mitzi Sarahí; Hernández Anaya, Jael Sarahí; Marrufo Meléndez, Oscar; Velázquez Ramírez, José Luis; Palacios Aguiar, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows investigators and clinicians to observe the anatomy and injuries of the cerebral white matter (CWM) in dogs. However, dynamic images based on the diffusion tensor (DT) technique are required to assess fiber tract integrity of the CWM. Diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) produces a three-dimensional representation in which data are displayed on a colored map obtained from the anisotropy of water molecules in the CWM tracts. Fractional anisotropy (FA) is a value that measures changes in water diffusion, which can occur if the CWM tracts are displaced, disrupted, or infiltrated. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of DTT for in vivo examination of the normal appearance of CWM in dogs through visual and quantitative analysis of the most representative CWM tracts. Nine tractographies were performed on healthy dogs using a 3T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images and DTI were acquired at different planes. Using DTT, three-dimensional reconstructions were obtained. Fractional ansisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the right and left corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum, cingulum, and right and left fronto-occipital fasciculus were determined. Tract reconstructions were similar in 8/9 healthy dogs. Values for FA and ADC were similar in all the dogs. In one dog, tract reconstructions were inhomogeneous; these were displaced because it had larger lateral ventricles. Findings indicated that DTT is a feasible technique for in vivo study of CWM in dogs and that it complements information from conventional MRI. PMID:25288360

  16. Thalamic fractional anisotropy predicts accrual of cerebral white matter damage in older subjects with small-vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Michele; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik; Skudlarski, Pawel; Pearlson, Godfrey D; White, William B; Wolfson, Leslie; Guttmann, Charles RG

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and lacunes are magnetic resonance imaging hallmarks of cerebral small-vessel disease, which increase the risk of stroke, cognitive, and mobility impairment. Although most studies of cerebral small-vessel disease have focused on white matter abnormalities, the gray matter (GM) is also affected, as evidenced by frequently observed lacunes in subcortical GM. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle neurodegenerative changes in deep GM structures. We explored the relationship between baseline DTI characteristics of the thalamus, caudate, and putamen, and the volume and subsequent accrual of WMHs over a 4-year period in 56 community-dwelling older (⩾75 years) individuals. Baseline thalamic fractional anisotropy (FA) was an independent predictor of WMH accrual. WMH accrual also correlated with baseline lacune count and baseline WMH volume, the latter showing the strongest predictive power, explaining 27.3% of the variance. The addition of baseline thalamic FA in multivariate modeling increased this value by 70%, which explains 46.5% of the variance in WMH accrual rate. Thalamic FA might serve as a novel predictor of cerebral small-vessel disease progression in clinical settings and trials. Furthermore, our findings point to the possibility of a causal relationship between thalamic damage and the accrual of WMHs. PMID:24824915

  17. Effects of statins on the progression of cerebral white matter lesion: Post hoc analysis of the ROCAS (Regression of Cerebral Artery Stenosis) study.

    PubMed

    Mok, Vincent C T; Lam, Wynnie W M; Fan, Yu Hua; Wong, Adrian; Ng, Ping Wing; Tsoi, Tak Hon; Yeung, Vincent; Wong, Ka Sing

    2009-05-01

    Arteriosclerotic related cerebral white matter lesion (WML) is associated with increased risk of death, stroke, dementia, depression, gait disturbance, and urinary incontinence. We investigated the effects of statins on WML progression by performing a post hoc analysis on the ROCAS (Regression of Cerebral Artery Stenosis) study, which is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effects of statins upon asymptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis progression among stroke-free individuals. Two hundreds and eight randomized subjects were assigned to either placebo (n = 102) or simvastatin 20 mg daily (n = 106) for 2 years. Baseline severity of WML was graded visually into none, mild, and severe. Volume (cm3) of WML was determined quantitatively at baseline and at end of study using a semi-automated method based on MRI. Primary outcome was the change in WML volume over 2 years. After 2 years of follow-up, there was no significant change in WML volume between the active and the placebo group as a whole. However, stratified analysis showed that for those with severe WML at baseline, the median volume increase in the active group (1.9 cm3) was less compared with that in the placebo group (3.0 cm3; P = 0.047). Linear multivariate regression analysis identified that baseline WML volume (beta = 0.63, P < 0.001) and simvastatin treatment (beta = -0.214, P = 0.043) independently predicted change in WML volume. Our findings suggest that statins may delay the progression of cerebral WML only among those who already have severe WML at baseline. PMID:19252811

  18. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . PMID:26371170

  19. Accelerated life test for high-power white LED based on spectroradiometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haiping; Pan, Jiangen; Feng, Huajun

    2008-03-01

    We implement an accelerated life test for the high-power white LEDs based on spectroradiometric measurement. The luminous flux degradation performances are investigated at both the rated current of 350mA and a higher current of 500mA. The average lifetime of the LEDs is 7057 hours at 350mA and 3508 hours at 500mA. The variations of the color of the white LEDs are studied. The color of the low quality white LEDs changes greatly, while the high quality white LEDs keep their color stable. The degradation performances of the chip and phosphor are studied separately. The quantum efficiency of the phosphor becomes lower from 350mA to 500mA current supply. The LED chip degrades faster than the phosphor during the 500mA high current aging. The luminous flux increase and the peak wavelength shift from 350mA to 500mA current supply are found to be useful lifetime indicating parameters that correlate well to the reliability of the high-power white LEDs.

  20. Consistent Injury to Medium Spiny Neurons and White Matter in the Mouse Striatum after Prolonged Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Katsu, Masataka; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Okami, Nobuya

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A reproducible transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) mouse model has not been fully established. Although striatal neurons and white matter are recognized to be vulnerable to ischemia, their injury after tGCI in mice has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate injuries to striatal neurons and white matter after tGCI in C57BL/6 mice, and to develop a reproducible tGCI model. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to tGCI by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Mice whose cortical cerebral blood flow after BCCAO decreased to less than 13% of the pre-ischemic value were used. Histological analysis showed that at 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO, striatal neurons were injured more consistently than those in other brain regions. Quantitative analysis of cytochrome c release into the cytosol and DNA fragmentation in the striatum showed consistent injury to the striatum. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that DARPP-32-positive medium spiny neurons, the majority of striatal neurons, were the most vulnerable among the striatal neuronal subpopulations. The striatum (especially medium spiny neurons) was susceptible to oxidative stress after tGCI, which is probably one of the mechanisms of vulnerability. SMI-32 immunostaining showed that white matter in the striatum was also consistently injured 3 days after 22 min of BCCAO. We thus suggest that this is a tGCI model using C57BL/6 mice that consistently produces neuronal and white matter injury in the striatum by a simple technique. This model can be highly applicable for elucidating molecular mechanisms in the brain after global ischemia. PMID:21309724

  1. Early postnatal hypotension is not associated with indicators of white matter damage or cerebral palsy in extremely low gestational age newborns

    PubMed Central

    Logan, J. Wells; O’Shea, T. Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Bose, Carl L.; Dammann, Olaf; Batton, Daniel G.; Kuban, Karl C.; Paneth, Nigel; Leviton, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate, in extremely low gestational age newborns (ELGANs), relationships between indicators of early postnatal hypotension and cranial ultrasound indicators of cerebral white matter damage imaged in the nursery and cerebral palsy diagnoses at 24 month follow-up. Methods The 1041 infants in this prospective study were born at < 28 weeks gestation, were assessed for 3 indicators of hypotension in the first 24 postnatal hours, had at least one set of protocol cranial ultrasound scans, and were evaluated with a structured neurologic exam at 24 months corrected age. Indicators of hypotension included: 1) lowest mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the lowest quartile for gestational age; 2) treatment with a vasopressor; and 3) blood pressure lability, defined as the upper quartile of the difference between each infant’s lowest and highest MAP. Outcomes included indicators of cerebral white matter damage, i.e. moderate/severe ventriculomegaly or an echolucent lesion on cranial ultrasound, and cerebral palsy diagnoses at 24 months gestation. Logistic regression was used to evaluate relationships among hypotension indicators and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Twenty-one percent of surviving infants had a lowest blood pressure in the lowest quartile for gestational age, 24% were treated with vasopressors, and 24% had labile blood pressure. Among infants with these hypotension indicators, 10% percent developed ventriculomegaly and 7% developed an echolucent lesion. At 24-months follow-up, 6% had developed quadriparesis, 4% diparesis, and 2% hemiparesis. After adjusting for confounders, we found no association between indicators of hypotension, and indicators of cerebral white matter damage or a cerebral palsy diagnosis. Conclusions The absence of an association between indicators of hypotension and cerebral white matter damage and or cerebral palsy suggests that early hypotension may not be important in the pathogenesis of brain injury

  2. Immediate remote ischemic postconditioning after hypoxia ischemia in piglets protects cerebral white matter but not grey matter

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Mojgan; Bainbridge, Alan; Broad, Kevin D; Kawano, Go; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Fierens, Igor; Rostami, Jamshid; Jane Hassell, K; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Hristova, Mariya; Bennett, Kate; Lebon, Sophie; Fleiss, Bobbi; Yellon, Derek; Hausenloy, Derek J; Golay, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) is a promising therapeutic intervention whereby brief episodes of ischemia/reperfusion of one organ (limb) mitigate damage in another organ (brain) that has experienced severe hypoxia-ischemia. Our aim was to assess whether RIPostC is protective following cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in a piglet model of neonatal encephalopathy (NE) using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) biomarkers and immunohistochemistry. After hypoxia-ischemia (HI), 16 Large White female newborn piglets were randomized to: (i) no intervention (n = 8); (ii) RIPostC – with four, 10-min cycles of bilateral lower limb ischemia/reperfusion immediately after HI (n = 8). RIPostC reduced the hypoxic-ischemic-induced increase in white matter proton MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate (p = 0.005) and increased whole brain phosphorus-31 MRS ATP (p = 0.039) over the 48 h after HI. Cell death was reduced with RIPostC in the periventricular white matter (p = 0.03), internal capsule (p = 0.002) and corpus callosum (p = 0.021); there was reduced microglial activation in corpus callosum (p = 0.001) and more surviving oligodendrocytes in corpus callosum (p = 0.029) and periventricular white matter (p = 0.001). Changes in gene expression were detected in the white matter at 48 h, including KATP channel and endothelin A receptor. Immediate RIPostC is a potentially safe and promising brain protective therapy for babies with NE with protection in white but not grey matter. PMID:26661194

  3. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement in chromosome 6p25 deletion syndrome with concomitant 5p15 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Smith, Kath; Williams, Steve; Griffiths, Paul D.; Parker, Michael J.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-telomeric deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are a well-described clinical entity characterized by developmental impairment, hypotonia, eye abnormalities and defects in the heart and kidneys. Chromosome 5p terminal duplication is a rarer entity, associated with developmental impairment and facial dysmorphism. We report a 3-year-old patient with a chromosome 6p25.1pter deletion and chromosome 5p15.1pter duplication who had global developmental impairment and unusual cerebral white matter changes, with hypoplastic corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan. We discuss the differential diagnosis to consider in patients with this appearance on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan and reiterate the need for chromosome analysis in patients with this pattern of developmental anomaly. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement has not been reported in chromosomal deletion/duplication syndromes. With the increasing use of molecular karyotyping for patients with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay, it is important to consider the exact size and nature of chromosomal deletion/duplication, in order to provide families with prognostic information and recurrence risk. This in turn, will help provide valuable information regarding the natural history of rare chromosomal imbalances.

  4. DTI of the Visual Pathway - White Matter Tracts and Cerebral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hana, Ardian; Husch, Andreas; Gunness, Vimal Raj Nitish; Berthold, Christophe; Hana, Anisa; Dooms, Georges; Boecher Schwarz, Hans; Hertel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    DTI is a technique that identifies white matter tracts (WMT) non-invasively in healthy and non-healthy patients using diffusion measurements. Similar to visual pathways (VP), WMT are not visible with classical MRI or intra-operatively with microscope. DTI will help neurosurgeons to prevent destruction of the VP while removing lesions adjacent to this WMT. We have performed DTI on fifty patients before and after surgery between March 2012 to January 2014. To navigate we used a 3DT1-weighted sequence. Additionally, we performed a T2-weighted and DTI-sequences. The parameters used were, FOV: 200 x 200 mm, slice thickness: 2 mm, and acquisition matrix: 96 x 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 mm. Axial MRI was carried out using a 32 gradient direction and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2 and b-value of 800 s/mm². The scanning time was less than 9 min. The DTI-data obtained were processed using a FDA approved surgical navigation system program which uses a straightforward fiber-tracking approach known as fiber assignment by continuous tracking (FACT). This is based on the propagation of lines between regions of interest (ROI) which is defined by a physician. A maximum angle of 50, FA start value of 0.10 and ADC stop value of 0.20 mm²/s were the parameters used for tractography. There are some limitations to this technique. The limited acquisition time frame enforces trade-offs in the image quality. Another important point not to be neglected is the brain shift during surgery. As for the latter intra-operative MRI might be helpful. Furthermore the risk of false positive or false negative tracts needs to be taken into account which might compromise the final results. PMID:25226557

  5. Hypoxia during pregnancy in rats leads to the changes of the cerebral white matter in adult offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingxing; Cai, Ruowei; Lv, Guorong; Huang, Ziyang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of reduced fetal oxygen supply on cerebral white matter in the adult offspring and further assess its susceptibility to postnatal hypoxia and high-fat diet. Based on a 3 x 2 full factorial design consisting of three factors of maternal hypoxia, postnatal high-fat diet, and postnatal hypoxia, the ultrastructure of myelin, axon and capillaries were observed, and the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-H+L(NF-H+L), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was analyzed in periventricular white matter of 16-month-old offspring. Demyelination, injured axon and damaged microvasculars were observed in maternal hypoxia offspring. The main effect of maternal hypoxia lead to decreased expression of MBP or NF-H+L, and increased expression of GFAP (all P < 0.05). Moreover, there was positive three-way interaction among maternal hypoxia, high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia on MBP, NF-H+L or GFAP expression (all P < 0.05). In summary, our results indicated that maternal hypoxia during pregnancy in rats lead to changes of periventricular white matter in adult offspring, including demyelination, damaged axon and proliferated astroglia. This effect was amplified by high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia.

  6. Sex-Dependent Influences of Obesity on Cerebral White Matter Investigated by Diffusion-Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Annette; Lepsien, Jöran; Busse, Franziska; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have shown that obesity is associated with changes in human brain function and structure. Since women are more susceptible to obesity than men, it seems plausible that neural correlates may also be different. However, this has not been demonstrated so far. To address this issue, we systematically investigated the brain's white matter (WM) structure in 23 lean to obese women (mean age 25.5 y, std 5.1 y; mean body mass index (BMI) 29.5 kg/m2, std 7.3 kg/m2) and 26 lean to obese men (mean age 27.1 y, std 5.0 y; mean BMI 28.8 kg/m2, std 6.8 kg/m2) with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There was no significant age (p>0.2) or BMI (p>0.7) difference between female and male participants. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we correlated several diffusion parameters including the apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as axial (λ∥) and radial diffusivity (λ⊥) with BMI and serum leptin levels. In female and male subjects, the putative axon marker λ∥ was consistently reduced throughout the corpus callosum, particularly in the splenium (r = −0.62, p<0.005). This suggests that obesity may be associated with axonal degeneration. Only in women, the putative myelin marker λ⊥ significantly increased with increasing BMI (r = 0.57, p<0.005) and serum leptin levels (r = 0.62, p<0.005) predominantly in the genu of the corpus callosum, suggesting additional myelin degeneration. Comparable structural changes were reported for the aging brain, which may point to accelerated aging of WM structure in obese subjects. In conclusion, we demonstrate structural WM changes related to an elevated body weight, but with differences between men and women. Future studies on obesity-related functional and structural brain changes should therefore account for sex-related differences. PMID:21494606

  7. Simvastatin Reduces Lipopolysaccharides-Accelerated Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activity.

    PubMed

    Anthony Jalin, Angela M A; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kim, Chunsook; Ju, Chung; Pahk, Kisoo; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Won-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Preceding infection or inflammation such as bacterial meningitis has been associated with poor outcomes after stroke. Previously, we reported that intracorpus callosum microinjection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly accelerated the ischemia/reperfusion-evoked brain tissue damage via recruiting inflammatory cells into the ischemic lesion. Simvastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgultaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in vascular diseases. Thus, we investigated whether simvastatin could reduce the LPS-accelerated ischemic injury. Simvastatin (20 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats prior to cerebral ischemic insults (4 times at 72, 48, 25, and 1-h pre-ischemia). LPS was microinjected into rat corpus callosum 1 day before the ischemic injury. Treatment of simvastatin reduced the LPS-accelerated infarct size by 73%, and decreased the ischemia/reperfusion-induced expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2 and IL-1β in LPS-injected rat brains. However, simvastatin did not reduce the infiltration of microglial/macrophageal cells into the LPS-pretreated brain lesion. In vitro migration assay also showed that simvastatin did not inhibit the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-evoked migration of microglial/macrophageal cells. Instead, simvastatin inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a key signaling event in expressions of various proinflammatory mediators, by decreasing the degradation of IκB. The present results indicate that simvastatin may be beneficial particularly to the accelerated cerebral ischemic injury under inflammatory or infectious conditions. PMID:26535078

  8. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Vijaya Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  9. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal Appearing White Matter in Patients with Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, V.; Tsien, C.I.; Chenevert, T.L.; Ross, B.D.; Lawrence, T.S.; Junck, L.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify radiation-induced changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) before, during and after radiation therapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor MRI. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. Temporal changes were assessed before, during, and till 45 weeks after start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water , fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ⊥) and parallel (λ∥) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, FA decreased and , λ∥, and λ⊥ increased linearly and significantly over time (p< 0.01). At 45 weeks after start of RT, λ⊥ increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, while λ∥ increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ⊥ and λ∥ were dose-dependent starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ⊥ and λ∥ were not sustained after 32 weeks indicating the transition from the focal to diffuse effects. Conclusions: The acute and sub-acute changes in normal appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. DT-MR imaging is potentially a marker for assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury. PMID:18313524

  10. Relationship between characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging and motor outcomes in children with cerebral palsy and white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Reid, Susan M; Ditchfield, Michael R; Bracken, Jenny; Reddihough, Dinah S

    2015-01-01

    In a population cohort of children with white matter injury (WMI) and cerebral palsy (CP), we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, identify key structure-function relationships, and classify the severity of WMI in a clinically relevant way. Stratified on MRI laterality/symmetry, variables indicating the extent and location of cerebral abnormalities for 272 children with CP and WMI on chronic-phase MRI were related to gross motor function and motor topography using univariable and multivariable approaches. We found that symmetrical involvement, severe WM loss in the hemispheres and corpus callosum, and cerebellar involvement were the strongest predictors of poor gross motor function, but the final model explained only a small proportion of the variability. Bilateral, extensive WM loss was more likely to result in quadriplegia, whereas volume loss in the posterior-mid WM more frequently resulted in diplegia. The extent and location of MRI abnormalities differed according to laterality/symmetry; asymmetry was associated with less extensive hemispheric involvement than symmetrical WMI, and unilateral lesions were more focal and located more anteriorly. In summary, laterality/symmetry of WMI, possibly reflecting different pathogenic mechanisms, together with extent of WM loss and cerebellar abnormality predicted gross motor function in CP, but to a limited extent. PMID:26263404

  11. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C; Indelicato, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  12. The Challenge of Understanding Cerebral White Matter Injury in the Premature Infant

    PubMed Central

    Elitt, Christopher M.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    White matter injury in the premature infant leads to motor and more commonly behavioral and cognitive problems that are a tremendous burden to society. While there has been much progress in understanding unique vulnerabilities of developing oligodendrocytes over the past 30 years, there remain no proven therapies for the premature infant beyond supportive care. The lack of translational progress may be partially explained by the challenge of developing relevant animal models when the etiology remains unclear, as is the case in this disorder. There has been an emphasis on hypoxia-ischemia and infection/inflammation as upstream etiologies, but less consideration of other contributory factors. This review highlights the evolution of white matter pathology in the premature infant, discusses the prevailing proposed etiologies, critically analyzes a sampling of common animal models and provides detailed support for our hypothesis that nutritional and hormonal deprivation may be additional factors playing critical and overlooked roles in white matter pathology in the premature infant. PMID:24838063

  13. Analyses of Disruption of Cerebral White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia with MR Diffusion Tensor Fiber Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Utako; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kito, Shinsuke; Koga, Yoshihiko

    We have analyzed cerebral white matter using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) to measure the diffusion anisotropy of water molecules. The goal of this study is the quantitative evaluation of schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor images are acquired for patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, group-matched for age, sex, and handedness. Fiber tracking is performed on the superior longitudinal fasciculus for the comparison between the patient and comparison groups. We have analysed and compared the cross-sectional area on the starting coronal plane and the mean and standard deviation of the fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient along fibers in the right and left hemispheres. In the right hemisphere, the cross-sectional areas in patient group are significantly smaller than those in the comparison group. Furthermore, in the comparison group, the cross-sectional areas in the right hemisphere are significantly larger than those in the left hemisphere, whereas there is no significant difference in the patient group. These results suggest that we may evaluate the disruption in white matter integrity in schizophrenic patients quantitatively by comparing the cross-sectional area of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in the right and left hemispheres.

  14. Cerebral white matter recovery in abstinent alcoholics—a multimodality magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Yeh, Ping-Hong; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2010-01-01

    Most previous neuroimaging studies of alcohol-induced brain injury and recovery thereof during abstinence from alcohol used a single imaging modality. They have demonstrated widespread microstructural, macrostructural or metabolite abnormalities that were partially reversible with abstinence, with the cigarette smoking potentially modulating these processes. The goals of this study were to evaluate white matter injury and recovery thereof, simultaneously with diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in the same cohort; and to evaluate the relationships between outcome measures of similar regions. We scanned 16 non-smoking and 20 smoking alcohol-dependent individuals at 1 week of abstinence from alcohol and 22 non-smoking light drinkers using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner. Ten non-smoking alcohol-dependent individuals and 11 smoking alcohol-dependent individuals were re-scanned at 1 month of abstinence. All regional diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopic outcome measures were calculated over comparable volumes of frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital white matter. At 1 week of abstinence and relative to non-smoking light drinkers, non-smoking alcohol-dependent individuals had higher mean diffusivity in frontal, temporal and parietal white matter (all P < 0.008), whereas smoking alcohol-dependent individuals had elevated mean diffusivity only in frontal white matter (P = 0.03). Smoking alcohol-dependent individuals demonstrated lower concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (a marker of neuronal viability) in frontal white matter (P = 0.03), whereas non-smoking alcohol-dependent individuals had lower N-acetyl-aspartate in parietal white matter (P = 0.05). These abnormalities were not accompanied by detectable white matter atrophy. However, the patterns of white matter recovery were different between non-smoking alcohol-dependent individuals and smoking alcohol-dependent individuals. In non

  15. Preclinical Cerebral Network Connectivity Evidence of Deficits in Mild White Matter Lesions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Sun, Xuan; Xu, Shijun; Liu, Yaou; Huang, Ruiwang; Jia, Jianjun; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are notable for their high prevalence and have been demonstrated to be a potential neuroimaging biomarker of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. This study aimed to identify the brain functional and structural mechanisms underlying cognitive decline observed in mild WMLs. Multi-domain cognitive tests, as well as resting-state, diffusion tensor and structural images were obtained on 42 mild WMLs and 42 age/sex-matched healthy controls. For each participant, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of three resting-state networks (RSNs) related to the changed cognitive domains: the default mode network (DMN) and the bilateral fronto-parietal network (FPN). We also performed voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare whole-brain gray matter (GM) volume, atlas-based quantification of the white matter tracts interconnecting the RSNs, and the relationship between FC and structural connectivity. We observed FC alterations in the DMN and the right FPN combined with related white matter integrity disruption in mild WMLs. However, no significant GM atrophy difference was found. Furthermore, the right precuneus FC in the DMN exhibited a significantly negative correlation with the memory test scores. Our study suggests that in mild WMLs, dysfunction of RSNs might be a consequence of decreased white matter structural connectivity, which further affects cognitive performance. PMID:26924981

  16. Preclinical Cerebral Network Connectivity Evidence of Deficits in Mild White Matter Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Sun, Xuan; Xu, Shijun; Liu, Yaou; Huang, Ruiwang; Jia, Jianjun; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are notable for their high prevalence and have been demonstrated to be a potential neuroimaging biomarker of early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. This study aimed to identify the brain functional and structural mechanisms underlying cognitive decline observed in mild WMLs. Multi-domain cognitive tests, as well as resting-state, diffusion tensor and structural images were obtained on 42 mild WMLs and 42 age/sex-matched healthy controls. For each participant, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of three resting-state networks (RSNs) related to the changed cognitive domains: the default mode network (DMN) and the bilateral fronto-parietal network (FPN). We also performed voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare whole-brain gray matter (GM) volume, atlas-based quantification of the white matter tracts interconnecting the RSNs, and the relationship between FC and structural connectivity. We observed FC alterations in the DMN and the right FPN combined with related white matter integrity disruption in mild WMLs. However, no significant GM atrophy difference was found. Furthermore, the right precuneus FC in the DMN exhibited a significantly negative correlation with the memory test scores. Our study suggests that in mild WMLs, dysfunction of RSNs might be a consequence of decreased white matter structural connectivity, which further affects cognitive performance. PMID:26924981

  17. Age-related slowing of memory retrieval: Contributions of perceptual speed and cerebral white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Barbara; Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Provenzale, James M.; Cabeza, Roberto; White, Leonard E.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research suggests that, in reaction time (RT) measures of episodic memory retrieval, the unique effects of adult age are relatively small compared to the effects aging shares with more elementary abilities such as perceptual speed. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanisms of perceptual speed. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test the hypothesis that white matter integrity, as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA), serves as one mechanism of perceptual slowing in episodic memory retrieval. Results indicated that declines in FA in the pericallosal frontal region and in the genu of the corpus callosum, but not in other regions, mediated the relationship between perceptual speed and episodic retrieval RT. This relation held, though to a different degree, for both hits and correct rejections. These findings suggest that white matter integrity in prefrontal regions is one mechanism underlying the relation between individual differences in perceptual speed and episodic retrieval. PMID:17383774

  18. Radial Coherence of Diffusion Tractography in the Cerebral White Matter of the Human Fetus: Neuroanatomic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Takahashi, Emi; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Haynes, Robin L.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Grant, P. Ellen; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) demonstrates transient radial coherence of telencephalic white matter in the human fetus. Our objective was to define the neuroanatomic basis of this radial coherence through correlative HARDI- and postmortem tissue analyses. Applying immunomarkers to radial glial fibers (RGFs), axons, and blood vessels in 18 cases (19 gestational weeks to 3 postnatal years), we compared their developmental profiles to HARDI tractography in brains of comparable ages (n = 11). At midgestation, radial coherence corresponded with the presence of RGFs. At 30–31 weeks, the transition from HARDI-defined radial coherence to corticocortical coherence began simultaneously with the transformation of RGFs to astrocytes. By term, both radial coherence and RGFs had disappeared. White matter axons were radial, tangential, and oblique over the second half of gestation, whereas penetrating blood vessels were consistently radial. Thus, radial coherence in the fetal white matter likely reflects a composite of RGFs, penetrating blood vessels, and radial axons of which its transient expression most closely matches that of RGFs. This study provides baseline information for interpreting radial coherence in tractography studies of the preterm brain in the assessment of the encephalopathy of prematurity. PMID:23131806

  19. Maternal Antenatal Complications and the Risk of Neonatal Cerebral White Matter Damage and Later Cerebral Palsy in Children Born at an Extremely Low Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Elizabeth N.; Boggess, Kim A.; Kuban, Karl; O'Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    In a 2002–2004 prospective cohort study of deliveries of infants at <28 weeks at 14 US centers, the authors sought the antecedents of white matter damage evident in newborn cranial ultrasound scans (ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion) and of cerebral palsy diagnoses at age 2 years. Of the 1,455 infants enrolled, those whose mothers received an antenatal steroid tended to have lower risks of ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion than their peers (10% vs. 23%, P < 0.001 and 7% vs. 11%, P = 0.06, respectively). Risk of ventriculomegaly was increased for infants delivered because of preterm labor (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 4.9), preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.5, 8.7), and cervical insufficiency (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.4, 5.5) when compared with infants delivered because of preeclampsia. Risk of an echolucent lesion was increased for infants delivered because of preterm labor (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.7) and intrauterine growth retardation (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.2, 9.4). The doubling of diparesis risk associated with preterm labor and with preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes did not achieve statistical significance, nor did the doubling of quadriparesis risk and the tripling of diparesis risk associated with cervical insufficiency. PMID:19713285

  20. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  1. Developmental changes in cerebral white matter microstructure in a disorder of lysosomal storage.

    PubMed

    Bava, Sunita; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Sach, Miriam; May, Susanne J; Frank, Lawrence R; Hesselink, John R; Vu, Duc; Trauner, Doris A

    2010-02-01

    The goal of this work was to study white matter (WM) integrity in children with cystinosis, a rare lysosomal storage disorder resulting in cystine accumulation in peripheral and central nervous system tissue. Based on previous reports of cystine crystal formation in myelin precursors as well as evidence for specific cognitive deficits in visuospatial functioning, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was applied to 24 children with cystinosis (age 3-7 years) and to 24 typically developing age-matched controls. Scalar diffusion indices, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), were examined in manually defined regions of interest within the parietal and inferior temporal lobes. Diffusion indices were correlated with performance on measures of visuospatial cognition and with white blood cell cystine levels. Bilaterally decreased FA and increased MD were evident in the inferior and superior parietal lobules in children with cystinosis, with comparable FA and MD to controls in inferior temporal WM, and implicate a dissociation of the dorsal and ventral visual pathways. In older cystinosis children (age>5), diminutions in visuospatial performance were associated with reduced FA in the right inferior parietal lobule. In addition, increased MD was found in the presence of high cystine levels in all children with cystinosis. This study provides new information that the average diffusion properties in children with cystinosis deviate from typically developing children. Findings suggest the presence of early microstructural WM changes in addition to a secondary effect of cystine accumulation. These alterations may impact the development of efficient fiber networks important for visuospatial cognition. PMID:19427638

  2. Altered white matter integrity and functional connectivity of hyperacute-stage cerebral ischemia in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Won Beom; Han, Yong Hee; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2016-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is accompanied by structural deformation and functional deficits in the affected hemisphere. Within a couple of hours after symptom onset, the accurate identification of brain characteristics is critical to design the therapeutic strategies and it can potentially improve overall brain tissue viability by minimizing irreversible brain damage. In this study, white matter integrity and functional connectivity within 2-4h after right middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats were investigated using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging. During this stage, diffusion tensor image (DTI) revealed that fractional anisotropy along the ipsilesional external capsule was slightly increased as compared with preoperative baseline. Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) showed that the inter-hemispheric functional connectivities from primary motor (M1), primary somatosensory of forelimb (S1FL), and barrel field (S1BF) seeds were considerably reduced at the hyperacute stage. Fractional amplitudes of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) from rs-fMRI were significantly enhanced at the hyperacute stage in the frequency spectrum between 0.01 and 0.08Hz. In addition, the changes in fALFF were negatively correlated with the number of functionally connected voxels in M1, S1FL and S1BF. Our results suggest that these techniques are useful tools to evaluate remarkable brain changes in the hyperacute stage of ischemic stroke. PMID:27108358

  3. Proinflammatory cytokine-receptor interaction model improves the predictability of cerebral white matter injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bass, W Thomas; Buescher, E Stephen; Hair, Pamela S; White, Larry E; Welch, J Camille; Burke, Bonnie L

    2008-04-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines have been variably linked to development of cerebral white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants. Because soluble receptors tightly control cytokine bioactivity, we modeled cytokine-receptor interaction as a predictor of WMI. Plasma from 100 preterm infants was assayed for cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-6) and their soluble receptors (sTNF-RI), sTNF-RII, sIL-1RA, and sIL-6R). Cranial ultrasound (US) results were correlated with cytokine and receptor concentrations individually and with cytokine-receptor interaction models (PROC LOGISTIC; SAS Software). Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine the predictability of WMI. Fifty-two infants with normal US exams were compared with 21 infants with evidence of WMI. There was no association between individual cytokine or receptor concentrations and the development of WMI. However, modeling cytokines with their soluble receptors significantly improved the predictability of WMI. We concluded that consideration of cytokine-receptor interaction may be more important than individual cytokine concentrations alone in determining the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of WMI in preterm infants. PMID:18548393

  4. Alterations in Cerebral White Matter and Neuropsychology in Patients with Cirrhosis and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Román, Eva; Fernández de Bobadilla, Ramón; Pires-Encuentra, Patricia; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Núñez, Fidel; Martinez-Horta, Saül; Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Kulisevsky, Jaume; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Falls are frequent in patients with cirrhosis but underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim was to determine the neuropsychological, neurological and brain alterations using magnetic resonance-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) in cirrhotic patients with falls. Patients and methods Twelve patients with cirrhosis and falls in the previous year were compared to 9 cirrhotic patients without falls. A comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological evaluation of variables that may predispose to falls included: the Mini-Mental State Examination, Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES), Parkinson’s Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale, specific tests to explore various cognitive domains, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale to evaluate parkinsonism, scales for ataxia and muscular strength, and electroneurography. High-field MR (3T) including DTI and structural sequences was performed in all patients. Results The main neuropsychological findings were impairment in PHES (p = 0.03), Parkinson’s Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale (p = 0.04) and in executive (p<0.05) and visuospatial-visuoconstructive functions (p<0.05) in patients with falls compared to those without. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in the neurological evaluation or in the visual assessment of MRI. MR-DTI showed alterations in white matter integrity in patients with falls compared to those without falls (p<0.05), with local maxima in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and corticospinal tract. These alterations were independent of PHES as a covariate and correlated with executive dysfunction (p<0.05). Conclusions With the limitation of the small sample size, our results suggest that patients with cirrhosis and falls present alterations in brain white matter tracts related to executive dysfunction. These alterations are independent of PHES impairment. PMID:25793766

  5. [A case of simple form of sudanophilic leukodystrophy of a child which showed a marked loss of cerebral white matter and fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Taguchi, K; Tsutsumi, A; Ogawa, K; Fujita, H; Hiramoto, A; Taki, T

    1985-10-01

    A sporadic case of sudanophilic leukodystrophy of the simple form (Peiffer) was reported. The patient was three-year-old girl who had suffered from progressive developmental retardation and neurological disorders such as ataxia, cortical blindness and spastic paralysis of the extremities for eighteen months after she had showed normal development till one and a half years old and died from respiratory insufficiency. On admission, computerized tomogram scan demonstrated diffuse low density lesions of the cerebral white matter extending subsequently to the subcortical white matter. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid revealed only slight increase of protein. Lysosomal enzyme activities such as arylsulfatase and beta-galactosidase in the white blood cells were normal except for distinctly low activity of a-mannosidase without any clinical symptoms suggesting a-mannosidase deficiency. Amino acids in blood were normal. The brain weighed 900 gm. On the coronal sections most part of the cerebral white matter was so strongly degenerated and disappeared that the lateral ventricular structure was not discernible. Histologically, a diffuse and symmetrical demylination, loss of axons including U fibers and moderate gliosis were observed in the residual white matter in the cerebrum and pons. There was no inflammatory cells and metachromatic substances. Large amount of sudanophilic droplets showing polarizing cross and needle like crystals were found in the intra- and/or extracytoplasm of macrophages. Demyelinated lesions with little tissue reaction were also found in the cerebellum, medulla oblongata and in pyramidal tracts through midbrain to cervical spinal cord. There were slight loss of neurons and moderate astrocytosis in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. There were no Rosenthal fibers and no sparing of islets of myelin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4074573

  6. Obesity Associated Cerebral Gray and White Matter Alterations Are Interrelated in the Female Brain

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Harald E.; Anwander, Alfred; Lepsien, Jöran; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is known to affect the brain's gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structure but the interrelationship of such changes remains unclear. Here we used T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to assess the relationship between obesity-associated alterations of gray matter density (GMD) and anisotropic water diffusion in WM, respectively. In a small cohort of lean to obese women, we confirmed previous reports of obesity-associated alterations of GMD in brain regions involved in executive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, DLPFC) and habit learning (i.e., dorsal striatum). Gray matter density alterations of the DLPFC were negatively correlated with radial diffusivity in the entire corpus callosum. Within the genu of the corpus callosum we found a positive correlation with axial diffusivity. In posterior region and inferior areas of the body of the corpus callosum, axial diffusivity correlated negatively with altered GMD in the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that, in women, obesity-related alterations of GMD in brain regions involved in executive control and habit learning might relate to alterations of associated WM fiber bundles within the corpus callosum. PMID:25494174

  7. Characterization of Cerebral White Matter Properties Using Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Stains

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Samuel A.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Adluru, Nagesh; Hosseinbor, Ameer Pasha; Mossahebi, Pouria; Tromp, Do P.M.; Zakszewski, Elizabeth; Field, Aaron S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive to several mechanisms that are modulated by the properties of the tissue environment. The degree and type of contrast weighting may be viewed as image filters that accentuate specific tissue properties. Maps of quantitative measures of these mechanisms, akin to microstructural/environmental-specific tissue stains, may be generated to characterize the MRI and physiological properties of biological tissues. In this article, three quantitative MRI (qMRI) methods for characterizing white matter (WM) microstructural properties are reviewed. All of these measures measure complementary aspects of how water interacts with the tissue environment. Diffusion MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging, characterizes the diffusion of water in the tissues and is sensitive to the microstructural density, spacing, and orientational organization of tissue membranes, including myelin. Magnetization transfer imaging characterizes the amount and degree of magnetization exchange between free water and macromolecules like proteins found in the myelin bilayers. Relaxometry measures the MRI relaxation constants T1 and T2, which in WM have a component associated with the water trapped in the myelin bilayers. The conduction of signals between distant brain regions occurs primarily through myelinated WM tracts; thus, these methods are potential indicators of pathology and structural connectivity in the brain. This article provides an overview of the qMRI stain mechanisms, acquisition and analysis strategies, and applications for these qMRI stains. PMID:22432902

  8. Cerebral white matter lesions – associations with Aβ isoforms and amyloid PET

    PubMed Central

    van Westen, Danielle; Lindqvist, Daniel; Blennow, Kaj; Minthon, Lennart; Nägga, Katarina; Stomrud, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Small vessel disease (SVD) and amyloid deposition may promote each other, with a potential association between SVD and altered production or clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) affecting its cleavage products. We investigated the relationship between SVD, multiple isoforms of Aβ in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cortical Aβ in 831 subjects with cognitive performance ranging from normal to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (the Swedish BioFINDER study). SVD was estimated as white matter lesions (WML) and lacunes. 18F-flutemetamol PET was performed in 321 subjects. Lower CSF levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 were consistently associated with increased WML in all subgroups, while lower levels of CSF Aβ42 were associated with WML mainly in AD. CSF Aβ38 and Aβ40 were associated with regional WML in all regions, while CSF Aβ42 was associated with temporal WML only. A composite measure of 18F-flutemetamol uptake was not associated with WML, and regional 18F-flutemetamol uptake only with temporal WML. Lacunes were not associated with Aβ isoforms nor 18F-flutemetamol uptake. Our results suggest that WML may be associated with alterations in the production or clearance of Aβ species, particularly of Aβ38 and Aβ40. However, in AD cases, Aβ42 pathology might be associated with WML, especially in the temporal lobe. PMID:26856756

  9. Plasma infusions into porcine cerebral white matter induce early edema, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA fragmentation: implications for white matter injury with increased blood-brain-barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Dean, Christopher; Beiler, Shauna; Bryan, David W; Packard, Benjamin A; Smulian, A George; Linke, Michael J; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M

    2005-04-01

    Plasma infused into porcine cerebral white matter induces both acute interstitial and delayed vasogenic edema. Edematous white matter contains extracellular plasma proteins and rapidly induces oxidative stress as evidenced by increased protein carbonyl formation and heme oxygenase-1 induction. We tested the hypothesis that edematous white matter would also upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and develop DNA damage. We infused autologous plasma into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. We monitored and controlled physiological variables and froze brains in situ at 1, 4 or 24 hrs. We determined edema volumes by computer-assisted morphometry. We measured white matter protein carbonyl formation by immunoblotting, cytokine gene expression by standard RT-PCR methods and DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. White matter edema developed acutely (1 hr) after plasma infusion and increased significantly in volume between 4 and 24 hrs. Protein carbonyl formation also occurred rapidly in edematous white matter with significant elevations (3 to 4-fold) already present at 1 hr. This increase remained through 24 hrs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was also rapidly increased at 1 hr post-infusion. Evidence for DNA fragmentation began at 2 to 4 hrs, and a pattern indicative of both ongoing necrosis and apoptosis was robust by 24 hrs. Plasma protein accumulation in white matter induces acute edema development and a cascade of patho-chemical events including oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA damage. These results suggest that in diseases with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or following intracerebral hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury, interstitial plasma can rapidly damage white matter. PMID:16181107

  10. Diffuse reduction of white matter connectivity in cerebral palsy with specific vulnerability of long range fiber tracts.

    PubMed

    Englander, Zoë A; Pizoli, Carolyn E; Batrachenko, Anastasiya; Sun, Jessica; Worley, Gordon; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive motor disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain. Although the defining feature of CP is motor impairment, numerous other neurodevelopmental disabilities are associated with CP and contribute greatly to its morbidity. The relationship between brain structure and neurodevelopmental outcomes in CP is complex, and current evidence suggests that motor and developmental outcomes are related to the spatial pattern and extent of brain injury. Given that multiple disabilities are frequently associated with CP, and that there is increasing burden of neurodevelopmental disability with increasing motor severity, global white matter (WM) connectivity was examined in a cohort of 17 children with bilateral CP to test the hypothesis that increased global WM damage will be seen in the group of severely affected (Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS) level of IV) as compared to moderately affected (GMFCS of II or III) individuals. Diffusion tensor tractography was performed and the resulting fibers between anatomically defined brain regions were quantified and analyzed in relation to GMFCS levels. Overall, a reduction in total WM connectivity throughout the brain in severe versus moderate CP was observed, including but not limited to regions associated with the sensorimotor system. Our results also show a diffuse and significant reduction in global inter-regional connectivity between severity groups, represented by inter-regional fiber count, throughout the brain. Furthermore, it was also observed that there is a significant difference (p = 0.02) in long-range connectivity in patients with severe CP as compared to those with moderate CP, whereas short-range connectivity was similar between groups. This new finding, which has not been previously reported in the CP literature, demonstrates that CP may involve distributed, network-level structural disruptions. PMID:24179798

  11. White matter pathology and disconnection in the frontal lobe in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, L J L; Yamamoto, Y; Ihara, M; Fenwick, R; Burke, M; Oakley, A E; Roeber, S; Duering, M; Kretzschmar, H; Kalaria, R N

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging indicates diffuse white matter (WM) changes are associated with cognitive impairment in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). We examined whether the distribution of axonal abnormalities is related to microvascular pathology in the underlying WM. Methods We used post-mortem brains from CADASIL subjects and similar age cognitively normal controls to examine WM axonal changes, microvascular pathology, and glial reaction in up to 16 different regions extending rostro-caudally through the cerebrum. Using unbiased stereological methods, we estimated length densities of affected axons immunostained with neurofilament antibody SMI32. Standard immunohistochemistry was used to assess amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity per WM area. To relate WM changes to microvascular pathology, we also determined the sclerotic index (SI) in WM arterioles. Results The degree of WM pathology consistently scored higher across all brain regions in CADASIL subjects (P < 0.01) with the WM underlying the primary motor cortex exhibiting the most severe change. SMI32 immunoreactive axons in CADASIL were invariably increased compared with controls (P < 0.01), with most prominent axonal abnormalities observed in the frontal WM (P < 0.05). The SIs of arterioles in CADASIL were increased by 25–45% throughout the regions assessed, with the highest change in the mid-frontal region (P = 0.000). Conclusions Our results suggest disruption of either cortico-cortical or subcortical-cortical networks in the WM of the frontal lobe that may explain motor deficits and executive dysfunction in CADASIL. Widespread WM axonal changes arise from differential stenosis and sclerosis of arterioles in the WM of CADASIL subjects, possibly affecting some axons of projection neurones connecting to targets in the subcortical structures. PMID:23844775

  12. Structural connectivity of the anterior cingulate in children with unilateral cerebral palsy due to white matter lesions

    PubMed Central

    Scheck, Simon M.; Pannek, Kerstin; Raffelt, David A.; Fiori, Simona; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the structural connectivity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and its link with impaired executive function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) due to periventricular white matter lesions. Fifty two children with UCP and 17 children with typical development participated in the study, and underwent diffusion and structural MRI. Five brain regions were identified for their high connectivity with the ACC using diffusion MRI fibre tractography: the superior frontal gyrus, medial orbitofrontal cortex, rostral middle frontal gyrus, precuneus and isthmus cingulate. Structural connectivity was assessed in pathways connecting these regions to the ACC using three diffusion MRI derived measures: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and apparent fibre density (AFD), and compared between participant groups. Furthermore we investigated correlations of these measures with executive function as assessed by the Flanker task. The ACC–precuneus tract had significantly different MD (p < 0.0001) and AFD (p = 0.0072) between groups, with post-hoc analysis showing significantly increased MD in the right hemisphere of children with left hemiparesis compared with controls. The ACC–superior frontal gyrus tract had significantly different FA (p = 0.0049) and MD (p = 0.0031) between groups. AFD in this tract (contralateral to side of hemiparesis; right hemisphere in controls) showed a significant relationship with Flanker task performance (p = 0.0045, β = −0.5856), suggesting that reduced connectivity correlates with executive dysfunction. Reduced structural integrity of ACC tracts appears to be important in UCP, in particular the connection to the superior frontal gyrus. Although damage to this area is heterogeneous it may be important in early identification of children with impaired executive function. PMID:26640762

  13. Chronic lead treatment accelerates photochemically induced platelet aggregation in cerebral microvessels of mice, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dhaheri, A.H.; El-Sabban, F.; Fahim, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Effects of two chronic treatment levels with lead on platelet aggregation in cerebral (pial) microcirculation of the mouse were investigated. Exposure to lead was made by subcutaneous injections for 7 days of lead acetate dissolved in 5% glucose solution, vehicle. Two doses of lead were used, a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg and a high dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Adult male mice were divided into three groups, 10 each; one group was injected with vehicle (control), another was injected with the low dose, and the third was injected with the high dose. Additional mice were used for the determination of hematological parameters and for the lead level in serum of the three groups. On the eighth day, platelet aggregation in pial microvessels of these groups of mice was carried out in vivo. Animals were anesthetized (urethane, 1-2 mg/g, ip), the trachea was intubated, and a craniotomy was performed. Platelet aggregation in pial microvessels was induced photochemically, by activation of circulating sodium fluorescein (0.1 mg/25 g, iv) with an intense mercury light. The time required for the first platelet aggregate to appear in pial arterioles was significantly shorter in the lead-treated mice than in control. This effect was in a dose-dependent manner; 113 {+-} 44 sec for low dose and 71 {+-} 18 sec for high dose vs 155 {+-} 25 sec for control, P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively. Between the two lead-treated groups, the high dose significantly (P < 0.05) shortened the time to first aggregate. These data evidenced an increased susceptibility to cerebrovascular thrombosis as a result of exposure to lead. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Complications Following Linear Accelerator Based Stereotactic Radiation for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Skjoth-Rasmussen, Jane; Roed, Henrik; Ohlhues, Lars; Jespersen, Bo; Juhler, Marianne

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Primarily, gamma knife centers are predominant in publishing results on arteriovenous malformations (AVM) treatments including reports on risk profile. However, many patients are treated using a linear accelerator-most of these at smaller centers. Because this setting is different from a large gamma knife center, the risk profile at Linac departments could be different from the reported experience. Prescribed radiation doses are dependent on AVM volume. This study details results from a medium sized Linac department center focusing on risk profiles. Method and Materials: A database was searched for all patients with AVMs. We included 50 consecutive patients with a minimum of 24 months follow-up (24-51 months). Results: AVM occlusion was verified in 78% of patients (39/50). AVM occlusion without new deficits (excellent outcome) was obtained in 44%. Good or fair outcome (AVM occlusion with mild or moderate new deficits) was seen in 30%. Severe complications after AVM occlusion occurred in 4% with a median interval of 15 months after treatment (range, 1-26 months). Conclusions: We applied an AVM grading score developed at the Mayo Clinic to predict probable outcome after radiosurgery in a large patient population treated with Gamma knife. A cutoff above and below a score of 1.5 could not discriminate between the likelihood of having an excellent outcome (approximately 45%). The chance of having an excellent or good outcome was slightly higher in patients with an AVM score below 1.5 (64% vs. 57%).

  15. Accelerated decline in white matter integrity in clinically normal individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Anna; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Buckner, Randy L; Hedden, Trey

    2016-06-01

    Prior studies have identified white matter abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, cross-sectional studies in normal older individuals show little evidence for an association between markers of AD risk (APOE4 genotype and amyloid deposition), and white matter integrity. Here, 108 normal older adults (age, 66-87) with assessments of apolipoprotein e4 (APOE4) genotype and assessment of amyloid burden by positron emission tomography underwent diffusion tensor imaging scans for measuring white matter integrity at 2 time points, on average 2.6 years apart. Linear mixed-effects models showed that amyloid burden at baseline was associated with steeper decline in fractional anisotropy in the parahippocampal cingulum (p < 0.05). This association was not significant between baseline measures suggesting that longitudinal analyses can provide novel insights that are not detectable in cross-sectional designs. Amyloid-related changes in hippocampus volume did not explain the association between amyloid burden and change in fractional anisotropy. The results suggest that accumulation of cortical amyloid and white matter changes in parahippocampal cingulum are not independent processes in individuals at increased risk for AD. PMID:27143434

  16. Comparison of quantitative autoradiographic and xenon-133 clearance methods: correlation of gray and white matter cerebral blood flow with compartmental blood flow indices

    SciTech Connect

    Tuor, U.I.; Fitch, W.; Graham, D.I.; Mendelow, A.D.

    1986-08-01

    The relationships between CBF in gray and white matter to those of the fast and slow components of xenon-133 clearance curves remain uncertain. CBF was measured in 13 anaesthetized baboons under a variety of conditions, using both the xenon-133 clearance technique and (14C)iodoantipyrine quantitative autoradiography. There was a linear relationship between CBF, as determined by the stochastic (height/area) analysis of the clearance curve, and mean CBF determined from the autoradiograms (r = 0.94, p less than 0.001, slope = 0.86 +/- 0.09). There was also a linear correlation between the fast-flow component (measured with xenon-133) and blood flow in the cerebral gray matter (measured with (14C)iodoantipyrine) (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001, slope = 0.69 +/- 0.15) and between the slow-flow component (with xenon-133) and blood flow in white matter (with (14C)iodoantipyrine) (r = 0.79, p less than 0.01, slope = 0.81 +/- 0.10). In the primate brain, the fast- and slow-flow indices therefore appear to be representative of CBF in gray matter and white matter, respectively, whereas the stochastic analysis provides a stable measure of mean CBF within the tissue monitored.

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Risk Factor for Cerebral White Matter Change in a Middle-Aged and Older General Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Chang-Ho; Thomas, Robert Joseph; Lee, Seung Hoon; Seo, Hyung Suk; Cho, Eo Rin; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Suh, Sooyeon; Shin, Chol

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) contributes to the development of systemic hypertension, and hypertension strongly predicts the development of white matter change (WMC). Thus, it is plausible that OSA mediates WMC. The goal of the current study is to determine whether a contextual relationship exists between OSA and cerebral WMC. Design: Cross-sectional analyses conducted in a population-based study. Setting: Korean community-based sample from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) who attended examinations in 2011 at a medical center. Participants: There were 503 individuals (mean ± SD, age 59.63 ± 7.48 y) who were free of previously diagnosed cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent 1-night polysomnography and were classified as no OSA (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] < 5, n = 289), mild OSA (AHI 5-15, n = 161), and moderate to severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15, n = 53). WMC was identified with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was found in 199 individuals (39.56%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for covariates revealed that moderate to severe OSA was significantly associated with the presence of WMC (odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 95%, confidence interval [CI] 1.05-4.13) compared with no OSA. Additional adjustment of hypertension to the model did not alter the significance of the association (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.02-4.05). Conclusions: Moderate to severe OSA is an independent risk factor for WMC in middle-aged and older individuals. Thus, early recognition and treatment of OSA could reduce the risk of stroke and vascular dementia. Citation: Kim H; Yun CH; Thomas RJ; Lee SH; Seo HS; Cho ER; Lee SK; Yoon DW; Suh S; Shin C. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cerebral white matter change in a middle-aged and older general population. SLEEP 2013;36(5):709-715. PMID:23633753

  18. Improved Sensitivity to Cerebral White Matter Abnormalities in Alzheimer’s Disease with Spherical Deconvolution Based Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Leemans, Alexander; Heringa, Sophie M.; Wielaard, Ilse; Jeurissen, Ben; Koek, Huiberdina L.; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tractography (FT) is the most popular approach for investigating white matter tracts in vivo, despite its inability to reconstruct fiber pathways in regions with “crossing fibers.” Recently, constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) has been developed to mitigate the adverse effects of “crossing fibers” on DTI based FT. Notwithstanding the methodological benefit, the clinical relevance of CSD based FT for the assessment of white matter abnormalities remains unclear. In this work, we evaluated the applicability of a hybrid framework, in which CSD based FT is combined with conventional DTI metrics to assess white matter abnormalities in 25 patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Both CSD and DTI based FT were used to reconstruct two white matter tracts: one with regions of “crossing fibers,” i.e., the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and one which contains only one fiber orientation, i.e. the midsagittal section of the corpus callosum (CC). The DTI metrics, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), obtained from these tracts were related to memory function. Our results show that in the tract with “crossing fibers” the relation between FA/MD and memory was stronger with CSD than with DTI based FT. By contrast, in the fiber bundle where one fiber population predominates, the relation between FA/MD and memory was comparable between both tractography methods. Importantly, these associations were most pronounced after adjustment for the planar diffusion coefficient, a measure reflecting the degree of fiber organization complexity. These findings indicate that compared to conventionally applied DTI based FT, CSD based FT combined with DTI metrics can increase the sensitivity to detect functionally significant white matter abnormalities in tracts with complex white matter architecture. PMID:22952880

  19. Poor Cerebral Inflammatory Response in eIF2B Knock-In Mice: Implications for the Aetiology of Vanishing White Matter Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geva, Michal; Marom, Liraz; Chetrit, David; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutations in any of the five subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) can lead to an inherited chronic-progressive fatal brain disease of unknown aetiology termed leucoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM). VWM is one of the most prevalent childhood white matter disorders, which markedly deteriorates after inflammation or exposure to other stressors. eIF2B is a major housekeeping complex that governs the rate of global protein synthesis under normal and stress conditions. A previous study demonstrated that Eif2b5R132H/R132H mice suffer delayed white matter development and fail to recover from cuprizone-induced demyelination, although eIF2B enzymatic activity in the mutant brain is reduced by merely 20%. Principal Findings Poor astrogliosis was observed in Eif2b5R132H/R132H mice brain in response to systemic stress induced by peripheral injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Even with normal rates of protein synthesis under normal conditions, primary astrocytes and microglia isolated from mutant brains fail to adequately synthesise and secrete cytokines in response to LPS treatment despite proper induction of cytokine mRNAs. Conclusions The mild reduction in eIF2B activity prevents the appropriate increase in translation rates upon exposure to the inflammatory stressor LPS. The data underscore the importance of fully-functional translation machinery for efficient cerebral inflammatory response upon insults. It highlights the magnitude of proficient translation rates in restoration of brain homeostasis via microglia-astrocyte crosstalk. This study is the first to suggest the involvement of microglia in the pathology of VWM disease. Importantly, it rationalises the deterioration of clinical symptoms upon exposure of VWM patients to physiological stressors and provides possible explanation for their high phenotypic variability. PMID:23056417

  20. FGF21 Lowers Plasma Triglycerides by Accelerating Lipoprotein Catabolism in White and Brown Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Schlein, Christian; Talukdar, Saswata; Heine, Markus; Fischer, Alexander W; Krott, Lucia M; Nilsson, Stefan K; Brenner, Martin B; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    FGF21 decreases plasma triglycerides (TGs) in rodents and humans; however, the underlying mechanism or mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of FGF21 in production and disposal of TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) in mice. Treatment with pharmacological doses of FGF21 acutely reduced plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), liver TG content, and VLDL-TG secretion. In addition, metabolic turnover studies revealed that FGF21 facilitated the catabolism of TRL in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). FGF21-dependent TRL processing was strongly attenuated in CD36-deficient mice and transgenic mice lacking lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissues. Insulin resistance in diet-induced obese and ob/ob mice shifted FGF21 responses from WAT toward energy-combusting BAT. In conclusion, FGF21 lowers plasma TGs through a dual mechanism: first, by reducing NEFA plasma levels and consequently hepatic VLDL lipidation and, second, by increasing CD36 and LPL-dependent TRL disposal in WAT and BAT. PMID:26853749

  1. Mild cognitive impairment, poor episodic memory, and late-life depression are associated with cerebral cortical thinning and increased white matter hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Motonobu; Maikusa, Norihide; Nakamura, Kei; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In various independent studies to date, cerebral cortical thickness and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume have been associated with episodic memory, depression, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The aim of this study was to uncover variations in cortical thickness and WMH volume in association with episodic memory, depressive state, and the presence of MCI simultaneously in a single study population. The participants were 186 individuals with MCI (clinical dementia rating [CDR] of 0.5) and 136 healthy elderly controls (HCs; CDR of 0) drawn from two community-based cohort studies in northern Japan. We computed cerebral cortical thickness and WMH volume by using MR scans and statistically analyzed differences in these indices between HCs and MCI participants. We also assessed the associations of these indices with memory performance and depressive state in participants with MCI. Compared with HCs, MCI participants exhibited thinner cortices in the temporal and inferior parietal lobes and greater WMH volumes in the corona radiata and semioval center. In MCI participants, poor episodic memory was associated with thinner cortices in the left entorhinal region and increased WMH volume in the posterior periventricular regions. Compared with non-depressed MCI participants, depressed MCI participants showed reduced cortical thickness in the anterior medial temporal lobe and gyrus adjacent to the amygdala bilaterally, as well as greater WMH volume as a percentage of the total intracranial volume (WMHr). A higher WMHr was associated with cortical thinning in the frontal, temporal, and parietal regions in MCI participants. These results demonstrate that episodic memory and depression are associated with both cortical thickness and WMH volume in MCI participants. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the dynamic associations and interactions among these indices. PMID:25426066

  2. Associations of Sleep Apnea, NRG1 Polymorphisms, Alcohol Consumption, and Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities: Analysis with Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Inkyung; Seo, Hyung Suk; Yoon, Daewui; Kim, Seong Hwan; Shin, Chol

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: There are few studies on gene-environment interactions with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Our study aimed to explore genetic polymorphisms associated with OSA using genome-wide association (GWA) data and evaluate the effects of relevant polymorphisms on the association between risk factors, including obesity and alcohol consumption, and OSA. We also investigated on these associations in relation to cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance images. Design: A cross-sectional design. Setting: A polysomnography study embedded in a population-based cohort from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study was conducted in 2011–2013. Participants: 1,763 participants aged 48–78 years. Results: 251 individuals were identified to have OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15. A common polymorphism of neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1), rs10097555, was selected as the most suggestive locus associated with OSA (P value < 10−5) based on the results of GWA analysis in a matched case-control subsample (n = 470). Among 1,763 participants, we found that the presence of the NRG1 polymorphism is inversely associated with OSA (P value < 0.01) even after taking into account potential risk factors; the multivariate odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for the mutant alleles was 0.57 (0.39–0.82) compared with the wild-type. We observed that this association is modified by alcohol consumption (P < 0.05), not by obesity. We also observed that WMH are positively associated with OSA independent of the NRG1 polymorphism and alcohol consumption (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1) may be involved in the etiological mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and that carriers of a particular NRG1 mutation may be less likely to have OSA if they do not drink alcoholic beverages. Citation: Baik I, Seo HS, Yoon D, Kim SH, Shin C. Associations of sleep apnea, NRG1 polymorphisms, alcohol consumption, and cerebral white

  3. Validity of semi-quantitative scale for brain MRI in unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions: Relationship with hand sensorimotor function and structural connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Pannek, Kerstin; Ware, Robert S.; Rossi, Giuseppe; Klingels, Katrijn; Feys, Hilde; Coulthard, Alan; Cioni, Giovanni; Rose, Stephen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To provide first evidence of construct validity of a semi-quantitative scale for brain structural MRI (sqMRI scale) in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) secondary to periventricular white matter (PWM) lesions, by examining the relationship with hand sensorimotor function and whole brain structural connectivity. Methods Cross-sectional study of 50 children with UCP due to PWM lesions using 3 T (MRI), diffusion MRI and assessment of hand sensorimotor function. We explored the relationship of lobar, hemispheric and global scores on the sqMRI scale, with fractional anisotropy (FA), as a measure of brain white matter microstructure, and with hand sensorimotor measures (Assisting Hand Assessment, AHA; Jebsen–Taylor Test for Hand Function, JTTHF; Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, MUUL; stereognosis; 2-point discrimination). Results Lobar and hemispheric scores on the sqMRI scale contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia correlated with sensorimotor paretic hand function measures and FA of a number of brain structural connections, including connections of brain areas involved in motor control (postcentral, precentral and paracentral gyri in the parietal lobe). More severe lesions correlated with lower sensorimotor performance, with the posterior limb of internal capsule score being the strongest contributor to impaired hand function. Conclusion The sqMRI scale demonstrates first evidence of construct validity against impaired motor and sensory function measures and brain structural connectivity in a cohort of children with UCP due to PWM lesions. More severe lesions correlated with poorer paretic hand sensorimotor function and impaired structural connectivity in the hemisphere contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia. The quantitative structural MRI scoring may be a useful clinical tool for studying brain structure–function relationships but requires further validation in other populations of CP. PMID:26106533

  4. Massive accumulation of modified tau and severe depletion of normal tau characterize the cerebral cortex and white matter of Alzheimer's disease. Demonstration using the hydrated autoclaving method.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, R. W.; Iwaki, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Tateishi, J.

    1992-01-01

    Using the hydrated autoclaving method, a new immunohistochemical procedure to enhance tau immunoreactivity in formalin-fixed brain tissue, the authors recently reported that tau protein is detected in neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells in normal human hippocampus and neocortex. In the this study, the authors performed a comparative study of the distribution of normal and modified forms of tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control brains. In the cerebral cortex and white matter of AD brains, a massive accumulation of modified tau and/or severe depletion of normal tau were documented in all the tau compartments. In mild AD cases, gray matter neuropil, axons, and glial cells were less severely involved than neuronal perikarya. In the controls, neuronal perikarya were often involved by modified tau accumulation, but the other compartments showed normal distribution. These observations suggest that modifications of tau which lead to neurofibrillary lesions in AD may begin in neuronal perikarya and extend to the other tau compartments in advanced stages of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1373272

  5. Comparison of cerebral blood flow and structural penumbras in relation to white matter hyperintensities: A multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lahna, David L; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Dodge, Hiroko H; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Rooney, William D; Silbert, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) surrounding WMHs is associated with decreased structural integrity and perfusion, increased risk of WMH growth, and is referred to as the WMH penumbra. Studies comparing structural and cerebral blood flow (CBF) penumbras within the same individuals are lacking, however, and would facilitate our understanding of mechanisms resulting in WM damage. This study aimed to compare both CBF and structural WMH penumbras in non-demented aging. Eighty-two elderly volunteers underwent 3T-MRI including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), pulsed arterial spin labeling and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A NAWM layer mask was generated for periventricular and deep WMHs. Mean CBF, DTI-fractional anisotropy (DTI-FA), DTI-mean diffusivity (DTI-MD) and FLAIR intensity for WMHs and its corresponding NAWM layer masks were computed and compared against its mean within total brain NAWM using mixed effects models. For both periventricular and deep WMHs, DTI-FA, DTI-MD and FLAIR intensity changes extended 2-9 mm surrounding WMHs (p ≤ 0.05), while CBF changes extended 13-14 mm (p ≤ 0.05). The CBF penumbra is more extensive than structural penumbras in relation to WMHs and includes WM tissue both with and without microstructural changes. Findings implicate CBF as a potential target for the prevention of both micro and macro structural WM damage. PMID:27270266

  6. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy with cerebral white matter changes: a clue to its diagnosis beyond infancy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Aroor, Shrikiran; Mundkur, Suneel; Kumar, Maneesh

    2014-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy born by a third-degree consanguineous marriage presented with progressive muscle weakness and delayed motor milestones noticed in early infancy with preserved language and social milestones. Examination revealed generalised hypotonia and hyporeflexia. Baseline haematological and biochemical investigations were normal except for mildly elevated creatine kinase. Provisional diagnosis of congenital myopathy was entertained. We performed brain imaging to look for abnormalities associated with congenital muscular dystrophy even though there were only features of myopathy with normal mentation. An MRI of the brain revealed periventricular and subcortical white matter hyperintensities suggestive of leucoencephalopathy. Muscle biopsy findings were consistent with degenerative muscle changes and immunohistochemical staining for merosin was negative, thus confirming the diagnosis of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Supportive care in the form of physiotherapy was initiated. The family was offered genetic counselling in their second pregnancy and immunohistochemistry at 12 weeks confirmed the fetus to be affected, which was then terminated. PMID:24604798

  7. Voxel-Wise Perfusion Assessment in Cerebral White Matter with PCASL at 3T; Is It Possible and How Long Does It Take?

    PubMed Central

    Skurdal, Mikjel Johannes; Bjørnerud, Atle; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Nordhøy, Wibeke; Lagopoulos, Jim; Groote, Inge Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether reliable voxel-wise assessment of perfusion in cerebral white matter (WM) is possible using arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3T in a cohort of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods Pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) with background suppression (BS) optimized for WM measurements was performed at 3T in eight healthy male volunteers aged 25–41. Four different labeling schemes were evaluated by varying the labeling duration (LD) and post-labeling delay (PLD). Eight slices with voxel dimension 3.75x3.75x5 mm3 were acquired from the anterosuperior aspect of the brain, and 400 image/control pairs were collected for each run. Rigid head immobilization was applied using individually fitted thermoplastic masks. For each voxel in the resulting ASL time series, the time needed to reach a 95% significance level for the ASL signal to be higher than zero (paired t-test), was estimated. Results The four protocols detected between 88% and 95% (after Bonferroni correction: 75% and 88%) of WM voxels at 95% significance level. In the most efficient sequence, 80% was reached after 5 min and 95% after 53 min (after Bonferroni correction 40% and 88% respectively). For all protocols, the fraction of significant WM voxels increased in an asymptotic fashion with increasing scan time. A small subgroup of voxels was shown to not benefit at all from prolonged measurement. Conclusion Acquisition of a significant ASL signal from a majority of WM voxels is possible within clinically acceptable scan times, whereas full coverage needs prohibitively long scan times, as a result of the asymptotic trajectory. PMID:26267661

  8. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  9. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  10. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  11. Analysis of junction temperature and modification of luminous flux degradation for white LEDs in a thermal accelerated reliability test.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hong-Liang; Jing, Lei; Hao, Jian; Gao, Qun; Wang, Yao; Wang, Xiao-Xun; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-08-01

    An accelerated aging test is the main method in evaluation of the reliability of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and the first goal of this study is to investigate how the junction temperature (Tj) of the LED varies during accelerated aging. The Tj measured by the forward voltage method shows an upward trend over the aging time, which gives a variation about 6°C-8°C after 3,000 h of aging under an ambient temperature of 80°C. The second goal is to investigate how the variation of Tj affects the lifetime estimation. It is verified that at a certain aging stage, as Tj increases, the normalized luminous flux linearly decreases with variation rate of microns (μ) (1/°C). Then, we propose a method to modify the luminous flux degradation with the Tj and μ to meet the requirements of a constant degradation rate in the data fitting. The experimental results show that with the proposed method, the accelerated lifetimes of samples are bigger than that of the current method with increment values from 8.8% to 21.4% in this research. PMID:27505370

  12. Sustained linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The subjective effects of sustained acceleration are discussed, including positive, negative, forward, backward, and lateral acceleration effects. Physiological effects, such as retinal and visual response, unconsciousness and cerebral function, pulmonary response, and renal output, are studied. Human tolerance and performance under sustained acceleration are ascertained.

  13. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  14. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  15. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  17. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  18. [Cerebral white matter bundle alterations in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type and patients with multi-infarct dementia--magnetic resonance imaging study].

    PubMed

    Yoshii, F; Shinohara, Y; Duara, R

    1990-01-01

    The widths of the anterior white matter bundle (AWM) and the interhemispheric (AWM-TER) and intrahemispheric (AWM-TRA) bundles at the level of the foramen of Monro on horizontal inversion recovery MRI scans were measured in 17 patients with dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT), 16 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID) and 47 age-matched normal subjects (NOR). The area of the corpus callosum (CC) on midsagittal spin-echo MRI scans was also measured in 12 DAT, 11 MID and 36 NOR. The Mini-mental score in patients with DAT was 20.8 +/- 5.9, which was not significantly different from that of 22.9 +/- 5.4 in patients with MID. The width of AWM was not significantly decreased in either DAT or MID compared with NOR. However, the width of AWM-TER in DAT and MID showed a significant decrease from that in NOR. The width of AWM-TRA was decreased significantly only in DAT. Compared with NOR, the area of the CC in DAT and MID was decreased by 7.0% (p less than 0.05) and 6.5%, respectively. The white matter bundle has an important role in the connectivity of the brain. Although loss of white matter occurs in both DAT and MID, the change appears more diffuse in DAT than MID. PMID:2331816

  19. Monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal activity using continuous gravity and local ground acceleration measurements: New deployments at Inferno Crater, Waimangu and White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Fournier, Nico; Cole-Baker, Jeremy; Miller, Craig

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes with crater lakes are often characterised by shallow hydrothermal systems which display cyclic behaviour (temperature, lake level, chemistry, etc.) and shallow seismic tremor. Present monitoring programmes in New Zealand include routine collection of these observables, but the associated shallow sub-surface processes are still inadequately modelled and poorly understood. Models would be better constrained with the incorporation of additional geophysical parameters. To this end, we have established a new test programme to continuously monitor for micro-gravity variations at New Zealand volcanoes. We utilise a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter having 1 Hz sample rate and a measurement precision of 1 microgal to test the viability of gravity monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal systems. We have initially tested the new sensor in a short term deployment (~2 months) at Inferno Crater, Waimangu, New Zealand. Inferno shows dramatic variations in crater lake level (> 7 m range), temperature (>40o C range) and hydrothermally derived tremor, all over a period of ~5 weeks. The amplitude and period of these observables are ideal for testing gravity variations associated with a cycling hydrothermal system because several cycles can be obtained in a relatively short campaign. We have deployed the gravity sensor into a buried vault having a stable concrete base to minimise local environmental influences. This vault is located ~20 meters from Inferno Lake edge (at high stand) and offers sufficient noise reduction to measure the gravitational effects associated with lake level changes. We will show results for the new gravity meter including raw relative gravity measurements and first order corrections (earth-tide, ocean loading, sensor level, temperature, and barometric pressure) to obtain both residual gravity and overprinted local ground accelerations (earthquakes and local tremor). To examine the effects of local ground vibrations on the gravity meter, we

  20. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers. PMID:26837375

  1. TM4SF20 ancestral deletion and susceptibility to a pediatric disorder of early language delay and cerebral white matter hyperintensities.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Hunter, Jill V; Hanchard, Neil A; Willer, Jason R; Shaw, Chad; Tian, Qi; Illner, Anna; Wang, Xueqing; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita; Campbell, Ian M; Gelowani, Violet; Hixson, Patricia; Ester, Audrey R; Azamian, Mahshid S; Potocki, Lorraine; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Ramocki, Melissa B; Santos-Cortez, Regie L P; Wang, Gao; York, Michele K; Justice, Monica J; Chu, Zili D; Bader, Patricia I; Omo-Griffith, Lisa; Madduri, Nirupama S; Scharer, Gunter; Crawford, Heather P; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Eifert, Anna; Kerr, Jeffery; Bacino, Carlos A; Franklin, Adiaha I A; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, Ladonna; Haque, Muhammad E; Stosic, Marija; Williams, Misti D; Morgan, Thomas M; Pruthi, Sumit; Omary, Reed; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Win, Kay K; Thida, Aye; Hurles, Matthew; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Gallagher, Thomas E; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Beaudet, Arthur L; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Davis, Erica E; Belmont, John W; Dunstan, Sarah; Simmons, Cameron P; Bonnen, Penelope E; Leal, Suzanne M; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R; Lalani, Seema R

    2013-08-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of the brain are important markers of aging and small-vessel disease. WMHs are rare in healthy children and, when observed, often occur with comorbid neuroinflammatory or vasculitic processes. Here, we describe a complex 4 kb deletion in 2q36.3 that segregates with early childhood communication disorders and WMH in 15 unrelated families predominantly from Southeast Asia. The premature brain aging phenotype with punctate and multifocal WMHs was observed in ~70% of young carrier parents who underwent brain MRI. The complex deletion removes the penultimate exon 3 of TM4SF20, a gene encoding a transmembrane protein of unknown function. Minigene analysis showed that the resultant net loss of an exon introduces a premature stop codon, which, in turn, leads to the generation of a stable protein that fails to target to the plasma membrane and accumulates in the cytoplasm. Finally, we report this deletion to be enriched in individuals of Vietnamese Kinh descent, with an allele frequency of about 1%, embedded in an ancestral haplotype. Our data point to a constellation of early language delay and WMH phenotypes, driven by a likely toxic mechanism of TM4SF20 truncation, and highlight the importance of understanding and managing population-specific low-frequency pathogenic alleles. PMID:23810381

  2. TM4SF20 Ancestral Deletion and Susceptibility to a Pediatric Disorder of Early Language Delay and Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Hunter, Jill V.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Willer, Jason R.; Shaw, Chad; Tian, Qi; Illner, Anna; Wang, Xueqing; Cheung, Sau W.; Patel, Ankita; Campbell, Ian M.; Gelowani, Violet; Hixson, Patricia; Ester, Audrey R.; Azamian, Mahshid S.; Potocki, Lorraine; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Ramocki, Melissa B.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.P.; Wang, Gao; York, Michele K.; Justice, Monica J.; Chu, Zili D.; Bader, Patricia I.; Omo-Griffith, Lisa; Madduri, Nirupama S.; Scharer, Gunter; Crawford, Heather P.; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Eifert, Anna; Kerr, Jeffery; Bacino, Carlos A.; Franklin, Adiaha I.A.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, Ladonna; Haque, Muhammad E.; Stosic, Marija; Williams, Misti D.; Morgan, Thomas M.; Pruthi, Sumit; Omary, Reed; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Win, Kay K.; Thida, Aye; Hurles, Matthew; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Gallagher, Thomas E.; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Davis, Erica E.; Belmont, John W.; Dunstan, Sarah; Simmons, Cameron P.; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R.; Lalani, Seema R.

    2013-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of the brain are important markers of aging and small-vessel disease. WMHs are rare in healthy children and, when observed, often occur with comorbid neuroinflammatory or vasculitic processes. Here, we describe a complex 4 kb deletion in 2q36.3 that segregates with early childhood communication disorders and WMH in 15 unrelated families predominantly from Southeast Asia. The premature brain aging phenotype with punctate and multifocal WMHs was observed in ∼70% of young carrier parents who underwent brain MRI. The complex deletion removes the penultimate exon 3 of TM4SF20, a gene encoding a transmembrane protein of unknown function. Minigene analysis showed that the resultant net loss of an exon introduces a premature stop codon, which, in turn, leads to the generation of a stable protein that fails to target to the plasma membrane and accumulates in the cytoplasm. Finally, we report this deletion to be enriched in individuals of Vietnamese Kinh descent, with an allele frequency of about 1%, embedded in an ancestral haplotype. Our data point to a constellation of early language delay and WMH phenotypes, driven by a likely toxic mechanism of TM4SF20 truncation, and highlight the importance of understanding and managing population-specific low-frequency pathogenic alleles. PMID:23810381

  3. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  4. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  6. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  7. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  8. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  9. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  10. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  11. Beyond Black and White.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.

    Black and white conflict is a by-product of a more basic problem: the failure of this society to develop a social system that enables all people to meet their basic human needs at a reasonable level. Until this is done, we will not be able to move beyond black and white. The underlying problem is related to a sudden acceleration of human history…

  12. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  13. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  14. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  15. White matter dementia in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Thompson, L L; Sze, C I; Simon, J A; Paskavitz, J F; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral white matter disorders may be associated with profound neurobehavioral dysfunction. We report a 62-year-old man who had a slowly progressive 25-year history of personality change, psychosis, mood disorder, and dementia. Neurologic examination disclosed abulia, impaired memory retrieval, and preserved language, with only minimal motor impairment. Neuropsychological testing found a sustained attention deficit, cognitive slowing, impaired learning with intact recognition, and perseveration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive leukoencephalopathy. Right frontal brain biopsy showed ill-defined white matter pallor with hyaline narrowing of white matter arterioles. Granular osmiophilic material adjacent to vascular smooth muscle cells on electron microscopy of a skin biopsy, and an arginine for cysteine replacement at position 169 in the 4 EGF motif of the notch 3 region on chromosome 19q12 established the diagnosis of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). This case illustrates that CADASIL can manifest as an isolated neurobehavioral disorder over an extended time period. The dementia associated with CADASIL closely resembles that which may occur with other white matter disorders, and represents an example of white matter dementia. PMID:10371078

  16. Cerebral perturbations during exercise in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Verges, Samuel; Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Perrey, Stéphane; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-04-15

    Reduction of aerobic exercise performance observed under hypoxic conditions is mainly attributed to altered muscle metabolism due to impaired O(2) delivery. It has been recently proposed that hypoxia-induced cerebral perturbations may also contribute to exercise performance limitation. A significant reduction in cerebral oxygenation during whole body exercise has been reported in hypoxia compared with normoxia, while changes in cerebral perfusion may depend on the brain region, the level of arterial oxygenation and hyperventilation induced alterations in arterial CO(2). With the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation, inconsistent changes in cortical excitability have been reported in hypoxia, whereas a greater impairment in maximal voluntary activation following a fatiguing exercise has been suggested when arterial O(2) content is reduced. Electromyographic recordings during exercise showed an accelerated rise in central motor drive in hypoxia, probably to compensate for greater muscle contractile fatigue. This accelerated development of muscle fatigue in moderate hypoxia may be responsible for increased inhibitory afferent signals to the central nervous system leading to impaired central drive. In severe hypoxia (arterial O(2) saturation <70-75%), cerebral hypoxia per se may become an important contributor to impaired performance and reduced motor drive during prolonged exercise. This review examines the effects of acute and chronic reduction in arterial O(2) (and CO(2)) on cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation, neuronal function, and central drive to the muscles. Direct and indirect influences of arterial deoxygenation on central command are separated. Methodological concerns as well as future research avenues are also considered. PMID:22319046

  17. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  19. Cerebral malaria in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Janota, I; Doshi, B

    1979-01-01

    Four fatal cases of cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria in English travellers returning from Africa have been seen in the last 13 years. The haemorrhages, accumulations of microglia, and destruction of cerebral white matter around small veins as a result of blockage of cortical capillaries by parasitised red blood corpuscles resemble the effect of fat embolism. Microglia in the lesions is demonstrated by special neuropathological techniques. Attention is drawn to the need for a prompt recognition of malaria since appropriate treatment can be successful. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:389955

  20. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  1. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a neurological condition in which proteins called amyloid build up on the walls of the arteries ... The cause of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. Sometimes, it ... Persons with this condition have deposits of amyloid protein ...

  3. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  4. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  5. Vanishing White Matter Disease: A Review with Focus on Its Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, Jan C.; van Kollenburg, Barbara; Scheper, Gert C.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2006-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM) is an autosomal recessive brain disorder, most often with a childhood onset. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy indicate that, with time, increasing amounts of cerebral white matter vanish and are replaced by fluid. Autopsy confirms white matter rarefaction and cystic degeneration. The…

  6. White House

    MedlinePlus

    ... Check out the most popular infographics and videos Photos View the photo of the day and other galleries Video Gallery ... your questions or your story with President Obama. Photo of the Day Explore the White House Photo ...

  7. What's new in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    JONES, M H

    1953-11-01

    Among new researches bearing on cerebral palsy are the growth of brain cells in tissue cultures for experimentation; the use of polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a glial barrier to nerve growth after injury; observation of changes in reactions of neurons at various stages of development; the finding of hypernatremia and hyperchloremia in lesions of the frontal lobe and the thalamus; stimulation of cerebral blood flow by injection of sodium bicarbonate and retardation with ammonium chloride; and studies of serial sections of brains of palsied children who died. Study of development in the early months of life has made possible the detection of significant abnormalities in behavior early in life. Loss of hearing may be tested in very young children by measuring minute variations in electrical resistance of the skin upon auditory stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Conditions which have been described as having been confused with cerebral palsy are dislocation of a cervical vertebra, hereditary spastic paraplegia, transverse myelopathy, injury to the spinal cord or cauda equina by anomalous growths of the spine, and also encephalitis and meningitis. Sedation has proved a valuable adjunct to electroencephalographic study of cerebral palsy. Better criteria for abnormality in the young child should be determined and the application of them more clearly standardized. Simple exercises are useful for early training of palsied children to stimulate development. "Crossed laterality"-the dominant eye being contralateral to the preferred hand-has been counteracted by special training with great success in eliminating emotional and behavior problems and accelerating development.Recent studies indicate that only 50 per cent of cerebral palsy patients have normal or better intelligence. Subluxation of the hip joint, a common deformity associated with cerebral palsy, can sometimes be corrected by operation if detected at an early stage. Radical ablation of

  8. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  9. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  10. Evaluating CT Perfusion Deficits in Global Cerebral Edema after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, H.; Fodera, V.; Mir, D.; Kesavobhotla, K.; Ivanidze, J.; Ozbek, U.; Gupta, A.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Global cerebral edema is an independent predictor of mortality and poor outcomes after aneurysmal SAH. Global cerebral edema, a complex disease process, is thought to be associated with an altered cerebral autoregulatory response. We studied the association between cerebral hemodynamics and early global cerebral edema by using CTP. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively studied consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH with admission CTP performed at days 0–3. Two neuroradiologists classified global cerebral edema and hydrocephalus on NCCT performed concurrently with CTP. Global cerebral edema was defined as diffuse effacement of the sulci and/or basal cisterns or diffuse disruption of the cerebral gray-white matter junction. CTP was postprocessed into CBF and MTT maps by using a standardized method. Quantitative analysis of CTP was performed by using standard protocol with ROI sampling of the cerebral cortex. The Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test, and independent-samples t test were used to determine statistical associations. RESULTS Of the 45 patients included, 42% (19/45) had global cerebral edema and 58% (26/45) did not. Patient groups with and without global cerebral edema were well-matched for demographic and clinical data. Patients with global cerebral edema were more likely to have qualitative global CTP deficits than those without global cerebral edema (P = .001) with an OR = 13.3 (95% CI, 2.09–138.63). Patients with global cerebral edema also had a very strong trend toward statistical significance, with reduced quantitative CBF compared with patients without global cerebral edema (P = .064). CONCLUSIONS Global perfusion deficits are significantly associated with global cerebral edema in the early phase after aneurysmal SAH, supporting the theory that hemodynamic disturbances occur in global cerebral edema. PMID:25977478

  11. Cerebral hemiatrophy: a clinicopathological report of two cases with a contribution to pathogenesis and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vosskämper, M; Schachenmayr, W

    1990-01-01

    "Cerebral hemiatrophy" describes a condition of different etiologies that is characterized by a marked asymmetry of cerebral hemispheres. Case reports of two different forms of cerebral hemiatrophy are presented. In the first case perinatal asphyxia led to severe white matter lesions with predominance on the left side and marked asymmetry of the pyramidal tracts. Symptoms were present immediately after birth ("primary cerebral hemiatrophy"). The second case displayed postictal cerebral hemiatrophy with a widespread loss of cortical neurons of the entire left hemisphere. The disease process started at the age of two years after a widely normal early development ("secondary cerebral hemiatrophy"). A modified classification of cerebral hemiatrophy is presented, and concepts of pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. PMID:2125535

  12. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia. PMID:9035826

  13. [Linear accelerator radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brandt, R A; Salvajoli, J V; Oliveira, V C; Carmignani, M; da Cruz, J C; Leal, H D; Ferraz, L

    1995-03-01

    Radiosurgery is the precise radiation of a known intracranial target with a high dose of energy, sparing the adjacent nervous tissue. Technological advances in the construction of linear accelerators, stereotactic instruments and in computer sciences made this technique easier to perform and affordable. The main indications for radiosurgery are inoperable cerebral vascular malformations, vestibular and other cranial schwannomas, skull base meningiomas, deep seated gliomas and cerebral metastases. More recently, the development of fraccionated stereotactic radiotherapy increased the spectrum of indications to bigger lesions and to those adjacent to critical nervous structures. We present our initial experience in the treatment of 31 patients. An adequate control of the neoplastic lesions was obtained and the adequate time of observation is still needed to evaluate the results in arteriovenous malformations. PMID:7575207

  14. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  15. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  16. Hemiparesis post cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Taiaa, Oumkaltoum; Amil, Touriya; Darbi, Abdelatif

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is one of the most serious complications in the Plasmodium falciparum infection. In endemic areas, the cerebral malaria interested mainly children. The occurrence in adults is very rare and most interested adult traveling in tropical zones. This case report describes a motor deficit post cerebral malaria in a young adult traveling in malaria endemic area. This complication has been reported especially in children and seems very rare in adults. PMID:25995798

  17. Incidental Cerebral Microbleeds and Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Nicholas M.; Kim, Albert E.; Gurol, M. Edip; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Mathis, Chester A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Snitz, Beth E.; Cohen, Ann D.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Minhas, Davneet; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Tamburo, Erica L.; Klunk, William E.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are collections of blood breakdown products that are a common incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging of elderly individuals. Cerebral microbleeds are associated with cognitive deficits, but the mechanism is unclear. Studies show that individuals with CMBs related to symptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy have abnormal vascular reactivity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but, to our knowledge, abnormalities in cerebral blood flow have not been reported for healthy individuals with incidental CMBs. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of incidental CMBs with resting-state CBF, cerebral metabolism, cerebrovascular disease, β-amyloid (Aβ), and cognition. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional study of 55 cognitively normal individuals with a mean (SD) age of 86.8 (2.7) years was conducted from May 1, 2010, to May 1, 2013, in an academic medical center in Pittsburgh; data analysis was performed between June 10, 2013, and April 9, 2015. INTERVENTIONS 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was performed with susceptibility-weighted imaging or gradient-recalled echo to assess CMBs, arterial spin labeling for CBF, and T1- and T2-weighted imaging for atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, and infarcts. Positron emission tomography was conducted with fluorodeoxyglucose to measure cerebral metabolism and Pittsburgh compound B for fibrillar Aβ. Neuropsychological evaluation, including the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, was performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Magnetic resonance images were rated for the presence and location of CMBs. Lobar CMBs were subclassified as cortical or subcortical. Measurements of CBF, metabolism, and Aβ were compared with the presence and number of CMBs with voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses. RESULTS The presence of cortical CMBs was associated with significantly reduced CBF in multiple regions on voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses (percentage difference in global CBF,

  18. Genetic variation in homocysteine metabolism, cognition, and white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke M L; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Uitterlinden, André G; Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga; Johnston, Carole; Breteler, Monique M B

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have shown an association between homocysteine concentration and cognitive performance or cerebral white matter lesions. However, variations in genes encoding for enzymes and other proteins that play a role in homocysteine metabolism have hardly been evaluated in relation to these outcome measures. In the population-based Rotterdam Scan Study, we examined the association of seven polymorphisms of genes involved in homocysteine metabolism (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, RFC 80G>A, TC 776C>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and CBS 844ins68) with plasma total homocysteine, cognitive performance, and cerebral white matter lesions among 1011 non-demented elderly participants. Of all the studied polymorphisms, only MTHFR 677C>T was associated with homocysteine concentration. No significant relationship was observed for any of the polymorphisms with cognitive performance or severity of cerebral white matter lesions. PMID:19019492

  19. The transcriptome of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    VanGilder, Reyna L.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Barr, Taura L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular causality and response to stroke is complex. Yet, much of the literature examining the molecular response to stroke has focused on targeted pathways that have been well-characterized. Consequently, our understanding of stroke pathophysiology has made little progress by way of clinical therapeutics since tissue plasminogen activator was approved for treatment nearly a decade ago. The lack of clinical translation is in part due to neuron-focused studies, preclinical models of cerebral ischemia and the paradoxical nature of neuro-inflammation. With the evolution of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable criteria streamlining research efforts and broad availability of genomic technologies, the ability to decipher the molecular fingerprint of ischemic stroke is on the horizon. This review highlights preclinical microarray findings of the ischemic brain, discusses the transcriptome of cerebral preconditioning and emphasizes the importance of further characterizing the role of the neurovascular unit and peripheral white blood cells in mediating stroke damage and repair within the penumbra. PMID:22381515

  20. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  1. White phosphorus

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    White phosphorus ; CASRN 7723 - 14 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  2. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  4. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  5. Long-term cognitive sequelae of cerebral malaria in Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed

    Richardson, E D; Varney, N R; Roberts, R J; Springer, J A; Wood, P S

    1997-01-01

    The brains of fatal cases of cerebral malaria exhibit capillary occlusion, punctiform hemorrhages, and focal necrosis in subcortical white matter. Some studies have suggested that the brain pathology of survivors is similar to that of fatal cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that cerebral malaria survivors would exhibit neuropsychological impairment due to the residual cerebral damage sustained from the infection. Vietnam veterans reporting a history of cerebral malaria were compared with a group of veterans with a history of combat-related injuries on standard neuropsychological tasks and on dichotic listening (DL). The cerebral malaria group performed worse on memory tasks and exhibited greater clinical impairments on DL, consistent with presumed disruption of subcortical white matter tracts. PMID:16318473

  6. Prognostic Impact of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease on Stroke Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), which includes white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), silent brain infarction (SBI), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), develops in a conjunction of cumulated injuries to cerebral microvascular beds, increased permeability of blood-brain barriers, and chronic oligemia. SVD is easily detected by routine neuroimaging modalities such as brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Research has revealed that the presence of SVD markers may increase the risk of future vascular events as well as deteriorate functional recovery and neurocognitive trajectories after stroke, and such an association could also be applied to hemorrhagic stroke survivors. Currently, the specific mechanistic processes leading to the development and manifestation of SVD risk factors are unknown, and further studies with novel methodological tools are warranted. In this review, recent studies regarding the prognostic impact of WMHs, SBI, and CMBs on stroke survivors and briefly summarize the pathophysiological concepts underlying the manifestation of cerebral SVD. PMID:26060797

  7. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  8. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  9. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  10. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  11. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  12. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  13. Neonatal White Matter Abnormalities an Important Predictor of Neurocognitive Outcome for Very Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Lianne J.; Clark, Caron A. C.; Bora, Samudragupta; Inder, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter abnormalities on term MRI are a strong predictor of motor disability in children born very preterm. However, their contribution to cognitive impairment is less certain. Objective Examine relationships between the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities on neonatal MRI and a range of neurocognitive outcomes assessed at ages 4 and 6 years. Design/Methods The study sample consisted of a regionally representative cohort of 104 very preterm (≤32 weeks gestation) infants born from 1998–2000 and a comparison group of 107 full-term infants. At term equivalent, all preterm infants underwent a structural MRI scan that was analyzed qualitatively for the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities, including cysts, signal abnormalities, loss of white matter volume, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosal thinning/myelination. At corrected ages 4 and 6 years, all children underwent a comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessment that included measures of general intellectual ability, language development, and executive functioning. Results At 4 and 6 years, very preterm children without cerebral white matter abnormalities showed no apparent neurocognitive impairments relative to their full-term peers on any of the domain specific measures of intelligence, language, and executive functioning. In contrast, children born very preterm with mild and moderate-to-severe white matter abnormalities were characterized by performance impairments across all measures and time points, with more severe cerebral abnormalities being associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment. These associations persisted after adjustment for gender, neonatal medical risk factors, and family social risk. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cerebral white matter connectivity for later intact cognitive functioning amongst children born very preterm. Preterm born children without cerebral white matter abnormalities on

  14. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  15. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process. PMID:1866952

  16. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  17. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  18. Perinatal White Matter Injury: The Changing Spectrum of Pathology and Emerging Insights into Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury in survivors of premature birth has a unique and unexplained predilection for periventricular cerebral white matter. Periventricular white-matter injury (PWMI) is now the most common cause of brain injury in preterm infants and the leading cause of chronic neurological morbidity. The spectrum of chronic PWMI includes focal…

  19. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter. PMID:24048830

  20. Vasospasm in Cerebral Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    All forms of cerebral inflammation as found in bacterial meningitis, cerebral malaria, brain injury, and subarachnoid haemorrhage have been associated with vasospasm of cerebral arteries and arterioles. Vasospasm has been associated with permanent neurological deficits and death in subarachnoid haemorrhage and bacterial meningitis. Increased levels of interleukin-1 may be involved in vasospasm through calcium dependent and independent activation of the myosin light chain kinase and release of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1. Another key factor in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial vasospasm may be the reduced bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide. Therapeutic trials in vasospasm related to inflammation in subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans showed a reduction of vasospasm through calcium antagonists, endothelin receptor antagonists, statins, and plasminogen activators. Combination of therapeutic modalities addressing calcium dependent and independent vasospasm, the underlying inflammation, and depletion of nitric oxide simultaneously merit further study in all conditions with cerebral inflammation in double blind randomised placebo controlled trials. Auxiliary treatment with these agents may be able to reduce ischemic brain injury associated with neurological deficits and increased mortality. PMID:25610703

  1. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  2. Whites Trashing Whites: Multiculturalism's Liberal Guilt Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Presents the opinions of a white, male literature professor who attended a conference of college writing teachers and was distressed because the overwhelmingly white audience listened quietly as speakers used the platform to identify whites as oppressors of minorities and linguistic imperialists. The paper questions the view that Standard English…

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Savoiardo, M; Erbetta, A; Di Francesco, J C; Brioschi, M; Silani, V; Falini, A; Storchi, G; Brighina, L; Ferrarese, C; Ticozzi, N; Messina, S; Girotti, F

    2011-05-15

    Three elderly patients with, respectively: mild cognitive impairment, severe and progressive neurologic involvement, and focal neurologic deficit, were observed. MRI showed multiple areas of white matter edema, at times partially involving the cortex, in the first two patients, and a single area in the third. Treatment with steroids determined the disappearance of the lesions and clinical amelioration. The key to the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) was the demonstration, with appropriate MRI sequences, of microbleeds consistent with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). This diagnosis was supported by genetic analysis of APOE with demonstration of ε4/ε4 genotype, found in about 80% of CAA patients who develop inflammatory changes. In the appropriate clinical setting, MRI demonstration of microbleeds supported by results of genetic analysis of APOE may strongly support the diagnosis of CAA-ri thus avoiding cerebral biopsy. PMID:24059616

  4. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  5. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  6. Cerebral thrombosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-11-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are acquired clonal disorders characterized by the proliferation of bone marrow myeloid cells. Different somatic mutations have been recently associated with MPN, the most common being JAK-2 V617F. Among MPN, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are particularly associated with an increased risk to develop thrombotic complications, either arterial or venous. Cerebrovascular events (stroke and transient ischemic attacks) are prevalent, accounting for approximately two-thirds of all events. Also cerebral vein thrombosis can complicate MPN and can be the first manifestation of the disease. Risk factors for thrombosis in patients with MPN are related or unrelated to the disease. Among the former there are cellular risk factors, such as increased white blood cell counts, vascular cell activation, endothelial dysfunction, and plasmatic risk factors, such as increased plasma viscosity, reduced levels of protein S, increased thrombin generation. The latter include increased age and previous thrombotic events. In addition, common cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity) contribute to the pathogenesis of arterial events, whereas circumstantial risk factors (particularly oral contraceptive use and pregnancy/puerperium) to that of venous events. Primary prevention of arterial thrombosis with antiplatelet therapy is warranted in the majority of patients with MPN, whereas primary prevention of venous thrombosis is limited to anticoagulant prophylaxis during high-risk situations. Secondary prevention includes long-term antiplatelet therapy for arterial and short- or long-term anticoagulant therapy for venous thrombosis, depending on the risk factors present at the first event. PMID:25217248

  7. Brainstem Involvement as a Cause of Central Sleep Apnea: Pattern of Microstructural Cerebral Damage in Patients with Cerebral Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duning, Thomas; Deppe, Michael; Brand, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Becht, Charlotte; Heidbreder, Anna; Young, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The exact underlying pathomechanism of central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR) is still unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between cerebral white matter changes and CSA. A dysfunction of central respiratory control centers in the brainstem was suggested by some authors. Novel MR-imaging analysis tools now allow far more subtle assessment of microstructural cerebral changes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and what severity of subtle structural cerebral changes could lead to CSA-CSR, and whether there is a specific pattern of neurodegenerative changes that cause CSR. Therefore, we examined patients with Fabry disease (FD), an inherited, lysosomal storage disease. White matter lesions are early and frequent findings in FD. Thus, FD can serve as a "model disease" of cerebral microangiopathy to study in more detail the impact of cerebral lesions on central sleep apnea. Patients and Methods Genetically proven FD patients (n = 23) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 44) underwent a cardio-respiratory polysomnography and brain MRI at 3.0 Tesla. We applied different MR-imaging techniques, ranging from semiquantitative measurement of white matter lesion (WML) volumes and automated calculation of brain tissue volumes to VBM of gray matter and voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Results In 5 of 23 Fabry patients (22%) CSA-CSR was detected. Voxel-based DTI analysis revealed widespread structural changes in FD patients when compared to the healthy controls. When calculated as a separate group, DTI changes of CSA-CSR patients were most prominent in the brainstem. Voxel-based regression analysis revealed a significant association between CSR severity and microstructural DTI changes within the brainstem. Conclusion Subtle microstructural changes in the brainstem might be a neuroanatomical correlate of CSA-CSR in patients at risk of WML. DTI is more sensitive and specific than

  8. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  9. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  10. The fetal cerebral circulation: three decades of exploration by the LLU Center for Perinatal Biology.

    PubMed

    Pearce, William J

    2014-01-01

    For more than three decades, research programs in the Center of Perinatal Biology have focused on the vascular biology of the fetal cerebral circulation. In the 1980s, research in the Center demonstrated that cerebral autoregulation operated over a narrower pressure range, and was more vulnerable to insults, in fetuses than in adults. Other studies were among the first to establish that compared to adult cerebral arteries, fetal cerebral arteries were more hydrated, contained smaller smooth muscle cells and less connective tissue, and had endothelium less capable of producing NO. Work in the 1990s revealed that pregnancy depressed reactivity to NO in extra-cerebral arteries, but elevated it in cerebral arteries through effects involving changes in cGMP metabolism. Comparative studies verified that fetal lamb cerebral arteries were an excellent model for cerebral arteries from human infants. Biochemical studies demonstrated that cGMP metabolism was dramatically upregulated, but that contraction was far more dependent on calcium influx, in fetal compared to adult cerebral arteries. Further studies established that chronic hypoxia accelerates functional maturation of fetal cerebral arteries, as indicated by increased contractile responses to adrenergic agonists and perivascular adrenergic nerves. In the 2000s, studies of signal transduction established age-dependent roles for PKG, PKC, PKA, ERK, ODC, IP3, myofilament calcium sensitivity, and many other mechanisms. These diverse studies clearly demonstrated that fetal cerebral arteries were functionally quite distinct compared to adult cerebral arteries. In the current decade, research in the Center has expanded to a more molecular focus on epigenetic mechanisms and their role in fetal vascular adaptation to chronic hypoxia, maternal drug abuse, and nutrient deprivation. Overall, the past three decades have transformed thinking about, and understanding of, the fetal cerebral circulation due in no small part to the

  11. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  12. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  13. Cerebral Palsy Among Asian Ethnic Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Tess C.; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Gilbert, William M.; Newman, Thomas B.; Xing, Guibo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Asians have a reduced risk for cerebral palsy (CP) compared with whites. We examined whether individual Asian subgroups have a reduced risk of CP and whether differences in sociodemographic factors explain disparities in CP prevalence. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort of 629 542 Asian and 2 109 550 white births in California from 1991 to 2001, we identified all children who qualified for services from the California Department of Health Services on the basis of CP. Asians were categorized as East Asian (Chinese, Japanese, Koreans), Filipino, Indian, Pacific Islander (Guamanians, Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders), Samoan, or Southeast Asian (Cambodian, Laotian, Thai, Vietnamese). RESULTS: Overall, CP prevalence was lower in Asians than whites (1.09 vs 1.36 per 1000; relative risk = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74–0.87) and ranged from 0.61/1000 in Thai children to 2.08/1000 in Samoan children. Several Asian subgroups had low risk profiles with respect to maternal age, educational attainment, and birth weight. However, after we adjusted for maternal age and education, infant gender, and birth weight, the adjusted risk of CP remained lower in East Asians (odds ratio [OR] = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.65–0.87), Filipinos (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.75–0.99), Indians (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.44–0.80), Pacific Islanders (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40–0.97), and Southeast Asians (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.57–0.82) compared with whites. CONCLUSIONS: Most Asian national origin subgroups have a lower rate of CP than whites, and this disparity is unexplained. Additional studies that focus on the cause of ethnic disparities in CP may provide new insights into pathogenesis and prevention. PMID:22430449

  14. Increased Cerebral Water Content in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Sofia; Gras, Vincent; Tiffin-Richards, Frances; Mirzazade, Shahram; Holschbach, Bernhard; Frank, Rolf Dario; Vassiliadou, Athina; Krüger, Thilo; Eitner, Frank; Gross, Theresa; Schulz, Jörg Bernhard; Floege, Jürgen; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD) on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours), and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuropsychological testing revealed mainly attentional and executive cognitive dysfunction in HD. Voxel-based-morphometry showed only marginal alterations in the right inferior medial temporal lobe white matter in HD compared to controls. Marked increases in global brain water content were found in the white matter, specifically in parietal areas, in HD patients compared to controls. Although the global water content in the gray matter did not differ between the two groups, regional increases of brain water content in particular in parieto-temporal gray matter areas were observed in HD patients. No relevant brain hydration changes were revealed before and after hemodialysis. Whereas longer duration of dialysis vintage was associated with increased water content in parieto-temporal-occipital regions, lower intradialytic weight changes were negatively correlated with brain water content in these areas in HD patients. Worse cognitive performance on an attention task correlated with increased hydration in frontal white matter. In conclusion, long-term HD is associated with altered brain tissue water homeostasis mainly in parietal white matter regions, whereas the attentional domain in the cognitive dysfunction profile in HD could be linked to increased frontal white matter water content. PMID:25826269

  15. A Dietary Treatment Improves Cerebral Blood Flow and Brain Connectivity in Aging apoE4 Mice.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Zerbi, Valerio; Jansen, Diane; Haast, Roy; Lütjohann, Dieter; Broersen, Laus M; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    APOE ε4 (apoE4) polymorphism is the main genetic determinant of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). A dietary approach (Fortasyn) including docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, uridine, choline, phospholipids, folic acid, vitamins B12, B6, C, and E, and selenium has been proposed for dietary management of AD. We hypothesize that the diet could inhibit AD-like pathologies in apoE4 mice, specifically cerebrovascular and connectivity impairment. Moreover, we evaluated the diet effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF), functional connectivity (FC), gray/white matter integrity, and postsynaptic density in aging apoE4 mice. At 10-12 months, apoE4 mice did not display prominent pathological differences compared to wild-type (WT) mice. However, 16-18-month-old apoE4 mice revealed reduced CBF and accelerated synaptic loss. The diet increased cortical CBF and amount of synapses and improved white matter integrity and FC in both aging apoE4 and WT mice. We demonstrated that protective mechanisms on vascular and synapse health are enhanced by Fortasyn, independent of apoE genotype. We further showed the efficacy of a multimodal translational approach, including advanced MR neuroimaging, to study dietary intervention on brain structure and function in aging. PMID:27034849

  16. A Dietary Treatment Improves Cerebral Blood Flow and Brain Connectivity in Aging apoE4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Zerbi, Valerio; Jansen, Diane; Haast, Roy; Lütjohann, Dieter; Broersen, Laus M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-01-01

    APOE ε4 (apoE4) polymorphism is the main genetic determinant of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). A dietary approach (Fortasyn) including docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, uridine, choline, phospholipids, folic acid, vitamins B12, B6, C, and E, and selenium has been proposed for dietary management of AD. We hypothesize that the diet could inhibit AD-like pathologies in apoE4 mice, specifically cerebrovascular and connectivity impairment. Moreover, we evaluated the diet effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF), functional connectivity (FC), gray/white matter integrity, and postsynaptic density in aging apoE4 mice. At 10–12 months, apoE4 mice did not display prominent pathological differences compared to wild-type (WT) mice. However, 16–18-month-old apoE4 mice revealed reduced CBF and accelerated synaptic loss. The diet increased cortical CBF and amount of synapses and improved white matter integrity and FC in both aging apoE4 and WT mice. We demonstrated that protective mechanisms on vascular and synapse health are enhanced by Fortasyn, independent of apoE genotype. We further showed the efficacy of a multimodal translational approach, including advanced MR neuroimaging, to study dietary intervention on brain structure and function in aging. PMID:27034849

  17. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  18. Role of phorbol esters in regional cerebral blood flow regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, D.F.; Uhl, G.R.; Miyabe, M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, an intracellular enzyme capable of phosphorylating membrane associated receptors. By using phorbol-12-13-dibutyrate (PDBU), they investigated the presence and function of protein kinase C on canine cerebral vessels. In vitro tissue autoradiographic studies performed on 8 ..mu.. sections of canine cerebral vessels with H/sup 3/-PDBU revealed a 3 to 1 ratio of specific to nonspecific binding. Competitive displacement was demonstrated for 3 physiologically active phorbol esters but could not be demonstrated for 3 physiologically inactive phorbol derivatives. The effect of PDBU on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was then studied in vivo using radiolabelled microspheres in 6 dogs. Measurements were made during control ventriculocisternal CSF infusions and 5,10,15,20 and 25 minutes after infusion of .1 nM/min PDBU. For grey matter regions in contact with the perfusate, caudate nucleus, cortical watershed and cerebellum, blood flow increased from 33 +/- 6 to 45 +/- 7, 20 +/- 2 to 27 +/- 2, and 31 +/- 2 to 42 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm, respectively. rCBF was unchanged for brainstem, temporal lobe or white matter regions. They conclude (1) PDBU has high affinity binding to canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle, and (2) PDBU produces an increase in rCBF when delivered intraventricularly. These data suggest a possible role for protein kinase C in the regulation of cerebral blood flow.

  19. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion- the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain- is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  20. Biofidelic white matter heterogeneity decreases computational model predictions of white matter strains during rapid head rotations.

    PubMed

    Maltese, Matthew R; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-11-01

    The finite element (FE) brain model is used increasingly as a design tool for developing technology to mitigate traumatic brain injury. We developed an ultra high-definition FE brain model (>4 million elements) from CT and MRI scans of a 2-month-old pre-adolescent piglet brain, and simulated rapid head rotations. Strain distributions in the thalamus, coronal radiata, corpus callosum, cerebral cortex gray matter, brainstem and cerebellum were evaluated to determine the influence of employing homogeneous brain moduli, or distinct experimentally derived gray and white matter property representations, where some white matter regions are stiffer and others less stiff than gray matter. We find that constitutive heterogeneity significantly lowers white matter deformations in all regions compared with homogeneous properties, and should be incorporated in FE model injury prediction. PMID:27123826

  1. Cerebral Ischemia Mediates the Effect of Serum Uric Acid on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Vannorsdall, Tracy D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Gordon, Barry; Kraut, Michael; Schretlen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose High normal concentrations of serum uric acid (UA) are associated with mild cognitive dysfunction and increased cerebral ischemia as indexed by white matter hyperintensity volumes. We hypothesized that individual differences in white matter hyperintensities mediate the association between UA and mild cognitive dysfunction. Methods One hundred eighty community-dwelling adults aged 20 to 96 years completed neuropsychological testing, laboratory blood studies, and a brain MRI scan. Results Serum UA was associated (P<0.05) with greater white matter hyperintensities and poorer working memory, processing speed, fluency, and verbal memory. Associations remained after controlling for age, sex, race, education, hypertension, diabetes, alcohol abuse, smoking, and body mass. Adding a term for white matter hyperintensity attenuated these associations such that UA no longer predicted cognitive performance. Conclusions Severity of cerebral ischemia might mediate the association between UA and cognitive dysfunction. Even mild elevations in UA appear to contribute to structural and functional brain changes. PMID:18772442

  2. Early CT findings of acute cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory.

    PubMed

    Ying, K S; Pang, K K; Huang, J K; Lin, J C

    1992-04-01

    For an early and definitive diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction by computed tomography (CT), we retrospectively analyzed the initial CT findings of 14 patients with proven acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction within 4 hours after stroke onset. The following results were obtained: (a) abnormal CT findings could be recognized quite early in 13 patients (92.9%), (b) the most common and earliest finding was loss of defination of the gray-white interface at the lateral margins of the insula. This sign was recognized in 12 patients (85.7%) and could be detected as early as 1 hour after stroke onset, (c) the next common finding was narrowing or blurring of the Sylvian fissure in 10 patients (71.4%) and could be detected 1.5 hours after stroke onset, (d) an obscured outline or partial disappearance of the lentiform nucleus was recognized in 7 patients (50%) and could be detected 1.5 hours after stroke onset, (e) effacement of the cerebral sulci was found in 6 patients (42.9%) and could be detected 2.5 hours after stroke onset, (f) increased density in MCA or its major branches was not seen in our patients. PMID:1318145

  3. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral phronetal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Zhang, Aiyu; Xu, Min; Jin, Taiyi

    1998-08-01

    Using the Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), the noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen concentration can be achieved in vivo based on the Lambert-Beer Law. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of studying higher brain functions through combining cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral function measurement. Event-related experiments are introduced to measure the cerebral phronetal function. Time domain curves show sight differences among these experiment results. However, with the aid of DFT, experiment data of all five human volunteers show the frequency near 20 Hz or 40 Hz is evoked depending on the difficulty of the mental tasks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cerebral functions study by means of cerebral oxygen saturation measurement analyzed in the frequency domain.

  5. Aging White Matter and Cognition: Differential Effects of Regional Variations in Diffusion Properties on Memory, Executive Functions, and Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Kristen M.; Raz, Naftali

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of cerebral white matter has been proposed as an explanation for age-related cognitive declines. However, the role of specific regions in specific cognitive declines remains unclear. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the associations between regional microstructural integrity of the white matter and performance on…

  6. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  7. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  8. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  9. Subcortical white matter abnormalities related to drug resistance in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Aikath, D; Gupta, A; Chattopadhyay, I; Hashmi, M A; Gangopadhyay, P K; Das, S K; Ray, K

    2006-09-12

    Wilson disease (WD) produces typical lesions in the brain, which can aid in diagnosis and therapy. The authors present a drug-resistant WD case with atypical cerebral lesions with marked involvement of white matter as visualized on MRI scans. The diagnosis was confirmed by identification of mutations in the ATP7B gene. The case demonstrates an uncommon pathology-related cerebral copper accumulation and emphasizes the importance of genetic screening in the diagnosis of WD. PMID:16966556

  10. Genetics of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It is thought that an inflammatory cascade initiated by extravasated blood products precipitates CV, disrupting vascular smooth muscle cell function of major cerebral arteries, leading to vasoconstriction. Mechanisms of CV and modes of therapy are an active area of research. Understanding the genetic basis of CV holds promise for the recognition and treatment for this devastating neurovascular event. In our review, we summarize the most recent research involving key areas within the genetics and vasospasm discussion: (1) Prognostic role of genetics—risk stratification based on gene sequencing, biomarkers, and polymorphisms; (2) Signaling pathways—pinpointing key inflammatory molecules responsible for downstream cellular signaling and altering these mediators to provide therapeutic benefit; and (3) Gene therapy and gene delivery—using viral vectors or novel protein delivery methods to overexpress protective genes in the vasospasm cascade. PMID:23691311

  11. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  12. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  13. Cerebral dysgenesis. An overview.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G B; Sheth, R D; Bodensteiner, J B

    1994-11-01

    A significant portion of patients with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, and so forth) have no definable cause for these problems. Mounting evidence suggests a substantial number of these idiopathic conditions have subtle abnormalities of brain development (cerebral dysgenesis) as the inherent pathophysiologic event. In this article the authors summarize normal and abnormal brain development, the diagnostic approach to idiopathic neurodevelopmental anomalies, and the new molecular genetic insights into the underlying causes of brain malformations. PMID:7845342

  14. Unique Transcriptome Patterns of the White and Grey Matter Corroborate Structural and Functional Heterogeneity in the Human Frontal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James D.; Kavanagh, Tomas; Kim, Woojin S.; Chen, Bei Jun; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Halliday, Glenda M.; Janitz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The human frontal lobe has undergone accelerated evolution, leading to the development of unique human features such as language and self-reflection. Cortical grey matter and underlying white matter reflect distinct cellular compositions in the frontal lobe. Surprisingly little is known about the transcriptomal landscape of these distinct regions. Here, for the first time, we report a detailed transcriptomal profile of the frontal grey (GM) and white matter (WM) with resolution to alternatively spliced isoforms obtained using the RNA-Seq approach. We observed more vigorous transcriptome activity in GM compared to WM, presumably because of the presence of cellular bodies of neurons in the GM and RNA associated with the nucleus and perinuclear space. Among the top differentially expressed genes, we also identified a number of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs), specifically expressed in white matter, such as LINC00162. Furthermore, along with confirmation of expression of known markers for neurons and oligodendrocytes, we identified a number of genes and splicing isoforms that are exclusively expressed in GM or WM with examples of GABRB2 and PAK2 transcripts, respectively. Pathway analysis identified distinct physiological and biochemical processes specific to grey and white matter samples with a prevalence of synaptic processes in GM and myelination regulation and axonogenesis in the WM. Our study also revealed that expression of many genes, for example, the GPR123, is characterized by isoform switching, depending in which structure the gene is expressed. Our report clearly shows that GM and WM have perhaps surprisingly divergent transcriptome profiles, reflecting distinct roles in brain physiology. Further, this study provides the first reference data set for a normal human frontal lobe, which will be useful in comparative transcriptome studies of cerebral disorders, in particular, neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24194939

  15. Cerebral autoregulation and brain networks in occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Avirame, Keren; Lesemann, Anne; List, Jonathan; Witte, Anja Veronica; Schreiber, Stephan Joachim; Flöel, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Patients with unilateral occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery (ICA) show subtle cognitive deficits. Decline in cerebral autoregulation and in functional and structural integrity of brain networks have previously been reported in the affected hemisphere (AH). However, the association between cerebral autoregulation, brain networks, and cognition remains to be elucidated. Fourteen neurologically asymptomatic patients (65±11 years) with either ICA occlusion or high-grade ICA stenosis and 11 age-matched healthy controls (HC) (67±6 years) received neuropsychologic testing, transcranial Doppler sonography to assess cerebral autoregulation using vasomotor reactivity (VMR), and magnetic resonance imaging to probe white matter microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Patients performed worse on memory and executive tasks when compared with controls. Vasomotor reactivity, white matter microstructure, and RSFC were lower in the AH of the patients when compared with the unaffected hemisphere and with controls. Lower VMR of the AH was associated with several ipsilateral clusters of lower white matter microstructure and lower bilateral RSFC in patients. No correlations were found between VMR and cognitive scores. In sum, impaired cerebral autoregulation was associated with reduced structural and functional connectivity in cerebral networks, indicating possible mechanisms by which severe unilateral occlusive processes of the ICA lead to cognitive decline. PMID:25388676

  16. What provides cerebral reserve?

    PubMed

    Staff, Roger T; Murray, Alison D; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2004-05-01

    The cerebral reserve hypothesis is a heuristic concept used to explain apparent protection from the onset of cerebral disease and/or cognitive decline in old age. A significant obstacle when investigating the reserve hypothesis is the absence of baseline data with which to compare current cognitive status. We tested the influence of three hypothesized proxies of reserve (education, head size and occupational attainment [OCC]) in 92 volunteers born in 1921, whose cognitive function was measured at age 11 and 79 years, and who underwent brain MRI. The association between each proxy and old age cognitive function was tested, adjusting for variance contributed by childhood mental ability and detrimental age-related pathological changes measured using MRI. The results showed that education and OCC, but not total intracranial volume (TICV), contribute to cerebral reserve and help retain cognitive function in old age. Education was found to contribute between 5 and 6% of the variance found in old age memory function but was found to have no significant association with reasoning abilities. OCC was found to contribute around 5% of the variance found in old age memory function and between 6 and 8% of the variance found in old age reasoning abilities. We conclude that the intellectual challenges experienced during life, such as education and occupation, accumulate reserve and allow cognitive function to be maintained in old age. PMID:15047587

  17. [Insomnia and cerebral hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Káposzta, Zoltán; Rácz, Klára

    2007-11-18

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, or quality of sleep that results in the impairment of daytime functioning, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. In most countries approximately every third inhabitant has insomnia. Insomnia can be classified as primary and secondary. The pathogenesis of primary insomnia is unknown, but available evidence suggests a state of hyperarousal. Insomnia secondary to other causes is more common than primary insomnia. Cerebral hypoperfusion can be the cause of insomnia in some cases. In such patients the cerebral blood flow should be improved using parenteral vascular therapy. If insomnia persists despite treatment, then therapy for primary insomnia should be instituted using benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone, or Zaleplon. In those cases Midazolam cannot be used for the treatment of insomnia due to its marked negative effect on cerebral blood flow. In Hungary there is a need to organize multidisciplinary Insomnia Clinics because insomnia is more than a disease, it is a public health problem in this century. PMID:17988972

  18. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  19. Sympathetic regulation of cerebral blood flow during seizures in newborn lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, C.D.; Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M. )

    1988-09-01

    The authors examined cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation by the sympathetic nerves in 12 newborn lambs during seizures, a potent reflex stimulator of the sympathetic nervous system. CBF was measured with microspheres, and seizures were induced with bicuculline. In six of these lambs, one hemibrain was denervated (D) chronically by interrupting the ipsilateral cervical sympathetic trunk; the other hemibrain remained innervated (I). Before and after 10, 35, and 70 min of seizures, cerebral gray matter blood flow was measured. In the cerebral white matter, hippocampus, caudate, and thalamus blood flows to the D and I hemibrains were similar before seizures but during seizures they were 10-39% greater in the D than in the I hemibrain. Midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum D and I blood flows were always similar. In the other six lambs, acute denervation during seizures increased ipsilateral cerebral gray and hippocampus blood flow by 10-31%, but unilateral electrical stimulation decreased ipsilateral cerebral gray, cerebral white, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate blood flow by 17-27%. The data demonstrate that, during seizures, sympathetic nerve activity modifies regional CBF and the effect is sustained, suggesting a role for the sympathetic nervous system in newborn CBF regulation.

  20. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  1. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  2. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  3. Radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, M; Runge, M; Kocher, M; Zähringer, M; Treuer, H; Sturm, V

    2004-07-27

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of radiosurgery (RS) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT AVMs). Two patients with seven HHT AVMs were treated by linear accelerator-RS. Complete obliteration was achieved 18 to 24 months post-treatment without side effects. Because HHT AVMs are small and multiple, RS is superior to microsurgery because it is noninvasive and all AVMs can be treated in one session regardless of their location. PMID:15277641

  4. Confronting White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalwell, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Even as the United States becomes more diverse, a new era of "white flight" is unfolding. Whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities, white students are likely to attend schools that reinforce their perceptions of cultural dominance. The average white student attends a school where 77 percent of the student body is of their race.…

  5. White, Male, and "Minority": Racial Consciousness among White Male Undergraduates Attending a Historically Black University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, R. Darrell; Hamrick, Florence A.

    2009-01-01

    Enrollments of non-Black students at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have recently increased to the point that 11% of all undergraduate students enrolled in HBCUs in 2001 were White (U. S. Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2004). Accelerated transdemographic enrollment patterns (Brown) at…

  6. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  7. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging of compressed air divers in diving accidents.

    PubMed

    Gao, G K; Wu, D; Yang, Y; Yu, T; Xue, J; Wang, X; Jiang, Y P

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of the cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of compressed air divers in diving accidents, we conducted an observational case series study. MRI of brain were examined and analysed on seven cases compressed air divers complicated with cerebral arterial gas embolism CAGE. There were some characteristics of cerebral injury: (1) Multiple lesions; (2) larger size; (3) Susceptible to parietal and frontal lobe; (4) Both cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter can be affected; (5) Cerebellum is also the target of air embolism. The MRI of brain is an sensitive method for detecting cerebral lesions in compressed air divers in diving accidents. The MRI should be finished on divers in diving accidents within 5 days. PMID:19341126

  8. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-ping; Li, Yi-ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Zi-shu; Zhou, Shun-ke; Tao, Fang-xu; Zhang, Zhi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073378

  9. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  10. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  11. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  12. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  13. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  14. Cerebral involvement in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy caused by mitofusin2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Knut; Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi; Dechent, Peter; Bönnemann, Carsten; Helms, Gunther; Kyllerman, Marten; Brück, Wolfgang; Frahm, Jens; Huehne, Kathrin; Gärtner, Jutta; Rautenstrauss, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Mutations in the mitofusin 2 (MFN2) gene are a major cause of primary axonal Charcot- Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. This study aims at further characterization of cerebral white matter alterations observed in patients with MFN2 mutations. Molecular genetic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations were performed in four unrelated patients aged 7 to 38 years with early onset axonal CMT neuropathy. Three distinct and so far undescribed MFN2 mutations were detected. Two patients had secondary macrocephaly and mild diffuse predominantly periventricular white matter alterations on MRI. In addition, one boy had symmetrical T2-hyperintensities in both thalami. Two patients had optic atrophy, one of them with normal MRI. In three patients proton MRS revealed elevated concentrations of total N-acetyl compounds (neuronal marker), total creatine (found in all cells) and myo-inositol (astrocytic marker) in cerebral white and gray matter though with regional variation. These alterations were most pronounced in the two patients with abnormal MRI. DTI of these patients revealed mild reductions of fractional anisotropy and mild increase of mean diffusivity in white matter. The present findings indicate an enhanced cellular density in cerebral white matter of MFN2 neuropathy which is primarily due to a reactive gliosis without axonal damage and possibly accompanied by mild demyelination. PMID:18425620

  15. Markers of cerebral small vessel disease and severity of depression in the general population.

    PubMed

    Direk, Nese; Perez, Heidi Saavedra; Akoudad, Saloua; Verhaaren, Benjamin F J; Niessen, Wiro J; Hofman, Albert; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-07-30

    The vascular depression hypothesis postulates that cerebral small vessel disease can cause or exacerbate depression in elderly persons. Numerous studies explored the association of imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease including white matter lesions (WMLs) and lacunar infarcts with depressive symptoms or disorders. However, cerebral microbleeds have not been tested in depression. In the current study, we aimed to explore the association of WMLs, lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds with depression continuum in a large population-based sample, the Rotterdam Study. Study population consisted of 3799 participants (aged 45 or over) free of dementia. WML volumes, lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds were measured with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Depressive symptoms, depressive disorders and co-morbid anxiety disorders were assessed with validated questionnaires and clinical interview. WML volumes and lacunar infarcts were associated with depressive symptoms and disorders. Cerebral microbleeds, especially in deep or infratentorial brain regions, were related to depressive disorders only. Our results indicate that WMLs and lacunar infarcts might be non-specific vascular lesions seen in depressive symptoms and disorders. Association of cerebral microbleeds with more severe forms of depression may indicate impaired brain iron homeostasis or minor episodes of cerebrovascular extraversion, which may play a role in depression etiology. PMID:27254084

  16. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:16391455

  17. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  18. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  19. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  20. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  1. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  2. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  3. [Stereotactically targeted radiotherapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations].

    PubMed

    Kimmig, B; Engenhart, R; Wowra, B; Höver, K H; Marin-Grez, M; Sturm, V

    1989-09-01

    A report is given about radiotherapy in 41 patients suffering from cerebral vessel anomalies. A modified linear accelerator was used in a moving field technique with multiple pendulum planes to apply single doses between 8 and 28 Gy by means of stereotaxis into the angiographically determined target volume. The medium follow-up is 23 months. The latency of radiogenic effects is between one and two years. Radiological controls with an interval of more than 18 months after therapy are available in 17 out of 41 patients. Angiographic investigation showed complete obliterations of pathological vessels in six out of these patients and partial obliterations in six patients; five patients remained unchanged. There were no acute complications. Seven patients presented neurological deficiencies with a latency of 6 to 12 months, however, in all cases but one they regressed completely. Even taking into consideration the small number of patients and the short time of observation, a comparison with the results of other radiotherapeutical proceedings allows to draw the conclusion that the presented technique of stereotaxic convergent-beam irradiation represents a relatively simple, reliable and, in case of precise indication, efficient method for the therapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations. PMID:2678547

  4. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  5. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  6. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  7. White matter lesions and intra-arterial thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Simon; Mono, Marie Luise; Findling, Oliver; Fischer, Urs; Galimanis, Aekaterini; Weck, Anja; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Ballinari, Pietro; Gralla, Jan; Brekenfeld, Caspar; Schroth, Gerhard; Arnold, Marcel; Mattle, Heinrich P; El-Koussy, Marwan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence of white matter lesions in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT). From September 2003 to January 2010, we treated 400 patients with IAT at our institution. Of these patients, 292 were evaluated with MRI scans and included in this observational study. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Outcome after 3 months was measured with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS); mRS 0-1 was considered as favorable outcome. White matter lesions were scored visually by two observers using the semiquantitative Scheltens and Fazekas scores. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the association of white matter lesions and clinical outcome, recanalization, and cerebral hemorrhage. The severity of white matter lesions was inversely correlated with favorable outcome, survival and successful recanalization. White matter lesions were an independent predictor of outcome (OR 0.569, p = 0.007) and survival (OR 0.550, p = 0.018) and a weak but independent predictor for recanalization (OR 0.949, p = 0.038). Asymptomatic intracerebral bleeding after IAT was associated with white matter lesions in the basal ganglia in the univariate analysis (p = 0.036), but not after multivariable analysis. The severity of white matter lesions independently predicts clinical outcome and survival in patients treated with IAT. White matter lesions are also a weak but independent predictor for recanalization. Symptomatic intracranial bleeding after IAT are not associated with white matter lesions. Therefore, white matter lesions should not be considered as a contraindication against IAT. PMID:22249288

  8. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  9. Cerebral circulation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier of rats in hypocapnic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, T.; Krieglstein, J.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of hypoxic hypoxia on physiological variables, cerebral circulation, cerebral metabolism, and blood-brain barrier were investigated in conscious, spontaneously breathing rats by exposing them to an atmosphere containing 7% O/sub 2/. Hypoxia affected a marked hypotension, hypocapnia and alkalosis. Cortical tissue high-energy phosphates and glucose content were not affected by hypoxia, glucose 6-phosphate lactate, and pyruvate levels were significantly increased. Blood-brain barrier permeability, regional brain glucose content and lumped constant were not changed by hypoxia. Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rose by 40-70% of control values in gray matter and by 80-90% in white matter. Under hypoxia, columns of increased and decreased LCGU and were detectable in cortical gray matter. Color-coded (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiograms of rat brain are shown. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) increased by 50-90% in gray matter and by up to 180% in white matter. Coupling between LCGU and LCBF in hypoxia remained unchanged. The data suggests a stimulation of glycolysis, increased glucose transport into the cell, and increased hexokinase activity. The physiological response of gray and white matter to hypoxia obviously differs. Uncoupling of the relation between LCGU and LCBF does not occur.

  10. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  11. Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An important cause of cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bano, Shahina; Yadav, Sachchida Nand; Garga, Umesh Chandra; Chaudhary, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) in the elderly. Although there are no pathognomic clinical features of CAA-related PICH, the association of white matter changes with lobar, recurrent, or multiple simultaneous hemorrhages in older patients should raise the suspicion of its diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of CAA requires pathologic examination of the affected tissue. However, with modern imaging techniques, it is possible to diagnose the "probable CAA" in patients presenting with PICH. Gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging is a very sensitive, noninvasive technique for identifying microhemorrhages in life. The diagnosis of CAA is important because of the likely implication it has on future management targeted to reduce risk of future bleeding. PMID:21716867

  12. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  13. White Matter Diseases with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Shih, Robert Y; Jones, Robert V; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Oleaga, Laura; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    White matter diseases include a wide spectrum of disorders that have in common impairment of normal myelination, either by secondary destruction of previously myelinated structures (demyelinating processes) or by primary abnormalities of myelin formation (dysmyelinating processes). The pathogenesis of many white matter diseases remains poorly understood. Demyelinating disorders are the object of this review and will be further divided into autoimmune, infectious, vascular, and toxic-metabolic processes. Autoimmune processes include multiple sclerosis and related diseases: tumefactive demyelinating lesions, Balo concentric sclerosis, Marburg and Schilder variants, neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (Hurst disease). Infectious processes include Lyme disease (neuroborreliosis), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy. Vascular processes include different types of small-vessel disease: arteriolosclerosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), primary angiitis of the central nervous system, Susac syndrome, and neurolupus. Toxic-metabolic processes include osmotic myelinolysis, methotrexate leukoencephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The imaging spectrum can vary widely from small multifocal white matter lesions to confluent or extensive white matter involvement. Understanding the pathologic substrate is fundamental for understanding the radiologic manifestations, and a systematic approach to the radiologic findings, in correlation with clinical and laboratory data, is crucial for narrowing the differential diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618323

  14. Factors affecting daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhou, Cheng-ye; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun-feng; Zou, Chang-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of death and long-term disability. This study was undertaken to investigate the factors influencing daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction so as to take interventional measures earlier to improve their daily activities. METHODS: A total of 149 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction were recruited into this prospective study. They were admitted to the Encephalopathy Center, Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College in Zhejiang Province from August 2008 to December 2008. The baseline characteristics of the patients and cerebral infarction risk factors on the first day of admission were recorded. White blood cell (WBC) count, plasma glucose (PG), and many others of laboratory targets were collected in the next morning. Barthel index (BI) was calculated at 2 weeks and 3 months respectively after onset of the disease at the outpatient clinic or by telephone call. Lung infection, urinary tract infection and atrial fibrillation if any were recorded on admission. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and the GCS scores were recorded within 24 hours on and after admission, at the second week, and at the third month after the onset of cerebral infarction respectively. RESULTS: The factors of BI at 2 weeks and 3 months after onset were the initial PG level, WBC count and initial NIHSS scores. Besides, urinary tract infection on admission was also the factor for BI at 3 months. CONCLUSION: Active measures should be taken to control these factors to improve the daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25214953

  15. An autopsied case of corticobasal degeneration showing severe cerebral atrophy over a protracted disease course of 16 years.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Daizo; Hino, Hiroaki; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Fujisawa, Koshiro; Kosaka, Kenji; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Ryoko; Kasanuki, Koji; Minegishi, Michiko; Sato, Kiyoshi; Hosokawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki; Arai, Heii; Iseki, Eizo

    2015-06-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old Japanese woman. At the age of 57, she started having difficulty performing daily work and developed agraphia. She also exhibited restlessness and loss of interest, and began to speak less. Thereafter, stereotypical behavior, gait disturbance and dysphagia were noted. CT scan demonstrated left-dominant frontal and temporal lobe atrophy. She died at the age of 72, about 16 years after the onset of symptoms. Neuropathologically, the brain weighed 867 g, and showed remarkable cerebral atrophy with degeneration of the white matter, predominantly in the left dorsal frontal lobe and anterior temporal lobe. Microscopically, severe neuronal loss and gliosis with rarefaction were found in the cerebral cortex, and severe destruction of myelin and axons was observed in the cerebral white matter. Moderate neuronal loss with gliosis was also found in the pallidum and substantia nigra. Gallyas-Braak staining and tau immunostaining revealed pretangle neurons, NFTs, ballooned neurons and astrocytic plaques in the cerebral cortex, subcortical nuclei and brainstem, and argyrophilic threads and coiled bodies in the subcortical white matter. Tau isoform-specific immunostaining revealed that most tau-immunoreactive structures were positive for 4-repeat (4R) tau, but some of the NFTs were positive for 3-repeat (3R) tau in the cerebral neocortex. Immunoblotting demonstrated an accumulation of 4R tau in the cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. The patient was pathologically diagnosed as having corticobasal degeneration. Her long survival course likely accounts for the severe white matter degeneration and accumulation of 3R tau in NFTs. PMID:25516199

  16. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  17. Inter-Parietal White Matter Development Predicts Numerical Performance in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Davis, Simon W.; Libertus, Melissa E.; Kahane, Jill; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to understand the role of interhemispheric transfer in numerical development, we investigated the relationship between children's developing knowledge of numbers and the integrity of their white matter connections between the cerebral hemispheres (the corpus callosum). We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography analyses to…

  18. Neonatal White Matter Abnormality Predicts Childhood Motor Impairment in Very Preterm Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spittle, Alicia J.; Cheong, Jeanie; Doyle, Lex W.; Roberts, Gehan; Lee, Katherine J.; Lim, Jeremy; Hunt, Rod W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children born very preterm are at risk for impaired motor performance ranging from cerebral palsy (CP) to milder abnormalities, such as developmental coordination disorder. White matter abnormalities (WMA) at term have been associated with CP in very preterm children; however, little is known about the impact of WMA on the range of motor…

  19. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  20. Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral Asymmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Dirk J.

    1982-01-01

    Research concerning cerebral asymmetry and its effect on scholastic achievement, reading disabilities, learning disabilities, and linguistic competence is reviewed in an exploration of brain hemisphere-specific etiologies of dyslexia. (CJ)

  1. White Teachers Talking Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American…

  2. White Mold of Chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White mold of chickpea can occur at either seedling stage or at flowering and pod filling stages. At seedling stage, the disease occurs at the base of the stem causing symptoms like collar rot. Often white mycelial growth around the stem on soil surface is visible. Affected plants wilt and die. ...

  3. The Hidden Curriculum of Whiteness: White Teachers, White Territory, and White Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ricky Lee

    This paper suggests that space and spatiality are major features of racial identity and the formation of student resistance. It brings together critical studies of "Whiteness," human territoriality, and theories of resistance in education. The problems between white teachers and students of color can be understood better through a combination of…

  4. Sailing to White Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a composite red-green-blue image of the rock called White Boat. It is the first rock target that Spirit drove to after finishing a series of investigations on the rock Adirondack. White Boat stood out to scientists due to its light color and more tabular shape compared to the dark, rounded rocks that surround it.

  5. Local cerebral glucose utilization in the beagle puppy model of intraventricular hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ment, L.R.; Stewart, W.B.; Duncan, C.C.

    1982-09-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization has been measured by means of carbon-14(/sup 14/C)-autoradiography with 2-deoxyglucose in the newborn beagle puppy model of intraventricular hemorrhage. Our studies demonstrate gray matter/white matter differentiation of uptake of /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose in the control pups, as would be expected from adult animal studies. However, there is a marked homogeneity of /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose uptake in all brain regions in the puppies with intraventricular hemorrhage, possibly indicating a loss of the known coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in this neuropathological condition.

  6. Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White Holly on right. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  7. Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage behind. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  8. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  9. Measurement of fluorescent white effects and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Anders, G

    1975-01-01

    This report surveys the literature and describes various techniques of whiteness measurement and evaluation in current use. Measuring techniques are described for dealing separately with the effects obtained by bleaching, blueing and fluorescent whitening, and an example is given of the direct quantitative estimation of a fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) on a substrate by measuring reflectance in the ultraviolet region. Another chapter deals with the colorimetric estimation of the whiteness and the shade of a fluorescent white using modern apparatus in conjunction with a programmable minicomputer. A new simple and universally applicab,e formula was worked out: W=D-Y+P-x+Q-y+C which has been successfully used in routine tests and which for the first time gives different weight to whiteness values corresponding to all shade preferences existing in theory. Each user can match the formula to his own preference by appropriate adjustment of the D, P, Q andC values. Y,x and y are the customary colorimetric values as standardized by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). It was also found that with another formula the shades of fluorescent whitening effects (green to red tints) may be defined in a simple way. PMID:1064551

  10. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  11. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  12. Progressive cerebral vascular degeneration with mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Nicola; Schrijver, Iris; Vogel, Hannes; Pique, Lynn M; Cowan, Tina M; Pasquali, Marzia; Steinberg, Gary K; Hedlund, Gary L; Ernst, Sharon L; Gallagher, Renata C; Enns, Gregory M

    2008-02-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a maternally inherited disorder characterized by recurrent cerebral infarctions that do not conform to discreet vascular territories. Here we report on a patient who presented at 7 years of age with loss of consciousness and severe metabolic acidosis following vomiting and dehydration. She developed progressive sensorineural hearing loss, myopathy, ptosis, short stature, and mild developmental delays after normal early development. Biochemical testing identified metabolites characteristic of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency (hexanoylglycine and suberylglycine), but also severe lactic acidemia (10-25 mM) and, in urine, excess of lactic acid, intermediates of the citric cycle, and marked ketonuria, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. She progressed rapidly to develop temporary cortical blindness. Brain imaging indicated generalized atrophy, more marked on the left side, in addition to white matter alterations consistent with a mitochondrial disorder. Magnetic resonance angiography indicated occlusion of the left cerebral artery with development of collateral circulation (Moyamoya syndrome). This process worsened over time to involve the other side of the brain. A muscle biopsy indicated the presence of numerous ragged red fibers. Molecular testing confirmed compound heterozygosity for the common mutation in the MCAD gene (985A>G) and a second pathogenic mutation (233T>C). MtDNA testing indicated that the muscle was almost homoplasmic for the 3243A>T mutation in tRNALeu, with a lower mutant load (about 50% heteroplasmy) in blood and skin fibroblasts. These results indicate that mitochondrial disorders may be associated with severe vascular disease resulting in Moyamoya syndrome. The contribution of the concomitant MCAD deficiency to the development of the phenotype in this case is unclear. PMID:18203188

  13. Primary Open Angle Glaucoma is Associated with MR Biomarkers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mercieca, Karl; Cain, John; Hansen, Thomas; Steeples, Laura; Watkins, Amy; Spencer, Fiona; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study tests the hypotheses that: 1) glaucoma is associated with evidence of cerebral small vessel disease; 2) that imaging biomarkers of cerebral small vessel disease in POAG and NTG will show different characteristics. 12 normal controls, 7 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and 9 patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) were recruited. Ophthalmological clinical assessment and MR imaging of the brain were performed. MR imaging was used to quantify white matter lesion load, frequency of dilated perivascular spaces (PVS) and abnormalities in cerebral hydrodynamics. Patients with POAG had significantly greater white matter lesion load (p < 0.05), more PVS in the centrum semiovale (p < 0.05) and had higher overall PVS scores than controls (p < 0.05). In the POAG group, optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) was positively correlated with deep white matter hyperintensities (R2 = 0.928, p < 0.01). Mean deviation on the Humphrey visual field assessment was negatively correlated with deep white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.840, p < 0.01), total white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.928, p < 0.01) and total PVS (R2 = −0.820, p < 0.01). MR evidence of cerebral small vessel disease is strongly associated with a diagnosis of POAG and with the severity of abnormalities in CDR and visual field. PMID:26923106

  14. The Embeddedness of White Fragility within White Pre-Service Principals' Reflections on White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Mack T., III

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the prevalence of white fragility within the six white, pre-service principals' online responses to readings about white privilege. Six white, pre-service principals were asked to provide commentary to class readings on the relevance of white privilege to their preparation for future positions as principals. The findings showed…

  15. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Katherine E.; Golden, Neville H.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  16. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Golden, Neville H; Feldman, Heidi M; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  17. Sex, Aging, and Preexisting Cerebral Ischemic Disease in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Acker, Michael A.; Bilello, Michel; Melhem, Elias R.; Stambrook, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing cardiac surgery have a high frequency of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions, the presence of which appears to predict cognitive sequelae. Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (AS) incur an exceptionally high risk for perioperative cerebral ischemia. The extreme risk in this subgroup may arise from the preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. We tested the hypotheses that increasing age, female sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS are predictive of the severity of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions. Methods A total of 95 subjects were included in this study. Subjects were imaged on 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanners to obtain multimodal image sets which were used for the automatic segmentation of cerebral lesion volume. The dependence of lesion volume upon age, sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS were tested. Results The results demonstrate a strong correlation between aging, female sex, and white matter and ischemia-like lesion volume in patients with aortic stenosis. Conclusions Women and those of advanced age presenting for aortic valve replacement for AS may incur a particularly high risk for postoperative neurologic sequelae due to an exceptional preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. PMID:20868818

  18. Update On Stem Cell Therapy For Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, James E; Mays, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Due to the publicity about stem cell transplantation for the treatment of cerebral palsy, many families seek information on treatment, and many travel overseas for cell transplantation. Even so, there is little scientific confirmation of benefit, and therefore existing knowledge in the field must be summarized. Areas covered This paper addresses the clinical protocols examining the problem, types of stem cells available for transplant, experimental models used to test the benefit of the cells, possible mechanisms of action, potential complications of cell treatment, and what is needed in the field to help accelerate cell-based therapies. Expert Opinion While stem cells may be beneficial in acute injuries of the central nervous system, the biology of stem cells is not well enough understood in chronic injuries or disorders such as cerebral palsy. More work is required at the basic level of stem cell biology, in the development of animal models, and finally in well-conceived clinical trials. PMID:21299445

  19. Radiative Levitation in Hot White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayer, P.; Fontaine, G.; Wesemael, F.

    1994-12-01

    We present the results of detailed calculations of radiative levitation in hot white dwarfs using the extensive and homogeneous atomic data given in TOPBASE. Radiative accelerations and equilibrium abundances have been computed for C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe on grids of pure hydrogen and pure helium stellar envelope models. The DA model grid has log g = 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, and 8.5, and spans the range of effective temperature 100,000 >= Teff >= 20,000 K in steps of 2,500 K. The DO/DB grid is similar but extends to Teff = 130,000 K. We discuss at some length the input physics used in order to provide a good physical understanding of radiative levitation under white dwarf conditions. We also discuss the depth dependence and the morphology of the reservoirs of levitating elements created by an equilibrium between the radiative acceleration and the local effective gravity in various stellar envelopes. The important role played in the morphology of the reservoirs by dominant ionization states in closed-shell electronic configurations is emphasized. Our central results are presented in the form of figures showing the behavior of the expected photospheric abundance of each element as a function of effective temperature and surface gravity. While only a handful of abundances are available from the few analyses of observations that have been carried out, we are nevertheless able to infer through a detailed comparison that equilibrium radiative levitation theory fails to explain the observed abundance patterns of heavy elements in hot white dwarfs. At least one other mechanism must be competing with radiative levitation and gravitational settling in the atmospheres/envelopes of hot white dwarfs. Finally, we indicate promising avenues for further progress in spectral evolution theory for white dwarfs. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-30180.

  20. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  1. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  2. Quantitative Tractography Metrics of White Matter Integrity in Diffusion-Tensor MRI

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Stephen; Lee, Stephanie Y.; Voorn, Thom; Tate, David F.; Paul, Robert H.; Zhang, Song; Salloway, Stephen P.; Malloy, Paul F.; Laidlaw, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We present new quantitative diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) tractography-based metrics for assessing cerebral white matter integrity. These metrics extend prior work in this area. Tractography models of cerebral white matter were produced from each subject's DTI data. The models are a set of curves (e.g., “streamtubes”) derived from DTI data that represent the underlying topography of the cerebral white matter. Nine metrics were calculated in whole brain tractography models and in three “tracts-of-interest” (TOI): transcallosal fibers, and the left and right cingulum bundles. The metrics included the number of streamtubes and several metrics based on the summed length of streamtubes in including some that were weighted by scalar anisotropy metrics and normalized for estimated intracranial volume. We then tested whether patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (i.e., vascular cognitive impairment or VCI) vs. healthy controls (HC) differed on the metrics. The metrics were significantly lower in the VCI group in whole brain and in transcallosal TOI but not in the left or right cingulum bundles. The metrics correlated significantly with cognitive functions known to be impacted by white matter abnormalities (e.g., processing speed) but not with those more impacted by cortical disease (e.g., naming). These new metrics help bridge the gap between DTI tractography and scalar analytical methods and provide a potential means for examining group differences in white matter integrity in specific tracts-of-interest. PMID:18617421

  3. Hypermedicalization in White Noise.

    PubMed

    Benson, Josef

    2015-09-01

    The Nazis hijacked Germany's medical establishment and appropriated medical language to hegemonize their ideology. In White Noise, shifting medical information stifles the public into docility. In Nazi Germany the primacy of language and medical authority magnified the importance of academic doctors. The muddling of identities caused complex insecurities and the need for psychological doubles. In White Noise, Professor Gladney is driven by professional insecurities to enact a double in Murray. Through the manipulation of language and medical overreach the U.S., exemplified in the novel White Noise, has become a hypermedicalized society where the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath has eroded. PMID:24458659

  4. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  5. Studies on regional cerebral pH in patients with cerebral tumors using continuous inhalation of /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J.; Beaney, R.P.; Thomas, D.G.; Marshall, J.; Jones, T.

    1986-10-01

    Regional cerebral pH (rpH) was measured in 12 patients with cerebral tumours and in 5 normal subjects using continuous inhalation of /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ and positron emission tomography (PET). Cerebral tumours with a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) on computed tomography scanning had a similar rpH to that of equivalent regions of contralateral brain tissue (mean tumour rpH, 6.98; mean contralateral brain pH, 6.99). Cerebral tumours with an intact BBB were consistently found to be more alkaline than contralateral brain tissue (mean tumour rpH, 7.09). There was no significant difference between the mean rpH values obtained for peripheral cortical gray and central white matter in normal subjects (7.02 and 6.98, respectively). It is concluded that in spite of reports of raised levels of aerobic glycolysis in neoplastic tissue, there is no evidence that cerebral tumour rpH values are depressed.

  6. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  7. Esophageal eosinophilia in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    de Nápolis, Ana Carolina Ramos; Alves, Flavia Araujo; Rezende, Erica Rodrigues Mariano de Almeida; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical picture, test results, and clinical evolution of patients with cerebral palsy associated with diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, monitored at tertiary centre. Methods: Cross-sectional, retrospective and descriptive study that evaluated the medical records data of pediatric patients with diagnosis of cerebral palsy and eosinophilic esophagitis in a tertiary center of pediatric gastroenterology between August 2005 and August 2013. Results: Seven out of 131 patients with cerebral palsy had the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The mean age at diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was 52.3 months and the mean number of eosinophils in esophagus was 35 per high-power field. Symptoms more frequent were recurrent vomiting and disphagia. Endoscopic alterations found were mucosal thickening, vertical lines, mucosal opacificacion and white plaques. Conclusion: The frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis found was higher than in general pediatric population. The investigation of eosinophilic esophagitis should be done regularly in those patients, once this entity could overlap other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26154544

  8. Review: Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William R.; Thore, Clara R.

    2010-01-01

    This review of age-related brain microvascular pathologies focuses on topics studied by this laboratory, including anatomy of the blood supply, tortuous vessels, venous collagenosis, capillary remnants, vascular density, and microembolic brain injury. Our studies feature thick sections, large blocks embedded in celloidin, and vascular staining by alkaline phosphatase (AP). This permits study of the vascular network in three dimensions, and the differentiation of afferent from efferent vessels. Current evidence suggests that there is decreased vascular density in aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and leukoaraiosis (LA), and cerebrovascular dysfunction precedes and accompanies cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration. A decline in cerebrovascular angiogenesis may inhibit recovery from hypoxia-induced capillary loss. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is inhibited by tortuous arterioles and deposition of excessive collagen in veins and venules. Misery perfusion due to capillary loss appears to occur before cell loss in LA, and CBF is also reduced in the normal-appearing white matter. Hypoperfusion occurs early in AD, inducing white matter lesions and correlating with dementia. In vascular dementia, cholinergic reductions are correlated with cognitive impairment, and cholinesterase inhibitors have some benefit. Most lipid microemboli from cardiac surgery pass through the brain in a few days, but some remain for weeks. They can cause what appears to be a type of vascular dementia years after surgery. Donepezil has shown some benefit. Emboli, such as clots, cholesterol crystals, and microspheres can be extruded through the walls of cerebral vessels, but there is no evidence yet that lipid emboli undergo such extravasation. PMID:20946471

  9. Unmyelinated White Matter Loss in the Preterm Brain Is Associated with Early Increased Levels of End-Tidal Carbon Monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Blok, Cornelie A.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; van der Aa, Niek E.; van Kooij, Britt J.; Anbeek, Petronella; Isgum, Ivana; de Vries, Linda S.; Krediet, Tannette G.; Groenendaal, Floris; Vreman, Hendrik J.; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Increased levels of end-tidal carbon monoxide (ETCOc) in preterm infants during the first day of life are associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory processes and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Therefore, we hypothesized that early ETCOc levels may also be associated with impaired growth of unmyelinated cerebral white matter. Methods From a cohort of 156 extremely and very preterm infants in which ETCOc was determined within 24 h after birth, in 36 infants 3D-MRI was performed at term-equivalent age to assess cerebral tissue volumes of important brain regions. Results Linear regression analysis between cerebral ventricular volume, unmyelinated white matter/total brain volume-, and cortical grey matter/total brain volume-ratio and ETCOc showed a positive, negative and positive correlation, respectively. Multivariable analyses showed that solely ETCOc was positively related to cerebral ventricular volume and cortical grey matter/total brain volume ratio, and that solely ETCOc was inversely related to the unmyelinated white matter/total brain volume ratio, suggesting that increased levels of ETCOc, associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, were related with impaired growth of unmyelinated white matter. Conclusion Increased values of ETCOc, measured within the first 24 hours of life may be indicative of oxidative stress and inflammation in the immediate perinatal period, resulting in impaired growth of the vulnerable unmyelinated white matter of the preterm brain. PMID:24622422

  10. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  11. When White Dwarfs Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried

  12. White Racial Identity Statuses as Predictors of White Privilege Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Havice, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between White privilege awareness and White racial identity development for 197 counseling trainees. Results indicated that 3 of J. E. Helms's (1984, 1990, 1995) White racial identity statuses (i.e., Contact, Reintegration, and Immersion/Emersian) significantly predicted White privilege awareness. Implications…

  13. Mutation in the AP4M1 Gene Provides a Model for Neuroaxonal Injury in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Verkerk, Annemieke J.M.H.; Schot, Rachel; Dumee, Belinda; Schellekens, Karlijn; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Govaert, Paul; van Zwol, A.L.; Hirst, Jennifer; Wessels, Marja W.; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Verheijen, Frans W.; de Graaff, Esther; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Kros, Johan M.; Willemsen, Rob; Willems, Patrick J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Mancini, Grazia M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy due to perinatal injury to cerebral white matter is usually not caused by genetic mutations, but by ischemia and/or inflammation. Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive type of tetraplegic cerebral palsy with mental retardation, reduction of cerebral white matter, and atrophy of the cerebellum in an inbred sibship. The phenotype was recorded and evolution followed for over 20 years. Brain lesions were studied by diffusion tensor MR tractography. Homozygosity mapping with SNPs was performed for identification of the chromosomal locus for the disease. In the 14 Mb candidate region on chromosome 7q22, RNA expression profiling was used for selecting among the 203 genes in the area. In postmortem brain tissue available from one patient, histology and immunohistochemistry were performed. Disease course and imaging were mostly reminiscent of hypoxic-ischemic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, with neuroaxonal degeneration and white matter loss. In all five patients, a donor splice site pathogenic mutation in intron 14 of the AP4M1 gene (c.1137+1G→T), was identified. AP4M1, encoding for the μ subunit of the adaptor protein complex-4, is involved in intracellular trafficking of glutamate receptors. Aberrant GluRδ2 glutamate receptor localization and dendritic spine morphology were observed in the postmortem brain specimen. This disease entity, which we refer to as congenital spastic tetraplegia (CST), is therefore a genetic model for congenital cerebral palsy with evidence for neuroaxonal damage and glutamate receptor abnormality, mimicking perinatally acquired hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury. PMID:19559397

  14. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  15. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  16. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  17. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  18. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  19. Comparison of Cerebral Volume in Toddlers 18 and 36 months Born Preterm and Term

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Jean R.; MacLean, Peggy C.; Caprihan, Arvind; Ohls, Robin K; Qualls, Clifford; VanMeter, Joy; Phillips, John

    2013-01-01

    Studies investigating differences in regional brain volumes in children born preterm and term during early childhood are limited. Neuroimaging could help understand patterns of deficit in children born preterm and target areas of development associated with these regions. The goal of this study was to identify differences in regional brain volume at two different ages using magnetic resonance imaging in preterm and term children. Magnetic resonance imaging and developmental testing occurred in children 18-22 month olds (16 preterm and 10 term children) and 36-47 month olds (12 preterm and 10 term children). There were significant differences between the four groups in the parietal region, cerebral white matter, third ventricle and lateral ventricle. Correlations between regional cerebral volume and developmental testing were explored for the third and lateral ventricles. Our findings indicate that in young toddlers differences in regional cerebral volume are due to both maturation and prematurity. PMID:21917544

  20. Cerebral palsy and aging

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and old age is not well understood. Nor do we know what happens to other functional domains, such as communication and eating behavior, in adults with CP. Although the brain injury that initially causes CP by definition does not progressively worsen through the lifetime, the effects of CP manifest differently throughout the life span. The aging process must inevitably interact with the motor disorder, but we lack systematic, large-scale follow-up studies of children with CP into adulthood and through adulthood with thorough assessments performed over time. In this paper we summarize what is known of the epidemiology of CP throughout the life span, beginning with mortality and life expectancy, then survey what is known of functioning, ability, and quality of life of adults with CP. We conclude by describing a framework for future research on CP and aging that is built around the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and suggest specific tools and approaches for conducting that research in a sound manner. PMID:19740206

  1. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Stojanov, Dragan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Tasic, Aleksandar; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”). PMID:25725137

  2. Cerebritis: an unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes, David C; Prabha, Ramesh D

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  3. Cerebritis: An unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes1, David C.; Prabha1, Ramesh D.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  4. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Gana, R; Skhissi, M; Maaqili, R; Bellakhdar, F

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual patient with multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts. A 20-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache and progressive left-sided hempiparesis. A cerebral CT scan showed a large and heterogeneous parieto-occipital lesion. During surgery an infected hydatid cyst was discovered with multiple daughter vesicles. Post-operatively the patient was treated with albendazol, cefotaxime and metronidazole. The clinical course was good with total recovery of the hemiparesis. A follow-up CT scan showed persistence of some small deep-seated cysts. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cyst is uncommon and can be confused with other cystic brain lesions. The aim of surgery is to remove the cyst unruptured and this should be followed by antihelminthic and antibiotic treatment in order to avoid recurrences. PMID:18342511

  5. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral anomalies and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images PMID:1583660

  6. Hypertension and Cerebral Hemorrhage: A Malpractice Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Hunt, Marshall T.; Vogt, Thomas; Walsh, Gregory; Paglia, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The plaintiff alleged that failure of the attending physician to manage her husband's hypertension properly resulted in his death from intracerebral hemorrhage. Four lines of evidence supported the defendant: (1) In 1970 to 1971 there was uncertainty in the medical community whether mild hypertension should be treated with drugs; this uncertainty still existed at the time of the trial. (2) Severe hypertension and advanced age are the two most important predisposing factors leading to intracerebral hemorrhage; the deceased patient had neither. (3) Hemorrhage into the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter is not typical of hypertensive intracerebral bleeding; more likely, rupture of an arteriovenous malformation occurred. (4) A diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is not one of exclusion but requires objective evidence of vascular change in the brain, heart and kidney; these changes were not found in the deceased patient. In conclusion, an expert witness should testify objectively rather than be the advocate of a lawyer's theory of liability. ImagesFig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 9.Fig. 10. PMID:7233893

  7. Age exacerbates HIV-associated white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Seider, Talia R; Gongvatana, Assawin; Woods, Adam J; Chen, Huaihou; Porges, Eric C; Cummings, Tiffany; Correia, Stephen; Tashima, Karen; Cohen, Ronald A

    2016-04-01

    Both HIV disease and advanced age have been associated with alterations to cerebral white matter, as measured with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and more recently with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This study investigates the combined effects of age and HIV serostatus on WMH and DTI measures, as well as the relationships between these white matter measures, in 88 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 49 seronegative (HIV-) individuals aged 23-79 years. A whole-brain volumetric measure of WMH was quantified from FLAIR images using a semi-automated process, while fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for 15 regions of a whole-brain white matter skeleton generated using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). An age by HIV interaction was found indicating a significant association between WMH and older age in HIV+ participants only. Similarly, significant age by HIV interactions were found indicating stronger associations between older age and decreased FA in the posterior limbs of the internal capsules, cerebral peduncles, and anterior corona radiata in HIV+ vs. HIV- participants. The interactive effects of HIV and age were stronger with respect to whole-brain WMH than for any of the FA measures. Among HIV+ participants, greater WMH and lower anterior corona radiata FA were associated with active hepatitis C virus infection, a history of AIDS, and higher current CD4 cell count. Results indicate that age exacerbates HIV-associated abnormalities of whole-brain WMH and fronto-subcortical white matter integrity. PMID:26446690

  8. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  9. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  10. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  11. Structural network alterations and neurological dysfunction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Reijmer, Yael D; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Salat, David H; Schultz, Aaron; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Ayres, Alison M; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Rosas, Diana; Schwab, Kristin; Leemans, Alexander; Biessels, Geert-Jan; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, M Edip; Greenberg, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common form of small-vessel disease and an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. The mechanisms linking small-vessel disease to cognitive impairment are not well understood. We hypothesized that in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, multiple small spatially distributed lesions affect cognition through disruption of brain connectivity. We therefore compared the structural brain network in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy to healthy control subjects and examined the relationship between markers of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related brain injury, network efficiency, and potential clinical consequences. Structural brain networks were reconstructed from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 38 non-demented patients with probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy (69 ± 10 years) and 29 similar aged control participants. The efficiency of the brain network was characterized using graph theory and brain amyloid deposition was quantified by Pittsburgh compound B retention on positron emission tomography imaging. Global efficiency of the brain network was reduced in patients compared to controls (0.187 ± 0.018 and 0.201 ± 0.015, respectively, P < 0.001). Network disturbances were most pronounced in the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes. Among patients, lower global network efficiency was related to higher cortical amyloid load (r = -0.52; P = 0.004), and to magnetic resonance imaging markers of small-vessel disease including increased white matter hyperintensity volume (P < 0.001), lower total brain volume (P = 0.02), and number of microbleeds (trend P = 0.06). Lower global network efficiency was also related to worse performance on tests of processing speed (r = 0.58, P < 0.001), executive functioning (r = 0.54, P = 0.001), gait velocity (r = 0.41, P = 0.02), but not memory. Correlations with cognition were independent of age, sex, education level, and other magnetic resonance imaging

  12. Dementia in cerebral amyloid angiopathy: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, M; Yamanouchi, H; Kuzuhara, S; Mori, H; Sugiura, S; Mizutani, T; Shimada, H; Tomonaga, M; Toyokura, Y

    1992-10-01

    Dementia is in addition to cerebral haemorrhage major symptom of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAa). In order to explore the pathological basis for dementia in CAa-related conditions, we made a clinicopathological analysis of CAa, with special attention to dementia. Among 150 patients (mean age 78.6 years) with autopsy-proven intracranial haemorrhage in Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Medical Center, CAa with cerebral haemorrhage accounted for 8.0% (12 cases), associated with hypertension and metastatic brain tumour. Among 38 patients with lobar haemorrhage, CAa represented the second most common cause (21.1%) of intracranial haemorrhage after hypertension. A total of 20 patients with CAa (mean age 82.5 years) were studies clinically and pathologically. Hypertension was present in 50%. Thirteen had a history of stroke and others had either ill-defined or no strokes. The average number of strokes 2.9. Fifteen patients (75%) had dementia. Based on the clinicopathological grounds for dementia, CAa-related conditions could be divided into three subtypes: "haemorrhagic", "dementia-haemorrhagic" and "dementia" type. Haemorrhagic type (30%, 6 cases) showed multiple recurrent lobar haemorrhages caused by CAa. Hypertension was present in only 1 patient. The incidence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles was generally correlated with age. Only 1 patient had dementia. The dementia-haemorrhagic type (40%, 8 patients) had recurrent strokes with cerebral haemorrhage after preceding dementia. There were two different neuropathological subsets: CAa with atypical senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and CAa with diffuse leucoencephalopathy. Patients with CAa with atypical SDAT had multiple cerebral haemorrhages caused by CAa combined with atypical Alzheimer-type pathology. Patients with CAa with diffuse leucoencephalopathy had cerebral haemorrhages in combination with diffuse white matter damage like Binswanger's subcortical vascular encephalopathy (BSVE). The incidence of

  13. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  14. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  15. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  16. Inflammation, Cerebral Vasospasm, and Evolving Theories of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kevin R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is a potentially lethal complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Recently, the symptomatic presentation of CVS has been termed delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), occurring as early as 3-4 days after the sentinel bleed. For the past 5-6 decades, scientific research has promulgated the theory that cerebral vasospasm plays a primary role in the pathology of DCI and subsequently delayed ischemic neurological decline (DIND). Approximately 70% of patients develop CVS after aSAH with 50% long-term morbidity rates. The exact etiology of CVS is unknown; however, a well-described theory involves an antecedent inflammatory cascade with alterations of intracellular calcium dynamics and nitric oxide fluxes, though the intricacies of this inflammatory theory are currently unknown. Consequently, there have been few advances in the clinical treatment of this patient cohort, and morbidity remains high. Identification of intermediaries in the inflammatory cascade can provide insight into newer clinical interventions in the prevention and management of cerebral vasospasm and will hopefully prevent neurological decline. In this review, we discuss current theories implicating the inflammatory cascade in the development of CVS and potential treatment targets. PMID:24058736

  17. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter? A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Gawryluk, Jodie R.; Mazerolle, Erin L.; D'Arcy, Ryan C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: (1) the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and (2) fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter) as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter). Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI. PMID:25152709

  18. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  19. White coat, patient gown.

    PubMed

    Wellbery, Caroline; Chan, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    Much has been written about the symbolic function of the white coat: its implications of purity, its representation of authority and professionalism, and its role in consolidating a medical hierarchy. By contrast, the medical literature has paid almost no attention to the patient gown. In this article, we argue that in order to understand the full implications of the white coat in the doctor-patient relationship, we must also take into account patients' dress, and even undress. We explore contemporary artistic images of white coat and patient gown in order to reveal the power differential in the doctor-patient relationship. Artistic representations capture some of the cultural ambivalence surrounding the use of the white coat, which confers professional status on its wearer, while undermining his or her personal identity. At the other end of the sartorial spectrum, hospital gowns also strip wearers of their identity, but add to this an experience of vulnerability. Although compelling reasons for continuing to wear the white coat in circumscribed settings persist, physicians should be mindful of its hierarchical implications. Ample room remains for improving patients' privacy and dignity by updating the hospital gown. PMID:24687912

  20. Tocilizumab inhibits neuronal cell apoptosis and activates STAT3 in cerebral infarction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojun; Zhou, Jun; Kang, Weijie; Dong, Zhaoni; Wang, Hezuo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a severe hypoxic ischemic necrosis with accelerated neuronal cell apoptosis in the brain. As a monoclonal antibody against interleukin 6, tocilizumab (TCZ) is widely used in immune diseases, whose function in cerebral infarction has not been studied. This study aims to reveal the role of TCZ in regulating neuronal cell apoptosis in cerebral infarction. The cerebral infarction rat model was constructed by middle cerebral artery occlusion and treated with TCZ. Cell apoptosis in hippocampus and cortex of the brain was examined with TUNEL method. Rat neuronal cells cultured in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and treated with TCZ were used to compare cell viability and apoptosis. Apoptosis-related factors including B-cell lymphoma extra large (Bcl-xL) and Caspase 3, as well as the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) in brain cortex were analyzed from the protein level. Results indicated that TCZ treatment could significantly prevent the promoted cell apoptosis caused by cerebral infarction or OGD (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). In brain cortex of the rat model, TCZ up-regulated Bcl-xL and down-regulated Caspase 3, consistent with the inhibited cell apoptosis. It also promoted tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of STAT3, which might be the potential regulatory mechanism of TCZ in neuronal cells. This study provided evidence for the protective role of TCZ against neuronal cell apoptosis in cerebral infarction. Based on these fundamental data, TCZ is a promising option for treating cerebral infarction, but further investigations on related mechanisms are still necessary. PMID:26773188

  1. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  2. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  3. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  4. White LED performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2004-10-01

    Two life tests were conducted to compare the effects of drive current and ambient temperature on the degradation rate of 5 mm and high-flux white LEDs. Tests of 5 mm white LED arrays showed that junction temperature increases produced by drive current had a greater effect on the rate of light output degradation than junction temperature increases from ambient heat. A preliminary test of high-flux white LEDs showed the opposite effect, with junction temperature increases from ambient heat leading to a faster depreciation. However, a second life test is necessary to verify this finding. The dissimilarity in temperature effect among 5 mm and high-flux LEDs is likely caused by packaging differences between the two device types.

  5. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  6. Innervation of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Duckles, S P

    1983-01-01

    With the development of specific antibodies to vasoactive peptides and application of immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay methods, knowledge of vascular innervation has grown rapidly. In the cerebral circulation, four possible neurotransmitters are present: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P. There is a dense adrenergic innervation of cerebral arteries, but contractile responses to nerve stimulation or circulating catecholamines are relatively small both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies using radioligand binding techniques indicate a lack of specific 3H-prazosin binding in cerebral arteries, in contrast to other vascular beds. Thus a lack of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cerebral arteries may account for weak responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Both VIP and acetylcholine may be vasodilator neurotransmitters, but blockade of cholinergic responses does not alter neurogenic vasodilation. The lack of specific VIP antagonists hampers efforts to explore this system more fully. Substance P-containing nerves are affected by capsaicin, supporting the hypothesis that these are primary sensory afferents, perhaps mediating pain. Future work in this area may focus on defining the pathways of these nerves and exploring the role of co-transmitters and possible interactions between nerves. With this basic information, experiments can be designed to elucidate more clearly the functional roles these nerves play. PMID:6210001

  7. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  8. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). PMID:26749338

  9. Imaging Small Vessel-Associated White Matter Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Salat, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in cerebrovascular structure and function may underlie the most common age-associated cognitive, psychiatric, and neurological conditions presented by older adults. Although much remains to understand, existing research suggests several age-associated detrimental conditions may be mediated through sometimes subtle small vessel-induced damage to the cerebral white matter. Here we review a selected portion of the vast work that demonstrates links between changes in vascular and neural health as a function of advancing age, and how even changes in low-to-moderate risk individuals, potentially beginning early in the adult age-span, may have an important impact on functional status in late life. PMID:24316059

  10. What are the Best Animal Models for Testing Early Intervention in Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Clowry, Gavin John; Basuodan, Reem; Chan, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Interventions to treat cerebral palsy should be initiated as soon as possible in order to restore the nervous system to the correct developmental trajectory. One drawback to this approach is that interventions have to undergo exceptionally rigorous assessment for both safety and efficacy prior to use in infants. Part of this process should involve research using animals but how good are our animal models? Part of the problem is that cerebral palsy is an umbrella term that covers a number of conditions. There are also many causal pathways to cerebral palsy, such as periventricular white matter injury in premature babies, perinatal infarcts of the middle cerebral artery, or generalized anoxia at the time of birth, indeed multiple causes, including intra-uterine infection or a genetic predisposition to infarction, may need to interact to produce a clinically significant injury. In this review, we consider which animal models best reproduce certain aspects of the condition, and the extent to which the multifactorial nature of cerebral palsy has been modeled. The degree to which the corticospinal system of various animal models human corticospinal system function and development is also explored. Where attempts have already been made to test early intervention in animal models, the outcomes are evaluated in light of the suitability of the model. PMID:25538677

  11. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  12. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, D.J.

    1997-06-24

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  13. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  14. White cell design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  15. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  16. White cell design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-11-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  17. Hypertension and cerebral vasoreactivity: a continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Zhao, Peng; Alsop, David; Novak, Vera

    2010-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with microvascular and macrovascular brain injury but its direct influence on the cerebral circulation is not fully clear. Our objective was to investigate the association of hypertension with global and regional cerebral vasoreactivity to CO(2) using continuous arterial spin labeling MRI, independent of stroke and white matter hyperintensities. Participants (n=62; mean age: 66.7±1.0 years, 55% women, 84% white, 65% hypertension, 47% stroke) underwent arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI during normal breathing, 5% CO(2) rebreathing, and hyperventilation, as well as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Vasoreactivity was the slope of the regression between cerebral perfusion and end-tidal CO(2). White matter hyperintensity volumes were quantified. Nighttime dipping was calculated as the percentage decline in nighttime/daytime blood pressure. After accounting for stroke and white matter hyperintensity volume, hypertensive participants had lower global vasoreactivity (1.11±0.13 versus 0.43±0.1 mL/100 g per minute per millimeter of mercury; P=0.0012). Regionally, this was significant in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Higher mean systolic blood pressure was associated with lower vasoreactivity (decreased by 0.11 U/10-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure; P=0.04), but nighttime dipping was not (P=0.2). The magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in hypertension without stroke was comparable to the magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in stroke without hypertension. Hypertension has a direct negative effect on the cerebrovascular circulation independent of white matter hyperintensities and stroke that is comparable to that seen with stroke. Because lower vasoreactivity is associated with poor outcomes, studies of the impact of antihypertensive on vasoreactivity are important. PMID:20876450

  18. Assessing Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Depression Using 320-Slice Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Songlin; Liu, Xingde; O'Neil, Adrienne; Turner, Alyna; Chai, Fangxian; Chen, Fanying; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence that the development and course of major depressive disorder (MDD) symptomatology is associated with vascular disease, and that there are changes in energy utilization in the disorder, the extent to which cerebral blood flow is changed in this condition is not clear. This study utilized a novel imaging technique previously used in coronary and stroke patients, 320-slice Computed-Tomography (CT), to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in those with MDD and examine the pattern of regional cerebral perfusion. Thirty nine participants with depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 24 (HAMD24) score >20, and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) score >53) and 41 healthy volunteers were studied. For all subjects, 3 ml of venous blood was collected to assess hematological parameters. Trancranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound was utilized to measure parameters of cerebral artery rCBFV and analyse the Pulsatility Index (PI). 16 subjects (8 =  MDD; 8 =  healthy) also had rCBF measured in different cerebral artery regions using 320-slice CT. Differences among groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Pearson's tests were employed in our statistical analyses. Compared with the control group, whole blood viscosity (including high\\middle\\low shear rate)and hematocrit (HCT) were significantly increased in the MDD group. PI values in different cerebral artery regions and parameters of rCBFV in the cerebral arteries were decreased in depressive participants, and there was a positive relationship between rCBFV and the corresponding vascular rCBF in both gray and white matter. rCBF of the left gray matter was lower than that of the right in MDD. Major depression is characterized by a wide range of CBF impairments and prominent changes in gray matter blood flow. 320-slice CT appears to be a valid and promising tool for measuring rCBF, and could thus be employed in psychiatric settings for biomarker and treatment response purposes. PMID:25251476

  19. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion— the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain— is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  20. Intravascular Perfusion of Carbon Black Ink Allows Reliable Visualization of Cerebral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes1 (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with2 or without3 carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen3. Maeda et al.2 have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound4. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner5. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion5. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries. PMID:23328838

  1. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F

    2011-09-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects. PMID:21775798

  2. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  3. White Sea - Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  4. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  5. The White Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Editor's Note: The caption below, published on May 10, 2001, is incorrect. According to Masha Vorontsova, director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare in Moscow, the situation with the seal pups in the White Sea is normal. There is no disaster and there never was. For more details, refer to the article entitled 'No Danger' on the New Scientist home page. The Earth Observatory regrets the earlier errant report. Original Caption According to the Russian Polar Research Institute for Fisheries and Oceanography, between 250,000 and 300,000 Greenland seal pups face death by starvation over the next two months due to a cruel trick by mother nature. The seals, most of them less than two months old, are trapped on ice sheets that remain locked in the White Sea, located near Archangel in Northern Russia. Typically, during the spring thaw the ice sheets break up and flow with the currents northward into the Barents Sea, the seals' spring feeding grounds. The seal pups hitch a ride on the ice floes, living on their own individual stores of fat until they arrive in the Barents Sea. Their mothers departed for the Barents Sea weeks ago. In a normal year, the seal pups' trip from the White Sea out to the Barents takes about six weeks and the seals have adapted to rely upon this mechanism of mother nature. During their yearly migration, the mother seals usually stay with their pups and feed them until their pelts turn from white to grey--a sign that the pups are mature enough to swim and feed themselves. Unfortunately, this year unusually strong northerly winds created a bottleneck of ice near the mouth of the white sea, thus blocking the flow of ice and trapping the pups. These true-color images of the White Sea were acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. This image, taken May 2, 2000 that there is usually much less ice in the White Sea this time of year as most of it is typically en route to the

  6. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  7. Severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces microglial dysfunction leading to memory loss in APPswe/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Maude; ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature plays a key role in controlling brain homeostasis. Cerebral vasculature dysfunction, associated to irregularities in cerebral blood perfusion, has been proposed to directly contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. More precisely, chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which impairs brain homeostasis, was demonstrated to take place even before cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying the implication of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis remain elusive. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the role of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (SCCH) in AD pathogenesis. For this purpose, SCCH was induced in young APPswe/PS1 in order to evaluate the progression of AD-like pathology in these mice. We observed that SCCH accelerated the cognitive decline of young APPswe/PS1 mice, which was associated with an increased amyloid plaque number in brain parenchyma. In addition, SCCH reduced the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), which has been shown to play an important role in the adaptive responses of neurons. Importantly, SCCH impaired the function of microglial cells, which are implicated in amyloid-β (Aβ) elimination. In vitro approaches underlined the ability of a low-glucose microenvironment to decrease the general activity and phagocytic capacity of microglia. By using a new model of SCCH, our study unravels new insights into the implication of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis, mainly by altering microglial cell activity and consequently Aβ clearance. PMID:26918610

  8. What is white?

    PubMed Central

    Bosten, J. M.; Beer, R. D.; MacLeod, D. I. A.

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on the perceptual basis of the color white, we measured settings of unique white in a dark surround. We find that settings reliably show more variability in an oblique (blue-yellow) direction in color space than along the cardinal axes of the cone-opponent mechanisms. This is against the idea that white perception arises at the null point of the cone-opponent mechanisms, but one alternative possibility is that it occurs through calibration to the visual environment. We found that the locus of maximum variability in settings lies close to the locus of natural daylights, suggesting that variability may result from uncertainty about the color of the illuminant. We tested this by manipulating uncertainty. First, we altered the extent to which the task was absolute (requiring knowledge of the illumination) or relative. We found no clear effect of this factor on the reduction in sensitivity in the blue-yellow direction. Second, we provided a white surround as a cue to the illumination or left the surround dark. Sensitivity was selectively worse in the blue-yellow direction when the surround was black than when it was white. Our results can be functionally related to the statistics of natural images, where a greater blue-yellow dispersion is characteristic of both reflectances (where anisotropy is weak) and illuminants (where it is very pronounced). Mechanistically, the results could suggest a neural signal responsive to deviations from the blue-yellow locus or an adaptively matched range of contrast response functions for signals that encode different directions in color space. PMID:26641948

  9. Jupiter's White Ovals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    These images show a newly created large-scale storm on Jupiter, known as a white oval. This storm is the size of Earth and was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Galileo spacecraft's photopolarimeter radiometer in July 1998. The color composite image shown in the upper panel was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide-Field/Planetary Camera on July 16, 1998. The image in the lower panel was created from data taken by Galileo's photopolarimeter experiment on July 20, 1998, and it is sensitive to Jupiter's atmospheric temperatures.

    The white oval is believed to be the result of a merger between two smaller, 50-year-old ovals sometime in February, 1998. This white oval may be the strongest storm in the solar system outside Jupiter's 200-year old Great Red Spot. The Galileo spacecraft's measurements of the temperature field show that the feature is distinctly colder than its surroundings, as would be expected from rapidly upwelling winds in the center of the feature, and this temperature difference is at least as large as that of the two former white ovals. The temperature measurements also show that the feature to the left of the new white oval, once distinctly warmer that its surroundings (as expected of downdrafts) has cooled off.

    More images and information on the Galileo mission are available on the Internet at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov .

    The Hubble Space Telescope image is courtesy of Amy Simon and Reta Beebe, New Mexico State University, and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  10. I Also Said, "White Racial Identity Influences White Researchers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Mio and Iwamasa (1992) on white researchers investigating ethnic-minority populations and other cross-cultural issues. Briefly summarizes theory of white racial identity development as conceptualized by Helms and suggests some ways in which white scholar's stages might influence her or his scholarship endeavors.…

  11. Exploring Whiteness: A Study of Self Labels for White Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Judith N.; Krizek, Robert L.; Nakayama, Thomas K.; Bradford, Lisa

    1996-01-01

    Examines the preferences and meanings of labels for White Americans as discursively defined expressions of identity, after preliminary revelations of resistance by Whites to self-labeling was seen. Surveys 371 White undergraduate students, rating seven labels regarding preference and discussing feelings about self-labeling. Reveals that the most…

  12. 50 CFR 660.373 - Pacific whiting (whiting) fishery management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 CFR Part 660, subpart G, a vessel that is 75 feet or less LOA that harvests whiting and, in... affecting § 660.373, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific whiting (whiting)...

  13. Complicating Whiteness: Identifications of Veteran White Teachers in Multicultural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miele, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A scrupulous search of whiteness literatures in relation to multicultural education reveals a preponderance of scholarship noting White privilege and race evasiveness. Given contrasting scholarship arguing White identity as complicated, multifarious, and bound to social and historical context, concurrent with a dearth of scholarship that examines…

  14. White Institutional Presence: The Impact of Whiteness on Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusa, Diane Lynn

    2010-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, Diane Gusa highlights the salience of race by scrutinizing the culture of Whiteness within predominately White institutions of higher education. Using existing research in higher education retention literature, Gusa examines embedded White cultural ideology in the cultural practices, traditions, and perceptions of…

  15. White Students Reflecting on Whiteness: Understanding Emotional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nathan R.; Spanierman, Lisa B.; Aber, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present investigation, the authors explored potential predictors of White students’ general emotional responses after they reflected on their Whiteness in a semi-structured interview (n = 88) or written reflection (n = 187). Specifically, the authors examined how color-blindness (i.e., awareness of White privilege) and racial affect (i.e., White empathy, White guilt, and White fear), assessed before the interview or written reflection, may predict positive and negative emotional responses, assessed immediately following the interview or written reflection. Furthermore, the authors considered whether affective costs of racism to Whites moderated the association between racial color-blindness and general positive and negative emotional responses of White students. Findings indicated that affective costs of racism moderated associations between racial color-blindness and general emotional responses. Specifically, White fear moderated associations for the written reflection group whereas White empathy moderated an association in the interview. White guilt did not moderate, but instead directly predicted a negative emotional response in the written reflection group. Findings suggest that the interaction between racial color-blindness and racial affect is important when predicting students’ emotional responses to reflecting on their Whiteness. Implications for educators and administrators are discussed. PMID:20657811

  16. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  17. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  18. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  19. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  20. White matter of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    White matter is found in the deeper tissues of the brain (subcortical). It contains nerve fibers (axons), which are ... or covering called myelin. Myelin gives the white matter its color. It also protects the nerve fibers ...

  1. White Flight: Pros and Cons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of school desegregation on White enrollment, the policy impact from two long-term demographic trends among middle class Whites--suburbanization and the declining birth rate--must be isolated. (Author/MC)

  2. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition in which there is an extra electrical pathway of the heart. The ... to periods of rapid heart rate ( tachycardia ). Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most common ...

  3. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  4. Imaging of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, F

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potentially life-threatening emergency. The wide ranging of clinical symptoms makes the use of imaging in "slices" even more important for diagnosis. Both CT and MRI are used to diagnose the occlusion of a venous sinus, but MRI is superior to CT for detecting a clot in the cortical or deep veins. CT can show the hyperintense clot spontaneously and CT angiography the intraluminal defect. MRI also detects this thrombus, whose signal varies over time: in the acute phase, it is hypointense in T2*, whilst T1 and T2 can appear falsely reassuring; in the subacute phase, it is hyperintense on all sequences (T1, T2, FLAIR, T2*, diffusion). MRI easily shows the ischemic damage, even hemorrhagic, in the cerebral parenchyma in cases of CVT. Finally, imaging may reveal pathology at the origin of the CVT, such as a fracture of the skull, infection, tumor, dural fistula, or intracranial hypotension. PMID:25465119

  5. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  6. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  7. Egg White Phantoms for HIFU

    SciTech Connect

    Divkovic, Gabriela; Jenne, Juergen W.

    2005-03-28

    We used fresh egg white and polyacrylamide to create a transparent tissue mimicking phantom. Heating of phantoms by HIFU leads to egg white protein denaturation and creation of visible white lesions. We measured the acoustical and thermal properties and investigated the possibility to use such phantoms to study the lesion formation during the HIFU therapy.

  8. White Students' Understanding of Race: An Exploration of How White University Students, Raised in a Predominately White State, Experience Whiteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines White university students' understanding of race. Based in the scholarship on higher education and diversity, and framed in Critical Race Theory (CRT), this study explores the racial awareness of White students. This study contributes to the literature on the racial experience of Whites and an understanding of how White…

  9. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G.; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomical and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter (WM). In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics, and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal WM integrity as compared to healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the splenium of corpus callosum, and left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD bilaterally in the anterior limbs of internal capsule, and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a p<0.01 level: FA in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with Total Pain Experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus were correlated with Total Pain Experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both Total Pain Experience and Pain Catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that WM abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain; either as a cause, predisposing factor, consequence, or compensatory adaptation. PMID:25135468

  10. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  11. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  12. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B. Z.; Yang, J. G.; Wu, D.; Zeng, D. W.; Yi, Y.; Yang, N.; Jiang, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Using acupuncture to treat cerebral hypoperfusion is a hot topic. However, there is a lack of effective tools to clarify the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cerebral hypoperfusion. Here, we show in a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion that photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can noninvasively image cerebral vasculature and track total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes in cerebral hypoperfusion with acupuncture stimulation on the YangLingQuan (GB34) point. We measured the changes of HbT concentration and found that the HbT concentration in hypoperfusion regions was clearly lower than that in the control regions when the acupuncture was absent; however, it was significantly increased when the acupuncture was implemented on the GB34 point. We also observed the increase of vessel size and the generation of new vessels in cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) was employed to validate some of the PAT findings. PMID:26417495

  14. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  15. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  16. REGIONAL WHITE MATTER VOLUME DIFFERENCES IN NONDEMENTED AGING AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Pacheco, Jennifer L.; Quinn, Brian T.; Helmer, Karl G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cerebral white matter (WM) influences normal aging, and further that WM degeneration may modulate the clinical expression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we conducted a study of differences in WM volume across the adult age span and in AD employing a newly developed, automated method for regional parcellation of the subcortical WM that uses curvature landmarks and gray matter (GM)/WM surface boundary information. This procedure measures the volume of gyral WM, utilizing a distance constraint to limit the measurements from extending into the centrum semiovale. Regional estimates were first established to be reliable across two scan sessions in 20 young healthy individuals. Next, the method was applied to a large clinically-characterized sample of 299 individuals including 73 normal older adults and 91 age-matched participants with very mild to mild AD. The majority of measured regions showed a decline in volume with increasing age, with strong effects found in bilateral fusiform, lateral orbitofrontal, superior frontal, medial orbital frontal, inferior temporal, and middle temporal WM. The association between WM volume and age was quadratic in many regions suggesting that WM volume loss accelerates in advanced aging. A number of WM regions were further reduced in AD with parahippocampal, entorhinal, inferior parietal and rostral middle frontal WM showing the strongest AD-associated reductions. There were minimal sex effects after correction for intracranial volume, and there were associations between ventricular volume and regional WM volumes in the older adults and AD that were not apparent in the younger adults. Certain results, such as the loss of WM in the fusiform region with aging, were unexpected and provide novel insight into patterns of age associated neural and cognitive decline. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of automated regional WM measures in revealing the distinct patterns of age and AD

  17. Atrial Fibrillation Exacerbates Cognitive Dysfunction and Cerebral Perfusion in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) increases risk for cognitive impairment in part due to the negative effects of cardiac dysfunction on cerebral perfusion. Atrial fibrillation (AF), an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment, often accompanies HF and is associated with lower systemic perfusion. However, no study has examined the associations among AF, cognitive function, and cerebral perfusion in patients with HF. Methods 187 HF patients completed neuropsychological testing and underwent transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (CBF-V) operationalized cerebral perfusion. A medical chart review ascertained AF. Results 32.1% of HF patients had a history of AF. HF patients with AF exhibited worse global cognition, memory, and CBF-V relative to patients without AF. These effects remained after HF severity and other demographic and medical factors were taken into account. Partial correlations controlling for possible confounds showed decreased CBF-V predicted worse cognition in multiple domains in the overall sample (r = 0.13 to 0.15, p < 0.05) and in the subgroup of HF patients with AF (r = 0.26 to r = 0.28, p < 0.05), but not among HF patients without AF. Conclusions AF exacerbates cognitive deficits in HF possibly through its association with decreased cerebral perfusion. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether AF accelerates cognitive decline in HF and whether medical (e.g., ablation) and lifestyle interventions (e.g., exercise programs) that target cerebral perfusion improve cognitive outcomes in patients with HF and AF. PMID:25492027

  18. 'Snow White' Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 43, the 43rd Martian day after landing (July 8, 2008). This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White.'

    Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample was taken from the surface area just left of the trench and informally named 'Rosy Red.' It was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). The second sample, informally named 'Sorceress,' was taken from the center of the 'Snow White' trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 41 (July 6, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Current pathophysiological concepts in cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Fred; Wright, Clinton B.

    2014-01-01

    The association between cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) – in the form of white matter lesions, infarctions, and hemorrhages – with vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), has mostly been deduced from observational studies. Pathological conditions affecting the small vessels of the brain and leading to SVD have suggested plausible molecular mechanisms involved in vascular damage and their impact on brain function. However, much still needs to be clarified in understanding the pathophysiology of VCI, the role of neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer’s disease, and the impact of aging itself. In addition, both genetic predispositions and environmental exposures may potentiate the development of SVD and interact with normal aging to impact cognitive function and require further study. Advances in technology, in the analysis of genetic and epigenetic data, neuroimaging such as magnetic resonance imaging, and new biomarkers will help to clarify the complex factors leading to SVD and the expression of VCI. PMID:24715862

  20. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, W.D.; Golden, C.J.; Gillen, R.W.; Sawicki, R.F.; Quaife, M.; Uhl, H.S.; Greenhouse, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the /sup 133/xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning.

  1. Pentobarbital changes compartmental contribution to cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, J.P.; Lawner, P.; Simeone, F.A.; Fink, E.

    1982-04-01

    Barbiturates were administered to normal dogs, establishing an isoelectric electrocorticogram. Cortical cerebral blood flows (CBF) and deeper CBF's were respectively measured by krypton-85 (85Kr) and xenon-133 (133 Xe). Following barbiturate administration, the two methods of measuring CBF showed a poor coefficient of variation (r.0.12, p less than 0.05). The cortical flows decreased less than the fast compartment flows. A shifting of percentage contribution of flow to the slow compartment (60% increase, p less than 0.001) was observed after barbiturate infusion. A selective shunting of blood flow to the slower areas may explain the lowering of intracranial pressure and protection of the deep white matter observed by many authors who use barbiturates in clinical an experimental situations.

  2. Automatic segmentation of cerebral MR images using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Alirezaie, J.; Jernigan, M.E.; Nahmias, C.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present an unsupervised clustering technique for multispectral segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. Our scheme utilizes the Self Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) artificial neural network for feature mapping and generates a set of codebook vectors. By extending the network with an additional layer the map will be classified and each tissue class will be labelled. An algorithm has been developed for extracting the cerebrum from the head scan prior to the segmentation. Extracting the cerebrum is performed by stripping away the skull pixels from the T2 image. Three tissue types of the brain: white matter, gray matter and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are segmented accurately. To compare the results with other conventional approaches we applied the c-means algorithm to the problem.

  3. White matter changes in chronic alcoholic liver disease: Hypothesized association and putative biochemical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Leith; Huang, Jimmy; Zamani, Amir; Morioka, Craig; El-Saden, Suzie

    2015-12-01

    Advanced liver disease has long been associated with cerebral abnormalities. These abnormalities, termed acquired hepatocerebral degeneration, are typically visualized as T1 weighted hyperintensity on MRI in the deep gray matter of the basal ganglia. Recent reports, however, have demonstrated that a subset of patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease may also develop white matter abnormalities. Thus far, the morphology of these changes is not well characterized. Previous studies have described these changes as patchy, sporadic white matter abnormalities but have not posited localization of these changes to any particular white matter tracts. This paper hypothesizes that the white matter findings associated with advanced alcoholic liver disease localize to the corticocerebellar tracts. As an initial investigation of this hypothesis, 78 patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and an MRI showing clearly abnormal T1 weighted hyperintensity in the bilateral globus pallidus, characteristic of chronic liver disease, were examined for white matter signal abnormalities in the corticocerebellar tracts using FLAIR and T2 weighted images. The corticocerebellar tracts were subdivided into two regions: periventricular white matter (consisting of the sum of the centrum-semiovale and corona radiata), and lower white matter (consisting of the corona radiata, internal capsules, middle cerebral peduncles, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellum). As compared to matched controls, significantly greater signal abnormalities in both the periventricular white matter and lower white matter regions of the corticocerebellar tracts were observed in patients with known liver cirrhosis and abnormal T1 W hyperintensity in the globi pallidi. This difference was most pronounced in the lower white matter region of the corticocerebellar tract, with statistical significance of p<0.0005. Furthermore, the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying these changes remains unknown. This paper

  4. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  5. Parasympathetic tonic dilatory influences on cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Nicholas C; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Talman, William T

    2009-05-11

    Parasympathetic nerves from the pterygopalatine ganglia may participate in development of cluster headaches, in vascular responses to hypertension and in modulation of damage due to stroke. Stimulation of the nerves elicits cerebral vasodilatation, but it is not known if the nerves tonically influence cerebrovascular tone. We hypothesized that parasympathetics provide a tonic vasodilator influence and tested that hypothesis by measuring cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats before and after removal of a pterygopalatine ganglion. Ganglion removal led to reduced cerebral blood flow without changing blood pressure. Thus, parasympathetic nerves provide tonic vasodilatory input to cerebral blood vessels. PMID:19195933

  6. Prevention and Management of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Lacunar infarcts/lacunes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are considered various manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Since the exact mechanisms of these manifestations differ, their associated risk factors differ. High blood pressure is the most consistent risk factor for all of these manifestations. However, a "J curve" phenomenon in terms of blood pressure probably exists for WMH. The association between cholesterol levels and lacunar infarcts/lacunes or WMH was less consistent and sometimes conflicting; a low cholesterol level probably increases the risk of CMBs. Homocysteinemia appears to be associated with WMH. It is noteworthy that the risk factors profile may also differ between different lacunar patterns and CMBs located at different parts of the brain. Thrombolysis, antihypertensives, and statins are used to treat patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction, just as in those with other stroke subtypes. However, it should be remembered that bleeding risks increase in patients with extensive WMH and CMBs after thrombolysis therapy. According to the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial results, a blood pressure reduction to <130 mmHg is recommended in patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction. However, an excessive blood pressure decrease may induce cognitive decline in older patients with extensive WMH. Dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin plus clopidogrel) should be avoided because of the excessive risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Although no particular antiplatelet is recommended, drugs such as cilostazol or triflusal may have advantages for patients with SVD since they are associated with less frequent bleeding complications than aspirin. PMID:26060798

  7. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: characterisation of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Johnson, G; Tofts, P S; Landon, D N

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used quantitatively to define the characteristics of two different models of experimental cerebral oedema in cats: vasogenic oedema produced by cortical freezing and cytotoxic oedema induced by triethyl tin. The MRI results have been correlated with the ultrastructural changes. The images accurately delineated the anatomical extent of the oedema in the two lesions, but did not otherwise discriminate between them. The patterns of measured increase in T1' and T2' were, however, characteristic for each type of oedema, and reflected the protein content. The magnetisation decay characteristics of both normal and oedematous white matter were monoexponential for T1 but biexponential for T2 decay. The relative sizes of the two component exponentials of the latter corresponded with the physical sizes of the major tissue water compartments. Quantitative MRI data can provide reliable information about the physico-chemical environment of tissue water in normal and oedematous cerebral tissue, and are useful for distinguishing between acute and chronic lesions in multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:3572428

  8. White matter hyperintensities and geriatric syndrome: An important role of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Saji, Naoki; Ogama, Noriko; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are defined as cerebral white matter changes presumed to be of vascular origin, bilateral and mostly symmetrical. They can appear as hyperintense on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, and as isointense or hypointense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. WMH have been focused on because of their clinical importance as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment. WMH are associated with geriatric syndrome, which is defined by clinical symptoms characteristic of older adults, including cognitive and functional impairment and falls. Cerebral small vessel diseases, such as WMH, might play an important role as risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive impairment and geriatric syndrome through the mechanism of arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness remain unclear. Basically, arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. These changes might arise from hemodynamic stress as a result of a "tsunami effect" on cerebral parenchyma. In the present article, we review the clinical characteristics of WMH, focusing particularly on two associations: (i) those between cerebral small vessel diseases including WMH and arterial stiffness; and (ii) those between WMH and geriatric syndrome. PMID:26671153

  9. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  10. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  11. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/μL; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/μL; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/μL). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous

  12. Differential effects of white noise in cognitive and perceptual tasks

    PubMed Central

    Herweg, Nora A.; Bunzeck, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of noise on higher cognition have recently attracted attention. Hypothesizing an involvement of the mesolimbic dopamine system and its functional interactions with cortical areas, the current study aimed to demonstrate a facilitation of dopamine-dependent attentional and mnemonic functions by externally applying white noise in five behavioral experiments including a total sample of 167 healthy human subjects. During working memory, acoustic white noise impaired accuracy when presented during the maintenance period (Experiments 1–3). In a reward based long-term memory task, white noise accelerated perceptual judgments for scene images during encoding but left subsequent recognition memory unaffected (Experiment 4). In a modified Posner task (Experiment 5), the benefit due to white noise in attentional orienting correlated weakly with reward dependence, a personality trait that has been associated with the dopaminergic system. These results suggest that white noise has no general effect on cognitive functions. Instead, they indicate differential effects on perception and cognition depending on a variety of factors such as task demands and timing of white noise presentation. PMID:26579024

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow during hypoxia-ischemia in immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vannucci, R.C.; Lyons, D.T.; Vasta, F.

    1988-02-01

    Immature rats subjected to a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation and hypoxia sustain brain damage confined largely to the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. To ascertain the extent and distribution of ischemic alterations in the brains of these small animals, we modified the Sakurada technique to measure regional cerebral blood flow using carbon-14 autoradiography. Seven-day-old rats underwent right common carotid artery ligation following which they were rendered hypoxic with 8% O2 at 37 degrees C. Before and during hypoxia, the rat pups received an injection of iodo(/sup 14/C)antipyrine for determination of regional cerebral blood flow. Blood flows to individual structures of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere were not influenced by arterial occlusion alone; flows to the contralateral hemisphere and to the brainstem and cerebellum actually increased by 25-50%. Hypoxia-ischemia was associated with decreases in regional cerebral blood flow of the ipsilateral hemisphere such that by 2 hours, flows to subcortical white matter, neocortex, striatum, and thalamus were 15, 17, 34, and 41% of control, respectively. The hierarchy of the blood flow reductions correlated closely with the distribution and extent of ischemic neuronal necrosis. However, unlike the pathologic pattern of this model, the degree of ischemia appeared homogeneous within each brain region. Blood flows to contralateral cerebral hemispheric structures were relatively unchanged from prehypoxic values, whereas flows to the brainstem and cerebellum nearly doubled and tripled, respectively. Thus, ischemia is the predominant factor that determines the topography of tissue injury to major regions of immature rat brain, whereas metabolic factors may influence the heterogeneous pattern of damage seen within individual structures.

  14. Preterm white matter brain injury is prevented by early administration of umbilical cord blood cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingang; Yawno, Tamara; Sutherland, Amy; Loose, Jan; Nitsos, Ilias; Bischof, Robert; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; McDonald, Courtney A; Wong, Flora Y; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2016-09-01

    Infants born very preterm are at high risk for neurological deficits including cerebral palsy. In this study we assessed the neuroprotective effects of umbilical cord blood cells (UCBCs) and optimal administration timing in a fetal sheep model of preterm brain injury. 50 million allogeneic UCBCs were intravenously administered to fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) at 12h or 5d after acute hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induced by umbilical cord occlusion. The fetal brains were collected at 10d after HI. HI (n=7) was associated with reduced number of oligodendrocytes (Olig2+) and myelin density (CNPase+), and increased density of activated microglia (Iba-1+) in cerebral white matter compared to control fetuses (P<0.05). UCBCs administered at 12h, but not 5d after HI, significantly protected white matter structures and suppressed cerebral inflammation. Activated microglial density showed a correlation with decreasing oligodendrocyte number (P<0.001). HI caused cell death (TUNEL+) in the internal capsule and cell proliferation (Ki-67+) in the subventricular zone compared to control (P<0.05), while UCBCs at 12h or 5d ameliorated these effects. Additionally, UCBCs at 12h induced a significant systemic increase in interleukin-10 at 10d, and reduced oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) following HI (P<0.05). UCBC administration at 12h after HI reduces preterm white matter injury, via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. PMID:27317990

  15. Arterial Spin Labeling of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Talagala, S. Lalith; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain cerebral perfusion territories of the left, the right and the posterior circulation in humans with high SNR and robust delineation. Materials and Methods CASL was implemented using a dedicated RF coil, positioned over the neck, to label the major cerebral feeding arteries in humans. Selective labeling was achieved by flow-driven adiabatic fast passage and by tilting the longitudinal labeling gradient about the Y-axis by θ=±60°. Results Mean CBF values in gray and white matter were 74±13 ml·100g−1·min−1 and 14±13 ml·100g−1·min−1, respectively (N=14). There were no signal differences between left and right hemispheres when θ=0° (P>0.19), indicating efficient labeling of both hemispheres. When θ=+60°, the signal in GM on the left hemisphere, 0.07±0.06%, was 92% lower than on the right hemisphere, 0.85±0.30% (P<10−9), while for θ=−60°, the signal in the right hemisphere, 0.16±0.13%, was 82% lower than on the contralateral side, 0.89±0.22% (P<10−10). Similar attenuations were obtained in white matter. Conclusions Clear delineation of the left and right cerebral perfusion territories was obtained, allowing discrimination of the anterior and posterior circulation in each hemisphere. PMID:18425844

  16. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  17. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  18. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  19. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Hua; Liu, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shu-Bin; Ji, Bing-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). However, brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology. Methods: To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP, 12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group, n = 6) and without (DHCA [D] group, n = 6) ASCP according to the random number table. ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery. Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass. The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites, and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups. Results: Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2Y = 0.88 for partial least squares-DA model). In comparing to group D, 62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP, which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway, subdued anaerobic metabolism, and oxidative stress. In addition, L-kynurenine (P = 0.0019), 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0499), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased, and citrulline (P = 0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D. Conclusions: The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral

  20. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  1. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  2. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  3. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  4. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  5. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  6. 'Snow White' in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench.

    The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Cerebral arterial bolus arrival time is prolonged in multiple sclerosis and associated with disability

    PubMed Central

    Paling, David; Thade Petersen, Esben; Tozer, Daniel J; Altmann, Daniel R; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia AM; Kapoor, Raju; Miller, David H; Golay, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the overall cerebral hemodynamics have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, their cause and significance is unknown. While potential venous causes have been examined, arterial causes have not. In this study, a multiple delay time arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging sequence at 3T was used to quantify the arterial hemodynamic parameter bolus arrival time (BAT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and deep gray matter in 33 controls and 35 patients with relapsing–remitting MS. Bolus arrival time was prolonged in MS in NAWM (1.0±0.2 versus 0.9±0.2 seconds, P=0.031) and deep gray matter (0.90±0.18 versus 0.80±0.14 seconds, P=0.001) and CBF was increased in NAWM (14±4 versus 10±2 mL/100 g/min, P=0.001). Prolonged BAT in NAWM (P=0.042) and deep gray matter (P=0.01) were associated with higher expanded disability status score. This study demonstrates alteration in cerebral arterial hemodynamics in MS. One possible cause may be widespread inflammation. Bolus arrival time was longer in patients with greater disability independent of atrophy and T2 lesion load, suggesting alterations in cerebral arterial hemodynamics may be a marker of clinically relevant pathology. PMID:24045400

  8. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-Ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  9. Effects of cochlear ablation on local cerebral glucose utilization in fetal sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, R.M.; Hutchison, A.A.; McTiernan, M.J.; Merwin, G.E.

    1987-12-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured by the (/sup 14/C)-deoxyglucose method in five near-term fetal sheep in whom bilateral ablation of the cochleae had been accomplished aseptically 5 to 8 days earlier. The tympanic membrane and ossicles were removed and all turns of each cochlea were unroofed with destruction carried to the modiolus. Mean local cerebral glucose utilization of 33 of 34 gray matter structures and four of four white matter structures in operated animals were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) than that in unoperated control fetuses. The depression in local cerebral glucose utilization was greatest (p less than 0.002) in brain stem auditory nuclei, in which the mean rate of glucose utilization was approximately 25% of the levels in unoperated fetuses. The pattern of glucose utilization in these structures was clearly altered, with a reversal of the normal distribution in density of the inferior colliculus. Tonotopic bands of high local cerebral glucose utilization frequently seen in autoradiographs of inferior colliculus in unoperated fetuses were not observed in operated fetuses. These results show that the glucose utilization of the brain, and by implication the normal growth and maturation of the brain, depends on an intact auditory system during prenatal life.

  10. Measuring intellectual ability in cerebral palsy: The comparison of three tests and their neuroimaging correlates.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Macaya, Alfons; Póo, Pilar; Meléndez-Plumed, Mar; Vázquez, Élida; Delgado, Ignacio; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Narberhaus, Ana; Toro-Tamargo, Esther; Russi, Maria Eugenia; Tenorio, Violeta; Segarra, Dolors; Pueyo, Roser

    2016-09-01

    Standard intelligence scales require both verbal and manipulative responses, making it difficult to use in cerebral palsy and leading to underestimate their actual performance. This study aims to compare three intelligence tests suitable for the heterogeneity of cerebral palsy in order to identify which one(s) could be more appropriate to use. Forty-four subjects with bilateral dyskinetic cerebral palsy (26 male, mean age 23 years) conducted the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-3rd (PPVT-III) and the Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability (WNV). Furthermore, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed. The results show that PPVT-III gives limited information on cognitive performance and brain correlates, getting lower intelligence quotient scores. The WNV provides similar outcomes as RCPM, but cases with severe motor impairment were unable to perform it. Finally, the RCPM gives more comprehensive information on cognitive performance, comprising not only visual but also verbal functions. It is also sensitive to the structural state of the brain, being related to basal ganglia, thalamus and white matter areas such as superior longitudinal fasciculus. So, the RCPM may be considered a standardized easy-to-administer tool with great potential in both clinical and research fields of bilateral cerebral palsy. PMID:27262445

  11. Substantial Reduction of Parenchymal Cerebral Blood Flow in Mice with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yorito; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) mouse model, which replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and white matter ischemic lesions, is considered to model some aspects of vascular cognitive impairment. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the brain surface post-BCAS have been demonstrated by laser speckle flowmetry, but CBF levels in the brain parenchyma remain unknown. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to BCAS using external microcoils. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was conducted to visualize the intracranial main arteries while arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF levels before and after BCAS. Brain MRA showed anterior circulation flow was substantially decreased until 14 days post-BCAS, which gradually but incompletely recovered over the following 14 days, with probable growth of collaterals from the posterior cerebral artery. ASL showed that cortical and subcortical parenchymal CBF remained decreased at approximately 50% of the baseline level during 1 and 14 days post-BCAS, recovering to approximately 70% at day 28. CBF levels in the parenchyma were lower than the cortical superficial region in the BCAS model and remained decreased without recovery during the first 2 weeks post-BCAS. These results suggest that the BCAS model reliably replicates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:27535801

  12. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  13. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  14. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  15. Basal ganglia germinoma with progressive cerebral hemiatrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, E; Robertson, R L; du Plessis, A; Pomeroy, S L

    1999-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old Chinese-American female with a germinoma of the basal ganglia who presented with progressive hemiparesis and cerebral hemiatrophy. The additional finding of markedly elevated antiphospholipid antibodies suggests the possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis for the progressive cerebral atrophy, as well as the later development of cognitive decline, tics, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. PMID:10328283

  16. New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John

    This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  18. UNDERSTANDING CEREBRAL PALSY, A HANDBOOK FOR PARENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HATTON, DANIEL A.

    THIS MANUAL, WRITTEN BY A PSYCHOLOGIST, PROVIDES BASIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE NATURE OF CEREBRAL PALSY AND DISCUSSES FEELINGS AND REACTIONS OF PARENTS OF CEREBRAL PALSIED CHILDREN. INFORMATION ABOUT THE BRAIN AND BRAIN DAMAGE IN RELATION TO MOTOR AND EMOTIONAL FUNCTION, PERCEPTION AND INTELLIGENCE IS PRESENTED. PART TWO GIVES INSIGHT INTO PROBLEMS…

  19. Rhinomaxillary mucormycosis with cerebral extension

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shikha; Palaskar, Sangeeta; Shetty, Vishwa Parkash; Bhushan, Anju

    2009-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by fungus belonging to the order Mucorales. A case of a controlled diabetic male with rhino maxillary mucormycosis, with cerebral extension, is described. The patient presented with hemifacial swelling, a nasal twang in his voice, fever, ocular signs, gross tissue destruction, and was sluggish. Early recognition of mucormycosis is necessary to limit the spread of infection, which can lead to high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, health practitioners should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of the disease. PMID:21886991

  20. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of subcortical circuits and structures. PMID:6619888

  1. Phase dynamics in cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Latka, Miroslaw; Turalska, Malgorzata; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Kolodziej, Waldemar; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J

    2005-11-01

    Complex continuous wavelet transforms are used to study the dynamics of instantaneous phase difference delta phi between the fluctuations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in a middle cerebral artery. For healthy individuals, this phase difference changes slowly over time and has an almost uniform distribution for the very low-frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) part of the spectrum. We quantify phase dynamics with the help of the synchronization index gamma = (sin delta phi)2 + (cos delta phi)2 that may vary between 0 (uniform distribution of phase differences, so the time series are statistically independent of one another) and 1 (phase locking of ABP and CBFV, so the former drives the latter). For healthy individuals, the group-averaged index gamma has two distinct peaks, one at 0.11 Hz [gamma = 0.59 +/- 0.09] and another at 0.33 Hz (gamma = 0.55 +/- 0.17). In the very low-frequency range (0.02-0.07 Hz), phase difference variability is an inherent property of an intact autoregulation system. Consequently, the average value of the synchronization parameter in this part of the spectrum is equal to 0.13 +/- 0.03. The phase difference variability sheds new light on the nature of cerebral hemodynamics, which so far has been predominantly characterized with the help of the high-pass filter model. In this intrinsically stationary approach, based on the transfer function formalism, the efficient autoregulation is associated with the positive phase shift between oscillations of CBFV and ABP. However, the method is applicable only in the part of the spectrum (0.1-0.3 Hz) where the coherence of these signals is high. We point out that synchrony analysis through the use of wavelet transforms is more general and allows us to study nonstationary aspects of cerebral hemodynamics in the very low-frequency range where the physiological significance of autoregulation is most strongly pronounced. PMID:16024579

  2. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids. PMID:25533053

  3. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  4. Focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Michael; Fischl, Bruce; Salat, David; Tempelmann, Claus; Schönfeld, Mircea Ariel; Busa, Evelina; Bodammer, Nils; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dale, Anders

    2003-08-01

    Brain atrophy as determined by quantitative MRI can be used to characterize disease progression in multiple sclerosis. Many studies have addressed white matter (WM) alterations leading to atrophy, while changes of the cerebral cortex have been studied to a lesser extent. In vivo, the cerebral cortex has been difficult to study due to its complex structure and regional variability. Measurement of cerebral cortex thickness at different disease stages may provide new insights into grey matter (GM) pathology. In the present investigation, we evaluated in vivo cortical thickness and its relationship to disability, disease duration, WM T2 hyper-intense and T1 hypo-intense lesion volumes. High-resolution MRI brain scans were obtained in 20 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis and 15 age-matched normal subjects. A novel method of automated surface reconstruction yielded measurements of the cortical thickness for each subject's entire brain and computed cross-subject statistics based on the cortical anatomy. Statistical thickness difference maps were generated by performing t-tests between patient and control groups and individual thickness measures were submitted to analyses of variance to investigate the relationship between cortical thickness and clinical variables. The mean overall thickness of the cortical ribbon was reduced in multiple sclerosis patients compared with controls [2.30 mm (SD 0.14) versus 2.48 mm (SD 0.11)], showing a significant main effect of group (controls versus patients). In patients, we found significant main effects for disability, disease duration, T2 and T1 lesion volumes. The visualization of statistical difference maps of the cortical GM thickness on inflated brains across the cortical surface revealed a distinct distribution of significant focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in addition to the diffuse cortical atrophy. Focal cortical thinning in frontal [2.37 mm (SD 0.17) versus 2.73 mm (SD 0.25)] and in temporal [2.65 mm

  5. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  6. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  7. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  8. Chronic ketosis and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    DeVivo, D C; Leckie, M P; Ferrendelli, J S; McDougal, D B

    1978-04-01

    The effects of chronic ketosis on cerebral metabolism were determined in adult rats maintained on a high-fat diet for approximately three weeks and compared to a control group of animals. The fat-fed rats had statistically significantly lower blood glucose concentrations and higher blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate concentrations; higher brain concentrations of bound glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, alanine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP); lower brain concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, aspartate, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), creatine, cyclic nucleotides, succinyl coenzyme A (CoA), acid-insoluble CoA, and total CoA; and similar brain concentrations of glucose, malate, calculated oxaloacetate, glutamate, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate, phosphocreatine, reduced CoA, acetyl CoA, sodium, potassium, chloride, and water content. The metabolite data in the chronically ketotic rats demonstrate an increase in the cerebral energy reserve and energy charge. These data also suggest negative modification of the enzymes phosphofructokinase, pyruvic dehydrogenase, and alpha-ketoglutaric dehydrogenase; positive modification of glycogen synthase; and possible augmentation of the hexose transport system. There was no demonstrable difference in brain pH, water content, or electrolytes in the two groups of animals. We speculate that the increased brain ATP/ADP ratio is central to most, if not all, the observed metabolic perturbations and may account for the increased neuronal stability that accompanies chronic ketosis. PMID:666275

  9. Cerebral lateralization in simultaneous interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Gran, L; Basso, G; Bava, A

    1990-07-01

    Cerebral asymmetries for L1 (Italian), L2 (English), and L3 (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) were studied, by using a verbal-manual interference paradigm, in a group of Italian right-handed polyglot female students at the Scuola Superiore di Lingue Moderne per Interpreti e Traduttori (SSLM-School for Interpreters and Translators) of the University of Trieste and in a control group of right-handed monolingual female students at the Medical School of the University of Trieste. In an automatic speech production task no significant cerebral lateralization was found for the mother tongue (L1) either in the interpreting students or in the control group; the interpreting students were not significantly lateralized for the third language (L3), while weak left hemispheric lateralization was shown for L2. A significantly higher degree of verbal-manual interference was found for L1 than for L2 and L3. A significantly higher disruption rate occurred in the meaning-based mode of simultaneous interpretation (from L2 into L1 and vice versa) than in the word-for-word mode (from L2 into L1 and vice versa). No significant overall or hemispheric differences were found during simultaneous interpretation from L1 into L2 or from L2 into L1. PMID:2207622

  10. Cerebral Syndromes of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shavelle, Henry S.

    1969-01-01

    Three labile diabetic patients had recurring episodes of altered sensorium. Each had severe cerebrovascular disease with superimposed metabolic derangements, including ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia without ketosis, mild uremia, and possibly cerebral edema. Two of the patients were examined postmortem. Severe leptomeningeal scarring, basal ganglial calcification and destruction of small intracerebral vessels without evidence of large vessel atherosclerosis were found unexpectedly in one patient, a rare occurrence in this country although recently reported from Europe. The other patient had large vessel atherosclerosis only. The clinical expression of the vascular disease was modified by concurrent abnormalities and reflected the sum total of the complexities which coexisted. The pathophysiology of the unconscious state necessarily depends on the inciting factors. Ketoacidotic coma is associated with depressed cerebral oxygen consumption. Spinal fluid pH is usually maintained during ketosis but is sometimes lowered inadvertently during bicarbonate therapy, with resultant coma. Other variables influencing the clinical expression, with or without ketosis, would include, among others, blood viscosity alterations, rapid decrements in blood sugar, and existing degrees of lactic acidosis. The increasing life-span of the juvenile diabetics, favorably influenced by improved management and recently by hemodialysis, may uncover vascular complications heretofore rarely seen and create additional diagnostic and therapeutic enigmas. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:5798497

  11. [Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milojević, T M; Baljozović, B V; Rakić, M Lj; Nestorović, B D; Dostanić, M M; Milaković, B D; Kojić, Z Z; Repac, N R; Cvrkota, I S

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm causes permanent neurolological deficit or death occurance in 13% of clinical cases. Peak frequency is from 8-10th day after SAH. The purpose of this study is factor analysis that may have influence on vasospasm development , as well as predictor determination. The study is prospective and analysis 192 patients treated in Institute of Neurosurgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. The majority of patients were admitted in hospital in first four days after SAH, and 184 had GCS over 7. Univariate methods of factor analysis were used, and for significance of predictors influence testing multivariante regression analysis was used. Vasospasm occurred in 22,40% of all cases. No relationships have been found between sex, age, previous hypertension, timing of surgery, appearance of hydrocephalus and intracerebral hematoma, hypertermia or mean arterial blood pressure, with occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. Factors with significantly associated with the occurance of vasospasm were: hearth disease, hypernatriemia, Hct, clinical grade on admission as well as preoperative clinical grade and Fisher CT scan grade. In the first four days after SAH, Fisher scan grade, preoperative clinical grade and Hct, appeared as predictors. After four days, clinical grade on admission and hypernatiemia, showed as poredictors. PMID:18792575

  12. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  13. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  14. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  15. The Achievement Gap between White and Non-White Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-LeBouef, Ana; Slate, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This Collection contains three seminal modules by Authors Ana Rojas-LeBouef and John R. Slate, professors and researchers from Sam Houston State University in Texas. They are nationally recognized scholars in the area of the academic inequity between White and Non-White students. This paper is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1--The…

  16. One Black, One White: Power, White Privilege, & Creating Safe Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delano-Oriaran, Omobolade O.; Parks, Marguerite W.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of two professors as they teach about White privilege in predominately White institutions of higher education. The authors discuss how racial potentiality shapes the classroom climates of each of the professors and then present strategies that utilize safe spaces to navigate students away from the resistance…

  17. Breakin' down Whiteness in Antiracist Teaching: Introducing Critical Whiteness Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matias, Cheryl E.; Mackey, Janiece

    2016-01-01

    Because of the changing nature of race the role of antiracist teaching is a forever-evolving process. Acknowledging that the majority of the U.S. teaching force, from K-12 to teacher education in institutions of higher education, are white middle-class females, it becomes imperative to unveil pedagogical applications of critical whiteness studies.…

  18. White Faculty Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom through Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbeneau, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this qualitative study is to present a conceptual framework of pedagogical practices reported by white faculty that serve to challenge the hegemony of whiteness in the university classroom. These transformative teaching practices surfaced through a review of racialized pedagogies discussed in the literature and in…

  19. Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

    Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

  20. Factors Determining Cognitive Dysfunction in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinod; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Christopher, Rita; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Prasad, Chandrajit; Subasree, Ramakrishnan; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular dementia consists of cognitive and functional impairment due to cerebrovascular brain injury. With reference to small vessel disease (SVD), even though the radiological evidence of SVD is present in a large number of persons above the age of 80 years, less than one-third of the people progress to dementia. Hence, if those factors are identified, we may be able to formulate strategies to protect that percentage of patients who progress to dementia. In this study, we have analyzed some genetic and nongenetic factors in patients with and without a cognitive impairment in the presence of radiological SVD. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and ten patients who satisfied the criteria for the study were included. All medical comorbidities, demographic factors, substance abuse, etc., were documented and neuropsychological evaluation done. In addition, the genetic testing was done for the polymorphisms of TT, TC, and CC alleles of CYP11B2 based on the literature evidence of the association of CYP11B2 polymorphism and hypertension. Results: This prospective hospital-based study revealed a significant relationship among hypertension, hyperhomocysteinemia, and severity of white matter changes but other comorbidities did not correlate. No significant correlation was seen between cognitive dysfunction and severity of white matter changes or genotypes TT, TC, and CC. However, TC genotype was more common in male hypertensives. Even though hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia were associated with leukoaraiosis, none of the factors studied trigger conversion of these radiological changes to clinical cognitive impairment. Discussion and Conclusion: Severity of cerebral white matter changes seems to correlate with hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia, however, none of the co-morbidities studied including the three polymorphisms of CYP11B2, that is, TT, TC, and CC seem to determine the conversion of leukoaraiosis to dementia. PMID:27011404

  1. Entry and distribution of microglial cells in human embryonic and fetal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Monier, Anne; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Evrard, Philippe; Gressens, Pierre; Verney, Catherine

    2007-05-01

    Microglial cells penetrate into and scatter throughout the human cortical grey and white matter according to a specific spatiotemporal pattern during the first 2 trimesters of gestation. Routes of entry were quantitatively and qualitatively different from those identified in the diencephalon. Starting at 4.5 gestational weeks, amoeboid microglial cells, characterized by different antibodies as Iba1, CD68, CD45, and MHC-II, entered the cerebral wall from the ventricular lumen and the leptomeninges. Migration was mainly radial and tangential toward the immature white matter, subplate layer, and cortical plate, whereas pial cells populated the prospective layer I. The intraparenchymal vascular route of entry was detectable only from 12 gestational weeks. Interestingly, microglial cells accumulated in restricted laminar bands particularly at 19 to 24 gestational weeks among the corona radiata fibers rostrally, extending caudally in the immature white matter to reach the visual radiations. This accumulation of proliferating MIB1-positive microglia (as shown by MIB1-Iba1 double immunolabeling) was located at the site of white matter injury in premature neonates. The spatiotemporal organization of microglia in the immature white and grey matter suggests that these cells may play active roles in developmental processes and in injury to the developing brain. PMID:17483694

  2. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  3. Cerebral tissue oxygenation impairment during experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Martins, Yuri C; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Carvalho, Leonardo JM

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and hypoxia have been implicated in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, although direct measurements of hypoxia have not been conducted. C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop a neurological syndrome known as experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), whereas BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM. In this study, intravital microscopy methods were used to quantify hemodynamic changes, vascular/tissue oxygen (O2) tension (PO2), and perivascular pH in vivo in ECM and non-ECM models, employing a closed cranial window model. ECM mice on day 6 of infection showed marked decreases in pial blood flow, vascular (arteriolar, venular), and perivascular PO2, perivascular pH, and systemic hemoglobin levels. Changes were more dramatic in mice with late-stage ECM compared with mice with early-stage ECM. These changes led to drastic decreases in O2 delivery to the brain tissue. In addition, ECM animals required a greater PO2 gradient to extract the same amount of O2 compared with non-infected animals, as the pial tissues extract O2 from the steepest portion of the blood O2 equilibrium curve. ECM animals also showed increased leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venules, and the intensity of adhesion was inversely correlated with blood flow and O2 extraction. PbA-infected BALB/c mice displayed no neurological signs on day 6 and while they did show changes similar to those observed in C57BL/6 mice (decreased pial blood flow, vascular/tissue PO2, perivascular pH, hemoglobin levels), non-ECM animals preserved superior perfusion and oxygenation compared with ECM animals at similar anemia and parasitemia levels, resulting in better O2 delivery and O2 extraction by the brain tissue. In conclusion, direct quantitative assessment of pial hemodynamics and oxygenation in vivo revealed that ECM is associated with severe progressive brain tissue hypoxia and acidosis. PMID:24128424

  4. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  5. White Cliffs: Operating Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneff, S.

    1984-01-01

    The fourteen dish white cliffs solar power station area is remote and subject to extreme environmental conditions, solution of the associated problems required careful and thoughtful attention and the application of resources. Notwithstanding the wide range and harshness of conditions, the difficulties caused by remoteness and the lack of a technological base and the need for relatively rapid demonstration of success, the project has had a very positive outcome. Qualitative and quantitative information and lessons are now available to enable considerable simplifications to be made for a new system, reducing both hardware and operation and maintenance costs. Experience and lessons are presented, particularly in relation to: system performance in various environmental conditions; design philosophies for collectors, the array, control systems, engine and plant; operation and maintenance strategies and cost reducing possibilities. Experience so far gives encouragement for the future of such paraboloidal dish systems in appropriate areas.

  6. Early microglial colonization of the human forebrain and possible involvement in periventricular white-matter injury of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Verney, Catherine; Monier, Anne; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine; Gressens, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Amoeboid microglial subpopulations visualized by antibodies against ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1, CD68, and CD45 enter the forebrain starting at 4.5 postovulatory or gestational weeks (gw). They penetrate the telencephalon and diencephalon via the meninges, choroid plexus, and ventricular zone. Early colonization by amoeboid microglia–macrophages is first restricted to the white matter, where these cells migrate and accumulate in patches at the junctions of white-matter pathways, such as the three junctions that the internal capsule makes with the thalamocortical projection, external capsule and cerebral peduncle, respectively. In the cerebral cortex anlage, migration is mainly radial and tangential towards the immature white matter, subplate layer, and cortical plate, whereas pial cells populate the prospective layer I. A second wave of microglial cells penetrates the brain via the vascular route at about 12–13 gw and remains confined to the white matter. Two main findings deserve emphasis. First, microglia accumulate at 10–12 gw at the cortical plate–subplate junction, where the first synapses are detected. Second, microglia accumulate in restricted laminar bands, most notably around 19–30 gw, at the axonal crossroads in the white matter (semiovale centre) rostrally, extending caudally in the immature white matter to the visual radiations. This accumulation of proliferating microglia is located at the site of white-matter injury in premature neonates. The spatiotemporal organization of microglia in the immature white and grey matter suggests that these cells may play active roles in developmental processes such as axonal guidance, synaptogenesis, and neurodevelopmental apoptosis as well as in injuries to the developing brain, in particular in the periventricular white-matter injury of preterm infants. PMID:20557401

  7. Early microglial colonization of the human forebrain and possible involvement in periventricular white-matter injury of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Verney, Catherine; Monier, Anne; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine; Gressens, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Amoeboid microglial subpopulations visualized by antibodies against ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1, CD68, and CD45 enter the forebrain starting at 4.5 postovulatory or gestational weeks (gw). They penetrate the telencephalon and diencephalon via the meninges, choroid plexus, and ventricular zone. Early colonization by amoeboid microglia-macrophages is first restricted to the white matter, where these cells migrate and accumulate in patches at the junctions of white-matter pathways, such as the three junctions that the internal capsule makes with the thalamocortical projection, external capsule and cerebral peduncle, respectively. In the cerebral cortex anlage, migration is mainly radial and tangential towards the immature white matter, subplate layer, and cortical plate, whereas pial cells populate the prospective layer I. A second wave of microglial cells penetrates the brain via the vascular route at about 12-13 gw and remains confined to the white matter. Two main findings deserve emphasis. First, microglia accumulate at 10-12 gw at the cortical plate-subplate junction, where the first synapses are detected. Second, microglia accumulate in restricted laminar bands, most notably around 19-30 gw, at the axonal crossroads in the white matter (semiovale centre) rostrally, extending caudally in the immature white matter to the visual radiations. This accumulation of proliferating microglia is located at the site of white-matter injury in premature neonates. The spatiotemporal organization of microglia in the immature white and grey matter suggests that these cells may play active roles in developmental processes such as axonal guidance, synaptogenesis, and neurodevelopmental apoptosis as well as in injuries to the developing brain, in particular in the periventricular white-matter injury of preterm infants. PMID:20557401

  8. Strategic Role of Frontal White Matter Tracts in Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Voxel-Based Lesion-Symptom Mapping Study in CADASIL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duering, Marco; Zieren, Nikola; Herve, Dominique; Jouvent, Eric; Reyes, Sonia; Peters, Nils; Pachai, Chahin; Opherk, Christian; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. It typically manifests with lacunar infarcts and ischaemic white matter lesions. However, little is known about how these lesions relate to the cognitive symptoms. Previous studies have found a poor correlation between the burden of ischaemic lesions and…

  9. Proliferative retinopathy in type 1 diabetes is associated with cerebral microbleeds, which is part of generalized microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Woerdeman, Jorn; van Duinkerken, Eelco; Wattjes, Mike P; Barkhof, Frederik; Snoek, Frank J; Moll, Annette C; Klein, Martin; de Boer, Michiel P; Ijzerman, Richard G; Serné, Erik H; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetic patients can be generalized to cerebral small vessel disease and whether it is associated with impaired peripheral microvascular function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-three patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR+), 34 patients without proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and 33 controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral microangiopathy (cerebral microbleeds) and ischemic damage (white matter hyperintensities and lacunes). Peripheral microvascular function, i.e., skin capillary density and capillary recruitment, was assessed by capillary microscopy. RESULTS Cerebral microbleeds, but not ischemic damage, were more prevalent in PDR+ patients versus the other groups (P < 0.05). A trend was found across groups for the lowest baseline capillary density in PDR+ patients (P for trend = 0.05). In individuals with microbleeds, capillary recruitment was impaired compared with those without microbleeds (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS In PDR+ patients, cerebral microbleed prevalence was higher and seems part of generalized microangiopathy that may affect the skin and the brain. PMID:24319122

  10. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  11. Parameters of diffusional kurtosis imaging for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction in different brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue-Lin; Li, Su-Juan; Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Gui-Shan; Yan, Gen; Wang, Yan-Ting; Rao, Hai-Bing; Zheng, Wen-Bin; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a new type diffusion-weighted sequence which measures the non-Gaussianity of water diffusion. The present study aimed to investigate whether the parameters of DKI could distinguish between differences in water molecule diffusion in various brain regions under the conditions of acute infarction and to identify the optimal DKI parameter for locating ischemic lesions in each brain region. A total of 28 patients with acute ischemic stroke in different brain regions were recruited for the present study. The relative values of DKI parameters were selected as major assessment indices, and the homogeneity of background image and contrast of adjacent structures were used as minor assessment indices. According to the brain region involved in three DKI parametric maps, including mean kurtosis (MK), axial kurtosis (Ka) and radial kurtosis (Kr), 112 groups of regions of interest were outlined in the following regions: Corpus callosum (n=17); corona radiata (n=26); thalamus (n=21); subcortical white matter (n=24); and cerebral cortex (n=24). For ischemic lesions in the corpus callosum and corona radiata, significant increases in relative Ka were detected, as compared with the other parameters (P<0.05). For ischemic lesions in the thalamus, subcortical white matter and cerebral cortices, an increase in the three parameters was detected, however this difference was not significant. Minor assessment indices demonstrated that Ka lacked tissue contrast and the background of Kr was heterogeneous; thus, MK was the superior assessment parameter for ischemic lesions in these regions. In conclusion, Ka is better suited for the diagnosis of acute ischemic lesions in highly anisotropic brain regions, such as the corpus callosum and corona radiate. MK may be appropriate for the lesions in low anisotropic or isotropic brain regions, such as the thalamus, subcortical white matter and cerebral cortices.

  12. Developmental changes in regional cerebral blood flow in fetal and newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Szymonowicz, W; Walker, A M; Cussen, L; Cannata, J; Yu, V Y

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) were determined using radioactively labeled microspheres to measure flow to the cortex, brain stem, cerebellum, white matter, caudate nucleus, and choroid plexus in three groups of chronically catheterized lambs under physiological conditions: 90- to 100-day preterm fetal lambs (n = 14), 125- to 136-day near-term fetal lambs (n = 11), and newborn lambs 5-44 days old (n = 10). We continually monitored heart rate, central venous pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and periodically measured arterial blood O2 and CO2 tensions (PaO2, PaCO2, respectively), pH, hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation (SaO2). The regional CBF measurements (ml.100 g-1.min-1) revealed that in all three age groups the high flow areas are the choroid plexus and caudate nucleus, whereas the lowest flow area is the white matter. There is, however, a different hierarchy of regional CBF in utero (cortex less than cerebellum and brain stem) compared with extrauterine life in the newborn lamb (cortex and cerebellum greater than brain stem). Analysis of regional cerebral oxygen delivery [CBF times arterial oxygen content (CaO2)] demonstrated a progressively increasing oxygen transport to the cortex with increasing gestational maturity and after birth. Oxygen transport to the brain stem, cerebellum, and white matter increased with gestational age, but did not increase after birth. Relationships between regional CBF and natural physiological variations of cardiorespiratory parameters (PaO2, SaO2, CaO2, pH, PaCO2, and MAP) were assessed using regression analysis. Correlations of regional CBF with PaO2 and SaO2 suggest that cerebral perfusion is not primarily determined by CaO2 when variations occur within the physiological range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3337259

  13. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  14. What Can White Faculty Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jill

    2007-01-01

    White faculty members, even those who desire to participate in institutional change, are often unsure what role they can play in making their campuses places where American racial minority students want, and are able, to learn. Knowing what they can do may be the first step for White faculty members to begin making changes that can positively…

  15. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  16. White Nationalism and Native Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stineback, David

    1977-01-01

    Suggesting there has been a nationalistic psychology inherent in white America's relationship with the American Indian, this article asserts that the Puritans and 19th century politicians are alike in their inability to accept the idea that Indians have not wanted to live like the white man. (JC)

  17. Acting White: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Kitae

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis of acting White has been heatedly debated and influential over the last 20 years or so in explaining the Black-White test score gap. Recently, economists have joined the debate and started providing new theoretical and empirical analyses of the phenomenon. This paper critically reviews the arguments that have been advanced to…

  18. Correlations of leuko-araiosis with cerebral atrophy and perfusion in elderly normal subjects and demented patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, J; Meyer, J S; Ichijo, M; Kobari, M; Terayama, Y; Weathers, S

    1993-01-01

    CT images of leuko-araiosis in brain slices were quantified according to volumes of reduced Hounsfield units in frontal periventricular white matter in groups of elderly patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 23) and dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT, n = 16). Volumes of leuko-araiosis, estimates of atrophic cerebral tissue, and local cerebral perfusion utilising inhalation of xenon gas as the indicator were correlated on the same CT slices. Ratios of frontal leuko-araiosis to total brain tissue volume were similar for patients with MID and DAT (mean 5.7 (SD 2.1)% v 6.5 (3.2%)), and both were significantly greater than ratios in elderly normal volunteers (3.1(1.3)%, 0 < 0.001). Cerebral atrophy (measured as the ratio of volumes of cerebrospinal fluid to total brain area) for DAT patients was 17.0 (6.7)%, which was greater than for MID patients (12.5 (5.4)%; p < 0.05) and both types of patients showed more cerebral atrophy than did age matched, elderly normal subjects. Cerebral perfusion was decreased in all regions measured in patients with MID and DAT compared with elderly normal subjects. Multi variate regression analyses correlated frontal leuko-araiosis with reductions of local cerebral blood flow in subcortical grey matter (p < 0.025) in patients with vascular dementia but not in those with DAT. These quantitative measures implicate decreased perfusion due to atherosclerosis in territories supplied by the deep penetrating cerebral arteries in the pathogenesis of leuko-araiosis in patients with vascular dementia, but suggest a different pathogenesis for leuko-araiosis in Alzheimer's disease. Images PMID:8437007

  19. Cerebral blood flow in the newborn infant.

    PubMed Central

    Pryds, O.; Edwards, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of CBF have provided some insight into cerebrovascular physiology and pharmacology. However, the precise relation between CBF and cerebral damage remains elusive, and there is no definition of a threshold CBF below which ischaemic brain damage always occurs. Measurement of CBF thus does not currently provide a secure guide in the clinical management of sick infants. Further work, particularly using techniques like magnetic resonance imaging and NIRS, which provide data in addition to CBF measurements, may yet disclose strategies which manipulate CBF to reduce cerebral ischaemia. While cerebral injury remains a substantial problem in neonatal intensive care, such research is urgently needed. Images Figure 3 PMID:8653440

  20. The evolution of cerebral revascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Melanie G; Lee, Marco; Guzman, Raphael; Steinberg, Gary K

    2009-05-01

    Among the relatively few surgeons to be awarded the Nobel Prize was Alexis Carrel, a French surgeon and pioneer in revascularization surgery at the turn of the 20th century. The authors trace the humble beginnings of cerebral revascularization surgery through to the major developments that helped shape the modern practice of cerebral bypass surgery. They discuss the cornerstone studies in the development of this technique, including the Extracranial/Intracranial Bypass Study initiated in 1977. Recent innovations, including modern techniques to monitor cerebral blood flow, microanastomosis techniques, and ongoing trials that play an important role in the evolution of this field are also evaluated. PMID:19408995

  1. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  2. Early white matter involvement in an infant carrying a novel mutation in ACOX1.

    PubMed

    Masson, R; Guerra, S; Cerini, R; Pensato, V; Gellera, C; Taroni, F; Simonati, A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the clinical findings and MRI features observed in a child who presented a two-step disease course: he was hypotonic at birth and soon afterwards developed seizures, which were partially responsive to treatment; he subsequently showed developmental delay and a progressive neurological deterioration with the onset of severe seizures at around three years of age. Head MRI at age 20 days was unremarkable, whereas at 25 months it showed bilateral hyperintensity of the deep cerebellar nuclei; five months later, the signal hyperintensity was also present in the cerebellar white matter and ventral pontine fibre tracts. Molecular analysis revealed a novel ACOX1 mutation, predicting a largely truncated protein. The white matter involvement, which followed an ascending trajectory from cerebellar and brainstem structures to the cerebral hemispheres, seemed to originate from the perinuclear white matter of the deep cerebellar nuclei. PMID:26965209

  3. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  4. Space Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This training video, presented by the Lewis Research Center's Space Experiments Division, gives a background and detailed instructions for preparing the space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) for use. The SAMS measures, conditions, and records forces of low gravity accelerations, and is used to determine the effect of these forces on various experiments performed in microgravity. Inertial sensors are used to measure positive and negative acceleration over a specified frequency range. The video documents the SAMS' uses in different configurations during shuttle missions.

  5. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  6. Accelerating into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry

    2009-05-01

    Accelerator science has traditionally been associated with high-energy physics and nuclear physics. But the use of accelerators in other areas of science, as well as in medicine and industry, is steadily growing. Accelerators are now, for example, used to treat cancer using proton therapy, which can deposit radiation onto a tumour while causing much less damage to surrounding healthy tissue than with other treatment techniques.

  7. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  8. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  9. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  10. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  11. Malignant cerebral swelling following cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, S; Damodaran, O; Lind, C R P; Lee, G

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years there have been a number of case reports and small cohort studies that have described so called "malignant" cerebral swelling following an uneventful cranioplasty procedure. The pathophysiology remains to be established however it has been suggested that it may be related to a combination of failure of autoregulation and the use of closed vacuum suction drainage. The current study presents three further patients who had had a decompressive hemicraniectomy for ischaemic stroke. If decompressive craniectomy is utilised in the management of neurological emergencies, close attention and wider reporting of this type of complication is required not only to focus attention on possible management strategies, but also to determine which patients are at most risk of this devastating complication. PMID:27189792

  12. Cerebral astroblastoma: A radiopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ragini; Husain, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    Astroblastoma is a rare glial neoplasm whose histogenesis has been clarified recently. It primarily occurs in children and young adults. We are reporting a case of 12-year-old girl child who presented with features of raised intracranial tension and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large well-circumscribed, cystic lesion without perifocal edema, and enhancing mural nodule in right parietal region. A radiological differential diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma and cerebral astroblastoma was made. A complete excision was done and histologically the lesion turned out to be an astroblastoma. We review the histology, immunohistochemistry, and imaging features of astroblastoma and survey the current literature, treatment strategies, and prognostic aspects for the management of this rare neoplasm. PMID:24891904

  13. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  14. A simple device for injection of small calibrated amounts of horseradish peroxidase into the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Bullier, J; Henry, G H; Baker, W J

    1980-02-01

    A simple device for injecting horseradish peroxidase into the cerebral cortex is described. It consists of a syringe connected by tubing to a hydraulic adaptor which provides a sealed connection to a disposable glass micropipette. Replaceable micropipettes may be prepared by drawing capillary glass under heat to a fine diameter tip that provides easy penetration into the cortex without dimpling the surface grey matter or damaging the underlying white matter. The hydraulic seal achieved by the adaptor allows volumes of the order of 0.05 microliter to be readily injected into nervous tissue. PMID:7035757

  15. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  16. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  17. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  18. Instability of the Middle Cerebral Artery Blood Flow in Response to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Rosemary E.; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The middle cerebral artery supplies long end-artery branches to perfuse the deep white matter and shorter peripheral branches to perfuse cortical and subcortical tissues. A generalized vasodilatory stimulus such as carbon dioxide not only results in an increase in flow to these various tissue beds but also redistribution among them. We employed a fast step increase in carbon dioxide to detect the dynamics of the cerebral blood flow response. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was approved by the Research Ethics Board of the University Health Network at the University of Toronto. We used transcranial ultrasound to measure the time course of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in 28 healthy adults. Normoxic, isoxic step increases in arterial carbon dioxide tension of 10 mmHg from both hypocapnic and normocapnic baselines were produced using a new prospective targeting system that enabled a more rapid step change than has been previously achievable. In most of the 28 subjects the responses at both carbon dioxide ranges were characterised by more complex responses than a single exponential rise. Most responses were characterised by a fast initial response which then declined rapidly to a nadir, followed by a slower secondary response, with some showing oscillations before stabilising. Conclusions/Significance A rapid step increase in carbon dioxide tension is capable of inducing instability in the cerebral blood flow control system. These dynamic aspects of the cerebral blood flow responses to rapid changes in carbon dioxide must be taken into account when using transcranial blood flow velocity in a single artery segment to measure cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:23936248

  19. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit. PMID:26122324

  20. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  1. Progressive intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion in a fatal case of cerebral aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case of cerebral aspergilloma in a 25-year-old immunoincompetent man admitted to a general intensive care unit. Monitoring of intracranial pressure was instigated and revealed hour-long epochs of severe intracranial hypertension, despite a normal opening pressure, with decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure. We documented that this was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The present case illustrates that severe intracranial hypertension may evolve despite a normal opening pressure; it furthermore shows that continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure may be used to predict changes in cerebral haemodynamics in critically ill patients with neuroinfection. PMID:24907204

  2. A radical scavenger edaravone inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation and blood-brain barrier breakdown in a mouse model of prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Liang, Anna C.; Arai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays key roles in the brain pathophysiology, especially in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Therefore, inhibiting MMP-9 activity may be a promising therapy for protecting brains in cerebrovascular diseases. Here we show that in a mouse prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion model, a clinically proven radical scavenger edaravone suppressed MMP-9 and reduced BBB damage in cerebral white matter. Prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion was induced by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis in male adult C57BL/6J mice (10 weeks old). After 7 days of cerebral hypoperfusion, white matter region (e.g. corpus callosum) exhibited significant BBB leakage, assessed by IgG staining. Correspondingly, immunostaining and western blotting showed that MMP-9 was upregulated in the white matter. Edaravone treatment (3 mg/kg, i.p. at day 0 and 3) inhibited both BBB leakage and MMP-9 increase. Under the early phase of cerebral hypoperfusion conditions, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) mainly contribute to the MMP-9 increase, but our immunostaining data showed that very little OPCs expressed MMP-9 in the edaravone-treated animals at day 7. Therefore, in vitro studies with primary rat OPCs were conducted to examine whether edaravone would directly suppressed MMP-9 expressions in OPCs. OPC cultures were exposed to sub-lethal CoCl2 for 7 days to induce prolonged chemical hypoxic stress. Prolonged chemical hypoxic stress increased MMP-9 expression in OPCs, and radical scavenging with edaravone (10 μM for 7 days) ameliorated the increase. Taken together, our proof-of-concept study demonstrates that radical scavengers may provide a potential therapeutic approach for white matter injury by suppressing BBB damage. PMID:24820542

  3. Effects of White Matter Injury on Resting State fMRI Measures in Prematurely Born Infants

    PubMed Central

    Smyser, Christopher D.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Blazey, Tyler M.; Inder, Terrie E.; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral white matter is vulnerable to injury in very preterm infants (born prior to 30 weeks gestation), resulting in a spectrum of lesions. These range from severe forms, including cystic periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular hemorrhagic infarction, to minor focal punctate lesions. Moderate to severe white matter injury in preterm infants has been shown to predict later neurodevelopmental disability, although outcomes can vary widely in infants with qualitatively comparable lesions. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly utilized in neurodevelopmental investigations and may provide complementary information regarding the impact of white matter injury on the developing brain. We performed resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent postmenstrual age in fourteen preterm infants with moderate to severe white matter injury secondary to periventricular hemorrhagic infarction. In these subjects, resting state networks were identifiable throughout the brain. Patterns of aberrant functional connectivity were observed and depended upon injury severity. Comparisons were performed against data obtained from prematurely-born infants with mild white matter injury and healthy, term-born infants and demonstrated group differences. These results reveal structural-functional correlates of preterm white matter injury and carry implications for future investigations of neurodevelopmental disability. PMID:23874510

  4. Pathological and biochemical studies on a case of Pick disease with severe white matter atrophy.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Kazuo; Takanashi, Masashi; Watanabe, Masao; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Masato; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Shigeki; Mori, Hideo

    2006-12-01

    We report on a male patient with Pick disease who had shown severe white matter atrophy and dilatation of the lateral ventricle in the frontal lobe from an early stage. Upon admission to our hospital 2 years after disease onset, the patient showed apathy, and MRI revealed severe atrophy of the cortex and white matter of the frontal lobe. He died at age 74, 11 years after disease onset. Autopsy revealed severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, severe loss of white matter in the frontal lobe, dilatation of the lateral ventricles, and cortical thinning. Histopathological examination showed severe loss of myelinated fibers in the frontal white matter and severe neuronal loss with gliosis in the frontal and temporal cortices. Many Pick bodies were seen. Our patient had a rare case of Pick disease predominantly affecting the frontal lobe with severe involvement of the white matter from an early stage. This case suggests that myelinated fibers in the white matter as well as cerebral neurons are primarily affected in Pick disease. PMID:17203597

  5. [What matters more in the white matter: thinking inside of the brain].

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Toshiki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko

    2015-04-01

    The proportion of white matter in the brain has increased during evolution, and white matter comprises approximately half of the human brain. Its macroscopic as well as microscopic structures change during development, aging, and disease progression as well as following physical or mental training. Knowledge about the structural plasticity of the white matter may alter our cortex-oriented view of brain functions and expand our strategies for diagnosis and treatment, including rehabilitation, since the gray and white matter are complementary. Although the presence of white matter lesions is easy to detect with magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, their qualitative differentiation requires vast knowledge about the underlying processes. Examples from multiple ischemic lesions caused by different disease processes affecting the cerebral arteries are presented for comparison. It is worth considering "what matters more in the white matter" by taking into account the basic structures of the brain as well as their plasticity. Such "thinking inside of the brain" may further expand our understanding of the brain to improve our clinical interpretations and treatments. PMID:25846587

  6. Genetics Home Reference: white sponge nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions white sponge nevus white sponge nevus Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description White sponge nevus is a condition characterized by the formation ...

  7. Solidification of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1982-01-01

    The internal structure of white dwarfs is discussed. Highly correlated plasmas are reviewed. Implications for phase separation in the core of cooling white dwarfs are considered. The consequences for evolution of white dwarfs are addressed.

  8. Longitudinal brain white matter alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy before and after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Chao-Long; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Huang, Chu-Chung; Lin, Ching-Po; Cheng, Yu-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema is the common pathogenic mechanism for cognitive impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Whether complete reversibility of brain edema, cognitive deficits, and their associated imaging can be achieved after liver transplantation remains an open question. To characterize white matter integrity before and after liver transplantation in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy, multiple diffusivity indices acquired via diffusion tensor imaging was applied. Twenty-eight patients and thirty age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included. Multiple diffusivity indices were obtained from diffusion tensor images, including mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The assessment was repeated 6-12 month after transplantation. Differences in white matter integrity between groups, as well as longitudinal changes, were evaluated using tract-based spatial statistical analysis. Correlation analyses were performed to identify first scan before transplantation and interval changes among the neuropsychiatric tests, clinical laboratory tests, and diffusion tensor imaging indices. After transplantation, decreased water diffusivity without fractional anisotropy change indicating reversible cerebral edema was found in the left anterior cingulate, claustrum, postcentral gyrus, and right corpus callosum. However, a progressive decrease in fractional anisotropy and an increase in radial diffusivity suggesting demyelination were noted in temporal lobe. Improved pre-transplantation albumin levels and interval changes were associated with better recoveries of diffusion tensor imaging indices. Improvements in interval diffusion tensor imaging indices in the right postcentral gyrus were correlated with visuospatial function score correction. In conclusion, longitudinal voxel-wise analysis of multiple diffusion tensor imaging indices demonstrated different white matter changes in minimal hepatic encephalopathy patients

  9. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... recurrent seizures (epilepsy). People with the Flemish and Italian types of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy are prone ... amyloid angiopathy . APP gene mutations cause the Dutch, Italian, Arctic, Iowa, Flemish, and Piedmont types of this ...

  11. Transcranial cerebral oximetry in random normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Mukesh; Stark, Jennifer; Dujovny, Manuel; Alp, M. Serdar; Widman, Ronald; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Near infrared optical spectroscopy is becoming a useful method for monitoring regional cerebral oxygenation status. The method is simple, reliable and noninvasive and the information which it provides is clinically significant in managing a growing number of neurological ailments. Use of this technique has been described previously by numerous authors. In the present study, regional cerebral oxygen saturation was measured at rest in 94 subjects randomly elected from a diverse population of individuals. This sample consisted of 38 males and 65 females, with the age ranging from 18 - 70. There were 68 light-skinned individuals and 35 with darker skin comprising various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was recorded as 67.14 plus or minus 8.84%. The association of the mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation in various group of individuals in relationship of their age, race, sex and skin color is examined.

  12. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children. PMID:27396366

  13. Cerebral aneurysms: Formation, progression and developmental chronology

    PubMed Central

    Etminan, Nima; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dreier, Rita; Bruckner, Peter; Torner, James C.; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UAIs) in the general population is up to 3%. Existing epidemiological data suggests that only a small fraction of UIAs progress towards rupture over the lifetime of an individual, but the surrogates for subsequent rupture and the natural history of UIAs are discussed very controversially at present. In case of rupture of an UIA, the case-fatality is up to 50%, which therefore continues to stimulate interest in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysm formation and progression. Actual data on the chronological development of cerebral aneurysm has been especially difficult to obtain and, until recently, the existing knowledge in this respect is mainly derived from animal or mathematical models or short-term observational studies. Here, we highlight the current data on cerebral aneurysm formation and progression as well as a novel approach to investigate the developmental chronology of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:24323717

  14. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  15. Cerebral intraventricular echinococcosis in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Pandey, Deepa; Shende, Neeraj; Sahu, Anurag; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Echinococcosis in humans occurs as a result of infection by the larval stages of taeniid cestodes of the genus echinococcus. Intracranial hydatid cysts usually develop at an intraparenchymal site. Hydatid cyst within the cerebral ventricle is quite unusual. Methods: We reviewed the literature on adult intraventricular hydatid cyst and found case reports mainly in children with an only handful of cases in adults. We reported a rare case of cerebral intraventricular (left lateral ventricle) hydatid cyst in a 21-year-old adult female. Results: Although cerebral hydatid cysts are most commonly seen in children and young adults cerebral intraventricular hydatid cyst are comparatively rarer in adults. Conclusion: The possibility of infection with Echinococcus granulosus should be included in the differential diagnosis of raised intracranial hypertension in patients from endemic areas. PMID:26392915

  16. STB-White

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Dan; Ammon, Rob; Gallagher, Todd; Gouhin, Pat; Hermann, Steve; Roos, John Bryan; Saurer, Craig; White, Heather

    1990-01-01

    The final design of a hypersonic, SCRAMjet research aircraft, which is to be dropped from a carrier plane, is considered. Topics such as propulsion systems, aerodynamics, component weight analysis, and aircraft design with waverider analyses are stressed with smaller emphasis placed on aircraft systems such as cockpit design and landing gear configurations. Propulsion systems include analysis of the turbofanramjet for acceleration to low hypersonic speed (Mach 6.0) and analysis of the SCRAMjets themselves to carry the aircraft to Mach 10.0. Both analyses include the use of liquid hydrogen as fuel. Inlet design for both propulsion systems is analyzed as well. Aerodynamic properties are found using empirical and theoretical formulas for lift and drag on delta-wing aircraft. The aircraft design involves the integration of all preliminary studies into a modified waverider configuration.

  17. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  18. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  19. Cardioprotective abilities of white wine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianhua; Tosaki, Arpad; Cordis, Gerald A; Bertelli, Alberto A E; Bertelli, Aldo; Maulik, Nilanjana; Das, Dipak K

    2002-05-01

    To study if white wines, like red wine, can also protect the heart from ischemia reperfusion injury, ethanol-free extracts of three different white wines (WW1, WW2 and WW3) (100 mg/100 g body weight) were given orally to Sprague Dawley rats (200 g body weight) for three weeks. Control rats were given water only for the same period of time. After three weeks, rats were anesthetized and sacrificed, and the hearts excised for the preparation of isolated working rat heart. All hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by two hours of reperfusion. The results demonstrated that among the three different white wines, only WW2 showed cardioprotection as evidenced by improved post-ischemic ventricular recovery compared to control. The amount of malonaldehyde production in white wine-fed rat hearts were lower compared to that found in control hearts indicating reduced formation of the reactive oxygen species. In vitro studies using chemiluminescence technique revealed that these white wines scavenged both superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. The results of our study demonstrated that only WW2 white wine provided cardioprotection as evidenced by the improved the post-ischemic contractile recovery and reduced myocardial infarct size. The cardioprotective effect of this white wine may be attributed, at least in part, from its ability to function as an in vivo antioxidant. PMID:12074987

  20. Wearable wireless cerebral oximeter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral oximeters measure continuous cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology noninvasively. It has been involved into operating room setting to monitor oxygenation within patient's brain when surgeons are concerned that a patient's levels might drop. Recently, cerebral oxygen saturation has also been related with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency (CCVI). Patients with CCVI would be benefited if there would be a wearable system to measure their cerebral oxygen saturation in need. However, there has yet to be a wearable wireless cerebral oximeter to measure the saturation in 24 hours. So we proposed to develop the wearable wireless cerebral oximeter. The mechanism of the system follows the NIRS technology. Emitted light at wavelengths of 740nm and 860nm are sent from the light source penetrating the skull and cerebrum, and the light detector(s) receives the light not absorbed during the light pathway through the skull and cerebrum. The amount of oxygen absorbed within the brain is the difference between the amount of light sent out and received by the probe, which can be used to calculate the percentage of oxygen saturation. In the system, it has one source and four detectors. The source, located in the middle of forehead, can emit two near infrared light, 740nm and 860nm. Two detectors are arranged in one side in 2 centimeters and 3 centimeters from the source. Their measurements are used to calculate the saturation in the cerebral cortex. The system has included the rechargeable lithium battery and Bluetooth smart wireless micro-computer unit.