Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated cosmological lattice

  1. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  2. Stephani Cosmological Models with Accelerated Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkina, M. P.; Kopteva, E. M.; Egurnov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stephani cosmological models are considered which describe spacetimes for a shear-free matter distribution and include Friedmann models as a particular case. The possibility is considered of constructing cosmological models in which a change of sign of the acceleration of the Universe expansion arises only due to curvature.

  3. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  4. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Buchoff, Michael I.; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    One intriguing beyond-the-Standard-Model particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong C P Problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the Universe. This particle is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry-breaking scale, fa, the value of which is roughly greater than 109 GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, ma, is roughly less than 104 μ eV ). The density of axions in the Universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early Universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the temperature-dependent QCD free energy with respect to the C P -violating phase, θ . However, this quantity is generically nonperturbative, and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small θ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the Universe, which is required to be less than or equal to the dark matter density. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-θ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound ma≥(14.6 ±0.1 ) μ eV when Peccei-Quinn breaking occurs

  5. An accelerating cosmology without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Santos, R.C.; Lima, J.A.S. E-mail: cliviars@astro.iag.usp.br

    2009-06-01

    The negative pressure accompanying gravitationally-induced particle creation can lead to a cold dark matter (CDM) dominated, accelerating Universe (Lima et al. 1996 [1]) without requiring the presence of dark energy or a cosmological constant. In a recent study, Lima et al. 2008 [2] (LSS) demonstrated that particle creation driven cosmological models are capable of accounting for the SNIa observations [3] of the recent transition from a decelerating to an accelerating Universe, without the need for Dark Energy. Here we consider a class of such models where the particle creation rate is assumed to be of the form Γ = βH+γH{sub 0}, where H is the Hubble parameter and H{sub 0} is its present value. The evolution of such models is tested at low redshift by the latest SNe Ia data provided by the Union compilation [4] and at high redshift using the value of z{sub eq}, the redshift of the epoch of matter — radiation equality, inferred from the WMAP constraints on the early Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect [5]. Since the contributions of baryons and radiation were ignored in the work of LSS, we include them in our study of this class of models. The parameters of these more realistic models with continuous creation of CDM are constrained at widely-separated epochs (z{sub eq} ≈ 3000 and z ≈ 0) in the evolution of the Universe. The comparison of the parameter values, (β, γ), determined at these different epochs reveals a tension between the values favored by the high redshift CMB constraint on z{sub eq} from the ISW and those which follow from the low redshift SNIa data, posing a potential challenge to this class of models. While for β = 0 this conflict is only at ∼< 2σ, it worsens as β increases from zero.

  6. Can a lattice string have a vanishing cosmological constant\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Terry; Lam, C. S.

    1992-08-01

    Given a modular-invariant partition function Q that integrates to a zero cosmological constant, there exists a whole class of functions scrCQ=\\{cQ+I\\} which does this as well; here I is an arbitrary imaginary modular-invariant function and c is an arbitrary scaling constant. The question of whether a nonsupersymmetric lattice string can be constructed to yield any of the partition functions in scrCQ is addressed. Two methods are devised to sidestep the arbitrariness of the function I, and lattice techniques are used to find conditions necessary for the existence of such a string. These conditions rely simply on the properties of lattices, and are independent of the supercurrents chosen, or the presence or absence of any symmetry such as Atkin-Lehner symmetry. As an illustration we apply these conditions to a recently proposed class of partition functions, and show that a nonsupersymmetric string for that class does not exist.

  7. A numerical study of the Regge calculus and smooth lattice methods on a Kasner cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewin, Leo

    2015-10-01

    Two lattice based methods for numerical relativity, the Regge calculus and the smooth lattice relativity, will be compared with respect to accuracy and computational speed in a full 3+1 evolution of initial data representing a standard Kasner cosmology. It will be shown that both methods provide convergent approximations to the exact Kasner cosmology. It will also be shown that the Regge calculus is of the order of 110 times slower than the smooth lattice method.

  8. Scalar-field-dominated cosmology with a transient acceleration phase.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F C; Alcaniz, J S; Lima, J A S; Silva, R

    2006-08-25

    A new cosmological scenario driven by a slow rolling homogeneous scalar field whose exponential potential V(Phi) has a quadratic dependence on the field Phi in addition to the standard linear term is discussed. The derived equation of state for the field predicts a transient accelerating phase, in which the Universe was decelerated in the past, began to accelerate at redshift z approximately 1, is currently accelerated, but, finally, will return to a decelerating phase in the future. This overall dynamic behavior is profoundly different from the standard evolution of the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and may alleviate some conflicts in reconciling the idea of a dark-energy-dominated universe with observables in String or M theory. Some theoretical predictions for the present scalar field plus dark matter dominated stage are confronted with cosmological observations in order to test the viability of the scenario. PMID:17026287

  9. Inflation and accelerated expansion tensor-vector-scalar cosmological solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Rivera, Luz Maria; Samushia, Lado; Ratra, Bharat

    2006-04-15

    We find exact exponentially expanding and contracting de Sitter solutions of the spatially homogeneous TeVeS cosmological equations of motion in the vacuum TeVeS model and a power law accelerated expanding solution in the presence of an additional ideal fluid with equation of state parameter -5/3<{omega}<-1. A preliminary stability analysis shows that the expanding vacuum solution is stable, while in the ideal fluid case stability depends on model parameter values. These solutions might provide a basis for incorporating early-time inflation or late-time accelerated expansion in TeVeS cosmology.

  10. Precision cosmology defeats void models for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Zibin, James P.; Scott, Douglas

    2011-05-15

    The suggestion that we occupy a privileged position near the center of a large, nonlinear, and nearly spherical void has recently attracted much attention as an alternative to dark energy. Putting aside the philosophical problems with this scenario, we perform the most complete and up-to-date comparison with cosmological data. We use supernovae and the full cosmic microwave background spectrum as the basis of our analysis. We also include constraints from radial baryonic acoustic oscillations, the local Hubble rate, age, big bang nucleosynthesis, the Compton y distortion, and for the first time include the local amplitude of matter fluctuations, {sigma}{sub 8}. These all paint a consistent picture in which voids are in severe tension with the data. In particular, void models predict a very low local Hubble rate, suffer from an ''old age problem,'' and predict much less local structure than is observed.

  11. Applications of black hole lattices in relativistic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Timothy; Gregoris, Daniele; Rosquist, Kjell

    2015-12-01

    This talk addresses the question of how to model an inhomogeneous universe, and in particular how to model a universe in which all mass is distributed amongst a family of discrete sources (non-rotating black holes). Inhomogeneous cosmological models can be used to place observations of accelerating expansion within wider theoretical frameworks, and can hence be used to critically evaluate the evidence for the existence of dark energy. We use analytic methods to investigate the solutions to Einstein's equations in vacuum along networks of curves that exhibit local rotational and reflection symmetry. It is shown that the deceleration parameter can be negative without invoking the existence of any exotic fluids. The role of the small-scale inhomogeneities on the large-scale expansion of the Universe is studied in a fully non-perturbative and relativistic way, which is made possible by the discrete symmetries of the model. A comparison with other approaches for modeling dark energy and quantifying the effects of local inhomogeneities is discussed.

  12. Late-time acceleration in higher dimensional cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pahwa, Isha; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Seshadri, T.R. E-mail: debajyoti.choudhury@gmail.com

    2011-09-01

    We investigate late time acceleration of the universe in higher dimensional cosmology. The content in the universe is assumed to exert pressure which is different in the normal and extra dimensions. Cosmologically viable solutions are found to exist for simple forms of the equation of state. The parameters of the model are fixed by comparing the predictions with supernovae data. While observations stipulate that the matter exerts almost vanishing pressure in the normal dimensions, we assume that, in the extra dimensions, the equation of state is of the form P∝ρ{sup 1−γ}. For appropriate choice of parameters, a late time acceleration in the universe occurs with q{sub 0} and z{sub tr} being approximately -0.46 and 0.76 respectively.

  13. Constraints on cold dark matter accelerating cosmologies and cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2010-07-15

    We discuss the properties of homogeneous and isotropic flat cosmologies in which the present accelerating stage is powered only by the gravitationally induced creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) particles ({Omega}{sub m}=1). For some matter creation rates proposed in the literature, we show that the main cosmological functions such as the scale factor of the universe, the Hubble expansion rate, the growth factor, and the cluster formation rate are analytically defined. The best CCDM scenario has only one free parameter and our joint analysis involving baryonic acoustic oscillations + cosmic microwave background (CMB) + SNe Ia data yields {Omega}-tilde{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.01 (1{sigma}), where {Omega}-tilde{sub m} is the observed matter density parameter. In particular, this implies that the model has no dark energy but the part of the matter that is effectively clustering is in good agreement with the latest determinations from the large-scale structure. The growth of perturbation and the formation of galaxy clusters in such scenarios are also investigated. Despite the fact that both scenarios may share the same Hubble expansion, we find that matter creation cosmologies predict stronger small scale dynamics which implies a faster growth rate of perturbations with respect to the usual {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Such results point to the possibility of a crucial observational test confronting CCDM with {Lambda}CDM scenarios through a more detailed analysis involving CMB, weak lensing, as well as the large-scale structure.

  14. Learn-as-you-go acceleration of cosmological parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, Grigor; Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C.

    2015-09-01

    Cosmological analyses can be accelerated by approximating slow calculations using a training set, which is either precomputed or generated dynamically. However, this approach is only safe if the approximations are well understood and controlled. This paper surveys issues associated with the use of machine-learning based emulation strategies for accelerating cosmological parameter estimation. We describe a learn-as-you-go algorithm that is implemented in the Cosmo++ code and (1) trains the emulator while simultaneously estimating posterior probabilities; (2) identifies unreliable estimates, computing the exact numerical likelihoods if necessary; and (3) progressively learns and updates the error model as the calculation progresses. We explicitly describe and model the emulation error and show how this can be propagated into the posterior probabilities. We apply these techniques to the Planck likelihood and the calculation of ΛCDM posterior probabilities. The computation is significantly accelerated without a pre-defined training set and uncertainties in the posterior probabilities are subdominant to statistical fluctuations. We have obtained a speedup factor of 6.5 for Metropolis-Hastings and 3.5 for nested sampling. Finally, we discuss the general requirements for a credible error model and show how to update them on-the-fly.

  15. Rotating and accelerating black holes with a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ng, Cheryl; Teo, Edward

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new form of the rotating C-metric with cosmological constant, which generalizes the form found by Hong and Teo for the Ricci-flat case. This solution describes the entire class of spherical black holes undergoing rotation and acceleration in dS or AdS space-time. The new form allows us to identify the complete ranges of coordinates and parameters of this solution. We perform a systematic study of its geometrical and physical properties, and of the various limiting cases that arise from it.

  16. PyCOOL — A Cosmological Object-Oriented Lattice code written in Python

    SciTech Connect

    Sainio, J.

    2012-04-01

    There are a number of different phenomena in the early universe that have to be studied numerically with lattice simulations. This paper presents a graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Python program called PyCOOL that solves the evolution of scalar fields in a lattice with very precise symplectic integrators. The program has been written with the intention to hit a sweet spot of speed, accuracy and user friendliness. This has been achieved by using the Python language with the PyCUDA interface to make a program that is easy to adapt to different scalar field models. In this paper we derive the symplectic dynamics that govern the evolution of the system and then present the implementation of the program in Python and PyCUDA. The functionality of the program is tested in a chaotic inflation preheating model, a single field oscillon case and in a supersymmetric curvaton model which leads to Q-ball production. We have also compared the performance of a consumer graphics card to a professional Tesla compute card in these simulations. We find that the program is not only accurate but also very fast. To further increase the usefulness of the program we have equipped it with numerous post-processing functions that provide useful information about the cosmological model. These include various spectra and statistics of the fields. The program can be additionally used to calculate the generated curvature perturbation. The program is publicly available under GNU General Public License at https://github.com/jtksai/PyCOOL. Some additional information can be found from http://www.physics.utu.fi/tiedostot/theory/particlecosmology/pycool/.

  17. Axion cosmology, lattice QCD and the dilute instanton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Dierigl, M.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Mages, S. W.; Nogradi, D.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Szabo, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Axions are one of the most attractive dark matter candidates. The evolution of their number density in the early universe can be determined by calculating the topological susceptibility χ (T) of QCD as a function of the temperature. Lattice QCD provides an ab initio technique to carry out such a calculation. A full result needs two ingredients: physical quark masses and a controlled continuum extrapolation from non-vanishing to zero lattice spacings. We determine χ (T) in the quenched framework (infinitely large quark masses) and extrapolate its values to the continuum limit. The results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation (DIGA). A nice agreement is found for the temperature dependence, whereas the overall normalization of the DIGA result still differs from the non-perturbative continuum extrapolated lattice results by a factor of order ten. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the prediction of the amount of axion dark matter.

  18. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  19. Nonlinear accelerator lattices with one and two analytic invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-02-01

    Integrable systems appeared in physics long ago at the onset of classical dynamics with examples being Kepler's and other famous problems. Unfortunately, the majority of nonlinear problems turned out to be nonintegrable. In accelerator terms, any 2D nonlinear nonintegrable mapping produces chaotic motion and a complex network of stable and unstable resonances. Nevertheless, in the proximity of an integrable system the full volume of such a chaotic network is small. Thus, the integrable nonlinear motion in accelerators has the potential to introduce a large betatron tune spread to suppress instabilities and to mitigate the effects of space charge and magnetic field errors. To create such an accelerator lattice one has to find magnetic and electric field combinations leading to a stable integrable motion. This paper presents families of lattices with one invariant where bounded motion can be easily created in large volumes of the phase space. In addition, it presents 3 families of integrable nonlinear accelerator lattices, realizable with longitudinal-coordinate-dependent magnetic or electric fields with the stable nonlinear motion, which can be solved in terms of separable variables.

  20. Deformed phase space Kaluza-Klein cosmology and late time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabido, M.; Yee-Romero, C.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of phase space deformations on Kaluza-Klein cosmology are studied. The deformation is introduced by modifying the symplectic structure of the minisuperspace variables. In the deformed model, we find an accelerating scale factor and therefore infer the existence of an effective cosmological constant from the phase space deformation parameter β.

  1. Multipass Arc Lattice Design for Recirculating Linac Muon Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    G.M. Wang, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, D. Trbojevic

    2009-05-01

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. A drawback of this scheme is that a separate return arc is required for each passage of the muons through the linac. In the work described here, a novel arc optics based on a Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NSFFAG) lattice is developed, which would provide sufficient momentum acceptance to allow multiple passes (two or more consecutive energies) to be transported in one string of magnets. An RLA with significantly fewer arcs will reduce the cost. We will develop the optics and technical requirements to allow the maximum number of passes by using an adjustable path length to accurately control the returned beam to synchronize with the linac RF phase.

  2. The SuperB Accelerator: Overview and Lattice Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zobov, M.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.; Heifets, S.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.T.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; Koop, I.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /LBL, Berkeley /CERN /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-22

    SuperB aims at the construction of a very high luminosity (10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} Flavour Factory, with possible location at the campus of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory. In this paper the basic principles of the design and details on the lattice are given. SuperB is a new machine that can exploit novel very promising design approaches: (1) large Piwinski angle scheme will allow for peak luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, well beyond the current state-of-the-art, without a significant increase in beam currents or shorter bunch lengths; (2) 'crab waist' sextupoles will be used for suppression of dangerous resonances; (3) the low beam currents design presents reduced detector and background problems, and affordable operating costs; (4) a polarized electron beam can produce polarized {tau} leptons, opening an entirely new realm of exploration in lepton flavor physics. SuperB studies are already proving useful to the accelerator and particle physics communities. The principle of operation is being tested at DAFNE. The baseline lattice, based on the reuse of all PEP-II hardware, fits in the Tor Vergata University campus site, near Frascati. A CDR is being reviewed by an International Review Committee, chaired by J. Dainton (UK). A Technical Design Report will be prepared to be ready by beginning of 2010.

  3. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON THE COSMOLOGICAL DECELERATION-ACCELERATION TRANSITION REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-03-20

    We compile a list of 28 independent measurements of the Hubble parameter between redshifts 0.07 {<=} z {<=} 2.3 and use this to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. These H(z) measurements by themselves require a currently accelerating cosmological expansion at about, or better than, 3{sigma} confidence. The mean and standard deviation of the six best-fit model deceleration-acceleration transition redshifts (for the three cosmological models and two Hubble constant priors we consider) are z{sub da} = 0.74 {+-} 0.05, in good agreement with the recent Busca et al. determination of z{sub da} = 0.82 {+-} 0.08 based on 11 H(z) measurements between redshifts 0.2 {<=} z {<=} 2.3, almost entirely from baryon-acoustic-oscillation-like data.

  4. Supernovae, an accelerating universe and the cosmological constant

    PubMed Central

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of supernova explosions halfway back to the Big Bang give plausible evidence that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating since that epoch, approximately 8 billion years ago and suggest that energy associated with the vacuum itself may be responsible for the acceleration. PMID:10200242

  5. Scalar curvature of spacelike hypersurfaces and certain class of cosmological models for accelerated expanding universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledo, Juan A.; Rubio, Rafael M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the scalar curvature of spacelike hypersurfaces in the family of cosmological models known as generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes, and give several rigidity results under appropriate mathematical and physical assumptions. On the other hand, we show that this family of spacetimes provides suitable models obeying the null convergence condition to explain accelerated expanding universes.

  6. Scalar speed limits and cosmology: Acceleration from D-cceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David

    2004-11-01

    Causality on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT correspondence restricts motion on the moduli space of the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory by imposing a speed limit on how fast the scalar field may roll. This effect can be traced to higher-derivative operators arising from integrating out light degrees of freedom near the origin. In the strong coupling limit of the theory, the dynamics is well approximated by the Dirac-Born-Infeld Lagrangian for a probe D3-brane moving toward the horizon of the AdS Poincaré patch, combined with an estimate of the (ultimately suppressed) rate of particle and string production in the system. We analyze the motion of a rolling scalar field explicitly in the strong coupling regime of the field theory and extend the analysis to cosmological systems obtained by coupling this type of field theory to four-dimensional gravity. This leads to a mechanism for slow roll inflation for a massive scalar at sub-Planckian vacuum expectation value without need for a flat potential (realizing a version of k inflation in a microphysical framework). It also leads to a variety of novel Friedman-Roberston-Walker cosmologies, some of which are related to those obtained with tachyon matter.

  7. Observation of Stueckelberg oscillations in accelerated optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Ciampini, D.; Arimondo, E.; Morsch, O.

    2010-12-15

    We report the experimental observation of Stueckelberg oscillations of matter waves in optical lattices. Extending previous work on Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices, we study the effects of the accumulated phase between two successive crossings of the Brillouin zone edge. Our results agree well with a simple model for multiple Landau-Zener tunneling events taking into account the band structure of the optical lattice.

  8. Gauss-Bonnet cosmology unifying late and early-time acceleration eras with intermediate eras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that with vacuum F(G) gravity it is possible to describe the unification of late and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and matter domination era. The Hubble rate of the unified evolution contains two mild singularities, so called Type IV singularities, and the evolution itself has some appealing features, such as the existence of a deceleration-acceleration transition at late times. We also address quantitatively a fundamental question related to modified gravity models description of cosmological evolution: Is it possible for all modified gravity descriptions of our Universe evolution, to produce a nearly scale invariant spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations? As we demonstrate, the answer for the F(G) description is no, since the resulting power spectrum is not scale invariant, in contrast to the F(R) description studied in the literature. Therefore, although the cosmological evolution can be realized in the context of vacuum F(G) gravity, the evolution is not compatible with the observational data, in contrast to the F(R) gravity description of the same cosmological evolution.

  9. The Accelerating Universe: Infinite Expansion, the Cosmological Constant, and the Beauty of the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2000-12-01

    Advance Praise for The Accelerating Universe "The Accelerating Universe is not only an informative book about modern cosmology. It is rich storytelling and, above all, a celebration of the human mind in its quest for beauty in all things." -Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams "This is a wonderfully lucid account of the extraordinary discoveries that have made the last years a golden period for observational cosmology. But Mario Livio has not only given the reader one clear explanation after another of what astronomers are up to, he has used them to construct a provocative argument for the importance of aesthetics in the development of science and for the inseparability of science, art, and culture." -Lee Smolin, author of The Life of the Cosmos "What a pleasure to read! An exciting, simple account of the universe revealed by modern astronomy. Beautifully written, clearly presented, informed by scientific and philosophical insights." -John Bahcall, Institute for Advanced Study "A book with charm, beauty, elegance, and importance. As authoritative a journey as can be taken through modern cosmology." -Allan Sandage, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington

  10. A class of transient acceleration models consistent with Big Bang cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Tian-Long; Chen, Jie-Wen; Zhang, Yang

    2014-02-01

    Is it possible that the current cosmic accelerating expansion will turn into a decelerating one? Can this transition be realized by some viable theoretical model that is consistent with the standard Big Bang cosmology? We study a class of phenomenological models with a transient acceleration, based on a dynamical dark energy with a very general form of equation of state pde = βρde - βρdem. It mimics the cosmological constant ρde → const for a small scale factor a, and behaves as a barotropic gas with ρde → a-3(α+1) with α >= 0 for large a. The cosmic evolution of four models in the class has been examined in detail, and all yield a smooth transient acceleration. Depending on the specific model, the future universe may be dominated by either dark energy or by matter. In two models, the dynamical dark energy can be explicitly realized by a scalar field with an analytical potential V(φ). Moreover, a statistical analysis shows that the models can be as robust as ΛCDM in confronting the observational data of Type Ia supernovae, cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation. As improvements over previous studies, our models overcome the problem of over-abundance of dark energy during early eras, and satisfy the constraints on dark energy from WMAP observations of CMB.

  11. Cosmographic bounds on the cosmological deceleration-acceleration transition redshift in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Farooq, Omer; Luongo, Orlando; Ratra, Bharat

    2014-08-01

    We examine the observational viability of a class of f(R) gravity cosmological models. Particular attention is devoted to constraints from the recent observational determination of the redshift of the cosmological deceleration-acceleration transition. Making use of the fact that the Ricci scalar is a function of redshift z in these models, R =R(z), and so is f(z), we use cosmography to relate a f(z) test function evaluated at higher z to late-time cosmographic bounds. First, we consider a model-independent procedure to build up a numerical f(z) by requiring that at z=0 the corresponding cosmological model reduces to standard ΛCDM. We then infer late-time observational constraints on f(z) in terms of bounds on the Taylor expansion cosmographic coefficients. In doing so we parametrize possible departures from the standard ΛCDM model in terms of a two-parameter logarithmic correction. The physical meaning of the two parameters is also discussed in terms of the post-Newtonian approximation. Second, we provide numerical estimates of the cosmographic series terms by using type Ia supernova apparent magnitude data and Hubble parameter measurements. Finally, we use these estimates to bound the two parameters of the logarithmic correction. We find that the deceleration parameter in our model changes sign at a redshift consistent with what is observed.

  12. Freezing, accelerating, and slowing directed currents in real time with superimposed driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Liebchen, Benno; Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We provide a generic scheme offering real-time control of directed particle transport using superimposed driven lattices. This scheme allows one to accelerate, slow, and freeze the transport on demand by switching one of the lattices subsequently on and off. The underlying physical mechanism hinges on a systematic opening and closing of channels between transporting and nontransporting phase space structures upon switching and exploits cantori structures which generate memory effects in the population of these structures. Our results should allow for real-time control of cold thermal atomic ensembles in optical lattices but might also be useful as a design principle for targeted delivery of molecules or colloids in optical devices.

  13. Implications of an Absolute Simultaneity Theory for Cosmology and Universe Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kipreos, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift–distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  14. Implications of an absolute simultaneity theory for cosmology and universe acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift-distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  15. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  16. Multigrid lattice Boltzmann method for accelerated solution of elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dhiraj V.; Premnath, Kannan N.; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-05-01

    A new solver for second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the multigrid (MG) technique is presented. Several benchmark elliptic equations are solved numerically with the inclusion of multiple grid-levels in two-dimensional domains at an optimal computational cost within the LB framework. The results are compared with the corresponding analytical solutions and numerical solutions obtained using the Stone's strongly implicit procedure. The classical PDEs considered in this article include the Laplace and Poisson equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions, with the latter involving both constant and variable coefficients. A detailed analysis of solution accuracy, convergence and computational efficiency of the proposed solver is given. It is observed that the use of a high-order stencil (for smoothing) improves convergence and accuracy for an equivalent number of smoothing sweeps. The effect of the type of scheduling cycle (V- or W-cycle) on the performance of the MG-LBM is analyzed. Next, a parallel algorithm for the MG-LBM solver is presented and then its parallel performance on a multi-core cluster is analyzed. Lastly, a practical example is provided wherein the proposed elliptic PDE solver is used to compute the electro-static potential encountered in an electro-chemical cell, which demonstrates the effectiveness of this new solver in complex coupled systems. Several orders of magnitude gains in convergence and parallel scaling for the canonical problems, and a factor of 5 reduction for the multiphysics problem are achieved using the MG-LBM.

  17. FRW Like Cosmological Model and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe from Non Commutative Seiberg-Witten Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissaoui, H.; Mebarki, N.; Bouhalouf, H.

    2010-10-01

    An FRW like cosmological model in the non commutative Seiberg-Witten space-time is proposed. The pure NCG dynamical apparent horizon and Hawking temperature are obtained and explicit expressions of the scale factor, Hubble and deceleration parameters are derived. The accelerated expansion of the universe scenario is also discussed.

  18. CDM accelerating cosmology as an alternative to ΛCDM model

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Jesus, J.F.; Oliveira, F.A. E-mail: jfernando@astro.iag.usp.br

    2010-11-01

    A new accelerating cosmology driven only by baryons plus cold dark matter (CDM) is proposed in the framework of general relativity. In this scenario the present accelerating stage of the Universe is powered by the negative pressure describing the gravitationally-induced particle production of cold dark matter particles. This kind of scenario has only one free parameter and the differential equation governing the evolution of the scale factor is exactly the same of the ΛCDM model. For a spatially flat Universe, as predicted by inflation (Ω{sub dm}+Ω{sub baryon} = 1), it is found that the effectively observed matter density parameter is Ω{sub meff} = 1−α, where α is the constant parameter specifying the CDM particle creation rate. The supernovae test based on the Union data (2008) requires α ∼ 0.71 so that Ω{sub meff} ∼ 0.29 as independently derived from weak gravitational lensing, the large scale structure and other complementary observations.

  19. The accelerating universe and other cosmological aspects of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Felice, Antonio

    I give a short introduction to standard cosmology and a review of what it is meant by "the dark energy enigma" in chapter l. In chapter 2, I mention and describe some attempts found in the literature of the past few years to attack this problem. Dark energy candidates for which the equation-of-state parameter w is less than -1 violate the dominant energy condition. In scalar-tensor theories of gravity, however, the expansion of the universe can mimic the behavior of general relativity with w < -1 dark energy, without violating any energy conditions. I examine, in chapter 3, whether this possibility is phenomenologically viable by studying Brans-Dicke models and characterizing both the naturalness of the models themselves, and additional observational constraints from limits on the time-dependence of Newton's constant. I find that only highly contrived models would lead observers to measure w < -1. In chapter 4, I consider general curvature-invariant modifications of the Einstein-Hilbert action that become important only in regions of extremely low space-time curvature. I investigate the far future evolution of the universe in such models, examining the possibilities for cosmic acceleration and other ultimate destinies. The models generically possess de Sitter space as an unstable solution and exhibit an interesting set of attractor solutions which, in some cases, provide alternatives to dark energy models. In chapter 5, I study a baryogenesis mechanism operating in the context of hyperextended inflation and making use of a coupling between the scalar field and a standard model global current, such as B or B - L . The method is efficient at temperatures at which these currents are not conserved due to some higher dimensional operator. The particle physics and cosmological phenomenology are discussed. I consider constraints stemming from nucleosynthesis and solar system experiments.

  20. Singular F(R) cosmology unifying early- and late-time acceleration with matter and radiation domination era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We present some cosmological models which unify the late- and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and the matter domination era, and we realize the cosmological models by using the theoretical framework of F(R) gravity. Particularly, the first model unifies the late- and early-time acceleration with the matter domination era, and the second model unifies all the evolution eras of our Universe. The two models are described in the same way at early and late times, and only the intermediate stages of the evolution have some differences. Each cosmological model contains two Type IV singularities which are chosen to occur one at the end of the inflationary era and one at the end of the matter domination era. The cosmological models at early times are approximately identical to the R 2 inflation model, so these describe a slow-roll inflationary era which ends when the slow-roll parameters become of order one. The inflationary era is followed by the radiation era and after that the matter domination era follows, which lasts until the second Type IV singularity, and then the late-time acceleration era follows. The models have two appealing features: firstly they produce a nearly scale invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations and a scalar-to-tensor ratio which are compatible with the most recent observational data and secondly, it seems that the deceleration–acceleration transition is crucially affected by the presence of the second Type IV singularity which occurs at the end of the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Hubble horizon at early times shrinks, as expected for an initially accelerating Universe, then during the matter domination era, it expands and finally after the Type IV singularity, the Hubble horizon starts to shrink again, during the late-time acceleration era. Intriguingly enough, the deceleration–acceleration transition, occurs after the second Type IV singularity. In addition, we investigate which F

  1. Achromatic and isochronous lattice design of P2DT bending section in RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-09-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, generally, the In-flight Fragmentation (IF) and Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) systems are employed in order to produce various isotope beams. Out of the isotope beams, the beams generated by the ISOL system are transported from the low energy linac SCL3 to the high energy driver linac SCL2. The post-accelerator to the driver linac transport (P2DT) section that consists of the charge stripper section, the 180° bending section, and the SCL2 matching section is placed between the SCL3 and the SCL2. In this P2DT section, however, the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth can aggravate the beam acceptance of the SCL2. Besides, the growth at the P2DT 180° bending section is considered a significant issue because of the unexpected achromatic effect. Therefore an achromatic and isochronous lattice design should be devised to prevent the transverse and longitudinal emittance from increasing while the multi-charge beams flow through the bending section. This study reports an improved design for the achromatic and isochronous lattice up to the second-order. After satisfying the first-order achromatic and isochronous condition by adjusting the field strength of quadrupoles with this design, the simple and efficient method will be utilized with the aim of getting the minimum number of sextupoles. The research on the collimator for the charge selection at the bending section will be also represented by using the designed lattice.

  2. Stringent restriction from the growth of large-scale structure on apparent acceleration in inhomogeneous cosmological models.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin; Troxel, M A

    2013-12-20

    Probes of cosmic expansion constitute the main basis for arguments to support or refute a possible apparent acceleration due to different expansion rates in the Universe as described by inhomogeneous cosmological models. We present in this Letter a separate argument based on results from an analysis of the growth rate of large-scale structure in the Universe as modeled by the inhomogeneous cosmological models of Szekeres. We use the models with no assumptions of spherical or axial symmetries. We find that while the Szekeres models can fit very well the observed expansion history without a Λ, they fail to produce the observed late-time suppression in the growth unless Λ is added to the dynamics. A simultaneous fit to the supernova and growth factor data shows that the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM) provides consistency with the data at a confidence level of 99.65%, while the Szekeres model without Λ achieves only a 60.46% level. When the data sets are considered separately, the Szekeres with no Λ fits the supernova data as well as the ΛCDM does, but provides a very poor fit to the growth data with only 31.31% consistency level compared to 99.99% for the ΛCDM. This absence of late-time growth suppression in inhomogeneous models without a Λ is consolidated by a physical explanation. PMID:24483736

  3. GPU-accelerated Lattice Boltzmann method for anatomical extraction in patient-specific computational hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, C.; Chen, N.; Zhao, Y.; Sawchuk, A. P.; Dalsing, M. C.; Teague, S. D.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Existing research of patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) heavily relies on software for anatomical extraction of blood arteries. Data reconstruction and mesh generation have to be done using existing commercial software due to the gap between medical image processing and CFD, which increases computation burden and introduces inaccuracy during data transformation thus limits the medical applications of PSCH. We use lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve the level-set equation over an Eulerian distance field and implicitly and dynamically segment the artery surfaces from radiological CT/MRI imaging data. The segments seamlessly feed to the LBM based CFD computation of PSCH thus explicit mesh construction and extra data management are avoided. The LBM is ideally suited for GPU (graphic processing unit)-based parallel computing. The parallel acceleration over GPU achieves excellent performance in PSCH computation. An application study will be presented which segments an aortic artery from a chest CT dataset and models PSCH of the segmented artery.

  4. Tunneling dynamics of superfluid Fermi gases in an accelerating optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Tie Lu; Xue Jukui

    2010-11-15

    The nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling and the nonlinear Rabi oscillations of superfluid Fermi gases between Bloch bands in an accelerating optical lattice are discussed. Within the hydrodynamic theory and a two-level model, the tunneling probability of superfluid Fermi gases between Bloch bands is obtained. We find that, as the system crosses from the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) side to the BCS side, the tunneling rate is closely related to the particle density: when the density is smaller (larger) than a critical value, the tunneling rate at unitarity is larger (smaller) than that in the BEC limit. This is well explained in terms of an effective interaction and an effective potential. Furthermore, the nonlinear Rabi oscillations of superfluid Fermi gases between the bands are discussed by imposing a periodic modulation on the level bias and the strength of the lattice. Analytical expressions of the critical density for suppressing or enhancing the Rabi oscillations are obtained. It is shown that, as the system crosses from the BEC side to the BCS side, the critical density strongly depends on the modulation parameters (i.e., the modulation amplitude and the modulation frequency). For a fixed density, a high-frequency or low-frequency modulation can suppress or enhance the Rabi oscillations both at unitarity and in the BEC limit. For an intermediate modulation frequency, the Rabi oscillations are chaotic along the entire BEC-BCS crossover, especially, on the BCS side. Interestingly, we find that the modulation of the lattice strength only with an intermediate modulation frequency has significant effect on the Rabi oscillations both in the BEC limit and at unitarity; that is, an intermediate-frequency modulation can enhance the Rabi oscillations, especially on the BCS side.

  5. Design and high order optimization of the Accelerator Test Facility lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, E.; Tomás, R.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G. R.; Woodley, M.

    2014-02-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) aims to test the novel chromaticity correction scheme which is implemented in the final focus systems of future linear colliders such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The ATF2 nominal and ultralow β* lattices are designed to vertically focus the beam at the focal point, or usually referred to as interaction point (IP), down to 37 and 23 nm, respectively. The vertical chromaticities of the nominal and ultralow β* lattices are comparable to those of ILC and CLIC, respectively. When the measured multipole components of the ATF2 magnets are considered in the simulations, the evaluated spot sizes at the IP are well above the design values. In this paper we describe the analysis of the high order aberrations that allows identifying the sources of the observed beam size growth. In order to recover the design spot sizes three solutions are considered, namely final doublet replacement, octupole insertion, and optics modification. Concerning the future linear collider projects, the consequences of magnetic field errors of the focusing quadrupole magnet of the final doublet are also addressed.

  6. Accelerating cosmologies and the phase structure of F (R ) gravity with Lagrange multiplier constraints: A mimetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    We study mimetic F (R ) gravity with a potential and Lagrange multiplier constraint. In the context of these theories, we introduce a reconstruction technique which enables us to realize arbitrary cosmologies, given the Hubble rate and an arbitrarily chosen F (R ) gravity. We exemplify our method by realizing cosmologies that are in concordance with current observations (Planck data) and also well-known bouncing cosmologies. The attribute of our method is that the F (R ) gravity can be arbitrarily chosen, so we can have the appealing features of the mimetic approach combined with the known features of some F (R ) gravities, which unify early-time with late-time acceleration. Moreover, we study the existence and the stability of de Sitter points in the context of mimetic F (R ) gravity. In the case of unstable de Sitter points, it is demonstrated that graceful exit from inflation occurs. We also study the Einstein-frame counterpart theory of the Jordan-frame mimetic F (R ) gravity, and we discuss the general properties of the theory and exemplify our analysis by studying a quite interesting (from a phenomenological point of view) model with two scalar fields. We also calculate the observational indices of the two-scalar-field model, by using the two-scalar-field formalism. Furthermore, we extensively study the dynamical system that corresponds to the mimetic F (R ) gravity, by finding the fixed points and studying their stability. Finally, we modify our reconstruction method to function in the inverse way and thus yield which F (R ) gravity can realize a specific cosmological evolution, given the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier.

  7. Studies into the nature of cosmic acceleration: Dark energy or a modification to gravity on cosmological scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossett, Jason Nicholas

    Since its discovery more than a decade ago, the problem of cosmic acceleration has become one of the largest in cosmology and physics as a whole. An unknown dark energy component of the universe is often invoked to explain this observation. Mathematically, this works because inserting a cosmic fluid with a negative equation of state into Einstein's equations provides an accelerated expansion. There are, however, alternative explanations for the observed cosmic acceleration. Perhaps the most promising of the alternatives is that, on the very largest cosmological scales, general relativity needs to be extended or a new, modified gravity theory must be used. Indeed, many modified gravity models are not only able to replicate the observed accelerated expansion without dark energy, but are also more compatible with a unified theory of physics. Thus it is the goal of this dissertation to develop and study robust tests that will be able to distinguish between these alternative theories of gravity and the need for a dark energy component of the universe. We will study multiple approaches using the growth history of large-scale structure in the universe as a way to accomplish this task. These approaches include studying what is known as the growth index parameter, a parameter that describes the logarithmic growth rate of structure in the universe, which describes the rate of formation of clusters and superclusters of galaxies over the entire age of the universe. We will explore the effectiveness of this parameter to distinguish between general relativity and modifications to gravity physics given realistic expectations of results from future experiments. Next, we will explore the modified growth formalism wherein deviations from the growth expected in general relativity are parameterized via changes to the growth equations, i.e. the perturbed Einstein's equations. We will also explore the impact of spatial curvature on these tests. Finally, we will study how dark energy

  8. Expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations that induce an anomalous acceleration into the Standard Model of Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Blake; Smoller, Joel

    2009-01-01

    We derive a system of three coupled equations that implicitly defines a continuous one-parameter family of expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations, such that the Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology is embedded as a single point in this family. By approximating solutions near the center to leading order in the Hubble length, the family reduces to an explicit one-parameter family of expanding spacetimes, given in closed form, that represents a perturbation of the Standard Model. By introducing a comoving coordinate system, we calculate the correction to the Hubble constant as well as the exact leading order quadratic correction to the redshift vs. luminosity relation for an observer at the center. The correction to redshift vs. luminosity entails an adjustable free parameter that introduces an anomalous acceleration. We conclude (by continuity) that corrections to the redshift vs. luminosity relation observed after the radiation phase of the Big Bang can be accounted for, at the leading order quadratic level, by adjustment of this free parameter. The next order correction is then a prediction. Since nonlinearities alone could actuate dissipation and decay in the conservation laws associated with the highly nonlinear radiation phase and since noninteracting expanding waves represent possible time-asymptotic wave patterns that could result, we propose to further investigate the possibility that these corrections to the Standard Model might be the source of the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies, an explanation not requiring the cosmological constant or dark energy. PMID:19706502

  9. Expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations that induce an anomalous acceleration into the Standard Model of Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Temple, Blake; Smoller, Joel

    2009-08-25

    We derive a system of three coupled equations that implicitly defines a continuous one-parameter family of expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations, such that the Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology is embedded as a single point in this family. By approximating solutions near the center to leading order in the Hubble length, the family reduces to an explicit one-parameter family of expanding spacetimes, given in closed form, that represents a perturbation of the Standard Model. By introducing a comoving coordinate system, we calculate the correction to the Hubble constant as well as the exact leading order quadratic correction to the redshift vs. luminosity relation for an observer at the center. The correction to redshift vs. luminosity entails an adjustable free parameter that introduces an anomalous acceleration. We conclude (by continuity) that corrections to the redshift vs. luminosity relation observed after the radiation phase of the Big Bang can be accounted for, at the leading order quadratic level, by adjustment of this free parameter. The next order correction is then a prediction. Since nonlinearities alone could actuate dissipation and decay in the conservation laws associated with the highly nonlinear radiation phase and since noninteracting expanding waves represent possible time-asymptotic wave patterns that could result, we propose to further investigate the possibility that these corrections to the Standard Model might be the source of the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies, an explanation not requiring the cosmological constant or dark energy. PMID:19706502

  10. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Gene

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with significant flexibility in mind, but without compromising cost efficiency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of different variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of-flight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  11. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, Gene

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  12. Determination of the cosmological rate of change of G and the tidal accelerations of earth and moon from ancient and modern astronomical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and numerical analysis of ancient astronomical observations (1374 to 1715) are combined with modern data in a simultaneous solution for: the tidal acceleration of the lunar longitude; the observed apparent acceleration of the earth's rotation; the true nontidal geophysical part of this acceleration; and the rate of change in the gravitational constant. Provided are three independent determinations of a rate of change of G consistent with the Hubble Constant and a near zero nontidal rotational acceleration of the earth. The tidal accelerations are shown to have remained constant during the historical period within uncertainties. Ancient and modern solar system data, and extragalactic observations provided a completely consistent astronomical and cosmological scheme.

  13. Analytical Study on the Cosmological Large-scale Structure in an Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the roughly log-normal probability density distribution function (PDF) of the small scale density field, we develop cosmological perturbation theory for the power spectrum of a logarithmically transformed density field with the formalism which is developed in the context of the cosmological renormalized perturbation theory. Compared with the standard perturbation theory, our approach help to regulate the convergence behavior of the perturbation series, and of the Taylor series expansion we use for the logarithmic mapping. The perturbation calculation achieved good agreement with simulation results. Then we consider the topology of the iso-density contour of the density field, especially the genus. The genus is relatively insensitive to nonlinear gravitational evolution, clustering bias and redshift distortion, and is approximately conserved over time as structures grow in Einstein's general relativity, hence it can be used as a robust standard ruler for cosmological measurements. However, in modified gravity models where structures grow with different rates on different scales, the genus should change over time, and therefore it can be used to test the gravity models on large scales. We studied the case of the f(R) theory, DGP brane-world theory as well as phenomenological models. We also forecast how the modified gravity models can be constrained with optical/IR or 21cm surveys in the near future.

  14. Studies of charge neutral FCC Lattice Gas with Yukawa Interaction and Accelerated Cartesian Expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He

    In this thesis, I present the results of studies of the structural properties and phase transition of a charge neutral FCC Lattice Gas with Yukawa Interaction and discuss a novel fast calculation algorithm---Accelerated Cartesian Expansion (ACE) method. In the first part of my thesis, I discuss the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out to understand the finite temperature (phase transition) properties and the ground state structure of a Yukawa Lattice Gas (YLG) model. In this model the ions interact via the potential q iqjexp(-kappar> ij)/rij where qi,j are the charges of the ions located at the lattice sites i and j with position vectors R i and Rj; rij = Ri-Rj, kappa is a measure of the range of the interaction and is called the screening parameter. This model approximates an interesting quaternary system of great current thermoelectric interest called LAST-m, AgSbPbmTem+2. I have also developed rapid calculation methods for the potential energy calculation in a lattice gas system with periodic boundary condition bases on the Ewald summation method and coded the algorithm to compute the energies in MC simulation. Some of the interesting results of the MC simulations are: (i) how the nature and strength of the phase transition depend on the range of interaction (Yukawa screening parameter kappa) (ii) what is the degeneracy of the ground state for different values of the concentration of charges, and (iii) what is the nature of two-stage disordering transition seen for certain values of x. In addition, based on the analysis of the surface energy of different nano-clusters formed near the transition temperature, the solidification process and the rate of production of these nano-clusters have been studied. In the second part of my thesis, we have developed two methods for rapidly computing potentials of the form R-nu. Both these methods are founded on addition theorems based on Taylor expansions. Taylor's series has a couple of inherent advantages: (i) it

  15. SU(2,CMB), the nature of light and accelerated cosmological expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ralf

    2006-09-01

    We present quantitative and qualitative arguments in favor of the claim that, within the present cosmological epoch, the U(1)Y factor in the Standard Model is an effective manifestation of SU(2) pure gauge dynamics of Yang-Mills scale Λ ˜ 10-4 eV. Results for the pressure and the energy density in the deconfining phase of this theory, obtained in a nonperturbative and analytical way, support this connection in view of large-angle features inherent in the map of the CMB tempera- ture fluctuations and temperature-polarization cross correlations. Dedicated to Pierre van Baal with best wishes for a soon recuperation.

  16. Reconstruction of lattice parameters and beam momentum distribution from turn-by-turn beam position monitor readings in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, C. S.; Gratus, J.; Hock, K. M.; Machida, S.; Muratori, B. D.; Torromé, R. G.; Wolski, A.

    2014-05-01

    In high chromaticity circular accelerators, rapid decoherence of the betatron motion of a particle beam can make the measurement of lattice and bunch values, such as Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron amplitude, difficult. A method for reconstructing the momentum distribution of a beam from beam position measurements is presented. Further analysis of the same beam position monitor data allows estimates to be made of the Courant-Snyder parameters and the amplitude of coherent betatron oscillation of the beam. The methods are tested through application to data taken on the linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, EMMA.

  17. Lattice design and beam dynamics studies of the high energy beam transport line in the RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-12-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS) or Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system are accelerated by lower energy superconducting linac and high energy superconducting linac. The accelerated beams are used in the high energy experimental hall which includes bio-medical and muon-SR facilities, after passing through the high energy beam transport lines. At the targets of those two facilities, the stable and small beams meeting the requirements rigorously are required in the transverse plane. Therefore the beams must be safely sent to the targets and simultaneously satisfy the two requirements, the achromatic condition and the mid-plane symmetric condition, of the targets. For this reason, the lattice design of the high energy beam transport lines in which the long deflecting sections are included is considered as a significant issue in the RAON accelerator. In this paper, we will describe the calculated beam optics satisfying the conditions and present the result of particle tracking simulations with the designed lattice of the high energy beam transport lines in the RAON accelerator. Also, the orbit distortion caused by the machine imperfections and the orbit correction with correctors will be discussed.

  18. ENTROPY AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AS IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMOLOGICAL COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-04-10

    Recently, gas entropy at the outskirts of galaxy clusters has attracted much attention. We propose that the entropy profiles could be used to study cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration around the clusters. If the CRs are effectively accelerated at the formation of clusters, the kinetic energy of infalling gas is consumed by the acceleration and the gas entropy should decrease. As a result, the entropy profiles become flat at the outskirts. If the acceleration is not efficient, the entropy should continue to increase outward. By comparing model predictions with X-ray observations with Suzaku, which show flat entropy profiles, we find that the CRs have carried {approx}< 7% of the kinetic energy of the gas away from the clusters. Moreover, the CR pressure at the outskirts can be {approx}< 40% of the total pressure. On the other hand, if the entropy profiles are not flat at the outskirts, as indicated by combined Plank and ROSAT observations, the carried energy and the CR pressure should be much smaller than the above estimations.

  19. Cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Ciaran; Neupane, Ishwaree P

    2013-04-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence--the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this Letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the four-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, from which we obtain a mass-reduction formula, namely, M(P)(2) = ρ(b)/|Λ(5)|, where M(P) is the effective (normalized) Planck mass, Λ(5) is the five-dimensional cosmological constant, and ρ(b) is the sum of the 3-brane tension V and the matter density ρ. Although the range of variation in ρ(b) is strongly constrained, the big bang nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the effective Newton constant G(N) = (8πM(P)(2))(-1) is satisfied when the ratio V/ρ ≳ O(10(2)) on cosmological scales. The same bound leads to an effective equation of state close to -1 at late epochs in accordance with astrophysical and cosmological observations. PMID:25166976

  20. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Observational constraints on the accelerating universe in the framework of a 5D bounce cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Bo; Xu, Li-Xin; Liu, Mo-Lin; Gui, Yuan-Xing

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of a five-dimensional (5D) bounce cosmological model, a useful function f(z) is obtained by giving a concrete expression of deceleration parameter Then using the obtained Hubble parameter H(z) according to the function f(z), we constrain the accelerating universe from recent cosmic observations: the 192 ESSENCE SNe Ia and the 9 observational H(z) data. The best fitting values of transition redshift ZT and current deceleration parameter qo are given as . Furthermore, in the 5D bounce model it can be seen that the evolution of equation of state (EOS) for dark energy wde can cross over -1 at about z = 0.23 and the current value w0de = -1.15 < -1. On the other hand, by giving a concrete expression of model-independent EOS of dark energy wde, in the 5D bounce model we obtain the best fitting values from the recently observed data: the 192 ESSENCE SNe Ia, the observational H(z) data, the 3-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) baryon acoustic peak and the x-ray gas mass fraction in clusters.

  1. Primordial cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Giovanni

    1. Historical picture. 1.1. The concept of universe through the centuries. 1.2. The XIX century knowledge. 1.3. Birth of scientific cosmology. 1.4. The genesis of the hot big bang model. 1.5. Guidelines to the literature -- 2. Fundamental tools. 2.1. Einstein equations. 2.2. Matter fields. 2.3. Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. 2.4. Synchronous reference system. 2.5. Tetradic formalism. 2.6. Gauge-like formulation of GR. 2.7. Singularity theorems. 2.8. Guidelines to the literature -- 3. The structure and dynamics of the isotropic universe. 3.1. The RW geometry. 3.2. The FRW cosmology. 3.3. Dissipative cosmologies. 3.4. Inhomogeneous fluctuations in the universe. 3.5. General relativistic perturbation theory. 3.6. The Lemaitre-Tolmann-Bondi spherical solution. 3.7. Guidelines to the literature -- 4. Features of the observed universe. 4.1. Current status: The concordance model. 4.2. The large-scale structure. 4.3. The acceleration of the universe. 4.4. The cosmic microwave background. 4.5. Guidelines to the literature -- 5. The theory of inflation. 5.1. The shortcomings of the standard cosmology. 5.2. The inflationary paradigm. 5.3. Presence of a self-interacting scalar field. 5.4. Inflationary dynamics. 5.5. Solution to the shortcomings of the standard cosmology. 5.6. General features. 5.7. Possible explanations for the present acceleration of the universe. 5.8. Guidelines to the literature -- 6. Inhomogeneous quasi-isotropic cosmologies. 6.1. Quasi-isotropic solution. 6.2. The presence of ultrarelativistic matter. 6.3. The role of a massless scalar field. 6.4. The role of an electromagnetic field. 6.5. Quasi-isotropic inflation. 6.6. Quasi-isotropic viscous solution. 6.7. Guidelines to the literature -- 7. Homogeneous universes. 7.1. Homogeneous cosmological models. 7.2. Kasner solution. 7.3. The dynamics of the Bianchi models. 7.4. Bianchi types VIII and IX models. 7.5. Dynamical systems approach. 7.6. Multidimensional homogeneous universes. 7.7. Guidelines

  2. GPU-Accelerated Population Annealing Algorithm: Frustrated Ising Antiferromagnet on the Stacked Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovský, Michal; Weigel, Martin; Barash, Lev Yu.; Žukovič, Milan

    2016-02-01

    The population annealing algorithm is a novel approach to study systems with rough free-energy landscapes, such as spin glasses. It combines the power of simulated annealing, Boltzmann weighted differential reproduction and sequential Monte Carlo process to bring the population of replicas to the equilibrium even in the low-temperature region. Moreover, it provides a very good estimate of the free energy. The fact that population annealing algorithm is performed over a large number of replicas with many spin updates, makes it a good candidate for massive parallelism. We chose the GPU programming using a CUDA implementation to create a highly optimized simulation. It has been previously shown for the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the stacked triangular lattice with a ferromagnetic interlayer coupling, that standard Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations fail to equilibrate at low temperatures due to the effect of kinetic freezing of the ferromagnetically ordered chains. We applied the population annealing to study the case with the isotropic intra- and interlayer antiferromagnetic coupling (J2/|J1| = -1). The reached ground states correspond to non-magnetic degenerate states, where chains are antiferromagnetically ordered, but there is no long-range ordering between them, which is analogical with Wannier phase of the 2D triangular Ising antiferromagnet.

  3. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  4. Unified cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.M. Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul )

    1990-04-15

    Recently a unified cosmology was proposed as a higher-dimensional generalization of the standard big-bang cosmology. In this paper we discuss its foundation, characteristics, and possible cosmological solutions in detail. In particular we discuss how the missing-mass problem, the horizon problem, and the flatness problem of the standard model can be resolved within the context of this unified cosmology.

  5. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  6. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  7. Cosmology from start to finish.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L

    2006-04-27

    Cosmology is undergoing a revolution. With recent precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation, large galaxy redshift surveys, better measurements of the expansion rate of the Universe and a host of other astrophysical observations, there is now a standard, highly constrained cosmological model. It is not a cosmology that was predicted. Unidentified dark particles dominate the matter content of our Universe, and mysteries surround the processes responsible for the accelerated expansion at its earliest moments (inflation?) and for its recent acceleration (dark energy?). New measurements must address the fundamental questions: what happened at the birth of the Universe, and what is its ultimate fate? PMID:16641983

  8. Current Issues in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, Jean-Claude; Narlikar, Jayant

    2006-06-01

    Part I. Observational Facts Relating to Discrete Sources: 1. The state of cosmology G. Burbidge; 2. The redshifts of galaxies and QSOs E. M. Burbidge and G. Burbidge; 3. Accretion discs in quasars J. Sulentic; Part II. Observational Facts Relating to Background Radiation: 4. CMB observations and consequences F. Bouchet; 5. Abundances of light nuclei K. Olive; 6. Evidence for an accelerating universe or lack of A. Blanchard; Part III. Standard Cosmology: 7. Cosmology, an overview of the standard model F. Bernardeau; 8. What are the building blocks of our universe? K. C. Wali; Part IV. Large-Scale Structure: 9. Observations of large-scale structure V. de Lapparent; 10. Reconstruction of large-scale peculiar velocity fields R. Mohayaee, B. Tully and U. Frisch; Part V. Alternative Cosmologies: 11. The quasi-steady state cosmology J. V. Narlikar; 12. Evidence for iron whiskers in the universe N. C. Wickramasinghe; 13. Alternatives to dark matter: MOND + Mach D. Roscoe; 14. Anthropic principle in cosmology B. Carter; Part VI. Evidence for Anomalous Redshifts: 15. Anomalous redshifts H. C. Arp; 16. Redshifts of galaxies and QSOs: the problem of redshift periodicities G. Burbidge; 17. Statistics of redshift periodicities W. Napier; 18. Local abnormal redshifts J.-C. Pecker; 19. Gravitational lensing and anomalous redshifts J. Surdej, J.-F. Claeskens and D. Sluse; Panel discussion; General discussion; Concluding remarks.

  9. Current Issues in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, Jean-Claude; Narlikar, Jayant

    2011-09-01

    Part I. Observational Facts Relating to Discrete Sources: 1. The state of cosmology G. Burbidge; 2. The redshifts of galaxies and QSOs E. M. Burbidge and G. Burbidge; 3. Accretion discs in quasars J. Sulentic; Part II. Observational Facts Relating to Background Radiation: 4. CMB observations and consequences F. Bouchet; 5. Abundances of light nuclei K. Olive; 6. Evidence for an accelerating universe or lack of A. Blanchard; Part III. Standard Cosmology: 7. Cosmology, an overview of the standard model F. Bernardeau; 8. What are the building blocks of our universe? K. C. Wali; Part IV. Large-Scale Structure: 9. Observations of large-scale structure V. de Lapparent; 10. Reconstruction of large-scale peculiar velocity fields R. Mohayaee, B. Tully and U. Frisch; Part V. Alternative Cosmologies: 11. The quasi-steady state cosmology J. V. Narlikar; 12. Evidence for iron whiskers in the universe N. C. Wickramasinghe; 13. Alternatives to dark matter: MOND + Mach D. Roscoe; 14. Anthropic principle in cosmology B. Carter; Part VI. Evidence for Anomalous Redshifts: 15. Anomalous redshifts H. C. Arp; 16. Redshifts of galaxies and QSOs: the problem of redshift periodicities G. Burbidge; 17. Statistics of redshift periodicities W. Napier; 18. Local abnormal redshifts J.-C. Pecker; 19. Gravitational lensing and anomalous redshifts J. Surdej, J.-F. Claeskens and D. Sluse; Panel discussion; General discussion; Concluding remarks.

  10. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, J. P.; Lebrat, J. F.; Soule, R.; Martini, M.; Jacqmin, R.; Imel, G. R.; Salvatores, M.

    1999-06-10

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties.

  11. Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    I discuss the classical cosmological tests, i.e., angular size-redshift, flux-redshift, and galaxy number counts, in the light of the cosmology prescribed by the interpretation of the CMB anisotropies. The discussion is somewhat of a primer for physicists, with emphasis upon the possible systematic uncertainties in the observations and their interpretation. Given the curious composition of the Universe inherent in the emerging cosmological model, I stress the value of searching for inconsistencies rather than concordance, and suggest that the prevailing mood of triumphalism in cosmology is premature.

  12. A three-dimensional phase field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces with accelerated crucible rotation and traveling magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie

    2014-11-01

    In this study, which builds on other related work, we present a new three-dimensional numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model accounts for buoyancy, accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT), and traveling magnetic field (TMF) induced convective flow and their effect on crystal growth and the chemical component's transport process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase field method. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. A one-way coupled concentration transport model is used to simulate the component fraction variation in both the liquid and solid phases, which can be used to check the quality of the crystal growth.

  13. Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses. In the last few years we have witnessed the birth and growth to healthy adolescence of a new collaboration between astrophysicists and particle physicists. The most notable success of this cooperative effort has been to provide the framework for understanding, within the context of GUTs and the hot big-bang cosmology, the universal baryon asymmetry. The most exciting new predictions this effort has spawned are that exotic relics may exist in detectable abundances. In particular, we may live in a neutrino-dominated Universe. In the next few years, accummulating laboratory data (for example proton decay, neutrino masses and oscillations) coupled with theoritical work in particle physics and cosmology will ensure the growth to maturity of this joint effort.

  14. The strained state cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Starting from some relevant facts concerning the behavior of the universe over large scale and time span, the analogy between the geometric approach of General Relativity and the classical description of an elastic strained material continuum is discussed. Extending the elastic deformation approach to four dimensions it is shown that the accelerated expansion of the universe is recovered. The strain field of space-time reproduces properties similar to the ones ascribed to the dark energy currently called in to explain the accelerated expansion. The strain field in the primordial universe behaves as radiation, but asymptotically it reproduces the cosmological constant. Subjecting the theory to a number of cosmological tests confirms the soundness of the approach and gives an optimal value for the one parameter of the model, i.e. the bulk modulus of the space-time continuum. Finally various aspects of the Strained State Cosmology (SSC) are discussed and contrasted with some non-linear massive gravity theories. The possible role of structure topological defects is also mentioned. The conclusion is that SSC is at least as good as the ΛCDM standard cosmology, giving a more intuitive interpretation of the physical nature of the phenomena.

  15. The screening Horndeski cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Sushkov, Sergey V.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic analysis of homogeneous and isotropic cosmologies in a particular Horndeski model with Galileon shift symmetry, containing also a Λ-term and a matter. The model, sometimes called Fab Five, admits a rich spectrum of solutions. Some of them describe the standard late time cosmological dynamic dominated by the Λ-term and matter, while at the early times the universe expands with a constant Hubble rate determined by the value of the scalar kinetic coupling. For other solutions the Λ-term and matter are screened at all times but there are nevertheless the early and late accelerating phases. The model also admits bounces, as well as peculiar solutions describing ``the emergence of time''. Most of these solutions contain ghosts in the scalar and tensor sectors. However, a careful analysis reveals three different branches of ghost-free solutions, all showing a late time acceleration phase. We analyse the dynamical stability of these solutions and find that all of them are stable in the future, since all their perturbations stay bounded at late times. However, they all turn out to be unstable in the past, as their perturbations grow violently when one approaches the initial spacetime singularity. We therefore conclude that the model has no viable solutions describing the whole of the cosmological history, although it may describe the current acceleration phase. We also check that the flat space solution is ghost-free in the model, but it may acquire ghost in more general versions of the Horndeski theory.

  16. Cosmological antigravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    The long-derided cosmological constant - a contrivance of Albert Einstein's that represents a bizarre form of energy inherent in space itself - is one of two contenders for explaining changes in the expansion rate of the Universe.

  17. Modular cosmology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, T.

    This talk is a summary of work done in collaboration with Micha Berkooz, Greg Moore, Steve Shenker and Paul Steinhardt on a cosmology whose early history is described in terms of the moduli fields of string theory.

  18. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  19. The Averaging Problem in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-06-01

    This thesis deals with the averaging problem in cosmology, which has gained considerable interest in recent years, and is concerned with correction terms (after averaging inhomogeneities) that appear in the Einstein equations when working on the large scales appropriate for cosmology. It has been claimed in the literature that these terms may account for the phenomenon of dark energy which causes the late time universe to accelerate. We investigate the nature of these terms by using averaging schemes available in the literature and further developed to be applicable to the problem at hand. We show that the effect of these terms when calculated carefully, remains negligible and cannot explain the late time acceleration.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    The field of cosmology has been transformed since the glorious decades of the 1920's and 1930's when theory and observation converged to develop the current model of the expanding universe. It was a triumph of the theory of general relativity and astronomy. The first revolution came when the nuclear physicists entered the fray. This marked the debut of the hot big bang, in which the light elements were synthesized in the first three minutes. It was soon realised that elements like carbon and iron were synthesized in exploding stars. However helium, as well as deuterium and lithium, remain as George Gamow envisaged, the detritus of the big bang. The climax arrived with one of the most remarkable discoveries of the twentieth century, the cosmic microwave background radiation, in 1964. The fossil glow turned out to have the spectrum of an ideal black body. One could not imagine a stronger confirmation of the hot and dense origin of the universe. This discovery set the scene for the next major advance. It was now the turn of the particle physicists, who realized that the energies attained near the beginning of the universe, and unachievable in any conceivable terrestrial accelerator, provided a unique testing ground for theories of grand unification of the fundamental forces. This led Alan Guth and Andrei Linde in 1980 to propose the theory of inflation, which solved outstanding puzzles of the big bang. One could now understand why the universe is so large and homogeneous, and the origin of the seed fluctuations that gave rise to large-scale structure. A key prediction was that the universe should have Euclidean geometry, now verified to a precision of a few percent. Modern cosmology is firmly embedded in particle physics. It merits a text written by a particle physicist who can however appreciate the contributions of astronomy that provide the foundation and infrastructure for the theory of the expanding universe. There are now several such texts available. The most

  1. Unstable anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-09-15

    We study stability conditions of the full Hamiltonian constraint equation describing the quantum dynamics of the diagonal Bianchi I model in the context of loop quantum cosmology. Our analysis has shown robust evidence of an instability in the explicit implementation of the difference equation, implying important consequences for the correspondence between the full loop quantum gravity theory and loop quantum cosmology. As a result, one may question the choice of the quantization approach, the model of lattice refinement, and/or the role of the ambiguity parameters; all these should, in principle, be dictated by the full loop quantum gravity theory.

  2. Vacuum energy and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2015-06-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive value for the cosmological constant or vacuum energy density. We discuss recent ideas that the cosmological constant plus Large Hadron Collider (LHC) results might hint at critical phenomena near the Planck scale.

  3. Cosmological Inflation: A Personal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review of Cosmological Inflation from the personal perspective of the speaker who almost 30 years ago proposed a way of resolving the problem of Cosmological Horizon by employing certain notions and developments from the field of High Energy Physics. Along with a brief introduction of the Horizon and Flatness problems of standard cosmology, this lecture concentrates on personal reminiscing of the notions and ideas that prevailed and influenced the author's thinking at the time. The lecture then touches upon some more recent developments related to the subject including exact solutions to conformal gravity that provide a first principles emergence of a characteristic acceleration in the universe and concludes with some personal views concerning the direction that the cosmology field has taken in the past couple of decades and certain speculations some notions that may indicate future directions of research.

  4. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years. PMID:27007681

  5. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  6. Improved cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    We study a class of nonlocal, action-based, and purely gravitational models. These models seek to describe a cosmology in which inflation is driven by a large, bare cosmological constant that is screened by the self-gravitation between the soft gravitons that inflation rips from the vacuum. Inflation ends with the Universe poised on the verge of gravitational collapse, in an oscillating phase of expansion and contraction that should lead to rapid reheating when matter is included. After the attainment of a hot, dense Universe the nonlocal screening terms become constant as the Universe evolves through a conventional phase of radiation domination. The onset of matter domination triggers a much smaller antiscreening effect that could explain the current phase of acceleration.

  7. String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraniotis, G. V.

    In this work, we review recent work on string cosmology. The need for an inflationary era is well known. Problems of Standard Cosmology such as horizon, flatness, monopole and entropy find an elegant solution in the inflationary scenario. On the other hand no adequate inflationary model has been constructed so far. In this review we discuss the attempts that have been made in the field of string theory for obtaining an adequate Cosmological Inflationary Epoch. In particular, orbifold compactifications of string theory which are constrained by target-space duality symmetry offer as natural candidates for the role of inflatons the orbifold moduli. Orbifold moduli dynamics is very constrained by duality symmetry and offers a concrete framework for discussing Cosmological Inflation. We discuss the resulting cosmology assuming that nonperturbative dynamics generates a moduli potential which respects target-space modular invariance. Various modular forms for the nonperturbative superpotential and Kähler potential which include the absolute modular invariant j(T) besides the Dedekind eta function η(T) are discussed. We also review scale-factor duality and pre-Big-Bang scenarios in which inflation is driven by the kinetic terms of the dilaton modulus. In this context we discuss the problem of graceful exit and review recent attempts for solving the problem of exiting from inflation. The possibility of obtaining inflation through the D-terms in string models with anomalous UA(1) and other Abelian factors is reviewed. In this context we discuss how the slow-roll problem in supergravity models with F-term inflation can be solved by D-term inflation. We also briefly review the consequences of duality for a generalized Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the structure of space-time at short scales. The problem of the Cosmological Constant is also briefly discussed.

  8. Dimensionless cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, Ali; Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that any consideration of the variations of fundamental constants should be restricted to their dimensionless combinations, the literature on variations of the gravitational constant G is entirely dimensionfull. To illustrate applications of this to cosmology, we explicitly give a dimensionless version of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and describe the physics of both Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and recombination in a dimensionless manner. Rigorously determining how to talk about the model in a way which avoids physical dimensions is a requirement for proceeding with a calculation to constrain time-varying fundamental constants. The issue that appears to have been missed in many studies is that in cosmology the strength of gravity is bound up in the cosmological equations, and the epoch at which we live is a crucial part of the model. We argue that it is useful to consider the hypothetical situation of communicating with another civilization (with entirely different units), comparing only dimensionless constants, in order to decide if we live in a Universe governed by precisely the same physical laws. In this thought experiment, we would also have to compare epochs, which can be defined by giving the value of any one of the evolving cosmological parameters. By setting things up carefully in this way one can avoid inconsistent results when considering variable constants, caused by effectively fixing more than one parameter today. We show examples of this effect by considering microwave background anisotropies, being careful to maintain dimensionlessness throughout. We present Fisher matrix calculations to estimate how well the fine structure constants for electromagnetism and gravity can be determined with future microwave background experiments. We highlight how one can be misled by simply adding G to the usual cosmological parameter set.

  9. Multi-dimensional cosmology and GUP

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynali, K.; Motavalli, H.; Darabi, F. E-mail: f.darabi@azaruniv.edu

    2012-12-01

    We consider a multidimensional cosmological model with FRW type metric having 4-dimensional space-time and d-dimensional Ricci-flat internal space sectors with a higher dimensional cosmological constant. We study the classical cosmology in commutative and GUP cases and obtain the corresponding exact solutions for negative and positive cosmological constants. It is shown that for negative cosmological constant, the commutative and GUP cases result in finite size universes with smaller size and longer ages, and larger size and shorter age, respectively. For positive cosmological constant, the commutative and GUP cases result in infinite size universes having late time accelerating behavior in good agreement with current observations. The accelerating phase starts in the GUP case sooner than the commutative case. In both commutative and GUP cases, and for both negative and positive cosmological constants, the internal space is stabilized to the sub-Planck size, at least within the present age of the universe. Then, we study the quantum cosmology by deriving the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, and obtain the exact solutions in the commutative case and the perturbative solutions in GUP case, to first order in the GUP small parameter, for both negative and positive cosmological constants. It is shown that good correspondence exists between the classical and quantum solutions.

  10. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  11. Adventures in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodstein, David

    1. Introduction -- 2. Galaxy formation: from start to finish / Andrew Benson -- 3. The reionization of cosmic hydrogen by the first galaxies / Abraham Loeb -- 4. Clusters of galaxies / Elena Pierpaoli -- 5. Reionizing the universe with the first sources of light / Volker Bromm -- 6. Mapping the cosmic dawn / Steven Furlanetto -- 7. Neutrino masses from cosmology / Ofer Lahav and Shaun Thomas -- 8. Measuring the expansion rate of the universe / Laura Ferrarese -- 9. Particles as dark matter / Dan Hooper -- 10. Detection of WIMP dark matter / Sunil Golwala and Dan McKinsey -- 11. The accelerating universe / Dragan Huterer -- 12. Frontiers of dark energy / Eric V. Linder -- 13. The first supermassive black holes in the universe / Xiaohui Fan.

  12. Cosmological ``Truths''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothun, Greg

    2011-10-01

    Ever since Aristotle placed us, with certainty, in the Center of the Cosmos, Cosmological models have more or less operated from a position of known truths for some time. As early as 1963, for instance, it was ``known'' that the Universe had to be 15-17 billion years old due to the suspected ages of globular clusters. For many years, attempts to determine the expansion age of the Universe (the inverse of the Hubble constant) were done against this preconceived and biased notion. Not surprisingly when more precise observations indicated a Hubble expansion age of 11-13 billion years, stellar models suddenly changed to produce a new age for globular cluster stars, consistent with 11-13 billion years. Then in 1980, to solve a variety of standard big bang problems, inflation was introduced in a fairly ad hoc manner. Inflation makes the simple prediction that the net curvature of spacetime is zero (i.e. spacetime is flat). The consequence of introducing inflation is now the necessary existence of a dark matter dominated Universe since the known baryonic material could comprise no more than 1% of the necessary energy density to make spacetime flat. As a result of this new cosmological ``truth'' a significant world wide effort was launched to detect the dark matter (which obviously also has particle physics implications). To date, no such cosmological component has been detected. Moreover, all available dynamical inferences of the mass density of the Universe showed in to be about 20% of that required for closure. This again was inconsistent with the truth that the real density of the Universe was the closure density (e.g. Omega = 1), that the observations were biased, and that 99% of the mass density had to be in the form of dark matter. That is, we know the universe is two component -- baryons and dark matter. Another prevailing cosmological truth during this time was that all the baryonic matter was known to be in galaxies that populated our galaxy catalogs. Subsequent

  13. Axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Axions comprise a broad class of particles that can play a major role in explaining the unknown aspects of cosmology. They are also well-motivated within high energy physics, appearing in theories related to CP-violation in the standard model, supersymmetric theories, and theories with extra-dimensions, including string theory, and so axion cosmology offers us a unique view onto these theories. I review the motivation and models for axions in particle physics and string theory. I then present a comprehensive and pedagogical view on the cosmology and astrophysics of axion-like particles, starting from inflation and progressing via BBN, the CMB, reionization and structure formation, up to the present-day Universe. Topics covered include: axion dark matter (DM); direct and indirect detection of axions, reviewing existing and future experiments; axions as dark radiation; axions and the cosmological constant problem; decays of heavy axions; axions and stellar astrophysics; black hole superradiance; axions and astrophysical magnetic fields; axion inflation, and axion DM as an indirect probe of inflation. A major focus is on the population of ultralight axions created via vacuum realignment, and its role as a DM candidate with distinctive phenomenology. Cosmological observations place robust constraints on the axion mass and relic density in this scenario, and I review where such constraints come from. I next cover aspects of galaxy formation with axion DM, and ways this can be used to further search for evidence of axions. An absolute lower bound on DM particle mass is established. It is ma > 10-24eV from linear observables, extending to ma ≳ 10-22eV from non-linear observables, and has the potential to reach ma ≳ 10-18eV in the future. These bounds are weaker if the axion is not all of the DM, giving rise to limits on the relic density at low mass. This leads to the exciting possibility that the effects of axion DM on structure formation could one day be detected

  14. Cosmological wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, A. A.; Savelova, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe in details the procedure how the Lobachevsky space can be factorized to a space of the constant negative curvature filled with a gas of wormholes. We show that such wormholes have throat sections in the form of tori and are traversable and stable in the cosmological context. The relation of such wormholes to the dark matter phenomenon is briefly described. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of analogous factorizations for all types of homogeneous spaces.

  15. Medieval Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    During the early Middle Ages (ca 500 to ca 1130) scholars with an interest in cosmology had little useful and dependable literature. They relied heavily on a partial Latin translation of PLATO's Timaeus by Chalcidius (4th century AD), and on a series of encyclopedic treatises associated with the names of Pliny the Elder (ca AD 23-79), Seneca (4 BC-AD 65), Macrobius (fl 5th century AD), Martianus ...

  16. Bianchi Type V Viscous Fluid Cosmological Models with Varying Cosmological Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Baghel, P. S.; Singh, A.

    2015-08-01

    Bianchi type V viscous fluid cosmological models with varying cosmological term Λ are investigated. We have examined a cosmological scenario proposing expansion anisotropy σ/ θ to be suitable function of average scale factor S in the background of homogeneous, anisotropic Bianchi type V space-time. The models isotropize asymptotically and the presence of shear viscosity accelerates the isotropization. Our models describe a unified expansion history of the universe indicating initial decelerating expansion and late time accelerating phase consistent with observations. Physical and kinematical parameters of the models are discussed.

  17. Astrophysical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs.

  18. Cosmological panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Hoyle, Fred

    1998-07-01

    The central regions of galaxies could provide the most promising venues for the large-scale synthesis of prebiotic molecules by Miller-Urey type processes.Exploding supermassive stars would produce the basic chemical elements necessary to form molecules in high-density mass flows under near-thermodynamic conditions. Such molecules are then acted upon by X-rays in a manner that simulates the conditions required for Miller-Urey type processing. The Miller-Urey molecular products could initially lead to the origination and dispersal of microbial life on a cosmological scale. Thereafter the continuing production of such molecules would serve as the feedstock of life.

  19. The Cosmological Constant in Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongchao

    2008-10-10

    Hawking proposed that the cosmological constant is probably zero in quantum cosmology in 1984. By using the right configuration for the wave function of the universe, a complete proof is found very recently.

  20. The cosmology of asymmetric brane modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth; Pourtsidou, Alkistis E-mail: ppxap1@nottingham.ac.uk

    2009-09-01

    We consider the asymmetric branes model of modified gravity, which can produce late time acceleration of the universe and compare the cosmology of this model to the standard ΛCDM model and to the DGP braneworld model. We show how the asymmetric cosmology at relevant physical scales can be regarded as a one-parameter extension of the DGP model, and investigate the effect of this additional parameter on the expansion history of the universe.

  1. Dark spinors with torsion in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Burnett, James

    2008-11-15

    We solve one of the open problems in Einstein-Cartan theory, namely, we find a natural matter source whose spin angular momentum tensor is compatible with the cosmological principle. We analyze the resulting evolution equations and find that an epoch of accelerated expansion is an attractor. The torsion field quickly decays in that period. Our results are interpreted in the context of the standard model of cosmology.

  2. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  3. Observational constraints on undulant cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    In an undulant universe, cosmic expansion is characterized by alternating periods of acceleration and deceleration. We examine cosmologies in which the dark-energy equation of state varies periodically with the number of e-foldings of the scale factor of the universe, and use observations to constrain the frequency of oscillation. We find a tension between a forceful response to the cosmic coincidence problem and the standard treatment of structure formation.

  4. Nonlinear growing neutrino cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaita, Youness; Baldi, Marco; Führer, Florian; Puchwein, Ewald; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-03-01

    The energy scale of dark energy, ˜2 ×10-3 eV , is a long way off compared to all known fundamental scales—except for the neutrino masses. If dark energy is dynamical and couples to neutrinos, this is no longer a coincidence. The time at which dark energy starts to behave as an effective cosmological constant can be linked to the time at which the cosmic neutrinos become nonrelativistic. This naturally places the onset of the Universe's accelerated expansion in recent cosmic history, addressing the why-now problem of dark energy. We show that these mechanisms indeed work in the growing neutrino quintessence model—even if the fully nonlinear structure formation and backreaction are taken into account, which were previously suspected of spoiling the cosmological evolution. The attractive force between neutrinos arising from their coupling to dark energy grows as large as 106 times the gravitational strength. This induces very rapid dynamics of neutrino fluctuations which are nonlinear at redshift z ≈2 . Nevertheless, a nonlinear stabilization phenomenon ensures only mildly nonlinear oscillating neutrino overdensities with a large-scale gravitational potential substantially smaller than that of cold dark matter perturbations. Depending on model parameters, the signals of large-scale neutrino lumps may render the cosmic neutrino background observable.

  5. Evolution of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Charles H.

    2005-04-01

    Aristotle thought that the universe was finite and Earth centered. Newton thought that it was infinite. Einstein guessed that the universe was finite, spherical, static, warped, and closed. Hubble's 1930 discovery of the expanding universe, Penzias and Wilson's 1968 discovery of the isotropic CMB, and measurements on light element abundances, however, established a big bang origin. Vera Rubin's 1980 dark matter discovery significantly impacted contending theories. However, 1998 is the year when sufficiently accurate supernova and primordial deuterium data was available to truly explore the universe. CMB anisotropy measurements further extended our cosmological database in 2003. On the theoretical side, Friedmann's 1922 perturbation solution of Einstein's general relativity equations for a static universe has shaped the thought and direction in cosmology for the past 80 years. It describes 3D space as a dynamic function of time. However, 80 years of trying to fit Friedmann's solution to observational data has been a bumpy road - resulting in such counter-intuitive, but necessary, features as rapid inflation, precision tuning, esoteric dark matter, and an accelerating input of esoteric dark energy.

  6. Cosmological constraints on a classical limit of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Trodden, Mark; Schuller, Frederic P.; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2005-08-15

    We investigate the cosmology of a recently proposed deformation of Einstein gravity, emerging from quantum gravity heuristics. The theory is constructed to have de Sitter space as a vacuum solution, and thus to be relevant to the accelerating universe. However, this solution turns out to be unstable, and the true phase space of cosmological solutions is significantly more complex, displaying two late-time power-law attractors - one accelerating and the other dramatically decelerating. It is also shown that nonaccelerating cosmologies sit on a separatrix between the two basins of attraction of these attractors. Hence it is impossible to pass from a decelerating cosmology to an accelerating one, as required in standard cosmology for consistency with nucleosynthesis and structure formation and compatibility with the data inferred from supernovae Ia. We point out that alternative models of the early universe, such as the one investigated here might provide possible ways to circumvent these requirements.

  7. Dark D-brane cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi; Wills, Danielle; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: d.e.wills@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Disformally coupled cosmologies arise from Dirac-Born-Infeld actions in Type II string theories, when matter resides on a moving hidden sector D-brane. Since such matter interacts only very weakly with the standard model particles, this scenario can provide a natural origin for the dark sector of the universe with a clear geometrical interpretation: dark energy is identified with the scalar field associated to the D-brane's position as it moves in the internal space, acting as quintessence, while dark matter is identified with the matter living on the D-brane, which can be modelled by a perfect fluid. The coupling functions are determined by the (warped) extra-dimensional geometry, and are thus constrained by the theory. The resulting cosmologies are studied using both dynamical system analysis and numerics. From the dynamical system point of view, one free parameter controls the cosmological dynamics, given by the ratio of the warp factor and the potential energy scales. The disformal coupling allows for new scaling solutions that can describe accelerating cosmologies alleviating the coincidence problem of dark energy. In addition, this scenario may ameliorate the fine-tuning problem of dark energy, whose small value may be attained dynamically, without requiring the mass of the dark energy field to be unnaturally low.

  8. Explicit cosmological coarse graining via spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present matter density of the Universe, while highly inhomogeneous on small scales, displays approximate homogeneity on large scales. We propose that whereas it is justified to use the Friedmann Lemaître Robertson Walker (FLRW) line element (which describes an exactly homogeneous and isotropic universe) as a template to construct luminosity distances in order to compare observations with theory, the evolution of the scale factor in such a construction must be governed not by the standard Einstein equations for the FLRW metric, but by the modified Friedmann equations derived by Buchert (Gen Relat Gravit 32:105, 2000; 33:1381, 2001) in the context of spatial averaging in Cosmology. Furthermore, we argue that this scale factor, defined in the spatially averaged cosmology, will correspond to the effective FLRW metric provided the size of the averaging domain coincides with the scale at which cosmological homogeneity arises. This allows us, in principle, to compare predictions of a spatially averaged cosmology with observations, in the standard manner, for instance by computing the luminosity distance versus red-shift relation. The predictions of the spatially averaged cosmology would in general differ from standard FLRW cosmology, because the scale-factor now obeys the modified FLRW equations. This could help determine, by comparing with observations, whether or not cosmological inhomogeneities are an alternative explanation for the observed cosmic acceleration.

  9. Average observational quantities in the timescape cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, David L.

    2009-12-15

    We examine the properties of a recently proposed observationally viable alternative to homogeneous cosmology with smooth dark energy, the timescape cosmology. In the timescape model cosmic acceleration is realized as an apparent effect related to the calibration of clocks and rods of observers in bound systems relative to volume-average observers in an inhomogeneous geometry in ordinary general relativity. The model is based on an exact solution to a Buchert average of the Einstein equations with backreaction. The present paper examines a number of observational tests which will enable the timescape model to be distinguished from homogeneous cosmologies with a cosmological constant or other smooth dark energy, in current and future generations of dark energy experiments. Predictions are presented for comoving distance measures; H(z); the equivalent of the dark energy equation of state, w(z); the Om(z) measure of Sahni, Shafieloo, and Starobinsky; the Alcock-Paczynski test; the baryon acoustic oscillation measure, D{sub V}; the inhomogeneity test of Clarkson, Bassett, and Lu; and the time drift of cosmological redshifts. Where possible, the predictions are compared to recent independent studies of similar measures in homogeneous cosmologies with dark energy. Three separate tests with indications of results in possible tension with the {lambda}CDM model are found to be consistent with the expectations of the timescape cosmology.

  10. Cosmological constant from the emergent gravity perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2014-05-01

    Observations indicate that our universe is characterized by a late-time accelerating phase, possibly driven by a cosmological constant Λ, with the dimensionless parameter Λ {LP2} ˜= 10-122, where LP = (Għ/c3)1/2 is the Planck length. In this review, we describe how the emergent gravity paradigm provides a new insight and a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. After reviewing the necessary background material, we identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for solving the cosmological constant problem. We show that these conditions are naturally satisfied in the emergent gravity paradigm in which (i) the field equations of gravity are invariant under the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian and (ii) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant in the solution. The numerical value of this integration constant can be related to another dimensionless number (called CosMIn) that counts the number of modes inside a Hubble volume that cross the Hubble radius during the radiation and the matter-dominated epochs of the universe. The emergent gravity paradigm suggests that CosMIn has the numerical value 4π, which, in turn, leads to the correct, observed value of the cosmological constant. Further, the emergent gravity paradigm provides an alternative perspective on cosmology and interprets the expansion of the universe itself as a quest towards holographic equipartition. We discuss the implications of this novel and alternate description of cosmology.

  11. The Age of Precision Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, our understanding of the evolution and fate of the universe has increased dramatically. This "Age of Precision Cosmology" has been ushered in by measurements that have both elucidated the details of the Big Bang cosmology and set the direction for future lines of inquiry. Our universe appears to consist of 5% baryonic matter; 23% of the universe's energy content is dark matter which is responsible for the observed structure in the universe; and 72% of the energy density is so-called "dark energy" that is currently accelerating the expansion of the universe. In addition, our universe has been measured to be geometrically flat to 1 %. These observations and related details of the Big Bang paradigm have hinted that the universe underwent an epoch of accelerated expansion known as Uinflation" early in its history. In this talk, I will review the highlights of modern cosmology, focusing on the contributions made by measurements of the cosmic microwave background, the faint afterglow of the Big Bang. I will also describe new instruments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background in order to search for evidence of cosmic inflation.

  12. How fabulous is Fab 5 cosmology?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2013-12-01

    Extended gravity origins for cosmic acceleration can solve some fine tuning issues and have useful characteristics, but generally have little to say regarding the cosmological constant problem. Fab 5 gravity can be ghost free and stable, have attractor solutions in the past and future, and possess self tuning that solves the original cosmological constant problem. Here we show however it does not possess all these qualities at the same time. We also demonstrate that the self tuning is so powerful that it not only cancels the cosmological constant but also all other energy density, and we derive the scalings of its approach to a renormalized de Sitter cosmology. While this strong cancellation is bad for the late universe, it greatly eases early universe inflation.

  13. Throat Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harling, B. v.

    2010-02-01

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppressed rate. If their lifetime is longer than the age of the universe, they are an interesting dark matter candidate. We show that, if the reheating temperature was 10^10 - 10^11 GeV, throats with infrared scales in the range of 10^5 GeV to 10^10 GeV can account for the observed dark matter. We identify several scenarios where this type of dark matter is sufficiently stable but where decays to the standard model can be discovered via gamma-ray observations.

  14. Quantum coherent states in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2015-07-01

    Coherent states consist of superposition of infinite number of particles and do not have a classical analogue. We study their evolution in a FLRW cosmology and show that only when full quantum corrections are considered, they may survive the expansion of the Universe and form a global condensate. This state of matter can be the origin of accelerating expansion of the Universe, generally called dark energy, and inflation in the early universe. Additionally, such a quantum pool may be the ultimate environment for decoherenceat shorter distances. If dark energy is a quantum coherent state, its dominant contribution to the total energy of the Universe at present provides a low entropy state which may be necessary as an initial condition for a new Big Bang in the framework of bouncing cosmology models.

  15. Attractor behaviour in ELKO cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Abhishek; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Shankaranarayanan, S.; Prasantha Varma, K. V.

    2013-04-01

    We study the dynamics of ELKO in the context of accelerated phase of our universe. To avoid the fine tuning problem associated with the initial conditions, it is required that the dynamical equations lead to an early-time attractor. In the earlier works, it was shown that the dynamical equations containing ELKO fields do not lead to early-time stable fixed points. In this work, using redefinition of variables, we show that ELKO cosmology admits early-time stable fixed points. More interestingly, we show that ELKO cosmology admit two sets of attractor points corresponding to slow and fast-roll inflation. The fast-roll inflation attractor point is unique for ELKO as it is independent of the form of the potential. We also discuss the plausible choice of interaction terms in these two sets of attractor points and constraints on the coupling constant.

  16. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  17. Cosmology with higher-derivative matter fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of a new class of modified gravity, where the field equations generically include higher-order derivatives of the matter fields, arising from the introduction of non-dynamical auxiliary fields in the action. Imposing a flat, homogeneous and isotropic geometry, we extract the Friedmann equations, obtaining an effective dark-energy sector containing higher-derivatives of the matter energy density and pressure. For the cases of dust, radiation and stiff matter, we analyze the cosmological behavior, finding accelerating, de Sitter and non-accelerating phases, dominated by matter or dark-energy. Additionally, the effective dark-energy equation-of-state parameter can be quintessence-like, cosmological-constant-like or even phantom-like. The detailed study of these scenarios may provide signatures, that could distinguish them from other candidates of modified gravity.

  18. 2 {times} 2 TeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider: Lattice and accelerator-detector interface study

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-05-01

    The design for a high-luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} superconducting storage ring is presented based on first-pass calculations. Special attention is paid to two Iowa interaction regions (IR) whose optics are literally interlaced with the collider detectors. Various sources of backgrounds in IR are explored via realistic Monte Carlo simulations. An improved design of the collider lattice in the neighborhood of the interaction points (EP) is determined by the need to reduce significantly background levels in the detectors.

  19. Lectures on cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.

    2014-12-01

    This is the text of part of the Cosmology course at the Special Courses at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro - CCE. The first part summarises cosmology today, including issues where significant questions reman, and the second part is dedicated to the 1+3 covariant formalism for cosmology.

  20. Tensile Lattice Strain Accelerates Oxygen Surface Exchange and Diffusion in La1–xSrxCoO3−δ Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The influence of lattice strain on the oxygen exchange kinetics and diffusion in oxides was investigated on (100) epitaxial La1–xSrxCoO3−δ (LSC) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Planar tensile and compressively strained LSC films were obtained on single-crystalline SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. 18O isotope exchange depth profiling with ToF-SIMS was employed to simultaneously measure the tracer surface exchange coefficient k* and the tracer diffusion coefficient D* in the temperature range 280–475 °C. In accordance with recent theoretical findings, much faster surface exchange (∼4 times) and diffusion (∼10 times) were observed for the tensile strained films compared to the compressively strained films in the entire temperature range. The same strain effect—tensile strain leading to higher k* and D*—was found for different LSC compositions (x = 0.2 and x = 0.4) and for surface-etched films. The temperature dependence of k* and D* is discussed with respect to the contributions of strain states, formation enthalpy of oxygen vacancies, and vacancy mobility at different temperatures. Our findings point toward the control of oxygen surface exchange and diffusion kinetics by means of lattice strain in existing mixed conducting oxides for energy conversion applications. PMID:23527691

  1. Exact cosmological solutions of models with an interacting dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, A. B.; Ferreira, Elisa G. M.; Micheletti, Sandro M. R.; de Souza, J. C. C.; Abdalla, E.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we extend the first order formalism for cosmological models that present an interaction between a fermionic and a scalar field. Cosmological exact solutions describing universes filled with interacting dark energy and dark matter have been obtained. Viable cosmological solutions with an early period of decelerated expansion followed by late acceleration have been found, notably one which presents a dark matter component dominating in the past and a dark energy component dominating in the future. In another one, the dark energy alone is the responsible for both periods, similar to a Chaplygin gas case. Exclusively accelerating solutions have also been obtained.

  2. Superbounce and loop quantum cosmology ekpyrosis from modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2015-09-01

    As is known, in modified cosmological theories of gravity many of the cosmologies which could not be generated by standard Einstein gravity, can be consistently described by theories. Using known reconstruction techniques, we investigate which theories can lead to a Hubble parameter describing two types of cosmological bounces, the superbounce model, related to supergravity and non-supersymmetric models of contracting ekpyrosis and also the Loop Quantum Cosmology modified ekpyrotic model. Since our method is an approximate method, we investigate the problem at large and small curvatures. As we evince, both models yield power law reconstructed gravities, with the most interesting new feature being that both lead to accelerating cosmologies, in the large curvature approximation. The mathematical properties of the some Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes , that describe superbounce-like cosmologies are also pointed out, with regards to the group of curvature collineations.

  3. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  4. Rigorous Newtonian cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1996-10-01

    It is generally believed that it is not possible to rigorously analyze a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model in Newtonian mechanics. I show on the contrary that if Newtonian gravity theory is rewritten in geometrical language in the manner outlined in 1923-1924 by Élie Cartan [Ann. Ecole Norm. Sup. 40, 325-412 (1923); 41, 1-25 (1924)], then Newtonian cosmology is as rigorous as Friedmann cosmology. In particular, I show that the equation of geodesic deviation in Newtonian cosmology is exactly the same as equation of geodesic deviation in the Friedmann universe, and that this equation can be integrated to yield a constraint equation formally identical to the Friedmann equation. However, Newtonian cosmology is more general than Friedmann cosmology: Ever-expanding and recollapsing universes are allowed in any noncompact homogeneous and isotropic spatial topology. I shall give a brief history of attempts to do cosmology in the framework of Newtonian mechanics.

  5. Lattice Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Given a segment that joins two lattice points in R[superscript 3], when is it possible to form a lattice cube that uses this segment as one of its twelve edges? A necessary and sufficient condition is that the length of the segment be an integer. This paper presents an algorithm for finding such a cube when the prime factors of the length are…

  6. Conformal cosmological model and SNe Ia data

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. F.; Pervushin, V. N.

    2012-11-15

    Now there is a huge scientific activity in astrophysical studies and cosmological ones in particular. Cosmology transforms from a pure theoretical branch of science into an observational one. All the cosmological models have to pass observational tests. The supernovae type Ia (SNe Ia) test is among the most important ones. If one applies the test to determine parameters of the standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model one can conclude that observations lead to the discovery of the dominance of the {Lambda} term and as a result to an acceleration of the Universe. However, there are big mysteries connected with an origin and an essence of dark matter (DM) and the {Lambda} term or dark energy (DE). Alternative theories of gravitation are treated as a possible solution of DM and DE puzzles. The conformal cosmological approach is one of possible alternatives to the standard {Lambda}CDM model. As it was noted several years ago, in the framework of the conformal cosmological approach an introduction of a rigid matter can explain observational data without {Lambda} term (or dark energy). We confirm the claim with much larger set of observational data.

  7. Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  9. Cosmology of a Covariant Galileon Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-09-01

    We study the cosmology of a covariant scalar field respecting a Galilean symmetry in flat space-time. We show the existence of a tracker solution that finally approaches a de Sitter fixed point responsible for cosmic acceleration today. The viable region of model parameters is clarified by deriving conditions under which ghosts and Laplacian instabilities of scalar and tensor perturbations are absent. The field equation of state exhibits a peculiar phantomlike behavior along the tracker, which allows a possibility to observationally distinguish the Galileon gravity from the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant.

  10. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  11. General very special relativity in Finsler cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kouretsis, A. P.; Stathakopoulos, M.; Stavrinos, P. C.

    2009-05-15

    General very special relativity (GVSR) is the curved space-time of very special relativity (VSR) proposed by Cohen and Glashow. The geometry of general very special relativity possesses a line element of Finsler geometry introduced by Bogoslovsky. We calculate the Einstein field equations and derive a modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology for an osculating Riemannian space. The Friedmann equation of motion leads to an explanation of the cosmological acceleration in terms of an alternative non-Lorentz invariant theory. A first order approach for a primordial-spurionic vector field introduced into the metric gives back an estimation of the energy evolution and inflation.

  12. Cosmology and the S-matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2005-01-25

    We study conditions for the existence of asymptotic observables in cosmology. With the exception of de Sitter space, the thermal properties of accelerating universes permit arbitrarily long observations, and guarantee the production of accessible states of arbitrarily large entropy. This suggests that some asymptotic observables may exist, despite the presence of an event horizon. Comparison with decelerating universes shows surprising similarities: Neither type suffers from the limitations encountered in de Sitter space, such as thermalization and boundedness of entropy. However, we argue that no realistic cosmology permits the global observations associated with an S-matrix.

  13. Plasma Redshift Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2011-04-01

    The newly discovered plasma redshift cross section explains a long range of phenomena; including the cosmological redshift, and the intrinsic redshift of Sun, stars, galaxies and quasars. It explains the beautiful black body spectrum of the CMB, and it predicts correctly: a) the observed XRB, b) the magnitude redshift relation for supernovae, and c) the surface- brightness-redshift relation for galaxies. There is no need for Big Bang, Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, and Black Holes. The universe is quasi-static and can renew itself forever (for details, see: http://www.plasmaredshift.org). There is no cosmic time dilation. In intergalactic space, the average electron temperature is T = 2.7 million K, and the average electron density is N = 0.0002 per cubic cm. Plasma redshift is derived theoretically from conventional axioms of physics by using more accurate methods than those conventionally used. The main difference is: 1) the proper inclusion of the dielectric constant, 2) more exact calculations of imaginary part of the dielectric constant, and as required 3) a quantum mechanical treatment of the interactions.

  14. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  15. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  16. ELKO applications in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, S. H.; Pinho S. S., A.

    2014-12-01

    A brief review is presented about the ELKO spinor field applied to cosmology, with the main results and limitations of the theory. As a simple application, we have analyzed a model involving the interaction of the ELKO spinor field with dark matter in the universe from a dynamical system approach. When the system is rewritten in terms of the deceleration parameter q and under the assumption that such parameter is nearly constant for some different stages of the evolution, stability points were found for different types of interaction between dark matter and ELKO spinors. Within this new analysis several interesting scenarios are possible, depending on the interaction term. For example, if it is assumed that the equation of the state parameter of the ELKO field is of the phantom type, ωϕ < -1, the current acceleration of the universe can be driven by the decay of dark matter particles into ELKO field. Furthermore, even for ωϕ > 0, the inflationary period can be driven by the decay of the inflaton field (described by the ELKO spinor) into dark matter particles.

  17. Cosmological parallax-distance formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2015-09-01

    The standard cosmological parallax-distance formula, as found in the literature, including text-books and reference books on cosmology, requires a correction. This correction stems from the fact that in the standard text-book derivation it has been ignored that any chosen baseline in a gravitationally bound system does not partake in the cosmological expansion. Though the correction is available in the literature for some time, the text-books still continue to use the older, incorrect formula, and its full implications are not yet fully realized. Apart from providing an alternate correct, closed-form expression that is more suitable and convenient for computations for certain limiting cases of FRW () world models, we also demonstrate how one can compute parallax distance for the currently favored flat-space accelerating-universe (, ) cosmologies. Further, we show that the correction in parallax distance at large redshifts could amount to a factor of three or even more. Moreover, even in an infinite universe the parallax distance does not increase indefinitely with redshift and that even the farthest possible observable point may have a finite parallax angle, a factor that needs to be carefully taken into account when using distant objects as the background field against which the parallax of a foreground object is to be measured. Some other complications that could arise in parallax measurements of a distant source, like that due to the deflection of incoming light by the gravitation field of the Sun and other planetary bodies in the solar system, are pointed out.

  18. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2008-01-24

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrinos on cosmology, focussing in particular on the role played by neutrinos in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of galaxies can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future.

  19. Hamiltonian cosmology of bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. O.

    The purpose of this talk is to give an introduction both to the Hamiltonian formalism and to the cosmological equations of bigravity. In the Hamiltonian language we provide a study of flat-space cosmology in bigravity and massive gravity constructed mostly with de Rham, Gabadadze, Tolley (dRGT) potential. It is demonstrated that the Hamiltonian methods are powerful not only in proving the absence of the Boulware-Deser ghost, but also in addressing cosmological problems.

  20. Dark Energy and the Cosmological Constant: A Brief Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The recently observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe is a topic of intense interest. The favoured causes are the "cosmological constant" or "dark energy". The former, which appears in the Einstein equations as the term [lambda]g[subscript [mu]v], provides an extremely simple, well-defined mechanism for the acceleration. However,…

  1. Sociology of Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2009-08-01

    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the ``snowball effect'' or ``groupthink''. We might wonder whether cosmology, the study of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other branches of physics or just a dominant ideology.

  2. Cosmology in p-brane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Minamitsuji, Masato; Uzawa, Kunihito

    2011-04-15

    We present time-dependent solutions in the higher-dimensional gravity which are related to supergravity in the particular cases. Here, we consider p-branes with a cosmological constant and the intersections of two and more branes. The dynamical description of p-branes can be naturally obtained as the extension of static solutions. In the presence of a cosmological constant, we find accelerating solutions if the dilaton is not dynamical. In the case of intersecting branes, the field equations normally indicate that time-dependent solutions in supergravity can be found if only one harmonic function in the metric depends on time. However, if the special relation between dilaton couplings to antisymmetric tensor field strengths is satisfied, one can find a new class of solutions where all harmonic functions depend on time. We then apply our new solutions to study cosmology, with and without performing compactifications.

  3. On the Convergence in Effective Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2010-07-12

    In Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) there is a discreteness parameter {lambda}, that has been heuristically associated to a fundamental granularity of quantum geometry. It is also possible to consider {lambda} as a regulator in the same spirit as that used in lattice field theory, where it specifies a regular lattice in the real line. A particular quantization of the k = 0 FLRW loop cosmological model yields a completely solvable model, known as solvable loop quantum cosmology(sLQC). In this contribution, we consider effective classical theories motivated by sLQC and study their {lambda}-dependence, with a special interest on the limit {lambda}{yields}0 and the role of the evolution parameter in the convergence of such limit.

  4. The velocity field in MOND cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The recently developed code for N-body/hydrodynamics simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), known as RAYMOND, is used to investigate the consequences of MOND on structure formation in a cosmological context, with a particular focus on the velocity field. This preliminary study investigates the results obtained with the two formulations of MOND implemented in RAYMOND, as well as considering the effects of changing the choice of MOND interpolation function, and the cosmological evolution of the MOND acceleration scale. The simulations are contrived such that structure forms in a background cosmology that is similar to Λcold dark matter, but with a significantly lower matter content. Given this, and the fact that a fully consistent MOND cosmology is still lacking, we compare our results with a standard ΛCDM simulation, rather than observations. As well as demonstrating the effectiveness of using RAYMOND for cosmological simulations, it is shown that a significant enhancement of the velocity field is likely an unavoidable consequence of the gravitational modification implemented in MOND, and may represent a clear observational signature of such a modification. It is further suggested that such a signal may be clearest in intermediate-density regions such as cluster outskirts and filaments.

  5. The velocity field in MOND cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The recently developed code for N-body/hydrodynamics simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), known as RAyMOND, is used to investigate the consequences of MOND on structure formation in a cosmological context, with a particular focus on the velocity field. This preliminary study investigates the results obtained with the two formulations of MOND implemented in RAyMOND, as well as considering the effects of changing the choice of MOND interpolation function, and the cosmological evolution of the MOND acceleration scale. The simulations are contrived such that structure forms in a background cosmology that is similar to $\\Lambda$CDM, but with a significantly lower matter content. Given this, and the fact that a fully consistent MOND cosmology is still lacking, we compare our results with a standard $\\Lambda$CDM simulation, rather than observations. As well as demonstrating the effectiveness of using RAyMOND for cosmological simulations, it is shown that a significant enhancement of the velocity field is likely an unavoidable consequence of the gravitational modification implemented in MOND, and may represent a clear observational signature of such a modification. It is further suggested that such a signal may be clearest in intermediate density regions such as cluster outskirts and filaments.

  6. Bouncing models with a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Rodrigo; Pereira, Stella; Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Siffert, Beatriz B.

    2012-01-01

    Bouncing models have been proposed by many authors as a completion of, or even as an alternative to, inflation for the description of the very early and dense Universe. However, most bouncing models contain a contracting phase from a very large and rarefied state, where dark energy might have had an important role as it has today in accelerating our large Universe. In that case, its presence can modify the initial conditions and evolution of cosmological perturbations, changing the known results already obtained in the literature concerning their amplitude and spectrum. In this paper, we assume the simplest and most appealing candidate for dark energy, the cosmological constant, and evaluate its influence on the evolution of cosmological perturbations during the contracting phase of a bouncing model, which also contains a scalar field with a potential allowing background solutions with pressure and energy density satisfying p=wɛ, w being a constant. An initial adiabatic vacuum state can be set at the end of domination by the cosmological constant, and an almost scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations is obtained for w≈0, which is the usual result for bouncing models. However, the presence of the cosmological constant induces oscillations and a running towards a tiny red-tilted spectrum for long-wavelength perturbations.

  7. Chaos in string cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.

    2003-10-01

    We briefly review two aspects of string cosmology: 1) the presence of chaos in the generic cosmological solutions of the tree-level low-energy effective actions coming out of string theory, and 2) the remarkable link between the latter chaos and the Weyl groups of some hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  8. String Cosmology and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    We briefly review two aspects of string cosmology: (1) the presence of chaos in the generic cosmological solutions of the tree-level low-energy effective actions coming out of string theory, and (2) the remarkable link between the latter chaos and the Weyl groups of some hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  9. Wormholes and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanov, I.; Susskind, L.

    1988-10-01

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We find a discouraging result that wormholes much bigger than the Planck size are generated. We also consider the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Large N Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    2001-09-01

    The large N approximation should hold in cosmology even at the origin of the universe. I use ADS-CFT to calculate the effective action and obtain a cosmological model in which inflation is driven by the trace anomaly. Despite having ghosts, this model can agree with observations.

  11. String Cosmology: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Liam P.; Silverstein, Eva

    2007-10-22

    We give an overview of the status of string cosmology. We explain the motivation for the subject, outline the main problems, and assess some of the proposed solutions. Our focus is on those aspects of cosmology that benefit from the structure of an ultraviolet-complete theory.

  12. Computational Cosmology at the Bleeding Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Salman

    2013-04-01

    Large-area sky surveys are providing a wealth of cosmological information to address the mysteries of dark energy and dark matter. Observational probes based on tracking the formation of cosmic structure are essential to this effort, and rely crucially on N-body simulations that solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation in an expanding Universe. As statistical errors from survey observations continue to shrink, and cosmological probes increase in number and complexity, simulations are entering a new regime in their use as tools for scientific inference. Changes in supercomputer architectures provide another rationale for developing new parallel simulation and analysis capabilities that can scale to computational concurrency levels measured in the millions to billions. In this talk I will outline the motivations behind the development of the HACC (Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code) extreme-scale cosmological simulation framework and describe its essential features. By exploiting a novel algorithmic structure that allows flexible tuning across diverse computer architectures, including accelerated and many-core systems, HACC has attained a performance of 14 PFlops on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia system at 69% of peak, using more than 1.5 million cores.

  13. The problem of initial conditions in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.

    2009-05-01

    The creation of a quantum Universe is described by a density matrix which yields an ensemble of universes with the cosmological constant limited to a bounded range Λmin<=Λ<=Λmax. The domain Λ<Λmin is ruled out by a cosmological bootstrap requirement (the self-consistent back reaction of hot matter). The upper cutoff results from the quantum effects of vacuum energy and the conformal anomaly mediated by a special ghost-avoidance renormalization. The cutoff Λmax establishes a new quantum scale-the accumulation point of an infinite sequence of garland-type instantons. The Euclidean path integral formalism used for the construction of the fundamental density matrix for a mixed state of the Universe is justified by proving its correspondence to the microcanonical ensemble in quantum cosmology. The cosmological evolution starting with these initial conditions also have some new features: the stage of cosmic acceleration can be followed by a big boost singularity-a rapid growth up to infinity of the scale factor acceleration parameter. From the developed approach it follows that the notion of the density matrix plays a more fundamental role than that was traditionally prescribed to it.

  14. Exploring bouncing cosmologies with cosmological surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu

    2014-08-01

    From recent observational data two significant directions have been made in the field of theoretical cosmology recently. First, we are now able to make use of present observations, such as the Planck and BICEP2 data, to examine theoretical predictions from the standard inflationary ΛCDM which were made decades of years ago. Second, we can search for new cosmological signatures as a way to explore physics beyond the standard cosmic paradigm. In particular, a subset of early universe models admit a nonsingular bouncing solution that attempts to address the issue of the big bang singularity. These models have achieved a series of considerable developments in recent years, in particular in their perturbative frameworks, which made brand-new predictions of cosmological signatures that could be visible in current and forthcoming observations. Herein we present two representative paradigms of early universe physics. The first is the reputed new matter (or matter-ekpyrotic) bounce scenario in which the universe starts with a matter-dominated contraction phase and transitions into an ekpyrotic phase. In the setting of this paradigm, we have proposed some possible mechanisms of generating a red tilt for primordial curvature perturbations and confront the general predictions with recent cosmological observations. The second is the matter-bounce inflation scenario which can be viewed as an extension of inflationary cosmology with a matter contraction before inflation. We present a class of possible model constructions and review the implications on the current CMB experiments. Lastly a review of significant achievements of these paradigms beyond the inflationary ΛCDM model is made, which is expected to shed new light on the future direction of observational cosmology.

  15. Cosmology and particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  16. Confirmation of Cosmological Bounces Predicted by Alexander Friedmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus

    2011-06-01

    It is shown that taking into consideration vorticity-related component of cosmological motion averts singularity and explains acceleration of the expansion. No mystic matter with dark energy is needed. That energy belongs to the local rotational motion (vorticity). Einstein's idea on static universe occurs to be encompassing conception for the standard cosmology, as well as for the emerging new (oscillating) one. Alexander Friedman gave to us its verbal model and was the most well prepared to give mathematical one.

  17. Tracking results using a standard cell lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1987-10-01

    This is a summary of results obtained by tracking a single particle through a lattice composed of a r.f. cavity and standard FODO cells. The lattice also includes two families of sextupoles for controlling the chromaticity. The parameters of the cells, i.e. their length and phase advance, closely resemble those of the Fermilab Main Ring or the Tevatron. We therefore have a model lattice which is similar to that of those accelerators but without the straight sections present in the actual machines. It is hoped that the simplified model used will exhibit the salient features of the actual accelerator but will be simpler to understand. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Stability analysis in tachyonic potential chameleon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Farajollahi, H.; Salehi, A.; Tayebi, F.; Ravanpak, A. E-mail: a.salehi@guilan.ac.ir E-mail: aravanpak@guilan.ac.ir

    2011-05-01

    We study general properties of attractors for tachyonic potential chameleon scalar-field model which possess cosmological scaling solutions. An analytic formulation is given to obtain fixed points with a discussion on their stability. The model predicts a dynamical equation of state parameter with phantom crossing behavior for an accelerating universe. We constrain the parameters of the model by best fitting with the recent data-sets from supernovae and simulated data points for redshift drift experiment generated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  20. Cosmological perturbations in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Jaime

    2013-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) are usually studied incorporating either holonomy corrections, where the Ashtekar connection is replaced by a suitable sinus function in order to have a well-defined quantum analogue, or inverse-volume corrections coming from the eigenvalues of the inverse-volume operator. In this paper we will develop an alternative approach to calculate cosmological perturbations in LQC based on the fact that, holonomy corrected LQC in the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry could be also obtained as a particular case of teleparallel F(T) gravity (teleparallel LQC). The main idea of our approach is to mix the simple bounce provided by holonomy corrections in LQC with the non-singular perturbation equations given by F(T) gravity, in order to obtain a matter bounce scenario as a viable alternative to slow-roll inflation. In our study, we have obtained an scale invariant power spectrum of cosmological perturbations. However, the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations is of order 1, which does not agree with the current observations. For this reason, we suggest a model where a transition from the matter domination to a quasi de Sitter phase is produced in order to enhance the scalar power spectrum.

  1. BMS in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to scalar, vector and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic data. Therefore, BMS transformations generate physically inequivalent vacua as they populate the universe at null infinity with these physical degrees of freedom. We also discuss the gravitational memory effect when cosmological expansion is taken into account. In this case, there are extra contribution to the gravitational memory due to the tail of the retarded Green functions which are supported not only on the light-cone, but also in its interior. The gravitational memory effect can be understood also from an asymptotic point of view as a transition among cosmological BMS-related vacua.

  2. Unimodular-mimetic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We combine the unimodular gravity and mimetic gravity theories into a unified theoretical framework, which is proposed to provide a suggestive proposal for a framework that may assist in the discussion and search for a solution to the cosmological constant problem and the dark matter issue. After providing the formulation of the unimodular mimetic gravity and investigating all the new features that the vacuum unimodular gravity implies, by using the underlying reconstruction method, we realize some well known cosmological evolutions, with some of these being exotic for the ordinary Einstein–Hilbert gravity. Specifically we provide the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity description of the de Sitter cosmology and of the perfect fluid with constant equation of state cosmology. As we demonstrate, these cosmologies can be realized by vacuum mimetic unimodular gravity, without the existence of any matter fluid source. Moreover, we investigate how cosmologically viable cosmologies, which are compatible with the recent observational data, can be realized by the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity. Since in some cases, a graceful exit from inflation problem might exist, we provide a qualitative description of the mechanism that can potentially generate the graceful exit from inflation in these theories, by searching for the unstable de Sitter solutions in the context of unimodular mimetic theories of gravity.

  3. Flow in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we use a known duality between expanding and contracting cosmologies to construct a dual of the inflationary flow hierarchy applicable to contracting cosmologies such as ekpyrotic and cyclic models. We show that the inflationary flow equations are invariant under the duality and therefore apply equally well to inflation or to cyclic cosmology. We construct a self-consistent small-parameter approximation dual to the slow-roll approximation in inflation, and calculate the power spectrum of perturbations in this limit. We also recover the matter-dominated contracting solution of Wands, and the recently proposed adiabatic ekpyrosis solution.

  4. Cosmic Inhomogeneities and Averaged Cosmological Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-10-01

    If general relativity (GR) describes the expansion of the Universe, the observed cosmic acceleration implies the existence of a “dark energy.” However, while the Universe is on average homogeneous on large scales, it is inhomogeneous on smaller scales. While GR governs the dynamics of the inhomogeneous Universe, the averaged homogeneous Universe obeys modified Einstein equations. Can such modifications alone explain the acceleration? For a simple generic model with realistic initial conditions, we show the answer to be “no.” Averaging effects negligibly influence the cosmological dynamics.

  5. Arguments concerning Relativity and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Klein, O

    1971-01-29

    In the first place I have reviewed the true foundation of Einstein's theory of general relativity, the so-called principle of equivalence, according to which there is no essential difference between "genuine" gravitation and inertial forces, well known from accelerated vehicles. By means of a comparison with Gaussian geometry of curved surfaces-the background of Riemannian geometry, the tool used by Einstein for the mathematical formulation of his theory-it is made clear that this principle is incompatible with the idea proposed by Mach and accepted by Einstein as an incitement to his attempt to describe the main situation in the universe as an analogy in three dimensions to the closed surface of a sphere. In the later attempts toward a mathematical description of the universe, where Einstein's cosmology was adapted to the discovery by Hubble that its observed part is expanding, the socalled cosmological postulate has been used as a kind of axiomatic background which, when analyzed, makes it probable that this expansion is shared by a very big, but still bounded system. This implies that our expanding metagalaxy is probably just one of a type of stellar objects in different phases of evolution, some expanding and some contracting. Some attempts toward the description of this evolution are sketched in the article with the hope that further investigation, theoretical and observational, may lead to an interesting advance in this part of astrophysics. PMID:17808634

  6. Computing tools for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-06-01

    An algorithm has been developed that calculates and obtains information about nonlinear contributions in accelerators. The comparison of the results obtained from this program ''NONLIN'' and HARMON is discussed and illustrated for the SSC-CDR clustered lattices.

  7. Cosmological bounds on tachyonic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Moss, Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent time-of-flight measurements on muon neutrinos in the OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment have found anomalously short times compared to the light travel-times, corresponding to a superluminal velocity, v - 1 = 2.37 ± 0.32 × 10-5 in units where c = 1. We show that cosmological bounds rule out an explanation involving a Lorentz invariant tachyonic neutrino. At the OPERA energy scale, nucleosynthesis constraints imply v - 1 < 0.86 × 10-12 and the Cosmic Microwave Background observations imply v - 1 < 7.1 × 10-23. The CMB limit on the velocity of a tachyon with an energy of 10 MeV is stronger than the SN 1987A limit. Superluminal neutrinos that could conceivably be observed at particle accelerator energy scales would have to be associated with Lorentz symmetry violation.

  8. Cosmological Inflation: A Personal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    We present a review of the sequence of events/circumstances that led to the introduction of interplay between the physics associated with phase transitions in the early universe and their effects on its dynamics of expansion with the goal of resolving the horizon problem that it has since become known as Cosmological Inflation. We then provide a brief review of the fundamentals and the solutions of a theory of gravity based on local scale invariance, known as Weyl gravity that have been elaborated by the presenter and his collaborator P. D. Mannheim. We point out that this theory provides from first principles for a characteristic universal acceleration, whose value appears to be in agreement with observations across a vast range of length scales in the universe.

  9. From Cosmology to Consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, William

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss my transition from Quantum Gravity and Cosmology to the world of consulting and describe the differences and similarities between academia and industry. I will give some dos and don'ts for industry interviews and jobs searches.

  10. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  11. Cosmology solved? Maybe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1999-03-01

    For two decades the hot big-bang model as been referred to as the standard cosmology - and for good reason. For just as long cosmologists have known that there are fundamental questions that are not answered by the standard cosmology and point to a grander theory. The best candidate for that grander theory is inflation + cold dark matter. It holds that the Universe is flat, that slowly moving elementary particles left over from the earliest moments provide the cosmic infrastructure, and that the primeval density inhomogeneities that seed all the structure arose from quantum fluctuations. There is now prima facie evidence that supports two basic tenets of this paradigm. An avalanche of high-quality cosmological observations will soon make this case stronger or will break it. Key questions remain to be answered; foremost among them are: identification and detection of the cold dark matter particles and elucidation of the dark-energy component. These are exciting times in cosmology!

  12. Kaluza-Klein Bulk Viscous Cosmological Model with Time Dependent Gravitational Constant and Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Namrata I.; Bhoga, Shyamsunder S.

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological models with time varying gravitational constant G and cosmological constant Λ in the presence of viscous fluid in Kaluza-Klein metric were investigated. The solutions to Einstein Field Equation were obtained for different types of G, with bulk coefficient ξ = ξ 0 ρ d (where ρ is density of the Universe, d is some constant) and lambda Λ = α H 2 + β R -2 where H and R are Hubble parameter and scale factor respectively. Two possible models are suggested, one where G is proportional to H and, the other where G is inversely proportional to H. While the former leads to a non-singular model, the latter results in an inflationary model. Both Cosmological models show that the Universe is accelerating; but at the early stage of the Universe the behaviour of both models is quite different,which has been studied through the variation of decelerating parameter q with time.

  13. Cosmology: A research briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    As part of its effort to update topics dealt with in the 1986 decadal physics survey, the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council (NRC) formed a Panel on Cosmology. The Panel produced this report, intended to be accessible to science policymakers and nonscientists. The chapters include an overview ('What Is Cosmology?'), a discussion of cosmic microwave background radiation, the large-scale structure of the universe, the distant universe, and physics of the early universe.

  14. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed. PMID:11801051

  15. Emergent cosmology revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri; Unnikrishnan, Sanil E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.

  16. Cosmological Models and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Lars

    Principles in the form of heuristic guidelines or generally accepted dogma play an important role in the development of physical theories. In particular, philosophical considerations and principles figure prominently in the work of Albert Einstein. As mentioned in the talk by Jiří Bičák at this conference, Einstein formulated the equivalence principle, an essential step on the road to general relativity, during his time in Prague 1911-1912. In this talk, I would like to discuss some aspects of cosmological models. As cosmology is an area of physics where "principles" such as the "cosmological principle" or the "Copernican principle" play a prominent role in motivating the class of models which form part of the current standard model, I will start by comparing the role of the equivalence principle to that of the principles used in cosmology. I will then briefly describe the standard model of cosmology to give a perspective on some mathematical problems and conjectures on cosmological models, which are discussed in the later part of this paper.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  18. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann computational physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments of the lattice gas automata method and its extension to the lattice Boltzmann method have provided new computational schemes for solving a variety of partial differential equations and modeling different physics systems. The lattice gas method, regarded as the simplest microscopic and kinetic approach which generates meaningful macroscopic dynamics, is fully parallel and can be easily programmed on parallel machines. In this talk, the author will review basic principles of the lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann method, its mathematical foundation and its numerical implementation. A detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann method with the lattice gas technique and other traditional numerical schemes, including the finite-difference scheme and the pseudo-spectral method, for solving the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic fluid flows, will be discussed. Recent achievements of the lattice gas and the the lattice Boltzmann method and their applications in surface phenomena, spinodal decomposition and pattern formation in chemical reaction-diffusion systems will be presented.

  19. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    PubMed

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations. PMID:26181770

  20. The Cosmology Distinction Course in NSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollow, Robert P.; McAdam, W. B.; O'Byrne, J.; White, Graeme L.; Holmes, R.; Webb, J. K.; Allen, L. R.; Zealey, W. J.; Hafner, R.

    1994-04-01

    The Cosmology Distinction Course is a new one-year course to be introduced for Year 12 candidates in the 1994 Higher School Certificate (HSC) examinations in NSW. It is one of three challenging courses of study that will enrich the HSC for talented students who accelerate and complete part of the HSC one year early. The courses will be taught through distance learning and will include residential seminars. They will be implemented on behalf of the Board of Studies by Charles Sturt University and the University of New England. The Cosmology Course is organized into nine modules of course work covering historical and social aspects of cosmology, observational techniques, key observatons and the various models developed--Newtonian, de Sitter, Friedmann, Lemaitre, steady-state, quasi-steady-state and big bang. Assessment will be through assignments, exams and a major project. As the first Distinction Course in a scientific area, the Cosmology Course represents an exciting and important educational initiative that needs the cooperation of NSW astronomers and, in return, promises to benefit the astronomical and general scientific community in Australia.

  1. On cosmic acceleration without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We elaborate on the proposal that the observed acceleration of the Universe is the result of the backreaction of cosmological perturbations, rather than the effect of a negative-pressure dark energy fluid or a modification of general relativity. Through the effective Friedmann equations describing an inhomogeneous Universe after smoothing, we demonstrate that acceleration in our local Hubble patch is possible even if fluid elements do not individually undergo accelerated expansion. This invalidates the no-go theorem that there can be no acceleration in our local Hubble patch if the Universe only contains irrotational dust. We then study perturbatively the time behavior of general-relativistic cosmological perturbations, applying, where possible, the renormalization group to regularize the dynamics. We show that an instability occurs in the perturbative expansion involving sub-Hubble modes, which indicates that acceleration in our Hubble patch may originate from the backreaction of cosmological perturbations on observable scales.

  2. Area of Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  4. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  5. Cosmology in time asymmetric extensions of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the cosmological behavior in a universe governed by time asymmetric extensions of general relativity, which is a novel modified gravity based on the addition of new, time-asymmetric, terms on the Hamiltonian framework, in a way that the algebra of constraints and local physics remain unchanged. Nevertheless, at cosmological scales these new terms can have significant effects that can alter the universe evolution, both at early and late times, and the freedom in the choice of the involved modification function makes the scenario able to produce a huge class of cosmological behaviors. For basic ansatzes of modification, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis, extracting the stable late-time solutions. Amongst others, we find that the universe can result in dark-energy dominated, accelerating solutions, even in the absence of an explicit cosmological constant, in which the dark energy can be quintessence-like, phantom-like, or behave as an effective cosmological constant. Moreover, it can result to matter-domination, or to a Big Rip, or experience the sequence from matter to dark energy domination. Additionally, in the case of closed curvature, the universe may experience a cosmological bounce or turnaround, or even cyclic behavior. Finally, these scenarios can easily satisfy the observational and phenomenological requirements. Hence, time asymmetric cosmology can be a good candidate for the description of the universe.

  6. Multi-scale gravity and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2013-12-01

    The gravitational dynamics and cosmological implications of three classes of recently introduced multi-scale spacetimes (with, respectively, ordinary, weighted and q-derivatives) are discussed. These spacetimes are non-Riemannian: the metric structure is accompanied by an independent measure-differential structure with the characteristics of a multi-fractal, namely, different dimensionality at different scales and, at ultra-short distances, a discrete symmetry known as discrete scale invariance. Under this minimal paradigm, five general features arise: (a) the big-bang singularity can be replaced by a finite bounce, (b) the cosmological constant problem is reinterpreted, since accelerating phases can be mimicked by the change of geometry with the time scale, without invoking a slowly rolling scalar field, (c) the discreteness of geometry at Planckian scales can leave an observable imprint of logarithmic oscillations in cosmological spectra and (d) give rise to an alternative mechanism to inflation or (e) to a fully analytic model of cyclic mild inflation, where near scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum can be produced without strong acceleration. Various properties of the models and exact dynamical solutions are discussed. In particular, the multi-scale geometry with weighted derivatives is shown to be a Weyl integrable spacetime.

  7. Modern cosmology: Interactive computer simulations that use recent observational surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Engelhardt, Larry; Stone, Keenan M.; Shuler, Ezekiel

    2013-06-01

    We present a collection of new, open-source computational tools for numerically modeling recent large-scale observational data sets using modern cosmology theory. These tools allow both students and researchers to constrain the parameter values in competitive cosmological models, thereby discovering both the accelerated expansion of the universe and its composition (e.g., dark matter and dark energy). These programs have several features to help the non-cosmologist build an understanding of cosmological models and their relation to observational data, including a built-in collection of several real observational data sets. The current list of built-in observations includes several recent supernovae Type-Ia surveys, baryon acoustic oscillations, the cosmic microwave background radiation, gamma-ray bursts, and measurements of the Hubble parameter. In this article, we discuss specific results for testing cosmological models using these observational data.

  8. Implications of the Cosmological Constant for Spherically Symmetric Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, scientists have made the discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is increasing rather than decreasing. This acceleration leads to an additional term in Albert Einstein's field equations which describe general relativity and is known as the cosmological constant. This work explores the aftermath of a non-vanishing cosmological constant for relativistic spherically symmetric mass distributions, which are susceptible to change against Einstein's field equations. We introduce a stellar structure equation known as the Tolman-Oppenhiemer-Volkoff (TOV) equation modified for a cosmological constant, which is derived from Einstein's modified field equations. We solve this modified TOV equation for these spherically symmetric mass distributions and obtain stellar properties such as mass and radius and investigate changes that may occur depending on the value of the cosmological constant.

  9. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio

    2009-01-15

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  10. Quark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. |; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin.

  11. Thermal tachyacoustic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Abhineet; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2014-08-01

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early Universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. nonrenormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. A concrete realization of this possibility for the early Universe is the tachyacoustic (or speedy sound) cosmology, which could also produce a scale-invariant spectrum for scalar cosmological perturbations. Here, we study thermal tachyacoustic cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early Universe, around the scale of the grand unified theory (GUT scale; T ˜1015 GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by 25 orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. We further discuss how production of primordial black holes constrains the cosmological acoustic history, while coupling TTC to Horava-Lifshitz gravity leads to a lower limit on the amplitude of tensor modes (r≳10-3), that are detectable by CMBpol (and might have already been seen by the BICEP-Keck Collaboration).

  12. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; Bates, D.A.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2006-10-06

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  13. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  14. Supernovas y Cosmología

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folatelli, G.

    Supernovae are very relevant astrophysical objects because they indicate the violent end of certain stars and because they alter the interstellar medium. But most importantly, they have become an extremely useful tool for measuring cosmological distances. Based on highly precise distances to type Ia supernovae it was possible to find out that the expansion of the universe is currently accelerated. This led to introducing the concept of ``dark energy'' as a dominant and yet unknown component of the cosmos. In this article we will describe the method of distance measurements that leads to the determination of cosmological parameters. We will briefly review the current status of the field with emphasis on the importance of improving our knowledge about the physical nature of supernovae. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  15. Lensing effects in inhomogeneous cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghassemi, Sima; Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh; Mansouri, Reza

    2009-05-15

    Concepts developed in the gravitational lensing techniques such as shear, convergence, tangential, and radial arcs maybe used to see how tenable inhomogeneous models proposed to explain the acceleration of the universe models are. We study the widely discussed Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) cosmological models. It turns out that for the observer sitting at origin of a global LTB solution the shear vanishes as in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models, while the value of convergence is different, which may lead to observable cosmological effects. We also consider Swiss-cheese models proposed recently based on LTB with an observer sitting in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker part. It turns out that they have different behavior as far as the formation of radial and tangential arcs are concerned.

  16. Exact evolution of discrete relativistic cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Timothy; Tavakol, Reza; Gregoris, Daniele; Rosquist, Kjell E-mail: danielegregoris@libero.it E-mail: r.tavakol@qmul.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    We study the effects of inhomogeneities on the evolution of the Universe, by considering a range of cosmological models with discretized matter content. This is done using exact and fully relativistic methods that exploit the symmetries in and about submanifolds of spacetimes that themselves possess no continuous global symmetries. These methods allow us to follow the evolution of our models throughout their entire history, far beyond what has previously been possible. We find that while some space-like curves collapse to anisotropic singularities in finite time, others remain non-singular forever. The resulting picture is of a cosmological spacetime in which some behaviour remains close to Friedmann-like, while other behaviours deviate radically. In particular, we find that large-scale acceleration is possible without any violation of the energy conditions.

  17. Confronting general relativity with further cosmological data

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Linder, Eric V.

    2010-11-15

    Deviations from general relativity in order to explain cosmic acceleration generically have both time and scale-dependent signatures in cosmological data. We extend our previous work by investigating model-independent gravitational deviations in bins of redshift and length scale, by incorporating further cosmological probes such as temperature-galaxy and galaxy-galaxy cross-correlations, and by examining correlations between deviations. Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the model-independent parameters fitting current data indicates that at low redshift general relativity deviates from the best fit at the 99% confidence level. We trace this to two different properties of the CFHTLS weak lensing data set and demonstrate that COSMOS weak lensing data does not show such deviation. Upcoming galaxy survey data will greatly improve the ability to test time and scale-dependent extensions to gravity and we calculate the constraints that the BigBOSS galaxy redshift survey could enable.

  18. Perfect Quantum Cosmological Bounce.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2016-07-01

    We study quantum cosmology with conformal matter comprising a perfect radiation fluid and a number of conformally coupled scalar fields. Focusing initially on the collective coordinates (minisuperspace) associated with homogeneous, isotropic backgrounds, we are able to perform the quantum gravity path integral exactly. The evolution describes a "perfect bounce", in which the Universe passes smoothly through the singularity. We extend the analysis to spatially flat, anisotropic universes, treated exactly, and to generic inhomogeneous, anisotropic perturbations treated at linear and nonlinear order. This picture provides a natural, unitary description of quantum mechanical evolution across a cosmological bounce. We provide evidence for a semiclassical description in which all fields pass "around" the cosmological singularity along complex classical paths. PMID:27447496

  19. Cosmological axino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Elor, Gilly; Hall, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the cosmology of the supersymmetric QCD axion, highlighting the existence of a serious cosmological axino problem that is fully analogous to the gravitino problem of overclosure via thermal production. A general analysis implies that the QCD axino has a mass greater than or equal to that of the gravitino in the absence of unnatural fine-tuning or sequestering. As a consequence, bounds from thermal gravitino and QCD axino production are complementary in parameter space, and together provide a quite stringent limit on the reheating temperature after inflation given by TR<103-106GeV for an axion decay constant of fa=109-1012GeV. Motivated by this result, we explore the cosmology of gravitino lightest supersymmetric particle and axino next to lightest supersymmetric particle at low TR and present three realistic scenarios for dark matter.

  20. Perfect Quantum Cosmological Bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2016-07-01

    We study quantum cosmology with conformal matter comprising a perfect radiation fluid and a number of conformally coupled scalar fields. Focusing initially on the collective coordinates (minisuperspace) associated with homogeneous, isotropic backgrounds, we are able to perform the quantum gravity path integral exactly. The evolution describes a "perfect bounce", in which the Universe passes smoothly through the singularity. We extend the analysis to spatially flat, anisotropic universes, treated exactly, and to generic inhomogeneous, anisotropic perturbations treated at linear and nonlinear order. This picture provides a natural, unitary description of quantum mechanical evolution across a cosmological bounce. We provide evidence for a semiclassical description in which all fields pass "around" the cosmological singularity along complex classical paths.

  1. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  2. General relativity and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2015-10-01

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s 1915 landmark paper “Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation” in which the field equations of general relativity were correctly formulated for the first time, thus rendering general relativity a complete theory. Over the subsequent hundred years, physicists and astronomers have struggled with uncovering the consequences and applications of these equations. This paper, which was written as an introduction to six chapters dealing with the connection between general relativity and cosmology that will appear in the two-volume book One Hundred Years of General Relativity: From Genesis and Empirical Foundations to Gravitational Waves, Cosmology and Quantum Gravity, endeavors to provide a historical overview of the connection between general relativity and cosmology, two areas whose development has been closely intertwined.

  3. 21cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Mario G.; Alonso, David; Bull, Philip; Camera, Stefano; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of radio telescopes with unprecedented capabilities for astronomy and fundamental physics will be in operation over the next few years. With high sensitivities and large fields of view, they are ideal for cosmological applications. We discuss their uses for cosmology focusing on the observational technique of HI intensity mapping, in particular at low redshifts (z < 4). This novel observational window promises to bring new insights for cosmology, in particular on ultra-large scales and at a redshift range that can go beyond the dark energy domination epoch. In terms of standard constraints on the dark energy equation of state, telescopes such as Phase I of the SKA should be able to obtain constrains about as well as a future galaxy redshift surveys. Statistical techniques to deal with foregrounds and calibration issues, as well as possible systematics are also discussed.

  4. Elementary particles and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrolyubov, M. I.; Ignatev, A. Yu.; Shaposhnikov, M. E.

    1988-12-01

    A series of lectures is devoted to actual problems which arise at the junction of elementary particle physics and cosmology. A brief review is given to the standard theory of hot universe and scenario of inflationary universe, modern state of the problem of baryon universe asymmetry and possible new mechanisms of this asymmetry formation. The possibility of construction of cosmological models on the basis of supersymmetric theories is considered: qualitative evaluation of the modern density of relic particles, cosmological restrictions for the mass of the lightest particle, astrophysical restrictions for the coupling constant of weakly interacting particles and matter are given. A perspective direction of search for light particles in light hadron decays is mentioned.

  5. Is ΛCDM an effective CCDM cosmology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Santos, R. C.; Cunha, J. V.

    2016-03-01

    We show that a cosmology driven by gravitationally induced particle production of all non-relativistic species existing in the present Universe mimics exactly the observed flat accelerating ΛCDM cosmology with just one dynamical free parameter. This kind of scenario includes the creation cold dark matter (CCDM) model [1] as a particular case and also provides a natural reduction of the dark sector since the vacuum component is not needed to accelerate the Universe. The new cosmic scenario is equivalent to ΛCDM both at the background and perturbative levels and the associated creation process is also in agreement with the universality of the gravitational interaction and equivalence principle. Implicitly, it also suggests that the present day astronomical observations cannot be considered the ultimate proof of cosmic vacuum effects in the evolved Universe because ΛCDM may be only an effective cosmology.

  6. Did Cosmology Trigger the Origin of the Solar System?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, H.-J.; Wilson, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    It is a matter of curious coincidence that the Solar System formed 4.6 billion years ago around the same epoch that the Friedmann-Lemaitre (FL) universe became -dominated or dark-energy-dominated, where is the cosmological constant. This observation was made in the context of known gravitational anomalies that affect spacecraft orbits during planetary flyby's and the Pioneer anomaly, both possibly having connections with cosmology. In addition, it has been known for some time that the Universe is not only expanding but accelerating as well. Hence one must add the onset of cosmological acceleration in the FL universe as having a possible influence on the origin of the Solar System. These connections will now be examined in greater detail.

  7. Supergravity brane cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidsey, James E.

    2000-10-01

    Solitonic brane cosmologies are found where the world-volume is curved due to the evolution of the dilaton field on the brane. In many cases, these may be related to the solitonic Dp- and M5-branes of string and M theory. An eleven-dimensional interpretation of the D8-brane cosmology of the massive type IIA theory is discussed in terms of compactification on a torus bundle. Brane worlds are also found in Horava-Witten theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau three-fold. The possibility of dilaton-driven inflation on the brane is discussed.

  8. Cosmology from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    1990-01-01

    The effective investigation of observational cosmological parameters is considered with attention given to the shielding provided by the lunar environment. The present measurements of the microwave and IR backgrounds are discussed, and reference is given to IR, microwave, and X- and gamma-ray investigations away from the earth to protect from terrestrial interferences. The most promising lunar investigations of cosmology are found to be studies of the microwave background and the X-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds from a hole in the lunar surface of 10 meters in depth.

  9. Measuring Neutrinos with Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Lloyd

    2016-03-01

    Along with a thermal distribution of photons, we expect a thermal distribution of neutrinos to have been produced in the big bang. Although direct detection of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) is extremely difficult, if not impossible, there is much we are learning indirectly about the CNB from its gravitational influences. I will review constraints from cosmic microwave background observations on the energy density in the CNB, present a recent detection of supersonic evolution of density perturbations in the CNB, and discuss constraints on neutrino masses from cosmological observables. I will also look toward what we can expect from future cosmological surveys, such as CMB-S4.

  10. Newtonian and relativistic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2012-03-01

    Cosmological N-body simulations are now being performed using Newtonian gravity on scales larger than the Hubble radius. It is well known that a uniformly expanding, homogeneous ball of dust in Newtonian gravity satisfies the same equations as arise in relativistic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robinson-Walker cosmology, and it also is known that a correspondence between Newtonian and relativistic dust cosmologies continues to hold in linearized perturbation theory in the marginally bound/spatially flat case. Nevertheless, it is far from obvious that Newtonian gravity can provide a good global description of an inhomogeneous cosmology when there is significant nonlinear dynamical behavior at small scales. We investigate this issue in the light of a perturbative framework that we have recently developed [S. R. Green and R. M. Wald, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 83, 084020 (2011).10.1103/PhysRevD.83.084020], which allows for such nonlinearity at small scales. We propose a relatively straightforward dictionary—which is exact at the linearized level—that maps Newtonian dust cosmologies into general relativistic dust cosmologies, and we use our “ordering scheme” to determine the degree to which the resulting metric and matter distribution solve Einstein’s equation. We find that, within our ordering scheme, Einstein’s equation fails to hold at “order 1” at small scales and at “order ɛ” at large scales. We then find the additional corrections to the metric and matter distribution needed to satisfy Einstein’s equation to these orders. While these corrections are of some interest in their own right, our main purpose in calculating them is that their smallness should provide a criterion for the validity of the original dictionary (as well as simplified versions of this dictionary). We expect that, in realistic Newtonian cosmologies, these additional corrections will be very small; if so, this should provide strong justification for the use of Newtonian simulations

  11. The Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Pierluigi

    1997-10-01

    This thesis aims to review the cosmological mass function problem, both from the theoretical and the observational point of view, and to present a new mass function theory, based on realistic approximations for the dynamics of gravitational collapse. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction on gravitational dynamics in cosmological models. Chapter 2 gives a complete review of the mass function theory. Chapters 3 and 4 present the ``dynamical'' mass function theory, based on truncated Lagrangian dynamics and on the excursion set approach. Chapter 5 reviews the observational state-of-the-art and the main applications of the mass function theories described before. Finally, Chapter 6 gives conclusions and future prospects.

  12. Bimetric gravity doubly coupled to matter: theory and cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.; Sandstad, Marit E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no E-mail: marit.sandstad@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    A ghost-free theory of gravity with two dynamical metrics both coupled to matter is shown to be consistent and viable. Its cosmological implications are studied, and the models, in particular in the context of partially massless gravity, are found to explain the cosmic acceleration without resorting to dark energy.

  13. The New Era of Precision Cosmology: Testing Gravity at Large Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic acceleration may be the biggest phenomenological mystery in cosmology today. Various explanations for its cause have been proposed, including the cosmological constant, dark energy and modified gravities. Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy ore modified gravity implement the Press & Schechter formalism (PGF). However, does the PGF apply in all cosmologies? The search is on for a better understanding of universality in the PGF In this talk, I explore the potential for universality and talk about what dark matter haloes may be able to tell us about cosmology. I will also discuss the implications of this and new cosmological experiments for better understanding our theory of gravity.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2008-10-01

    compare the two books as I am clearly biased, but looking at mine again in the course of writing this review it struck me how much the landscape of cosmology has changed in the relatively short time that has elapsed between their publication dates. The past decade has seen the discovery of cosmic acceleration, detailed all-sky maps of the microwave background, the completion of huge galaxy surveys, and the synthesis of these observations into a standard 'concordance' cosmological model. If someone has the time and energy to undertake a project like this in ten years' time, I wonder if the current consensus will have survived.

  15. DESIGN OF THE RCMS LATTICE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.

    2002-06-02

    THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON (RCMS) IS DESIGNED TO BE A VERY LIGHT AND INEXPENSIVE ACCELERATOR. THIS IS POSSIBLE DUE TO THE SMALL BEAM SIZE THAT HAS BEEN CHOSEN EARLY DURING THE DESIGN STAGE. THIS CHOICE HAS IMPLICATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE LATTICE OPTICS. IN THIS PAPER, WE PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF THE RCMS OPTICS LATTICE, THE KIND OF MAGNETS TO BE USED AND ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIAL OPTIC MODULE THAT MATCHES THE ROTATING GANTRY WITH THE REST OF THE FIXED ACCELERATOR. TECHNIQUESDEVELOPED TO WIN ADDITIONAL SPACE BETWEEN QUADRUPOLES WITHOUT DISTRUBING BETA FUNCTIONS ARE ALSO PRESENTED.

  16. Cosmology and the Bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Crocce, Martin; Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman; /CCPP, New York

    2006-04-01

    The present spatial distribution of galaxies in the Universe is non-Gaussian, with 40% skewness in 50 h{sup -1} Mpc spheres, and remarkably little is known about the information encoded in it about cosmological parameters beyond the power spectrum. In this work they present an attempt to bridge this gap by studying the bispectrum, paying particular attention to a joint analysis with the power spectrum and their combination with CMB data. They address the covariance properties of the power spectrum and bispectrum including the effects of beat coupling that lead to interesting cross-correlations, and discuss how baryon acoustic oscillations break degeneracies. They show that the bispectrum has significant information on cosmological parameters well beyond its power in constraining galaxy bias, and when combined with the power spectrum is more complementary than combining power spectra of different samples of galaxies, since non-Gaussianity provides a somewhat different direction in parameter space. In the framework of flat cosmological models they show that most of the improvement of adding bispectrum information corresponds to parameters related to the amplitude and effective spectral index of perturbations, which can be improved by almost a factor of two. Moreover, they demonstrate that the expected statistical uncertainties in {sigma}s of a few percent are robust to relaxing the dark energy beyond a cosmological constant.

  17. Quantifying concordance in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Grandis, Sebastian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the concordance between different cosmological experiments is important for testing the validity of theoretical models and systematics in the observations. In earlier work, we thus proposed the Surprise, a concordance measure derived from the relative entropy between posterior distributions. We revisit the properties of the Surprise and describe how it provides a general, versatile, and robust measure for the agreement between data sets. We also compare it to other measures of concordance that have been proposed for cosmology. As an application, we extend our earlier analysis and use the Surprise to quantify the agreement between WMAP 9, Planck 13, and Planck 15 constraints on the Λ CDM model. Using a principle component analysis in parameter space, we find that the large Surprise between WMAP 9 and Planck 13 (S =17.6 bits, implying a deviation from consistency at 99.8% confidence) is due to a shift along a direction that is dominated by the amplitude of the power spectrum. The Planck 15 constraints deviate from the Planck 13 results (S =56.3 bits), primarily due to a shift in the same direction. The Surprise between WMAP and Planck consequently disappears when moving to Planck 15 (S =-5.1 bits). This means that, unlike Planck 13, Planck 15 is not in tension with WMAP 9. These results illustrate the advantages of the relative entropy and the Surprise for quantifying the disagreement between cosmological experiments and more generally as an information metric for cosmology.

  18. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Coc, Alain

    2014-05-09

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  19. Chaos in String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    We briefly review recent work which established the existence of chaos in the generic cosmological solutions of the tree-level low-energy effective actions coming out of string theory, and linked this chaos to the Weyl groups of some hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  20. Quantum phantom cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    DaPbrowski, Mariusz P.; Kiefer, Claus; Sandhoefer, Barbara

    2006-08-15

    We apply the formalism of quantum cosmology to models containing a phantom field. Three models are discussed explicitly: a toy model, a model with an exponential phantom potential, and a model with phantom field accompanied by a negative cosmological constant. In all these cases we calculate the classical trajectories in configuration space and give solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in quantum cosmology. In the cases of the toy model and the model with exponential potential we are able to solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly. For comparison, we also give the corresponding solutions for an ordinary scalar field. We discuss, in particular, the behavior of wave packets in minisuperspace. For the phantom field these packets disperse in the region that corresponds to the big-rip singularity. This thus constitutes a genuine quantum region at large scales, described by a regular solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. For the ordinary scalar field, the big-bang singularity is avoided. Some remarks on the arrow of time in phantom models as well as on the relation of phantom models to loop quantum cosmology are given.

  1. Discrete Newtonian cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we lay down the foundations for a purely Newtonian theory of cosmology, valid at scales small compared with the Hubble radius, using only Newtonian point particles acted on by gravity and a possible cosmological term. We describe the cosmological background which is given by an exact solution of the equations of motion in which the particles expand homothetically with their comoving positions constituting a central configuration. We point out, using previous work, that an important class of central configurations are homogeneous and isotropic, thus justifying the usual assumptions of elementary treatments. The scale factor is shown to satisfy the standard Raychaudhuri and Friedmann equations without making any fluid dynamic or continuum approximations. Since we make no commitment as to the identity of the point particles, our results are valid for cold dark matter, galaxies, or clusters of galaxies. In future publications we plan to discuss perturbations of our cosmological background from the point particle viewpoint laid down in this paper and show consistency with much standard theory usually obtained by more complicated and conceptually less clear continuum methods. Apart from its potential use in large scale structure studies, we believe that our approach has great pedagogic advantages over existing elementary treatments of the expanding universe, since it requires no use of general relativity or continuum mechanics but concentrates on the basic physics: Newton’s laws for gravitationally interacting particles.

  2. An ancient revisits cosmology.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, J L

    1993-06-01

    In this after-dinner speech, a somewhat light-hearted attempt is made to view the observational side of physical cosmology as a subdiscipline of astrophysics, still in an early stage of sophistication and in need of more theoretical understanding. The theoretical side of cosmology, in contrast, has its deep base in general relativity. A major result of observational cosmology is that an expansion of the Universe arose from a singularity some 15 billion years ago. This has had an enormous impact on the public's view of both astronomy and theology. It places on cosmologists an extra responsibility for clear thinking and interpretation. Recently, gravitational physics caused another crisis from an unexpected observational result that nonbaryonic matter appears to dominate. Will obtaining information about this massive nonbaryonic component require that astronomers cease to rely on measurement of photons? But 40 years ago after radio astronomical techniques uncovered the high-energy universe, we happily introduced new subfields, with techniques from physics and engineering still tied to photon detection. Another historical example shows how a subfield of cosmology, big bang nucleosynthesis, grew in complexity from its spectroscopic astrophysics beginning 40 years ago. Determination of primordial abundances of lighter nuclei does illuminate conditions in the Big Bang, but the observational results faced and overcame many hurdles on the way. PMID:11607403

  3. An ancient revisits cosmology.

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, J L

    1993-01-01

    In this after-dinner speech, a somewhat light-hearted attempt is made to view the observational side of physical cosmology as a subdiscipline of astrophysics, still in an early stage of sophistication and in need of more theoretical understanding. The theoretical side of cosmology, in contrast, has its deep base in general relativity. A major result of observational cosmology is that an expansion of the Universe arose from a singularity some 15 billion years ago. This has had an enormous impact on the public's view of both astronomy and theology. It places on cosmologists an extra responsibility for clear thinking and interpretation. Recently, gravitational physics caused another crisis from an unexpected observational result that nonbaryonic matter appears to dominate. Will obtaining information about this massive nonbaryonic component require that astronomers cease to rely on measurement of photons? But 40 years ago after radio astronomical techniques uncovered the high-energy universe, we happily introduced new subfields, with techniques from physics and engineering still tied to photon detection. Another historical example shows how a subfield of cosmology, big bang nucleosynthesis, grew in complexity from its spectroscopic astrophysics beginning 40 years ago. Determination of primordial abundances of lighter nuclei does illuminate conditions in the Big Bang, but the observational results faced and overcame many hurdles on the way. PMID:11607403

  4. Culture and Children's Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Butterworth, George; Newcombe, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined children's knowledge of cosmology in relation to the shape of the earth and the day-night cycle. Using explicit questioning involving a choice of alternative answers and 3D models, we carried out a comparison of children aged 4-9 years living in Australia and England. Though Australia and England have a close…

  5. f(T,T) gravity and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Otalora, G.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension of f(T) gravity, allowing for a general coupling of the torsion scalar T with the trace of the matter energy-momentum tensor T. The resulting f(T,T) theory is a new modified gravity, since it is different from all the existing torsion or curvature based constructions. Applied to a cosmological framework, it leads to interesting phenomenology. In particular, one can obtain a unified description of the initial inflationary phase, the subsequent non-accelerating, matter-dominated expansion, and then the transition to a late-time accelerating phase. Additionally, the effective dark energy sector can be quintessence or phantom-like, or exhibit the phantom-divide crossing during the evolution. Moreover, in the far future the universe results either to a de Sitter exponential expansion, or to eternal power-law accelerated expansions. Finally, a detailed study of the scalar perturbations at the linear level reveals that f(T,T) cosmology can be free of ghosts and instabilities for a wide class of ansatzes and model parameters.

  6. Deformation quantization of cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Rubén; García-Compeán, Hugo; Turrubiates, Francisco J.

    2011-06-01

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to cosmological models in the minisuperspace. The quantization procedure is performed explicitly for quantum cosmology in a flat minisuperspace. The de Sitter cosmological model is worked out in detail and the computation of the Wigner functions for the Hartle-Hawking, Vilenkin and Linde wave functions are done numerically. The Wigner function is analytically calculated for the Kantowski-Sachs model in (non)commutative quantum cosmology and for string cosmology with dilaton exponential potential. Finally, baby universes solutions are described in this context and the Wigner function is obtained.

  7. Fundamental Questions of Practical Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Yurij; Teerikorpi, Pekka

    The book guides the reader (astronomer, physicist, university student) through central questions of Practical Cosmology, a term used by the late Allan Sandage to denote the modern scientific enterprise to find out the cosmological model best describing the universe of galaxies, its geometry, size, age, and material contents. The authors draw from their personal experience in astrophysics and cosmology to explain key concepts of cosmology, both observational and theoretical, and to highlight several items which give cosmology its special character: - idiosyncratic features of the "cosmic laboratory" - Malmquist bias in determination of cosmic distances - theory of gravitation as a cornerstone of cosmological models - crucial tests checking the reality of space expansion - methods of analyzing the structures of the universe as mapped by galaxies - usefulness of fractal as a model to describe the large-scale structure - new cosmological physics inherent in the Friedmann world model

  8. Bouncing loop quantum cosmology from F(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorós, Jaume; de Haro, Jaume; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2013-05-01

    The big bang singularity could be understood as a breakdown of Einstein’s general relativity at very high energies. By adopting this viewpoint, other theories that implement Einstein cosmology at high energies might solve the problem of the primeval singularity. One of them is loop quantum cosmology (LQC) with a small cosmological constant that models a universe moving along an ellipse, which prevents singularities like the big bang or the big rip, in the phase space (H,ρ), where H is the Hubble parameter and ρ the energy density of the universe. Using LQC one considers a model universe filled by radiation and matter where, due to the cosmological constant, there are a de Sitter and an anti-de Sitter solution. This means that one obtains a bouncing nonsingular universe which is in the contracting phase at early times. After leaving this phase, i.e., after bouncing, it passes trough a radiation- and matter-dominated phase and finally at late times it expands in an accelerated way (current cosmic acceleration). This model does not suffer from the horizon and flatness problems as in big bang cosmology, where a period of inflation that increases the size of our universe in more than 60 e-folds is needed in order to solve both problems. The model has two mechanisms to avoid these problems: the evolution of the universe through a contracting phase and a period of super inflation (H˙>0).

  9. Some cosmological consequences of Weyl invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; González-Martín, Sergio; Herrero-Valea, Mario

    2015-03-19

    We examine some Weyl invariant cosmological models in the framework of generalized dilaton gravity, in which the action is made of a set of N conformally coupled scalar fields. It will be shown that when the FRW ansatz for the spacetime metric is assumed, the Ward identity for conformal invariance guarantees that the gravitational equations hold whenever the scalar fields EM do so. It follows that any scale factor can solve the theory provided a non-trivial profile for a dilaton field. In particular, accelerated expansion is a natural solution to the full set of equations.

  10. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  11. The Future of Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Rankin, S. J.

    2009-08-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Popular Symposium: 2. Our complex cosmos and its future Martin J. Rees; 3. Theories of everything and Hawking's wave function of the Universe James B. Hartle; 4. The problem of space-time singularities: implications for quantum gravity? Roger Penrose; 5. Warping spacetime Kip Thorne; 6. 60 years in a nutshell Stephen W. Hawking; Part II. Spacetime Singularities: 7. Cosmological perturbations and singularities George F. R. Ellis; 8. The quantum physics of chronology protection Matt Visser; 9. Energy dominance and the Hawking-Ellis vacuum conservation theorem Brandon Carter; 10. On the instability of extra space dimensions Roger Penrose; Part III. Black Holes: 11. Black hole uniqueness and the inner horizon stability problem Werner Israel; 12. Black holes in the real universe and their prospects as probes of relativistic gravity Martin J. Rees; 13. Primordial black holes Bernard Carr; 14. Black hole pair creation Simon F. Ross; 15. Black holes as accelerators Steven Giddings; Part IV. Hawking Radiation: 16. Black holes and string theory Malcolm Perry; 17. M theory and black hole quantum mechanics Joe Polchinski; 18. Playing with black strings Gary Horowitz; 19. Twenty years of debate with Stephen Leonard Susskind; Part V. Quantum Gravity: 20. Euclidean quantum gravity: the view from 2002 Gary Gibbons; 21. Zeta functions, anomalies and stable branes Ian Moss; 22. Some reflections on the status of conventional quantum theory when applied to quantum gravity Chris Isham; 23. Quantum geometry and its ramifications Abhay Ashtekar; 24. Topology change in quantum gravity Fay Dowker; Part VI. M Theory and Beyond: 25. The past and future of string theory Edward Witten; 26. String theory David Gross; 27. A brief description of string theory Michael Green; 28. The story of M Paul Townsend; 29. Gauged supergravity and holographic field theory Nick Warner; 30. 57 varieties in a NUTshell Chris Pope; Part VII. de Sitter Space

  12. Holographic dark energy and late cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón, Diego

    2007-06-01

    It has been persuasively argued that the number of effective degrees of freedom of a macroscopic system is proportional to its area rather than to its volume. This entails interesting consequences for cosmology. Here we present a model based on this 'holographic principle' that accounts for the present stage of accelerated expansion of the Universe and significantly alleviates the coincidence problem also for non-spatially flat cosmologies. Likewise, we comment on a recently proposed late transition to a fresh decelerated phase.

  13. Supernova tests of the timescape cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, Peter R.; Wiltshire, David L.

    2011-05-01

    The timescape cosmology has been proposed as a viable alternative to homogeneous cosmologies with dark energy. It realizes cosmic acceleration as an apparent effect that arises in calibrating average cosmological parameters in the presence of spatial curvature and gravitational energy gradients that grow large with the growth of inhomogeneities at late epochs. Recently Kwan, Francis and Lewis have claimed that the timescape model provides a relatively poor fit to the Union and Constitution supernovae compilations, as compared to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. We show this conclusion is a result of systematic issues in supernova light-curve fitting, and of failing to exclude data below the scale of statistical homogeneity, z≲ 0.033. Using all currently available supernova data sets (Gold07, Union, Constitution, MLCS17, MLCS31, SDSS-II, CSP, Union2), and making cuts at the statistical homogeneity scale, we show that data reduced by the SALT/SALT-II (Spectral Adaptive Light curve Template) fitters provide Bayesian evidence that favours the spatially flat ΛCDM model over the timescape model, whereas data reduced with MLCS2k2 fitters give Bayesian evidence which favours the timescape model over the ΛCDM model. We discuss the questions of extinction and reddening by dust, and of intrinsic colour variations in supernovae which do not correlate with the decay time, and the likely impact these systematics would have in a scenario consistent with the timescape model.

  14. Thermodynamics and holography of tachyon cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, H.; Ravanpak, A.; Abolghasemi, M.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have investigated the dynamics of the universe in tachyon cosmology with non-minimal coupling to matter (Farajollahi et al. in Mod Phys Lett A 26(15):1125-1135, 2011; Phys Lett B 711(3-4)15:225-231,2012; Phys Rev D 83:124042, 2011; JCAP 10:014, 20112011; JCAP 05:017, 2011). In particular, for the interacting holographic dark energy (IHDE), the model is studied in Farajollahi et al. (Astrophys Space Sci 336(2):461-467, 2011). In the current work, a significant observational program has been conducted to unveil the model's thermodynamic properties. Our result shows that the IHDE version of our model better fits the observational data than Λ CDM model. The first and generalized second thermodynamics laws for the universe enveloped by cosmological apparent and event horizon are revisited. From the results, both first and generalized second laws, constrained by the observational data, are satisfied on cosmological apparent horizon.In addition, the total entropy is verified with the observation only if the horizon of the universe is taken as apparent horizon. Then, due to validity of generalized second law, the current cosmic acceleration is also predicted.

  15. The Directedness of Time in Classical Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Andreas; Wohlfarth, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that a new understanding of fundamentality can be applied successfully in classical cosmology based on General Relativity. We are thereby able to achieve an account of cosmological time asymmetry as an intrinsic and fun-damental property of the universe. First, we consider Price's arguments against the fundamental status of time-asymmetry (Price (1996, 2002, 2011)). We show that these arguments have some force, but their force depends on understanding fundamentality as law-likeness. Second, we show that alternative approaches attempting to explain time directedness either by applying an anthropic strategy based on a multiverse approach, or by using the empirical fact of accelerated expansion of the universe, equally fail to provide a fundamental explanation of time directedness. In the third part, we present our own new concept of fundamentality based on properties of the solution space of fundamental laws. We demonstrate how this new concept of fundamentality is effective in understanding the cosmological asymmetry.

  16. Brane cosmology in string/M-theory and cosmological parameters estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang

    In this dissertation, I mainly focus on two subjects: (I) highly effective and efficient parameter estimation algorithms and their applications to cosmology; and (II) the late cosmic acceleration of the universe in string/M theory. In Part I, after developing two highly successful numerical codes, I apply them to study the holographical dark energy model and ΛCMD model with curvature. By fitting these models with the most recent observations, I find various tight constraints on the parameters involved in the models. In part II, I develop the general formulas to describe orbifold branes in both string and M theories, and then systematical study the two most important issues: (1) the radion stability and radion mass; and (2) the localization of gravity, the effective 4D Newtonian potential. I find that the radion is stable and its mass is in the order of GeV, which is well above the current observational constraints. The gravity is localized on the TeV brane, and the spectra of the gravitational Kluza-Klein towers are discrete and have a mass gap of TeV. The contributions of high order Yukawa corrections to the Newtonian potential are negligible. Using the large extra dimensions, I also show that the cosmological constant can be lowered to its current observational value. Applying the formulas to cosmology, I study several models in the two theories, and find that a late transient acceleration of the universe is a generic feature of our setups.

  17. Integrable cosmological models from higher dimensional Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Masakazu; Suzuki, Hisao

    2007-09-15

    We consider the cosmological models for the higher dimensional space-time which includes the curvatures of our space as well as the curvatures of the internal space. We find that the condition for the integrability of the cosmological equations is that the total space-time dimensions are D=10 or D=11 which is exactly the conditions for superstrings or M theory. We obtain analytic solutions with generic initial conditions in the four-dimensional Einstein frame and study the accelerating universe when both our space and the internal space have negative curvatures.

  18. Cosmology without inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Patrick; Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2008-09-15

    We propose a new cosmological paradigm in which our observed expanding phase is originated from an initially large contracting Universe that subsequently experienced a bounce. This category of models, being geodesically complete, is nonsingular and horizon-free and can be made to prevent any relevant scale to ever have been smaller than the Planck length. In this scenario, one can find new ways to solve the standard cosmological puzzles. One can also obtain scale invariant spectra for both scalar and tensor perturbations: this will be the case, for instance, if the contracting Universe is dust-dominated at the time at which large wavelength perturbations get larger than the curvature scale. We present a particular example based on a dust fluid classically contracting model, where a bounce occurs due to quantum effects, in which these features are explicit.

  19. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  20. Gravitomagnetic amplification in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2010-02-15

    Magnetic fields interact with gravitational waves in various ways. We consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields in cosmology and study the effects of the former on the latter. The approach is fully analytical and the results are gauge invariant. We show that the nature and the outcome of the gravitomagnetic interaction depends on the electric properties of the cosmic medium. When the conductivity is high, gravitational waves reduce the standard (adiabatic) decay rate of the B field, leading to its superadiabatic amplification. In poorly conductive environments, on the other hand, Weyl-curvature distortions can result into the resonant amplification of large-scale cosmological magnetic fields. Driven by the gravitational waves, these B fields oscillate with an amplitude that is found to diverge when the wavelengths of the two sources coincide. We present technical and physical aspects of the gravitomagnetic interaction and discuss its potential implications.

  1. Supersymmetric quantum cosmological billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Koehn, Michael; Nicolai, Hermann

    2009-09-01

    D=11 supergravity near a spacelike singularity admits a cosmological billiard description based on the hyperbolic Kac-Moody group E10. The quantization of this system via the supersymmetry constraint is shown to lead to wave functions involving automorphic (Maass wave) forms under the modular group W+(E10)≅PSL2(O) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the billiard domain. A general inequality for the Laplace eigenvalues of these automorphic forms implies that the wave function of the Universe is generically complex and always tends to zero when approaching the initial singularity. We discuss possible implications of this result for the question of singularity resolution in quantum cosmology and comment on the differences with other approaches.

  2. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  3. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  4. Quantum cosmology: a review.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-02-01

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity. De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting 'microscopic' degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions. PMID:25582917

  5. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2014-02-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  6. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2009-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  7. Topics in inflationary cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.

    1986-04-01

    Several aspects of inflationary cosmologies are discussed. An introduction to the standard hot big bang cosmological model is reviewed, and some of the problems associated with it are presented. A short review of the proposals for solving the cosmological conundrums of the big bang model is presented. Old and the new inflationary scenarios are discussed and shown to be unacceptable. Some alternative scenarios especially those using supersymmetry are reviewed briefly. A study is given of inflationary models where the same set of fields that breaks supersymmetry is also responsible for inflation. In these models, the scale of supersymmetry breaking is related to the slope of the potential near the origin and can thus be kept low. It is found that a supersymmetry breaking scale of the order of the weak breaking scale. The cosmology obtained from the simplest of such models is discussed in detail and it is shown that there are no particular problems except a low reheating temperature and a violation of the thermal constraint. A possible solution to the thermal constraint problem is given by introducing a second field, and the role played by this second field in the scenario is discussed. An alternative mechanism for the generation of baryon number within the framework of supergravity inflationary models is studied using the gravitational couplings of the heavy fields with the hidden sector (the sector which breaks supersymmetry). This mechanism is applied to two specific models - one with and one without supersymmetry breaking. The baryon to entropy ratio is found to be dependent on parameters which are model dependent. Finally, the effect of direct coupling between the two sectors on results is related, 88 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Average density in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnor, W.B.

    1987-05-01

    The Einstein-Straus (1945) vacuole is here used to represent a bound cluster of galaxies embedded in a standard pressure-free cosmological model, and the average density of the cluster is compared with the density of the surrounding cosmic fluid. The two are nearly but not quite equal, and the more condensed the cluster, the greater the difference. A theoretical consequence of the discrepancy between the two densities is discussed. 25 references.

  9. Cosmology, Clusters and Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2005-01-01

    I will review the current state of Cosmology with Clusters and discuss the application of microcalorimeter arrays to this field. With the launch of Astro-E2 this summer and a slew of new missions being developed, microcalorimeters are the next big thing in x-ray astronomy. I will cover the basics and not-so-basic concepts of microcalorimeter designs and look at the future to see where this technology will go.

  10. Greek Cosmology and Cosmogony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alexander

    The structure, composition, and long-term history of the cosmos were prominent topics in many ancient Greek philosophical systems. Philosophers and philosophically informed astronomers differed over whether the cosmos was finite or infinite, eternal or transient, and composed of discrete particles or continuous, homogeneous elements. The Aristotelian cosmology preferred by astronomers following Ptolemy assumed a finite, spherical shell of eternally unalterable matter enclosing a terrestrial globe composed of earth, water, air, and fire.