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1

Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Perceptions of Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated nursing students, few empirical studies have been undertaken to examine these students' success, despite this type of programs' existence for more than a decade, and only three studies have sought to examine the perspective of the…

Blozen, Barbara B.

2010-01-01

2

Stressors and coping strategies of students in accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs.  

PubMed

Baccalaureate students enrolled in 6 accelerated programs reported their stress level, sources of stress, and coping strategies. They differentiated helpful from unhelpful coping strategies. Findings indicate that accelerated nursing students experienced high stress levels over prolonged periods that exceeded stress levels in prior life events. Implications for nurse educators in accelerated nursing programs are explored. PMID:18091468

Hegge, Marge; Larson, Vicky

2008-01-01

3

Accelerated versus traditional nursing students: a comparison of stress, critical thinking ability and performance.  

PubMed

A high demand for graduate nurses and a dwindling pool of nursing school applicants have led several collegiate nursing programs to adopt innovative programs to increase the number of eligible applicants. One option is the development of accelerated nursing program. Because of the relative newness of these programs, the need to ascertain data about accelerated students and their success in these programs is vital. This prospective study examines the differences in stress levels, critical thinking ability, and performance of traditional and accelerated nursing students. A voluntary convenient sample (n = 94) was used from nursing students enrolled in the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Scale of Judgmental Abilities were used to measure the two independent variables. The grade point average in nursing courses and the National Council Licensure Exam scores were employed to measure performance of students. Results revealed that accelerated students showed consistently higher stress levels than those of the traditional students. Moreover, the accelerated group had significantly higher grade averages in nursing courses than traditional students. Implications for nurse educators and recommendations for further studies were made. PMID:8655267

Yousseff, F A; Goodrich, N

1996-02-01

4

An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

Krumwiede, Kelly A.

2010-01-01

5

Curriculum design to promote the critical thinking of accelerated bachelor's degree nursing students.  

PubMed

This project describes the curriculum design of an accelerated bachelor's degree nursing program intended to promote the critical thinking of its students. Course objectives and teaching-learning strategies are described. Rogers' unitary view of human beings supports critical thinking as a developing process that should be measured in the context of nursing practice. Pre- and post-program critical thinking test scores indicated significant growth for the 38 graduates in the first 4 consecutive classes tested. PMID:16980825

DeSimone, Barbara B

2006-01-01

6

Academic and clinical immersion in an accelerated nursing program to foster learning in the adult student.  

PubMed

Second-degree accelerated nursing programs provide an expedited pathway to enter the nursing profession. Most students in such programs are adult learners with high expectations for their own performance and equally high expectations for the curriculum of the chosen program. Clinical and academic immersions are curriculum strategies that are particularly suited to the adult learner in a second-degree accelerated program. This article discusses the development of an accelerated program, with a focus on the intended and unexpected challenges and outcomes associated with planning and implementing immersion learning for academic and clinical experiences. Content linkage as a teaching strategy is also described. The immersion year enhances collaboration and socialization among students, faculty, and staff nurses. PMID:21086867

Caldwell, Linda M; Tenofsky, Linda M; Nugent, Elinor

2010-01-01

7

Clinical leadership development in accelerated baccalaureate nursing students: an education innovation.  

PubMed

Nursing faculty members are responsible for assuring competence and safety in the preparation of prelicensure students who are preparing to deliver care in diverse settings. The growing complexity of care and the rapid expansion of knowledge have challenged the adequacy of traditional educational approaches. Proposed solutions have encouraged closer integration of classroom and clinical teaching. This article describes an integrated instructional approach to developing clinical leadership competencies in a cohort of accelerated, second-degree, baccalaureate nursing students. Fifty-six students completed an intensive clinical experience in long-term care settings in which they used evidence on improving care for persons with heart failure to practice the principles of delegation and supervision with nursing staff. The pre- and postassessments indicated improvement in heart failure knowledge and increased readiness for delegation and supervision of certified nursing assistants. As one component of the learning experience, the students completed reflection journals. The entries in the students' journals revealed five themes: (a) low leadership self-efficacy, (b) managing the credibility gap, (c) flexibility in communication strategies, (d) RN accountability in delegation and supervision, and (e) knowledge dissemination with diverse nursing staff. Students and faculty judged the learning experience to be successful and supported the experience for future cohorts of students. This report is one example of how innovative learning experiences could be developed to increase the "real-world" aspects of clinical care within a multidisciplinary team context for the entry-level learner. PMID:21767817

Lekan, Deborah A; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Gilliss, Catherine L; Bailey, Donald E

2011-01-01

8

Nursing Students Assess Nursing Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing edu- cation, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey adminis- tered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid

Linda Norman; Peter I. Buerhaus; Karen Donelan; Barbara McCloskey; Robert Dittus

2005-01-01

9

Accelerated baccalaureate nursing students use of emotional intelligence in nursing as "caring for a human being": a mixed methods grounded theory study.  

PubMed

Accelerated nursing students are ideal informants regarding abstract nursing concepts. How emotional intelligence (EI) is used in nursing remains a relatively elusive process that has yet to be empirically modeled. The purpose of this study was to generate a theoretical model that explains how EI is used in nursing by accelerated baccalaureate nursing students. Using a mixed methods grounded theory study design, theoretical sampling of EI scores directed sampling for individual interviews and focus groups. Caring for a human being emerged as the basic social process at the heart of which all other processes--Getting it; Being caring; The essence of professional nurse caring; Doing something to make someone feel better; and Dealing with difficulty--are interconnected. In addition to a theoretical explanation of the use of EI in nursing, this study corroborates findings from other qualitative studies in nursing and contributes a rich description of accelerated baccalaureate nursing students and an example of a mixed methods study design to the small but growing literature in these areas. PMID:24317790

Ball, Lisa Sherry

2013-01-01

10

Nursing students assess nursing education.  

PubMed

This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum. PMID:16021558

Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

2005-01-01

11

Use of self-regulating learning strategies by students in the second and third trimesters of an accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing program.  

PubMed

Accelerated nursing programs have proliferated in recent years, attracting adult learners with varied backgrounds and experience into the profession of nursing. Learner adaptation to and successful completion of nursing programs delivered in an accelerated format require that students use self-regulatory learning strategies to focus, organize, integrate, and retain knowledge derived from classroom and clinical sources. The purpose of this descriptive, exploratory study was to examine the presence and extent of and differences in self-reported regulatory learning strategy use in a convenience sample of two groups of non-nursing college graduates. Determination of strategy use was delineated by student responses to the learning strategy subscales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Results of this study demonstrate that although both groups of students used self-regulated learning strategies, students who have completed more of the accelerated program use more self-regulatory learning strategies than their less experienced counterparts. PMID:17912992

Mullen, Patricia A

2007-09-01

12

Expert Holistic Nurses’ Advice to Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to describe the advice that expert holistic nurses gave to nursing students regarding the theory and practice of holistic nursing and to describe nursing students’ experience and perceptions of their interaction with the experts. Design: This was a qualitative descriptive study. Methods: Nursing students who attended the 2008 and 2009 conferences of the

Glenda Christiaens; Jo Ann Abegglen; Andrea Gardner

2010-01-01

13

Predictors of success for Saudi Arabian students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate degree program in nursing in the United States.  

PubMed

In the mid 1980s, a professional nursing education program was initiated between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. Based on a perceived and documented need, a collaborative education and research program was established with George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, to begin building a community of new scholars to assist in the advancement of professional nursing in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Four cohorts of Saudi citizens from three institutions (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia National Guard Hospital, and Ministry of Aviation and Defense Hospital), who held a degree in science or a related field, were enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate program leading to a bachelor of science in nursing degree. This project was funded by Saudi Arabian sources. A descriptive research study was conducted to identify predictors of success in the program. Results indicated a rate of program completion that was higher than expected. Some of the first graduates went on for a doctor of philosophy degree, but not all enrolled completed the program. Many countries around the world are seeking ways to upgrade and increase the supply of qualified nurses within their own borders. This study identified those factors that were predictors of success for Saudi Arabian students who completed a baccalaureate degree in nursing program in the United States. PMID:17903789

Carty, Rita M; Moss, Margaret M; Al-Zayyer, Wael; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Arietti, Lesley

2007-01-01

14

Iranian nursing students' experiences of nursing  

PubMed Central

Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment.

Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

2012-01-01

15

Competence of accelerated second degree students after studying in a collaborative model of nursing practice education.  

PubMed

The article, "CAN-Care: An Innovative Model of Practice-Based Learning" was published in the International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship in 2006 (Article 20). Reported in this paper are the findings of a program evaluation study with 58 participants who completed a survey questionnaire at the end of the program of study and six-months post graduation. The data reveal that the model resulted in graduates who perceived themselves to be competent and effectively prepared for real-world nursing practice. This is contrary to the existing literature which reports graduates' perceived lack of readiness for RN practice. The participants in this study also identified the opportunity to work with a consistent unit-based nurse and having the nursing practice course experiences on consecutive days and for the entire 12-hour shift as significant factors in the effectiveness of their learning experience. PMID:19725804

Raines, Deborah A

2009-01-01

16

Student impressions of clinical nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informal verbal reports of attitudes of nursing degree students over two years suggested a growing trend of lack of motivation in pursuing a career in nursing upon qualification. In an attempt to discover the reasons for this a small qualitative study was undertaken. Fourteen undergraduate nursing students from years 3 and 4 from a BSc Nursing Sciences (Hons) program were

Patricia A Pearcey; Barbara E Elliott

2004-01-01

17

Nursing Students with Learning Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the following topics: identification and classification of learning disabilities (LD), effects of LD on nursing students, teaching and learning, LD legislation, and academic interventions for nursing students with LD. (SK)

Selekman, Janice

2002-01-01

18

Factors for attrition in an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been a proliferation of accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs. However, the body of nursing knowledge about students who choose this career path is not well developed. This descriptive study from one midwestern school of nursing explores the factors that predict attrition among this student population. Effective interventions to support and retain these students are described. The retention of accelerated-degree students may provide one solution to addressing the nurse shortage, as graduates of these programs move into the workforce at a more rapid rate than their traditional counterparts. This article proposes a variety of potential ways to address the issue of rising attrition rates in accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs. PMID:20210286

Rouse, Susan M; Rooda, Linda A

2010-06-01

19

Writing approaches of nursing students.  

PubMed

Over the past 20years, research has focused on the writing processes of college students, however, despite recent support for writing as a tool of reflection in nursing education, little is known about how it is that nursing students go about writing papers and assignments as part of their professional education. In order to determine the writing processes of nursing students, the Inventory of Processes in College Composition, a self-response questionnaire, was administered to 169 nursing students. Results support the independence of the writing approaches that nursing students use and similarity to the writing approaches of a general college student population. PMID:22112918

Lavelle, Ellen; Ball, Susan C; Maliszewski, Genevieve

2013-01-01

20

Academic dishonesty among nursing students.  

PubMed

Student cheating on college campuses is believed to be a common occurrence, but academic dishonesty among nursing students is a source of legitimate concern to nursing faculty members because of its potential effect on present and future professional practice. Strategies are outlined that can promote academic honesty in the nursing program through moral and character development of nursing students, teaching moral decision-making skills, role-modeling of honest academic behavior, and developing and enforcing an appropriate academic integrity policy. PMID:9362877

Gaberson, K B

1997-01-01

21

Demystifying the OR for baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

Students in baccalaureate nursing programs often receive minimal exposure to specialty areas such as perioperative nursing, and new nurses may therefore fail to consider perioperative nursing as a potential practice area. Instructors from one college of nursing partnered with local hospitals to develop a program to introduce baccalaureate nursing students to the perioperative nursing specialty. This partnership program had positive outcomes for the college, the health care facilities, and the students. Six nursing students pursued careers in perioperative nursing after graduation. PMID:17144055

Cooper, Kathy; Bowers, Beverly

2006-11-01

22

Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands

Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery; Mansur Dianati

2005-01-01

23

Great expectations: points of congruencies and discrepancies between incoming accelerated second-degree nursing students and faculty.  

PubMed

This study analyzes the expectations that incoming students and faculty bring to accelerated pre-licensure education programs for second-degree students. Although research supports the congruence of expectations between students and faculty as essential to learning, anecdotal evidence and single case reports suggest there may be important discrepancies in expectations of second-degree students and their faculty. Data are intended to support curriculum review, refinement, and innovation in these programs. PMID:20795607

D'Antonio, Patricia; Beal, Margaret W; Underwood, Patricia W; Ward, Frances Rieth; McKelvey, Michele; Guthrie, Barbara; Lindell, Deborah

2010-12-01

24

Accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing programs: what is the significance of clinical instructors?  

PubMed

Accelerated second-degree nursing programs are a popular method of entry into nursing for many individuals beginning a second career in nursing. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, this study analyzed the experiences of 19 accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing graduates to understand how their student experiences best prepared them for nursing practice after graduation. The significance of clinical instructors to students' development as nurses was revealed in the data analysis and identified in the theme, Blending Practice and Pedagogy. This article describes the implications of this theme for both accelerated second-degree nursing programs and faculty recruitment and retention. PMID:17912991

Cangelosi, Pamela R

2007-09-01

25

Starting an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program: challenges and opportunities for creative educational innovations.  

PubMed

Accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs provide many benefits to students, faculty, nursing educational institutions, and health care institutions. Students, faculty, and nursing program administrators also face a variety of challenges with accelerated programs. This article reviews what is known about accelerated programs, strategies undertaken during the start-up of a new program to enhance its success, and evaluation of the new program. In addition, implications for future research and nursing education are discussed. PMID:19476033

Lindsey, Pamela

2009-05-01

26

Learning preference as a predictor of academic performance in first year accelerated graduate entry nursing students: a prospective follow-up study.  

PubMed

The growth of accelerated graduate entry nursing programs has challenged traditional approaches to teaching and learning. To date, limited research has been undertaken in the role of learning preferences, language proficiency and academic performance in accelerated programs. Sixty-two first year accelerated graduate entry nursing students, in a single cohort at a university in the western region of Sydney, Australia, were surveyed to assess their learning preference using the Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinaesthetic (VARK) learning preference questionnaire, together with sociodemographic data, English language acculturation and perceived academic control. Six months following course commencement, the participant's grade point average (GPA) was studied as a measurement of academic performance. A 93% response rate was achieved. The majority of students (62%) reported preference for multiple approaches to learning with the kinaesthetic sensory mode a significant (p=0.009) predictor of academic performance. Students who spoke only English at home had higher mean scores across two of the four categories of VARK sensory modalities, visual and kinaesthetic compared to those who spoke non-English. Further research is warranted to investigate the reasons why the kinaesthetic sensory mode is a predictor of academic performance and to what extent the VARK mean scores of the four learning preference(s) change with improved English language proficiency. PMID:21093122

Koch, Jane; Salamonson, Yenna; Rolley, John X; Davidson, Patricia M

2011-08-01

27

Teaching experiences of second degree accelerated baccalaureate nursing faculty.  

PubMed

Despite the extraordinary growth of accelerated second degree baccalaureate nursing programs, little research has been conducted about the experiences of faculty teaching these students. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, this study explored the experiences of 14 accelerated second degree baccalaureate faculty from the eastern region of the United States. The data revealed that many faculty teaching second degree students feel unprepared and want guidance on how to teach these students, which was identified in the theme, Figuring It Out On My Own. This article describes this study and the implications of this theme for faculty recruitment and retention in accelerated second degree baccalaureate nursing programs. PMID:24317788

Cangelosi, Pamela R

2013-01-01

28

Demystifying the OR for Baccalaureate Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDENTS IN BACCALAUREATE nursing programs often receive minimal exposure to specialty areas such as perioperative nursing, and new nurses may therefore fail to consider perioperative nursing as a potential practice area.•INSTRUCTORS FROM ONE COLLEGE of nursing partnered with local hospitals to develop a program to introduce baccalaureate nursing students to the perioperative nursing specialty.•THIS PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM had positive outcomes for

Kathy Cooper; Beverly Bowers

2006-01-01

29

Career Preferences of Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

2012-01-01

30

Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.  

PubMed

Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(4):233-237.]. PMID:24654592

Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

2014-04-01

31

Faculty perceptions of an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program.  

PubMed

In response to one of the most severe staff and faculty shortages in the history of the nursing profession, second-degree accelerated nursing programs are springing up throughout the United States. Struggles, solutions, and learning experienced by faculty teaching in an accelerated baccalaureate program in its inaugural year are described in this article. Focus groups were conducted and themes were identified. Themes included adapting to a new clinical teaching model, effectively teaching a different type of student, combining accelerated and traditional students, and learning as you go. Recommendations were made based on the data and the extant literature. PMID:19634267

Lockwood, Suzy; Walker, Charles Alan; Tilley, Donna Scott

2009-07-01

32

High Test Anxiety among Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing programs can be highly stressful, and the investigation was undertaken to see if nursing students are more test anxious than students in other fields. The Westside Test Anxiety Scale has administered to 298 nursing students at two colleges, and to a comparison group of 471 high school and college students. Fully 30% of nursing students

Driscoll, Richard; Evans, Ginger; Ramsey, Gary; Wheeler, Sara

2009-01-01

33

Investigating student nurses' constructions of health promotion in nursing education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes student nurses' construc- tions of health promotion and the change of these constructions during their nursing educa- tion in two Finnish polytechnics. The data consisted of essays written by the 19 student nurses before they began their nursing educa- tion in 1997 and of stimulated recall interviews with the same students during the second year of their

Leena Liimatainen; Marita Poskiparta; Auli Sjogren; Tarja Kettunen; Paivi Karhila

2001-01-01

34

Teaching Ethics to Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors discuss the ethics content to be taught in nursing education and the goals of ethics education for both undergraduate and graduate students. Teacher qualifications and evaluation of learning are also considered. (CH)

Thompson, Joyce E.; Thompson, Henry O.

1989-01-01

35

Changing nursing culture to welcome second-degree students: herding and corralling sacred cows.  

PubMed

Accelerated nursing programs necessitate new learning approaches that challenge stubborn sacred cows because bright second-degree students have high expectations. Myths about nursing education may hinder innovation in accelerated programs. Mezirow's theoretical model of transformational learning provides a framework for streamlining nursing education for second-degree students. PMID:19112745

Hegge, Margaret J; Hallman, Patricia A

2008-12-01

36

20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029 Employees...Excluded from Employment § 404.1029 Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses...

2013-04-01

37

20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school which is chartered or approved under State...

2010-04-01

38

20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school which is chartered or approved under State...

2009-04-01

39

Voices of faculty of second-degree baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

The limited research related to accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing programs primarily focuses on curricular issues or student experiences. The purpose of this study was to focus on the experiences of faculty teaching these students. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, 14 second-degree faculty from the East Coast region of the United States were interviewed to understand their experiences teaching accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing students and how these experiences helped or hindered their teaching and learning practices with these students. The challenges associated with teaching these students were identified in the themes At the Top of My Game and Teaching to Think Like a Nurse. This article describes this study and the implications for teaching accelerated second-degree baccalaureate students. PMID:19877576

Cangelosi, Pamela R; Moss, Margaret M

2010-03-01

40

A Nursing Course for Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A course is described which altered the traditional physician-dominated teaching pattern and allowed nurses to help teach potential physicians. Provided by staff nurses from various agencies and a university school of nursing, "Introduction to Nursing" for first-year medical students taught patient care from a nurse's perspective. (Author/AJ)

Harding, Elizabeth H.; And Others

1975-01-01

41

42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing...

2012-10-01

42

42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing...

2013-10-01

43

Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

Maroo, Jill Deanne

44

The Stress Sources of Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Overall, nursing training is a stressful process. Especially when second year nursing students are evaluated within the professional socialization theory, they are stated to be affected by these sources of stress more negatively. This research was carried out in order to determine the stress sources of second year nursing students. 15 nursing

Oner Altiok, Hatice; Ustun, Besti

2013-01-01

45

Evaluation of selected outcomes of an accelerated nursing degree program.  

PubMed

Accelerated or condensed programs in nursing have gained popularity over the last 10 years in Canada. They are designed to accommodate the learning needs of a special pool of learners with prior university education. These learners have expectations, abilities, and skills different from students in basic baccalaureate programs and so require instruction to suit their background. While accelerated programs have proliferated, there is little published evidence as to the actual number in Canada or on their effectiveness in preparing beginning practitioners who can meet the demands of the workplace. In this paper, the authors discuss selected outcomes of a pilot project wherein an accelerated option was examined as a feasible avenue for the education of Canadian professional nurses. Evaluation during and following the project was an integral component to contribute to an evidence base for nursing education decisions. Data were collected from two student cohorts and multiple stakeholders including faculty, employers, and nurse co-workers. Data were elicited on many variables but only four are addressed here. These are: scores on the national licensure examination, competency-to-practice rankings, student and employer perceptions of preparedness for practice, and manageability of students' stress levels during the program. The paper focuses on the findings pertaining to each variable and the lessons learned. PMID:17449146

Ouellet, Louiselle L; MacIntosh, Judy; Gibson, Cheryl H; Jefferson, Steven

2008-02-01

46

Classroom performance system use in an accelerated graduate nursing program.  

PubMed

Many students who enter accelerated nursing programs have not been exposed to the analysis, prediction, and decision-making skills needed by today's RN. To foster practice with complex concepts in the classroom and to give teachers immediate feedback about student in-class mastery of core material, use of an audience participation system within the classroom may be useful. This article reports the implementation of a classroom performance system and the results ofa program evaluation project designed to capture the system's impact on student and faculty satisfaction and student learning outcomes. Project results and implications for further work are presented. PMID:20182157

Grimes, Corinne; Joiner Rogers, Glenda; Volker, Deborah; Ramberg, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

47

Cheating among nursing students.  

PubMed

How big a problem is cheating and plagiarism among students? In what ways do students cheat and plagiarize? Are formal policies on cheating and plagiarism effective? The author discusses the results of a descriptive survey on this subject. PMID:2352675

Bailey, P A

1990-01-01

48

42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308 Section...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a)...

2013-10-01

49

42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308 Section...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a)...

2012-10-01

50

Does nursing assistant certification increase nursing student's confidence level of basic nursing care when entering a nursing program?  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore nursing student's confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program after implementation of required nursing assistant certification for program admission. In addition, the relationship between being employed as a nursing assistant and confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program was explored. A Likert-scale survey assessing confidence levels of basic nursing care was sent to 156 nursing students admitted to a nursing program prior to their first nursing course. Confidence level with nursing skills, nursing assistant employment, and length of nursing assistant employment were assessed. Students were most confident in hand washing (M = 5.87, SD = 0.36), gloving and gowning (M =5.46, SD = 0.75), making an unoccupied bed (M = 5.38, SD = 0.88), and oral temperature (M = 5.30, SD = 0.87). Students were least confident in the fitting for cane (M = 1.74, SD = 1.16) and ambulation with crutches on steps (M =1.81, SD = 1.27). Nursing assistant employment increased student confidence with basic nursing care. Nursing programs cannot assume that students are prepared in basic nursing care based on a nursing assistant certification. PMID:24720945

Stombaugh, Angie; Judd, Andrea

2014-01-01

51

Mock webpage: an innovative assignment for second-degree nursing students.  

PubMed

Generating challenging and meaningful academic assignments for nursing students in which the student manages the technology used to deliver information is needed for accelerated second-degree nursing students. Developing those assignments is critical for keeping accelerated second-degree students engaged in the learning process. They are highly motivated, self-directed learners who have been found to have a preference for teaching-learning experiences that incorporate the use of technology. This paper describes the development of a mock webpage assignment to meet the learning needs of accelerated second-degree nursing students. PMID:20690991

Boyd, Cory Ann

2010-01-01

52

Nursing students' expectations of the college experience.  

PubMed

Nursing students' expectations of college have not received much attention in the empirical literature. These expectations may be important in better understanding nurses' motivations, role acquisition, and academic and professional success. The first study discussed in this article examined the reliability and construct validity of an instrument designed to assess students' (N = 95) expectations of their college experience. The results indicate good reliability and validity. The second study discussed in this article examined differences in expectations, comparing nursing and non-nursing students (N = 160) in an urban college setting. The results suggest expectations emphasizing practical and professional aspects (i.e., acquiring a profession, earning more money), followed by self-betterment and social life expectations. Nursing students differed from non-nursing students by reporting higher self-betterment and professional expectations but lower academic expectations. Implications for application and further research are discussed. PMID:18792705

Zysberg, Leehu; Zisberg, Anna

2008-09-01

53

Use of the MMPI with student nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The group form of the MMPI was administered to 81 freshmen student nurses, and a matched group of 50 freshmen college women. The data were compared with norms published by Weisgerber (see ^W29:^n 967) and Beaver (see ^W29:^n 1484). Despite some differences, it is concluded that the Iowa nurses accord with Weisgerber's norms. Although a significant difference between nurses and

Irwin Mahler

1955-01-01

54

Using structured academic controversy with nursing students.  

PubMed

Nurse educators use a variety of strategies to foster critical thinking in undergraduate and graduate students. Structured academic controversy, although used by other disciplines, offers a novel approach for nurse educators. The author describes structured academic controversy and its use in a graduate course in gerontological nursing. The article also presents a rubric developed to grade the structured academic controversy assignment. PMID:17828023

Bull, Margaret J

2007-01-01

55

Academic dishonesty among nursing students.  

PubMed

This quantitative study identified sociodemographic and situational conditions that affected 336 nursing students' engagement in academic dishonesty, their attitudes regarding various forms of academic dishonesty, and the prevalence of academic dishonesty in which they engaged and witnessed. More than half of the participants reported cheating in the classroom and in the clinical settings. A positive relationship was found between the frequency of cheating in classroom and clinical settings. Results revealed differences in frequency of engagement in and attitudes toward academic dishonesty by gender, semester in the program, and ethnicity. Relationships were also found among peer behavior, personal beliefs and values, and frequency of engaging in academic dishonesty. PMID:24444011

Krueger, Linda

2014-02-01

56

Student Nurses Responses to Assisting Hurricane Victims  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of compassion fatigue student nurses experienced while assisting hurricane victims and if these levels changed after they returned. This study examined the levels of risk for compassion fatigue student nurses experienced while assisting hurricane victims and if these levels changed after they returned. Subscale levels of secondary stress (or compassion

Mary Colleen Hicks

2005-01-01

57

Nursing Schools: Students' Beacon to Professionalism?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nurses Professional Orientation Scale was completed by 309 students and 23 faculty members in the baccalaureate nursing program at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Results indicate that the professional socialization process is in operation; the further students advanced in the program, the more closely their responses correlated with those of…

Cohen, Barbara J.; Jordet, Caroline P.

1988-01-01

58

Nursing students today: who are they and what are their learning preferences?  

PubMed

This study compared the personal characteristics, life events, learning needs, and preferred teaching and evaluation methods of baccalaureate nursing students and accelerated nursing students. The sample included 194 baccalaureate and 93 accelerated students from four schools of nursing located in a Midwestern urban area. The participants completed an online quantitative questionnaire. The findings indicate that baccalaureate and accelerated students are more similar than they are different in preferences for teaching methods, evaluation methods, and expectations of faculty. Accelerated students work fewer hours, study more, and have higher career aspirations than do baccalaureate students. Most differences between the two groups were the result of age rather than the type of nursing program within which they were enrolled. PMID:21767820

Pettigrew, Amy C; Dienger, M Joyce; O'Brien King, Margaret

2011-01-01

59

Videoconferencing expands nursing students' cultural realm.  

PubMed

Nurse educators struggle to provide culturally diverse community health clinical placements that cultivate cultural awareness, knowledge, and competence among baccalaureate nursing students. Public health nurses observe that many new nursing graduates lack the fundamental knowledge, skills, and affective behaviors necessary to work with culturally diverse populations. To address this, nursing faculty from two schools partnered to strategize, design, implement, and evaluate a community health assessment project using the instructional method of videoconferencing. The goal was to maximize students' exposure to and engagement with geographically and demographically dissimilar populations. Through videoconferencing, students from two distant schools were able to exchange and actively discuss their community health assessments. Videoconferencing gave students the opportunity to exchange community assessments and perceptions augmented by technology and guided through faculty networking. This article describes a piloted teaching strategy by which students performed and exchanged their community health assessments from diverse populations to enhance their cultural awareness. PMID:22908884

Pirkey, Jean M; Levey, Janet A; Newberry, Shirley M; Guthman, Pamela L; Hansen, Judith M

2012-10-01

60

Health assessment in a 2-week intensive format for second-degree baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

The proliferation of second-degree baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States has led to a critical need for effective strategies to meet the unique learning needs of this group of students. This article describes an innovative approach to delivery of a health assessment course for accelerated nursing students. PMID:19297966

Yastik, Joanne; Anthony, Maureen

2009-03-01

61

Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.  

PubMed

Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous. PMID:19269071

Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

2009-08-01

62

Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

Lovan, Sherry R.

2009-01-01

63

Nursing Students with Disabilities: A Survey of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of baccalaureate nursing programs (n=247) to determine their responses and reactions to applicants and students with disabilities revealed that programs provide an extensive array of special services and indicated a high level of student satisfaction with the services provided. (JOW)

Watson, Pamela G.

1995-01-01

64

Accelerated LPN-RN nursing education: is role socialization lost along the way?  

PubMed

In response to a critical shortage of registered nurses, an accelerated transition program for licensed practical nurses (LPNs) was developed and implemented. A study of the program was undertaken to evaluate students' academic achievement and socialization into the RN role. NCLEX-RN scores and the Professional Nursing Questionnaire (PNQ) of Minnick, Yocum and Scherubel were used for evaluation. Experimental program students were compared with students in the second year of conventional two-year nursing programs. Results of role socialization revealed no significant differences between the groups at either the beginning or end of the program. NCLEX-RN scores were not significantly different. The lack of significant results may be attributable to the inability of the PNQ to detect changes over a short time, or to LPNs' knowledge of the RN role prior to program entry. NCLEX score results indicated that comparable academic achievement was possible in the accelerated program. PMID:2553887

Boyar, D C; Senturia, B B; Palisin, H

1989-10-01

65

Assessing nursing students' knowledge of health literacy.  

PubMed

Because patients' limited level of health literacy can have a negative impact on patient health outcomes, it is important to address this topic in the nursing curricula. The author discusses a comparative study that assessed baccalaureate nursing students' knowledge of health literacy before and after implementation of an asynchronous online educational module. With a significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores, the findings provide information that can inform curriculum planning in baccalaureate nursing programs. PMID:22914282

McCleary-Jones, Voncella

2012-01-01

66

Simulation Technology in Nursing Education: Student Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing education programs are faced with the challenge of providing students with the necessary skills to function in a fast paced, high technological environment. To address this challenge, the current trend in nursing education is to integrate the use of high-fidelity simulation technology into the curricula although there has been limited…

Panunto, Karen L.

2009-01-01

67

Ethics Education for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The final report of a 3-year project which involved the development, implementation, and evaluation of Multi-Course Sequential Learning, a model for integrating ethics education into the curriculum of the undergraduate programs in nursing at the University of Minnesota (UM) in Minneapolis is provided. The project focused on nursing students

Ryden, Muriel B.; Duckett, Laura

68

Student Retention: Crisis in Nursing Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducted nationwide study of higher education student retention programs for baccalaureate-degree nursing programs in U.S. Findings from 263 National League for Nursing accredited programs revealed that respondent institutions with retention programs at college level had statistically significant higher retention rate (70.77%) than those colleges…

Catalano, Joseph T.; Eddy, John P.

1993-01-01

69

Financial Aid for Nursing Students  

MedlinePLUS

... related to gerontology, medicine, nursing, social work, or sociology at an accredited four-year university. A scholarship ... related to gerontology, medicine, nursing, social work, or sociology at an accredited four-year university. A scholarship ...

70

Education of nurse practitioners in academic nurse-managed centers: student perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical experiences for advanced practice nurses are increasingly a challenge. Finding settings that demonstrate primary care nursing practice in its finest form can be difficult. This article reports on nurse practitioner (NP) student feedback on clinical placements in the academic nurse-managed centers (ANMCs) associated with four Michigan schools or colleges of nursing. Student feedback was solicited over three years through

Clare L Tanner; Joanne Pohl; Sheila Ward; Kathy Dontje

2003-01-01

71

A Meta-Analysis of Cultural Competence Education in Professional Nurses and Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cultural competence learning interventions have been suggested to positively improve knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in both professional nurses and nursing students. A meta-analysis was used to examine the effectiveness of learning interventions designed to increase the cultural competence in professional nurses and nursing students. This is the first known meta-analysis of studies on cultural competence learning interventions in professional nurses

Ruth Wilmer Gallagher

2011-01-01

72

Evaluation by Exception for Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation by exception instrument was developed to rate nursing students' clinical performance by documenting whether behaviors deviated from acceptable standards. The method increased student understanding of areas needing improvement and reduced faculty time to prepare evaluations and conduct student conferences. (SK)

Wishnia, Gracie S.; Yancy, Pam; Silva, Judith; Kern-Manwaring, Nancy

2002-01-01

73

Student Financial Aid Guidelines. Book II. Nursing Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Health Professions Student Loan Program; the Scholarship Program for First-Year Students of Exceptional Financial Need; the Nursing Student Loan Program; and the Nursing Scholarship Program are Federal programs authorized by the Public Health Service ...

1980-01-01

74

[Hospice palliative care education for nursing students, nurses, and advanced nursing practitioners].  

PubMed

The aim of hospice palliative education care is to train nurses in hospice philosophy, terminal care skills, nursing care competencies, and professional reliability. Student nurses, staff nurses, and advanced practice nurses must be taught through a proper sequence, from novice to expert. Working together with patients and their families, nurses can educate and care for the physical, social and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients. Currently, problems faced in hospice palliative care education include: 1. The lack of a systematic plan focusing on hospice palliative care and terminal care in nursing schools; 2. The absence of comfort care, communications, ethics, and other relevant issues in extant education and training; 3. The limited number of institutes that currently provide in-service training; 4. The shortage of teachers proficient in both hospice care knowledge and practice; and 5. The current overdependence on traditional nursing education models, which hinders student nurse originality and delays staff nurse growth. Faced with the present issues, self-reflection, localization, and multiple teaching strategies should be the critical developmental directions of hospice palliative education. In order to improve terminal care quality, it is also important to integrate practice, education, and research in order to train more hospice palliative nurses. PMID:19221995

Lai, Wei-Shu; Ying, Wan-Ping; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal

2009-02-01

75

Nursing students respond to a computer assignment.  

PubMed

Computer-generated information is becoming increasingly important in nursing. Nursing schools are faced with the need to ensure that students have basic informatics skills and rudimentary computer literacy. This article describes the introduction of an assignment using electronic communication skills within a teaching-learning course in a baccalaureate program. The assignment was designed to introduce the students to several tasks that would be useful to them in their studies as well as in their care of clients. Students learned to send electronic mail, post to a class list, use search engines, access libraries, and critique web pages. They developed increased confidence and skill, advancing from informed user to proficient user status as identified by Ronald & Skiba. The students' appraisal of the assignment in terms of value to their nursing education and their nursing careers indicated that they recognized the value of these skills for their professional nursing lives. Activities were monitored for content and technical glitches. Lessons learned are highlighted, and "Inbox overload" is identified. The authors found that nursing curricula can be designed to meet the challenge of fostering computer literacy. The assignment could be easily adapted for continuing education or other professional education endeavors. PMID:9951201

Stamler, L L; Thomas, B; McMahon, S

1999-01-01

76

Student Nurse-Older Person Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Observations and interviews of eight student nurses in clinical placements with older patients yielded four themes: task- and nontask-related communication, need for verbal and nonverbal communication, communication hindrances and enhancers, and students' approach to communicating with older persons. A person-centered approach to elder care and…

Tuohy, Dympna

2003-01-01

77

Caring Behaviors of Advanced Practice Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to provide advanced practice nursing (APN) students with the opportunity to enrich their aesthetic knowing and acquire the meaning of caring in their practice by reflecting on their caring narratives. Students were asked to write about a caring encounter they experienced in their practice. The instructor analyzed and organized that data from each narrative.

Karen Moore Schaefer

2003-01-01

78

Literature Update on Academic Performance of Minority Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reviews the literature on minority nursing students including the identification of high risk students, admission policies, evaluation methods and prediction of success of nursing students since the mid-1980s. The review finds that many variables have been used in research studies to identify at-risk students, to predict nursing

Fearing, Arleen D.

79

Teaching Design of Cultivating Nursing Students' Creative Thinking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chinese nursing education levels have developed fast over the past few years. Many nursing educators are devoted to the research of nursing teaching. How to cultivate nursing students, creative thinking is one of the principle researches and has received increasing attention. In the course of nursing teaching, we renewed the teaching design based…

Xi-wen, Liu; Chun-ping, Ni; Rui, Yang; Xiu-chuan, Li; Cheng, Cheng

2007-01-01

80

Nursing students' perceptions of bullying behaviours by classmates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this non-experimental descriptive study was to explore types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours that nursing students experience while in nursing school. The study also evaluated resources utilised by nursing students to cope with these bullying behaviours. Six hundred thirty-six participants completed the investigator- developed Bullying in Nursing Education Questionnaire (BNEQ). All respondents reported at least one

Janet R. M. Cooper; Jean T. Walker; Karen Winters; P. Renée Williams; Rebecca Askew; Jennifer C. Robinson

2009-01-01

81

The Lived Experience of How Adult Nursing Students Blend Lifestyle Obligations with Nursing School Expectations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adult nursing students have lifestyle obligations that require integration with nursing school programs in order to graduate and fulfill their dreams of becoming a nurse. Fourteen participants shared their stories of how they were able to blend their lifestyles commitments with nursing school. Student interaction between lifestyle obligations…

Coutrier, Karen A.

2011-01-01

82

Baccalaureate student nurse success prediction: a replication.  

PubMed

The use of group testing that predicts success in understanding and using the nursing process suggests a tempting solution to a vexing problem: selecting those students from an applicant pool who have the potential to successfully complete a nursing program. Failure to replicate or extend previous studies has been recognized as a major limitation in nursing research (Brown, Tanner, & Padrick, 1984). The purpose of this research was to replicate a study using a set of four short test instruments identified as being successful predictors (Kissinger & Munjas, 1982). As part of a larger research project, four successive classes of students admitted to the school of nursing (N = 155) were tested and followed over a 4 1/2-year period with 100% participation. The results were not supportive of the findings in the previous study. The importance of cross validation of prediction studies, as well as the need for periodic sampling of previously validated prediction batteries due to changing elements in selection programs, was demonstrated. The study's outcome and the nursing literature suggest that some configuration of prerequisite grade point average, with all of its limitations and student manipulations, and a required verbal SAT/ACT score may still be the most efficient predictors available to admission committees in schools of nursing. PMID:2154568

Wold, J E; Worth, C

1990-02-01

83

Mentoring nursing students in the sexual health setting.  

PubMed

The sexual health setting provides many opportunities for nursing students to meet the competencies set out in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards for Pre-Registration Nursing Education. However, students who are daunted by the setting may adopt a passive, observer role. Mentors may find it a challenge to facilitate the learning of pre-registration nursing students in this setting. This article explores several strategies that mentors can adopt to make learning active and relevant for nursing students. These strategies may also be relevant to other nursing fields and to midwifery students. PMID:24779841

Brown, Kate; Plant, Selina

2014-04-30

84

Undergraduate nursing student experiences with faculty bullies.  

PubMed

Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility, whereas less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive phenomenology, this study explored these lived experiences. Themes emerged including the emotional experience of bullying, the giving and gaining of mutual respect, the value of resilience and persistence, and that perception is reality. PMID:24743180

Mott, Jason

2014-01-01

85

[Alcohol and alcoholism: attitudes of nursing students].  

PubMed

This is a descriptive exploratory study that aimed to verify nursing students' attitudes facing to the alcoholic drinks, alcoholism and alcoholics, according to their position in face of an attitudes scale items. For data collection, it was used the Scale of Attitudes to alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholic, applied to 144 nursing students. The results showed a tendency to negative attitudes of these students in face of alcoholism, alcoholic person and alcoholic drinks, since most participants were placed in category indifferent or disagree with the positive items, agreeing with negative scale items. We conclude that this trend of negative attitudes is connected to insufficient attention given to the subject during the nurses' education, being verified the need for greater importance to be given to this problem. PMID:23681384

Vargas, Divane; Bittencourt, Marina Nolli

2013-01-01

86

Attitudes toward research among undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Attitudinal changes about research among undergraduate nursing students during their two years in a baccalaureate nursing program showed no significant improvements except for significant improvements in confidence about understanding research terminology methods and evaluating the adequacy of research studies. These improvements were apparent after the course and in the second year when the students were queried again. The overall research attitude score was essentially the same in the senior year as it had been on the pre-test when the students began the program. Although 52.9% of the students indicated they wanted to go on for a master's degree, 6.2% said they definitely wanted to take additional research courses. In the senior year, 31.9% of the students indicated they definitely wanted to go on to graduate school, while 60.4% said they were uncertain; 7.7% indicated they definitely did not want to return to graduate school. PMID:6094765

Swenson, I; Kleinbaum, A

1984-11-01

87

Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

Diers, Jane E.

88

Comparison between Heads of Nursing and Nursing Administration Students in the Sultanate of Oman regarding Education for Nurse Administrators  

PubMed Central

Objective: To explore the future of nursing administration in preparation for a major review of the current curriculum in the one-year diploma in nursing administration at the Oman Specialized Nursing Institute (OSNI). Methods: A two-part study explored 1) requisite roles, skills and competencies of the nurse administrator, 2) a leadership profile with two convenience samples: heads of nursing and nursing administration students. Each part was analysed separately; the two groups were then compared with the latter revealing similarities and differences. Results: Heads of nursing were more likely to describe roles and be task-oriented, emphasising problem solving, whereas students focused on functions and processes. Both groups wanted nursing to be known for its code of professional conduct, and have an empowered nursing association. Leadership profile comparisons indicated heads of nursing were mature and practical whereas students were idealistic, with risk-taking tendencies. There was overall agreement that preparation for the nursing administration specialty should be at master’s level; however, all nurses should undertake a leadership and management course during their progression to senior positions. Conclusion: The vision of those preparing to enter and those already in leadership positions is for empowerment of the nursing profession in Oman. Thus there is a need for highly educated nurse leaders and managers in nursing administration to provide the driving force for change and sustained motivation. The current Nursing Administration Programme (NAP) needs to be upgraded and delivered at the master’s level for nurses specialising in nursing administration.

White, Gillian

2012-01-01

89

Factors affecting practical nursing student attrition.  

PubMed

This study investigated factors that affect student attrition for 151 students in a practical nursing program. The academic variables studied were scores on preadmission tests and grades in required prerequisite courses. The demographic variables included age, gender, and race. The analysis of the data obtained from student records revealed a statistically significant difference between the retention and attrition student groups for the variables of race, preadmission test scores, and prerequisite course grades. Recommendations for a retention program to reduce attrition were made based on the findings of this study. PMID:18792710

Stickney, Margaret Christine

2008-09-01

90

Nursing Students Benefit from Video Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At Renton Technical College in Renton, Washington, a video system that captures and records live images is enhancing the educational experience for students in the nursing program. Capturing and recording live images from the rooms has proven to be one of the most successful teaching methods instituted at Renton Tech. Instructors are able to…

Barron, Rich

2006-01-01

91

International Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a survey of 16 nursing students and interviews with 11 regarding international education experience were distilled into 4 themes--preparing, adjusting, caring, and transforming--that were influenced by culture, values, and ethics. All participants experienced shock related to culture or to the poverty they encountered. (Contains 19…

Pross, Elizabeth

2003-01-01

92

Being a Nursing Aide; Student Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed for students receiving on-the-job training as nursing aides, this illustrated manual contains these chapters: (1) Orientation, (2) Introduction to the Patient, (3) Your Working Environment, (4) The Patient's Unit: Making the Unoccupied Bed, (5) Lifting, Moving, and Transporting Patients: Making the Occupied Bed, (6) Personal Care of the…

American Hospital Association, Chicago, IL.

93

Accommodating RN Students in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing faculty from 35 programs met at workshops to discuss problems of admission policies and curriculum design for the increasing number of RNs seeking a BSN degree. Items of concern included the identification of critical issues, curriculum design models, curriculum revision, faculty and administrator attitudes, and student needs. (CT)

Hale, Shirley L.; Boyd, Beverly T.

1981-01-01

94

U.S. Army Survey of Nurses and Nursing Students: Sampling Frame and Survey Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the rationale for the study of nurses and the development of the sampling frame and questionnaires for a survey of registered nurses and nursing students. An understanding of the perceptions of the U.S. Army and Army nursing by regis...

P. Lerro J. Morrison P. Ramsberger

1992-01-01

95

Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

LaFauci, Frances F.

2009-01-01

96

Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior.

Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

2005-01-01

97

Incorporating a built environment module into an accelerated second-degree community health nursing course.  

PubMed

Environmental quality is a leading indicator of population health. Environmental health content has been integrated into the curriculum of an Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program for second-degree students through development of an environmental health nursing module for the final-semester community health nursing course. The module was developed through collaboration between two professional schools at Duke University (the School of Nursing and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences). It focused on the role of the built environment in community health and featured a mix of teaching strategies, including five components: (1) classroom lecture with associated readings, (2) two rounds of online small-group student discussions, (3) assessment of the built environment in local neighborhoods by student teams, (4) team presentation of the neighborhood assessments, and (5) individual student papers synthesizing the conclusions from all team presentations. The goal of the module was to provide nursing students with an organizing framework for integrating environmental health into clinical practice and an innovative tool for understanding community-level components of public health. PMID:16961563

Hays, Judith C; Davis, Jeffrey A; Miranda, Marie Lynn

2006-01-01

98

International exchange program: findings from Taiwanese graduate nursing students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored Taiwanese graduate nursing students’ transcultural experiences in the United States during an international exchange program. A qualitative method with content analysis was used to analyze journal entries on perceptions of American culture, American nursing, and reflections on personal and professional growth written by nine graduate nursing students from Taiwan. The mean age of the participants was 32

Carol Shieh

2004-01-01

99

A Qualitative Look at Leisure Benefits for Taiwanese Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine attitudes of first year nursing students toward leisure participation at the Jen-Te Junior College of Medicine Nursing and Management in Miao-Li, Taiwan. The three research questions used for this study were: What types of leisure activities do first year nursing students at Jen-Te Junior College…

Hsieh, Shwu-Ching; Spaulding, Angela; Riney, Mark

2004-01-01

100

Nursing Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Classmates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this non-experimental descriptive study was to explore types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours that nursing students experience while in nursing school. The study also evaluated resources utilised by nursing students to cope with these bullying behaviours. Six hundred thirty-six participants completed the…

Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean T.; Winters, Karen; Williams, P. Renee; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.

2009-01-01

101

Life History and Zimbabwean Nursing Student: "Global Boarder"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A considerable number of students undertaking pre-registration nurse education in the UK are international students from Zimbabwe. The traditional strength of nursing education in Zimbabwe itself has been the large labour pool available for recruitment into the programmes. However, the numbers of recruits to UK nursing courses from Zimbabwe…

Dyson, Sue

2005-01-01

102

Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

2011-01-01

103

First Year Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Reasons for Drop-Out?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Improving throughput in the B. Tech. Nursing Sciences programme is a complex issue as not only the theoretical but also the practical component and undefined inner strengths of the student influence success. The purpose of this article is to report factors in the prospective students' social background, their perceptions of nursing and nurses and…

Wright, S. C. D.; Maree, J. E.

2007-01-01

104

Nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of any health care service is to provide optimal quality care to clients and families regardless of their ethnic group. As today's Australian society comprises a multicultural population that encompasses clients with different cultural norms and values, this study examined undergraduate nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural nursing care. A sample of 196 nursing students enrolled in the

Janet Lim; Jill Downie; Pauline Nathan

2004-01-01

105

Differential Dimensions of Death Anxiety in Nursing Students with and without Nursing Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have demonstrated death anxiety in nursing professionals; however, it is unclear as to when this anxiety develops. This study used a multidimensional measure to investigate death anxiety in a group of experienced (n = 53) and inexperienced (n = 49) nursing students and a control group of non-nursing students (n = 50). Experienced…

Chen, Yi-Chuen; Ben, Kevin S. Del; Fortson, Beverly L.; Lewis, Jean

2006-01-01

106

Practice nurses as mentors for student nurses: An untapped educational resource?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes an evaluation process aimed at exploring the issues related to placing third year undergraduate students with Practice Nurses for their adult branch community placement. The evaluation process was based on an iterative action research cycle, demonstrating a reflective approach to the placement. This evaluation of student nurse placements with Practice Nurses intended to provide a useful contribution

Ina Machen

2003-01-01

107

Simulation: Perceptions of First Year Associate Degree Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It was the purpose of this study to determine if there is a relationship between student satisfaction with high-fidelity-patient simulation experience and self-confidence in learning among student nurses. The population was associate nursing degree students. The study measured by the students' perceptions of their satisfaction and self-confidence.…

Dougherty, Suzanne V.

2011-01-01

108

42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. 57.310 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a)...

2009-10-01

109

42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or...

2013-10-01

110

42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. 57.310 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a)...

2013-10-01

111

42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or...

2012-10-01

112

42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. 57.306...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a)...

2013-10-01

113

42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of...

2012-10-01

114

42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. 57.310 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a)...

2010-10-01

115

42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307 Section 57...IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of...

2013-10-01

116

Faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students.  

PubMed

Men are entering the field of nursing in increasing numbers. As men enter nursing programs, they may encounter role stereotyping and gender bias through the faculty's assumption of stereotypical notions of caring. The purpose of this interpretive phenomenological study was to describe the ways faculty perceive and respond to caring in male nursing students to better understand how to facilitate it. The central question for this study was: What are the essences and meaning of nursing faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students? Six faculty members in a nursing program with a large percentage of male student enrollment were interviewed. Applying a phenomenological data analysis method, the researchers identified six themes: altruism, antecedents, attainment, ambiguity, agency, and anecdotes. Implications for nursing education and practice are made, including the need to recognize, allow, and support male nursing student ways of caring. PMID:18630717

Grady, Carole A; Stewardson, Gary A; Hall, Janice L

2008-07-01

117

Reflective Learning Groups for Student Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a An often-reported difficulty undergraduate student nurses confront in participating effectively in healthcare workplaces is\\u000a the perceived mismatch between the experiences provided in the university setting and the practice setting. In particular,\\u000a the pedagogical approaches currently employed in university settings are held to inadequately prepare graduates for the transition\\u000a to their professional role. As part of a larger project exploring preparation

Jennifer M. Newton

118

Success indicators for an accelerated masters entry nursing program: staff RN performance.  

PubMed

The purpose of this exploratory research study was to assess employment performance outcomes of students who completed the prelicensure segment of an accelerated graduate entry program, the Masters Entry Program in Nursing (MEPN) at the University of California, San Francisco. MEPN RNs and their managers at three study sites completed a survey constructed from staff RN performance criteria position descriptions and participated in focus groups. Data were used to evaluate staff RN employment performance and how well the educational program prepared students for the staff RN role. Findings indicate that MEPN RNs' self-assessment and their managers' performance evaluation were rated as very effective in their staff RN roles, regardless of years of nursing experience. Recommendations for further research are discussed, encouraging the use of employment performance criteria as an additional way to evaluate the quality of nursing educational programs. PMID:21534500

Ziehm, Scott R; Uibel, Isabel Cunningham; Fontaine, Dorrie K; Scherzer, Teresa

2011-07-01

119

Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the “concerns of becoming a nurse,” which itself consisted of three categories: “nurses clinical competency,” “nurses as full-scale mirror of the future,” and “Monitoring and modeling through clinical education” (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education.

Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

2012-01-01

120

The transition from nursing student to registered nurse: the mentor's possibilities to act as a supporter.  

PubMed

The transition from nursing student to registered nurse can be exciting, stressful and challenging. It is common for nursing students to feel insecure about their competence and ability to step into working life. The role of the mentor in the final clinical practice is essential, as they guide students in their clinical learning process and professional growth. This study describes the mentor's support in the transition from nursing student to registered nurse. Sixteen nursing students wrote narrative essays about the significance of the clinical mentor in their role change in the transition process from nursing student to registered nurse. The essays were analysed using inductive content analysis. The findings show that the mentor has a significant role. Three main categories emerged in mentor's role: role change support, the mentor's actions and the qualities of the mentor. In future in clinical nursing practice, it is important to allocate resources to the mentor's work and understand its importance for nursing students' transition to nursing. PMID:23415959

Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja; Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Salminen, Leena

2013-09-01

121

Profile of Nonnurse College Graduates Enrolled in Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics of nonnurse college graduates (n=166) who pursue baccalaureate degrees in accelerated nursing programs. Found that accelerated programs are an efficient use of resources and an effective way to increase the supply of nurses. (JOW)

Wu, Chien-Yun; Connelly, Catherine E.

1992-01-01

122

Accelerated second degree advanced practice nurses: How do they fare in the job market?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accelerated, nontraditional, advanced practice nursing programs are an alternative way to increase the supply of nurse practitioners. This study profiles demographic and job characteristics of second degree, non-nurse college graduates who pursued graduate degrees in nursing. Graduates' sex, age, income, previous education, nursing experience, factors describing the scope of the advanced practice role, and quality of the educational experience were

Kenneth R White; William A Wax; Allison L Berrey

2000-01-01

123

Values held by nursing faculty and students in a university setting.  

PubMed

An ever-expanding wealth of life-preserving high technology and scientific knowledge, coupled with expanded autonomy of nurses, has created for them ethical and moral dilemmas. As society's values are changing, manifested by an accelerated crime rate, malfeasance in high places, and seeming social indifference, have nurses maintained their ethical equilibrium? This article reports the findings of a descriptive study that examined the professional and personal values of nursing faculty in a large midwestern school of nursing and compares them with those of generic students entering the program. Faculty demonstrated a significantly higher commitment to the American Association of College of Nursing professional value, human dignity, than to the values of equality (P less than .05) and esthetics (P less than .01). Also, there was a significantly higher commitment to altruism than esthetics (P less than .05). Results showed that entering students were more alike on personal values (Rokeach Values Survey) than different from the faculty who teach them. PMID:2778221

Thurston, H I; Flood, M A; Shupe, I S; Gerald, K B

1989-01-01

124

Accelerating Struggling Students' Learning Through Identity Redevelopment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Presents students views about the Accelerated Program, an intervention designed to get students on a path to on-time graduation by helping them develop a more positive sense of their own ability to accomplish, belong, and engage in the classroom. The program was designed to accelerate learning so that students completed two years of academic content within one year.

Finnan, Christine; Kombe, Dennis

2011-03-01

125

Why do student nurses leave? Suggestions from a Delphi Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The high dropout rate of nursing students is a major concern. However, there is little research available about the reasons why students leave. Universities collect some information from ‘exit’ interviews but, due to ethical sensitivities, it is not made available for research analysis. The purpose of this study was to establish a consensus view of the reasons why student nurses

Paul Fulbrook

2003-01-01

126

Health Behaviors of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 3-year study compared 52 undergraduate nursing students with 93 education majors and with the general population. No significant differences among students on 9 health behaviors appeared. Compared with the general population, nursing students had inadequate time for sleep, exercise, and eating breakfast. (Contains 77 references.) (SK)

Clement, Madeleine; Jankowski, Louis W.; Bouchard, Louise; Perreault, Michel; Lepage, Yves

2002-01-01

127

Assessment of Critical Thinking Skills in Associate Degree Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the change in the critical thinking skills of associate degree nursing students as they progressed through their educational process at the Reedsburg campus of Madison Area Technical College (MATC) in Wisconsin. The study sample consisted of two cohorts of 24 students each (students entering MATC's associate degree nursing program…

Soukup, Frances

128

Nursing Students and Technology: Is Virtual Simulation Feasible?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Simulation learning scenarios are increasingly utilized in nursing education as a way for students to gain experience taking care of patients. Virtual reality is a developing technology where students can participate in nursing simulation scenarios. Student accessibility to virtual reality technology is a potential barrier for implementing this teaching-learning tool. This project will assess the technology needed for virtual

Craig Stevens

2009-01-01

129

Collaborative efforts of nursing students and surgical technology students in the simulation laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field of nursing education rarely integrates other allied health professions into its core curriculum. The surgical technology faculty and students at Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn, New York, assist the nursing students with their rotation through the operating room through simulation. This incorporation has been extremely helpful to the clinical nursing students and has allowed for a mutual understanding

Richard Fruscione; Deborah Hyland

2010-01-01

130

Bundling the death and dying learning experience for prelicensure nursing students.  

PubMed

One of the greatest challenges in nursing education lies in linking classroom content to the clinical environment. Simulation is now an established method for allowing students to practice the skills and techniques discussed in didactic nursing education and to allow this to occur in a safe, controlled environment before moving into the real world of clinical practice. Multidimensional learning bundles, such as the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium curriculum, provide an opportunity to link theoretical content with practice, yet time constraints may limit implementation of the full curriculum. A compacted learning bundle with a didactic component, unfolding case study, and video-recorded family conference to prepare students for a simulation on care of the dying patient is being used in 1 accelerated bachelor of science in nursing program to address students' learning needs. PMID:24743178

Carman, Margaret J

2014-01-01

131

Accelerated second degree advanced practice nurses: how do they fare in the job market?  

PubMed

Accelerated, nontraditional, advanced practice nursing programs are an alternative way to increase the supply of nurse practitioners. This study profiles demographic and job characteristics of second degree, non-nurse college graduates who pursued graduate degrees in nursing. Graduates' sex, age, income, previous education, nursing experience, factors describing the scope of the advanced practice role, and quality of the educational experience were studied. Data were collected from 29 graduates (57%) from Virginia Commonwealth University's accelerated second-degree nursing program from 1995 through 1999. The findings have implications for nursing educators, health care administrators, employers, and other persons who plan and recruit for this type of nursing education program. PMID:11044296

White, K R; Wax, W A; Berrey, A L

2000-01-01

132

Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Nursing Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes the types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours encountered by nursing students in their final year of nursing education. Six hundred thirty-six respondents reported encountering at least one bullying behaviour from School of Nursing (SON) Faculty during one year of classroom or clinical course work. The results of…

Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.; McNair, Mary

2011-01-01

133

Toward a Grounded Theory of Nursing Student Attrition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attrition of students from a nursing program is a significant concern. It is even more critical now because there are not enough nurses to fill all open positions in the healthcare industry. It is predicted the shortage will worsen in the next decade as an aging society increases the number of people requiring nursing care. While increasing the…

Cook, Lenora

2010-01-01

134

Students' Perceptions of Ideal and Nursing Career Choices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental group of high school students viewed a video and presentation on nursing careers. Responses from 260 experimentals and 87 controls (of 450) showed that both groups wanted more appreciation, money, safety, and power than they thought nursing provided. The presentation did have some effect on changing attitudes toward nursing

Tomey, Ann Marriner; And Others

1996-01-01

135

Learning Styles of Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Attitudes toward Theory-Based Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The personal and environmental factors related to undergraduate and post-RN nursing students' attitudes toward theory-based nursing from Kolb's experiential learning theory perspective were investigated. Learning style and environmental press perceptions were found to be related to attitudes toward theory-based nursing. (Author/MLW)

Laschinger, Heather K.; Boss, Marvin K.

1989-01-01

136

Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Aging among Nursing and Non-Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasing life expectancies and more years spent living with chronic illnesses mean that increasing numbers of older adults will require nursing care. However, most nurses prefer not to work with older adults, and many nursing students have limited knowledge and negative attitudes towards aging and older adults. This study examined the knowledge…

Flood, Meredith Troutman; Clark, Robert B.

2009-01-01

137

Psychometric Features of The Nursing Information Use Scale With A Sample of Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract n this paper the researchers report the psychometric,parameters for the Nursing Information Use Scale (NIUS) which measures use of information sources in clinical practice. The primary study aimed to determine whether providing nursing students a handheld, computer-based nursing information system improved use of information sources and clinical learning outcomes (stress, computer attitudes and competence) (Jamiesonet al.). On recruitment into

M. Loretta Secco; Barb Jamieson; Sheila Profit; Judy Bailey; Debbie Brennick; Joanne Whitty-Rodgers; Allene MacIsaac

138

Nursing staff and nursing students' emotions towards homosexual patients and their wish to refrain from nursing, if the option existed.  

PubMed

Studies have reported that homosexual patients fear they will not receive adequate care if they openly show their sexual orientation, for example, when introducing their partner. The aims of this study were to investigate the emotions of nursing staff and nursing students, and possible relations to cultural background and gender, towards homosexual patients; whether nursing staff and nursing students would choose to refrain from nursing homosexual patients, if the option existed; and, if so, how they express their wish to refrain from nursing this group of patients. All participants received verbal and written information before the study started. Returning a completed questionnaire indicated a participant's tacit consent. Approval was obtained from the heads of departments and persons in charge of nursing and nursing assistant programmes. The study had a descriptive, comparative design, and an Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) and specially designed Nursing Behaviour Questionnaire (NBQ) were used. The participants included nurses and assistant nurses from an infectious disease clinic, and students enrolled in a university nursing programme and upper secondary assistant nurses' training, all in central Sweden. The findings showed that both professional nursing staff (response rate 67%, n = 57), and students (response rate 62%, n = 165), expressed emotions of homophobic anger, homophobic guilt and delight. Groups with a cultural background other than Swedish expressed more homophobia. No gender differences were indicated for homophobic emotions. In the professional group, 36% would refrain from nursing for homosexual patients if given the option. The corresponding figure for the students was 9%. The limitations were that the sample was small and not randomly selected, and as participation was anonymous no follow-up could be done. It was concluded that the emotional factors of homosexual anger and homosexual guilt might be of value in helping to explain and predict attitudes towards homosexuals. PMID:15005660

Röndahl, Gerd; Innala, Sune; Carlsson, Marianne

2004-03-01

139

Nursing Students' Perceptions of a Holistic Nursing ConferenceEmpowerment, Self-Care, and Application to Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe nursing students' perceptions of their experiences at the 2007 annual conference of the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA), and identify benefits of professional conference attendance as an educational strategy for undergraduate nursing students. Method: Sixteen nursing students attended the 2007 AHNA annual conference and made daily journal entries about their perceptions

Glenda Christiaens; JoAnn Abegglen; Alanna Rowley

2008-01-01

140

Recruitment and retention of scholarship recipient nursing students and staff.  

PubMed

Few problems are more relevant in health care today than nurse recruitment and retention. The purpose of this study was to identify job satisfaction factors for nurse and nursing student education scholarship recipients, as well as examine the relationship of these factors to the intent to complete contractual agreements. Findings revealed that job satisfaction and a positive image of nursing were influential factors in intent to complete contractual agreements. Results may prove valuable information to recruit nursing students and increase job satisfaction. PMID:22718670

Tucker, Susan K; Sherrod, Roy A

2011-01-01

141

Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future. PMID:24093735

Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

2013-10-01

142

Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students  

PubMed Central

Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme.

Procter, Paula M

2012-01-01

143

An Epidemiological Approach to Addressing Student Attrition in Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In place of Tinto's model of student retention, an epidemiological approach is recommended for nursing education. It includes primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions for preventing student attrition. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

Wells, Marcia I.

2003-01-01

144

School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

2010-01-01

145

Identification of Gifted and Accelerated Hispanic Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sixty-five Hispanic students (average age 9.9 years) were evaluated for placement in a gifted/accelerated program. Of the five standardized tests administered, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (Revised) identified the highest proportion of gifted/accelerated students; the Otis-Lennon School Ability Test and reading achievement scores…

Ortiz, Vincente; Volkoff, William

1987-01-01

146

Promoting self-confidence in clinical nursing students.  

PubMed

Clinical nursing instructors are continually telling their students that they just need more confidence. But how do students find this needed confidence and how can nursing instructors help them? The author discusses sources and principles of confidence in relationship to teaching behaviors and strategies for increasing self-confidence, such as simulations, peer modeling, story telling, skill review sessions, and journaling. PMID:18317322

Lundberg, Karen M

2008-01-01

147

Nursing students motivation toward their studies – a survey study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. METHODS: A

Kerstin EL Nilsson; Margareta I Warrén Stomberg

2008-01-01

148

The influence of a baccalaureate program on traditional, RN-BSN, and accelerated students' critical thinking abilities.  

PubMed

Although there are multiple ways of achieving baccalaureate-level nursing education, all graduates must demonstrate critical thinking abilities to practice competently. The purpose of this study was to measure the changes in critical thinking abilities of students pursuing various pathways in the same baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Traditional, registered nurse-bachelor of science (RN-BSN), and accelerated students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA) at the beginning and end of their nursing course sequence. Findings revealed a significant difference between the pre- and post-WGCTA scores of traditional students (t = -2.84, P = .007) and RN-BSN students (t = -2.28, P = .029), but not of accelerated students. Similarities between the curricular pathways that could account for the results were analyzed. Further research is needed to determine the best combination of liberal arts and nursing courses for the development of critical thinking abilities. PMID:12120110

Brown, J M; Alverson, E M; Pepa, C A

2001-04-01

149

Success of Underrepresented Nursing Students at Selected Southwest Institutions: Impact of a Nursing Retention Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined retention initiatives and strategies provided to underserved students in the nursing programs at three community colleges in the Southwest region. This research addressed nursing student retention, as well as ways to increase retention among underrepresented populations in the three community colleges, representing a unique…

Khattab, Ibrahim

2011-01-01

150

Student Nurses' Conceptions of Internationalisation in General and as an Essential Part of Swedish Nurses' Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to describe student nurses' conceptions of internationalisation. Firstly this is done in terms of what they themselves conceive as important and related to internationalisation. Secondly, student nurses' conceptions of internationalisation are described in terms of how they experience internationalisation in their…

Wihlborg, Monne

2004-01-01

151

Preparing faculty and students for an international nursing education experience.  

PubMed

As society becomes increasingly globalized, it is imperative to include international educational perspectives in the nursing profession. This article shares experiences of a university and hospital in facilitating education of students of nursing from India. It includes implementing partnerships, student selection process, and transcultural considerations. These considerations include faculty preparation for receiving students from India. In addition, ways to prepare Indian and U.S. students are examined. PMID:16479846

Robinson, Kim; Sportsman, Susan; Eschiti, Valerie S; Bradshaw, Pam; Bol, Todd

2006-01-01

152

Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.  

PubMed

In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight. PMID:22908430

Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

2012-01-01

153

Female Arab-Muslim nursing students' reentry transitions.  

PubMed

As nursing students are increasingly studying abroad and returning to their home countries to practice, it is important to identify international nursing students' reentry transition to understand their reentry needs. Phenomenological inquiry was used to describe the reentry experience of seven Omani nurses after studying in the United States. The nurses' reentry experience was influenced by the personal and professional transformation from studying abroad and included themes of adaptation to cultural differences and service to themselves, their profession, and their nation. These nurses returned home to resume previous roles; they were changed and this required them to redefine and adapt to their roles within their families and workplace. Nurses returning from international study could benefit from a formal reentry program to assist their transition to family, community, and professional life and to enhance the nurses' contribution from their international education. PMID:23832951

McDermott-Levy, Ruth

2013-01-01

154

[The application of student-centered teaching to nursing education].  

PubMed

Nursing education in Taiwan is currently facing an extensive reform toward student-centeredness. However, few articles were found in the Taiwanese nursing literature focusing on student-centered teaching and nurse educators in Taiwan may have different interpretations of it. Misinterpretation of the term 'student-centeredness' may lead educational reform into inconsistency or ineffectiveness. This study aims to expand student-centered teaching's application to nursing education, stressing that not only the teaching techniques but also a consistent thinking approach is essential for educational reform. The content of this article addresses the meaning of student-centeredness and the differences between teacher-centeredness and student-centeredness. The article also advocates Weimers' five key changes toward student-centered teaching: the balance of power, the function of content, the role of the teacher, the responsibility for learning, and the purpose and process of evaluation, and further expounds their application to nursing education. Hopefully this article can provide Taiwanese nursing educators and students with an explicit view of student-centeredness and facilitate a more effective application of it to educational reform in nursing. PMID:17160871

Chien, Li-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Ping

2006-12-01

155

Faculty practice and roles of staff nurses and clinical faculty in nursing student learning.  

PubMed

The perceptions of staff nurses and clinical nurse faculty on the roles they play in nursing student learning were examined. The study also sought to explore how faculty practice status affected these perceived roles. Nursing schools with generic baccalaureate nursing programs in the middle Atlantic region composed the study population. A convenience sample of two schools that expected their undergraduate clinical faculty to engage in faculty practice and two schools that did not expect faculty practice participated in the study. Clinical faculty members (15) and nursing education administrators (4) from each school participated, as well as staff nurses (22) and nursing service administrators (4) from each school's related hospital. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted. Manifest and latent content analyses were used to examine the issues. Staff nurses who worked with practicing faculty reported fewer instances of role overload, conflict, and ambiguity than when they worked with nonpracticing faculty. Lack of clear communication and delineation of expectations among administrators, staff, faculty, and students were cited as major factors in perceived role problems. Administrators, faculty, and staff nurses viewed high student/faculty ratios as a causative factor in the faculty's inability to meet all teaching objectives with students. PMID:12748932

Langan, Joanne C

2003-01-01

156

Nursing student-patient relationships: a descriptive study of students' and patients' views.  

PubMed

This study was designed to describe and compare nursing students' and patients' perceptions of the relationship between students and patients. The data was collected in Finland from a convenience sample of nursing students (n=290) and patients (n=242) using questionnaires especially designed for this study. The results indicated that students viewed the relationship as more authoritative and facilitative, while patients regarded the relationship as more mechanistic. Furthermore, students' and patients' views on their relationships differed significantly. These results have important implications for nursing education. They particularly highlight the need to further strengthen nursing student-patient interactions and relationships. PMID:18384273

Suikkala, Arja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko

2008-01-01

157

Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings. PMID:22616410

Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

2012-01-01

158

Intuition in Nursing Practice: Sharing Graduate Students' Exemplars with Undergraduate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graduate nursing students (n=21) wrote descriptions of how they used intuition in clinical practice. Undergraduates in a nursing research course used these exemplars to learn about content analysis and develop their own intuitive thinking. (SK)

Beck, Cheryl Tatano

1998-01-01

159

From Student to RN. A Report of the Nurse Career - Pattern Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study initiated in 1962 by the National League for Nursing to obtain information about the characteristics of nursing students, their occupational goals, their reasons for choosing nursing as a career, and the relation of these variables to the students...

L. Knopf

1972-01-01

160

Stimulating student interest in nursing research: a program pairing students with practicing clinician researchers.  

PubMed

Teaching nursing research to baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students can be challenging for nurse educators. The content of research courses often is dry and seemingly irrelevant to BSN students who are focused on more concrete tasks, such as passing clinical and academic courses. Through our search for creative ways to bring energy, excitement, passion, purpose, and reality to students' views of nursing research, we designed a program in which hospital nurses involved in clinical research projects mentored students in the clinical environment. Students were asked to perform literature reviews, collect and analyze data, and help with poster presentations. Student evaluations at the end of the program were positive, and analysis of pretest and posttest scores indicated student interest in nursing research increased significantly (p = 0.00). PMID:19441637

Kennel, Susan; Burns, Suzanne; Horn, Heather

2009-04-01

161

A Pilot Study To Measure the Caring Efficacy of Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of the Coates Caring Efficacy Scale for 193 preentry to final-semester nursing students indicated that mean scores were higher than in Coates' sample of novice student nurses. Students were able to articulate the role of caring in nursing. Even preentry students scored well, suggesting that factors other than nursing education contribute…

Sadler, Judith

2003-01-01

162

Development of Critical Thinking: Career Ladder P.N. and A.D. Nursing Students, Pre-Health Science Freshmen, Generic Baccalaureate Sophomore Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study compared career ladder practical nursing (PN) and associate degree (AD) nursing students with their university counterparts with regard to the development of critical thinking over an academic year. The sample included 55 PN students, 55 AD students, 38 pre-health science freshmen, and 29 generic baccalaureate sophomore nursing students.…

Kintgen-Andrews, Jean

163

BLAST model: an innovative approach to prepare second-degree accelerated BSN students for inpatient psychiatric clinical experiences.  

PubMed

This article describes the design, development, and implementation of an innovative teaching/learning model involving integration of classroom teaching, clinical simulation, and debriefing/critical thinking to prepare accelerated baccalaureate nursing students for clinical practice experiences in the inpatient psychiatric setting. Lessons learned and future directions for simulation experiences involving standardized patient scenarios in undergraduate psychiatric nursing education are shared. PMID:23394963

Lang, Carol S; Hahn, Joyce A

2013-03-01

164

Teaching spiritual care to nursing students:an integrated model.  

PubMed

Graduating nurses are required to know how to support patient spiritual well-being, yet there is scant literature about how spiritual care is taught in undergraduate programs. Typically spiritual content only is sporadically included; the authors recommend intergrating spiritual can thoughout the nursing curriculum. This article describes how one Christian nursing school integrates spiritual care content, supports student spiritual well-being throughout the program, and evaluates spiritual care instruction at graduation. PMID:24693611

Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Testerman, Nancy; Hart, Dynnette

2014-01-01

165

The relationship between leadership styles and empathy among student nurses.  

PubMed

Much of the nursing literature on leadership describes the qualities of existing nursing leaders, while emphasizing the need for leadership development in student nurses for both managerial and clinical practice. However, there is a lack of research literature on the characteristics of current students. Conducted by the University of Tennessee College of Nursing Empathy Research Group, this pilot study explores the relationship between leadership styles and empathy (cognitive and affective) levels. This correlational descriptive study involved self-report using 3 instruments. Hogan Empathy Scale (HES) and Emotional Empathy Tendency Scale (EETS) measured cognitive and affective empathy levels. The Multifactoral Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ-5x) was used to determine leadership style. Data analysis yielded evidence of a weak positive correlation between the predominant transformational leadership style and empathy levels in both junior and senior students. This correlation has implications for both nurse educators and future employers. PMID:17678685

Gunther, Mary; Evans, Ginger; Mefford, Linda; Coe, Thomas R

2007-01-01

166

Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance edu- cation nursing programs were interviewed. Interview transcripts were examined using content analysis. Kanter's theory was useful in describing empowerment structures

Elizabeth A. Ledwell; Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn; Carroll L. Iwasiw

167

Problems with competence assessment as it applies to student nurses.  

PubMed

Nursing has enthusiastically embraced the concept of continuing competence as the key means of reassuring the public of the overall quality of the profession. There are many definitions of competence and a number of nursing regulatory bodies have put into operation, a definition which is reductionist rather then holistic in nature. Not surprisingly, and as a consequence many nurses, including nurse educators, think competence comprises a number of key competencies which can be isolated, accumulated and tallied. It is clear that both philosophically and practically these notions of competence have influenced the way that student nurses are currently educated. More specifically it is in preparation for their initial entry to practice that the approach to competence assessment of student nurses becomes problematic. In this paper it will be argued that the principles of continuing competence assessment, associated with the on going competence of experienced registered nurses, do not readily translate to students who are still in the process of learning. We suggest that solutions to this problem are three-fold and can be found by replicating for the student the conditions that apply to the assessment of continuing competence for registered nurses. PMID:22770776

Gallagher, Peter; Smith, Trish; Ousey, Karen

2012-11-01

168

Enabling Student Nurses to Use the Information Superhighway.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty nursing graduate students in an Internet-based course were compared with 23 who did not take the course. The former were more likely to be connected to nursing networks, used Internet-based health information in practice, used computer skills for other classes, and understood the relevance of telemedicine. (SK)

Bachman, Jean A.; Panzarine, Susan

1998-01-01

169

Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance education nursing programs were interviewed.…

Ledwell, Elizabeth; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll

2006-01-01

170

Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

2003-01-01

171

Effect of psychiatric clinical learning site on nursing students' attitudes toward mental illness and psychiatric nursing.  

PubMed

As a component of an undergraduate nursing program evaluation, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the psychiatric clinical learning site on students' attitudes toward mental illness and psychiatric nursing. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was utilized. The dependent measures included an Environmental Rating Scale, an Attitude Toward Mental Illness Scale, and an Attitude Toward Psychiatric Nursing Scale. The non-probability sample of convenience included 45 students enrolled in the senior level psychiatric nursing module of a baccalaureate nursing program at a midwest, metropolitan liberal arts college. The subjects were randomly assigned to a Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center and a private hospital. The results indicated that after controlling for students' attitudes toward mental illness and psychiatric nursing prior to the psychiatric nursing module, clinical site location did not account for any significant variance in students' attitudes after the module. However, correlation analysis of the specific components of the Environmental Rating Scale did demonstrate statistically significant associations with a decrease in authoritative, restrictive attitudes toward mental illness, and an increase in the milieu therapy and community mental health orientations to psychiatric nursing. PMID:2156976

Slimmer, L W; Wendt, A; Martinkus, D

1990-03-01

172

"You Have to Know Why": The Influence of Different Curricula on Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need in modern healthcare for professionals who are self-directed and autonomous has increased in recent decades. Problem-based learning is spreading in nursing education as one strategy for meeting these demands. This article deals with the relationship between the design and execution of nursing education curricula and students'…

Fredholm Nilsson, Angelica; Silen, Charlotte

2010-01-01

173

Extension of Study of Student Selection Processes in Schools of Nursing. (Entry into Nursing).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The final report on student selection processes in schools of nursing and on alternate paths taken by applicants is presented. Data are derived from surveys of 1439 nursing schools, 20 site visits with in-depth interviews, and a survey of over 2,400 appli...

1978-01-01

174

Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.  

PubMed

This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status. PMID:18706741

Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

2009-01-01

175

Involvement of Nursing Students in Unethical Classroom and Clinical Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study to determine the incidence of unethical classroom and clinical behaviors among nursing students, to find out their opinions, and to investigate the relationships among demographic data, unethical behaviors and opinions about the behaviors is discussed. (Author/MLW)

Hilbert, Gail A.

1985-01-01

176

Collaborative Learning Experiences for Nursing Students in Environmental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An environmental health learning experience involved collaborative activities of graduate public health and undergraduate nursing students. Pre/postcourse measures (n=31) showed increased awareness of issues and competence in interdisciplinary teamwork. (Contains 13 references.) (SK)

Wright, Dolores J.

2003-01-01

177

Renegotiating Institutional Power Relationships to Better Serve Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of a college nursing program reveals the politics of planning in higher education and the need to be aware of power relations, negotiated interests, and ethical issues in order to effect meaningful change for students. (SK)

Hendricks, Susan M.

1996-01-01

178

Levels of Stress and Academic Performance in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparison of 39 nursing students in an old program with 62 in the first year of a new baccalaureate program showed the former experienced more stress and did not perceive the program as challenging. Academic gains of new-program students were not as significant as those of old-program students. (SK)

Gwele, Nonthandazo Sylvia; Uys, Leana Ria

1998-01-01

179

"I Was Actually a Nurse": The Meaning of Professionalism for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a phenomenological study, 69 nursing students discussed their experience of being professional, which was grounded in their concept of self and others. Three interrelated figural themes emerged from this ground: belonging, knowing, and affirmation. (SK)

Secrest, Janet A.; Norwood, Barbara R.; Keatley, Virginia M.

2003-01-01

180

Textbook treatments and students' understanding of acceleration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The ways in which the concept of acceleration is treated in physics textbooks is compared with understandings of the concept demonstrated by final-year secondary (n=30) and first-year university students (n=60). Some students' understandings are shown to be incomplete in ways that parallel misleading or inaccurate textbook treatment of the concept.

Dall'Alba, Gloria

2006-05-23

181

Early identification of at-risk nursing students: a student support model.  

PubMed

Due to the shortage of nurses in the health care industry, colleges offering associate-degree nursing programs are beginning to pay more attention to attrition and the factors contributing to success. Alogistic regression model was used to explain the cognitive and noncognitive variables that contribute to success in a nursing fundamentals course. Although much work is necessary to fully understand first-semester nursing students' retention and success, an early identification model is explored to better support students as they enter associate-degree nursing programs. PMID:18557312

Hopkins, T Hampton

2008-06-01

182

Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions regarding factors that affect math abilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of math abilities, factors that affect math abilities, the use of math in nursing, and the extent to which specific math skills were addressed throughout a nursing curriculum. Polya’s Model for Problem Solving and the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Affective Domain served as the theoretical background for the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to obtain data from a purposive sample of undergraduate nursing students from a private university in western Pennsylvania. Participants were selected based on the proficiency level with math skills, as determined by a score on the Elsevier’s HESI™ Admission Assessment (A2) Exam, Math Portion. Ten students from the “Excellent” benchmark group and eleven students from the “Needing Additional Assistance or Improvement” benchmark group participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, and completed a 25-item, 4-point Likert scale survey that rated confidence levels with specific math skills and the extent to which these skills were perceived to be addressed in the nursing curriculum. Responses from the two benchmark groups were compared and contrasted. Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Findings related to mathematical approach and confidence levels with specific math skills were determined to be statistically significant.

Pyo, Katrina A.

183

Gradually Guiding Nursing Students through Their Capstone Course: Registered Nurse Preceptors Share Their Experiences  

PubMed Central

Professional precepted immersion courses (capstone) have become the standard as a means to prepare senior nursing students to enter the workforce. Preceptors have a significant role in developing the student nurse, yet exactly how to prepare preceptors for this role has been an ongoing discussion. This qualitative inquiry explored the educational needs of clinical registered nurse (RN) preceptors who work directly with senior nursing students in a professional precepted immersion (capstone) course. A descriptive qualitative design was used to examine preceptors responses to a prepared set of questions about their educational needs. Results showed that preceptors have three distinct sets of learning needs: the need to know the expectations of their role, wanting to know how best to role model for the student, and knowing how to socialize the student into the profession of nursing. Overall, preceptors communicated their desire and commitment to doing the best job possible. They also clearly stated their expectation of faculty to have a physical presence on the nursing unit that included being proactive in resolving mismatches and exposing the student to the roles of provider of care, leader and manager of care, and member of profession.

Martin, David L.; Brewer, M. Kathleen; Barr, Nancy

2011-01-01

184

Commencing nursing students' perceptions and anxiety of bioscience.  

PubMed

It is known that bioscience is perceived to be difficult and causes anxiety within undergraduate nursing students; yet, commencing students' perceptions of bioscience is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain incoming students' perceptions, knowledge and approaches to learning bioscience. Incoming students to the Bachelor of Nursing completed a questionnaire prior to undertaking bioscience. Two hundred and seventy three students completed the questionnaire that explored their expectations, preconceptions of bioscience content, approaches to learning bioscience, and relationship to clinical practice in the context of biosciences. Participant ages ranged from 17 to 53 (mean 23 years), and 78% of students had completed at least one secondary school science subject, of which 60% had studied biology. Overall, students' preconceptions included anxiety about studying bioscience, bioscience being difficult and harder than nursing subjects, and that more content will be required for bioscience than nursing subjects. Analysis using ANOVA revealed the relationships for secondary school science and age on student responses. A significant effect of secondary school science was found for science in school being advantageous for bioscience (p=0.010), understanding what bioscience entails (p=0.002), needing to study science prior to the start of the semester (p=0.009), and that bioscience is considered difficult (p=0.029). A significant effect of age was found for exams being more difficult than other assessments (p=0.000) and for being able to see the relevance of nursing when reaching the workplace (p=0.011). The findings also indicated that perceptions and associated anxieties related to bioscience were present in commencing students, similar to those which have been reported previously in established student groups. This strongly suggests that the faculty should attempt to dispel preconceptions about bioscience and target improved supports to facilitate the transition of students into the commencement of bioscience for nursing students. PMID:23182891

Craft, Judy; Hudson, Peter; Plenderleith, Mark; Wirihana, Lisa; Gordon, Christopher

2013-11-01

185

Evaluation of Makaton in practice by children's nursing students.  

PubMed

The number of service users with communication difficulties is increasing. Training in the use of alternative communication and aids, such as Makaton, is valuable and should be made available. to nurses and other healthcare professionals, in particular to students in the first year of their nursing degree. Early introduction of Makaton could encourage staff to be proactive in their communication skills throughout their career and inspire other workers to learn the same techniques. The author discusses the evaluation and use of basic signing in Makaton following a session for children's nursing students at one UK university. PMID:23691900

Vinales, James Jude

2013-04-01

186

Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p < 0.05) was found between nursing students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses. PMID:23166146

Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

2013-06-01

187

U.S. Army Survey of Registered Nurses and the U.S. Army Survey of Nursing Students: Methodology and Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report details the methodology of and preliminary results from surveys of registered nurses (RNs) and nursing students. Representative samples of each were selected and their attitudes toward various aspects of nursing, and military nursing in partic...

P. F. Ramsberger J. D. Barnes A. S. DiFazio R. Tiggle

1995-01-01

188

Comparing the Effect Upon Students Who Are Taught Nursing Math in the Classroom with Students Who Do Not Experience the Nursing Math Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This ex-post facto, quasi-experimental study was conducted to determine whether students taught nursing math in the classroom did better than students who did not take the nursing math course in the classroom. First-year students enrolled in the Long Beach City College Associate Degree Nursing Program were selected as the treatment sample. Thirty…

Harrell, Brenda McCane

189

Nursing students' spiritual well-being, spirituality and spiritual care  

PubMed Central

Background: Spiritual care should be considered an important part of holistic and multidisciplinary care and it has not been given much importance so far. We should begin with student nurses, who will soon be clinicians, to find out about potentiality of the nursing profession to put spiritual care into practice. Little has been known about spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives among nursing students. In this study, a comparison has been made in spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives between the first and fourth year baccalaureate nursing students. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive–comparative study that was carried out among 283 nursing students. All the students were Iranians studying in the universities of Iran, Tehran, and Shahid Beheshti medical sciences. They volunteered to participate in the study. There were 105 first year students and 178 fourth year students. The questionnaires used were on Spiritual Well-being (SWB) Scale, Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), and Nursing Spiritual Care Perspective Scale (NSCPS). The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software, version 10. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (distribution frequency, mean, and standard deviation). Mann–Whitney test was to compare each item and independent t-test to compare the mean values of two groups. Results: Regarding spiritual well-being, there were no significant differences between the two groups. 98.8% of the first year students and 100% of the fourth year students were in the category of moderate spiritual well-being. Neither were there any significant differences between the two groups in spiritual perspective and spiritual care perspectives. Conclusions: The scores of fourth year nursing students were similar to those of first year students in spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives, though the fourth year students had already undergone 4-year nursing course. Including spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing students’ courses will add to their understanding and provision of spiritual care. This will fill the present gap evident in the system in Iran. At present, the educational system here does not make use of spiritual care as part of its comprehensive curriculum.

Abbasi, Mojgan; Farahani-Nia, Marhamat; Mehrdad, Neda; givari, Azam; Haghani, Hamid

2014-01-01

190

Jordanian undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of effective clinical teachers.  

PubMed

Clinical teaching is a dynamic process that occurs in a variety of sociocultural contexts. The quality of student-teacher interaction in the clinical field can either facilitate or hinder the students' learning in the clinical area. This paper presents the results of a study to explore Jordanian undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of effective clinical teacher characteristics. The results showed that overall, the nursing students rated the professional competence of the clinical teacher as the most important characteristic, which when compared to the Western population was different. When male and female nursing students' perceptions were compared, no significant differences were found. However, responses of nursing students from the three academic years differed significantly in that second-year students rated the clinical teachers' relationship with students as most important and fourth-year students rated personal qualities of the clinical teachers as most important. The results were significant in that they were congruent with the students' level of education and most importantly, their cultural beliefs and values about education. PMID:10855143

Nahas, V L; Nour, V; al-Nobani, M

1999-11-01

191

Using the Hidden Curriculum to Teach Professionalism in Nursing Students  

PubMed Central

Background: Professionalism in nursing is critical for creating credibility and a positive image. Objectives: This study was carried out to explain the use of hidden curriculum in teaching professionalism in nursing students. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted through purposeful sampling strategy by the participation of 32 nursing students. The data were collected by using semi-structured interviews, and this process was continued until achieving data saturation and themes’ emergence. Content analysis method was used for data analysis. Results: Data analysis revealed three main themes: Development of understanding the professionalism elements, Variety of influenceability strategies, and Influenceability to various resources. Each theme consisted of some subthemes. Conclusions: The nursing students learnt the professionalism elements by different methods from different resources through the hidden curriculum. Therefore, exploration of the currently administered hidden curricula is suggested.

Karimi, Zohreh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Mohammadi, Easa; Abedi, Heidar Ali

2014-01-01

192

The Impact of a Reflective Thinking Intervention on Nursing Students in a Child and Family Nursing Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the ever-changing healthcare systems, nursing students need to think at a high level by applying their knowledge from theory to the clinical setting by prioritizing, delegating, and problem solving to provide safe, competent, quality nursing care. Using action research, nursing students participated in R.A.V.E. (Reflective Thinking Allows…

Becherer, Vicky H.

2011-01-01

193

Student perceptions of team learning in nursing education.  

PubMed

Nurse educators are challenged to find instructional methods that actively engage learners and help students understand concepts for application in practice situations. During the 2003-2004 academic year, faculty implemented team learning in a first-semester clinical nursing course in a baccalaureate nursing program at a Research I state university in the southwestern United States. Team learning engages small groups in learning tasks that require problem solving and decision making. Student perceptions about team learning were evaluated using classroom observations and interviews. The results verified that team learning predominantly promotes learner-to-learner engagement and indicated that students struggled with application problems that had several plausible answers yet recognized the relevance to clinical practice. Students appreciated the need for increased individual accountability for learning and identified value in learning through discussion, both characteristics inherent to team learning. Students were concerned about their team learning grade and its dependence on group performance. PMID:18522153

Feingold, Carol E; Cobb, Martha D; Givens, Raquel Hernandez; Arnold, Joanna; Joslin, Sarah; Keller, Jill Leslie

2008-05-01

194

Barriers to Increasing Native Hawaiian, Samoan, and Filipino Nursing Students: Perceptions of Students and Their Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of parents, high school students, and community members (n=92) and focus groups with 34 current and potential nursing students indicate that Asian Pacific Islanders are composed of distinct groups that have diverse concerns. Results suggest ways to increase the recruitment and retention of native Hawaiian, Filipino, and Samoan nursing

Harrigan, Rosanne C.; Gollin, Lisa X.; Casken, John

2003-01-01

195

Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

Mister, Brenda J.

196

Occupational Choice, Career Plans, Work-Values and Work Orientations of Nursing Students.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study examines the occupational choice, career plans, work values, and work orientations of 632 nursing students enrolled in ten nursing schools in Maine. Data collected in 1969 indicated that: Most respondents made the decision to enter nursing at an...

B. S. Bolaria S. B. Williams

1970-01-01

197

Chinese baccalaureate nursing students' readiness for self-directed learning.  

PubMed

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 536 Chinese nursing students to explore students' readiness for self-directed learning (SDL). The Self-Directed Learning Readiness (SDLR) Scale for nursing education (Chinese translation version) was used. The value of the content validity index tested by five experts was 0.915. A measure of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.925 on the total scale. Students possessed readiness for SDL with a mean score of 157.72 (S.D.=15.08, 62.3% in high level, and 37.7% in low level). The attributes of Chinese students, such as a strong sense of responsibility and perseverance, due diligence and rigorous self-discipline, enable students to take the initiative and responsibility for their own learning. The existing variation in students' readiness for SDL is helpful in identifying student characteristics that might be used to modify learning activities for these students. Senior students had higher scores for SDLR than junior students. This finding likely reflects the maturational process of developing self-directedness. Promoting SDL skills is a challenging process for faculty members and students. It is helpful if nurse educators assess the learning styles and preferences of their students in order to determine the level of SDL activities to include from year to year in the curriculum. PMID:21458116

Yuan, Hao Bin; Williams, Beverly A; Fang, Jin Bo; Pang, Dong

2012-05-01

198

Changes in Taiwanese nursing student values during the educational experience.  

PubMed

Professional values are standards for action and provide a framework for evaluating behavior. This study examined changes in the professional values of nursing students between their entrance to and graduation from an undergraduate nursing program. A pre- and post-test design was employed. A convenience sample of 94 students from a university in Taiwan was surveyed. Data were collected from students during the sophomore and senior years. Total scores obtained for the revised Nurses Professional Values Scale during the senior year of the nursing program were significantly higher than upon program entry. The 'caring' subscale was scored highest at both program entry and graduation, but the pre- and post-test scores were not significantly different from each other. The students scored significantly higher on the 'professionalism' and 'activism' subscales at post-test than they did at pre-test. Professional values changed in a positive direction between the beginning of the student nurses' educational experience and their graduation. The results supported the premise that education had a positive effect on these students' professional values but causality could not be assumed. PMID:20801966

Lin, Yu-Hua; Liching Sung Wang; Yarbrough, Susan; Alfred, Danita; Martin, Pam

2010-09-01

199

Nursing students motivation toward their studies - a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. Methods A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. Results The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0–10) and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315) with motivation score <4 reported explanations such as negative opinion about the organisation of the programme, attitude towards the studies, life situation and degree of difficulty/demand on studies. Students (234/315) with motivation score >6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234), organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8) and female (6.8) students. Conclusion Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

Nilsson, Kerstin EL; Warren Stomberg, Margareta I

2008-01-01

200

Are we preparing student nurses for final practice placement?  

PubMed

The aims of this research were to illuminate student nurses' perceptions of preparedness for final practice placement, and to ascertain factors that supported and hindered preparation for final placement practice. This phenomenological qualitative research was carried out in a UK higher education institution (HEI) with eight adult branch student nurses maintaining written diaries for the first 4 weeks of their final 10-week practice placement. Data were then analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA). Results showed that students felt ill-prepared for placement. Eight clear themes emerged, including: being used as 'an extra pair of hands'; mentors appearing to treat student practice documentation as unimportant; and high staff expectations. Other themes were: mentor importance; students feeling that they lacked knowledge; and students feeling unsupported and stressed. In conclusion, although students felt that they lacked knowledge and were used as an extra pair of hands, they did show clinical competence. PMID:24851915

Morrell, Nicola; Ridgway, Victoria

201

Self-esteem and Stress Coping among Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing Students in Nursing Campus Maharajgunj and Lalitpur Nursing Campu.  

PubMed

Background: Nursing requires high self-esteem and effective coping strategies for the quality of health services that they deliver. Self -esteem and stress coping mechanism developed during education period is foundation for professional practice. So, this study was conducted to identify self-esteem, coping activities, and their relationship. Methods: Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among 287 PCL nursing students currently studying in different level in nursing campuses of the Institute of Medicine during June and July 2013. Self administered semi structured questionnaire and rating scales were used for the data collection. Results: Findings showed that 21 (7.31%), 194 (67.5%), and 67 (23.34%), students had have very high, high and moderate, self-esteem and only five (1.74%) have low self-esteem.The difference in self-esteem level was insignificant with the level of the students. Students most frequently used problem focused (3.36±0.54) followed by emotion focused (3.04±0.45) and avoidance coping activities (2.91±0.63). The relationship of use of coping activities and level of students was statistically insignificant. Self-esteem level had positive relation with problem focused and emotion focused coping activities (Pearson r: 0.114 and 0.118), though the correlation was significant with emotion focused coping activities only.Bicytopenia and pancytopenia were seen in two cases each of myelodysplastic syndrome. Chronic myeloid leukemia and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma showed anemia and pancytopenia respectively. Conclusions: Majority of PCL nursing students have high level of self-esteem. They used problem focused coping activities most however, use of it decreased with increased level of students. Students with high self -esteem used problem focused followed by emotion focused coping activities. Students should be encouraged to use problem focused coping activities. Keywords: PCL nursing students; self-esteem;stress coping. PMID:24908532

Shrestha, T

2013-09-01

202

[The corporality of the client according to nursing students representations].  

PubMed

This study based on the theory of the Social Representation that subsidized the apprehension and analysis of how nursing students had perceived and represented the body of their clients and the emergent subjectives of contact and relation of taking care. It was carried with 20 female students of four grades of the nursing faculty of the UNIFESP The data were obtained using interview and analysed by content analysis method (Categorial Analysis) that showed the following categories: body object, stigmatisation, student-client relationship, body communication, privacy's intrusion and embarrassing. PMID:17469477

de Lima, Renata Campos; Brêtas, José Roberto da Silva

2006-01-01

203

Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

Mayfield, Linda Riggs

2012-01-01

204

Health Promotion and Tobacco Control: Student Nurses' Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews and surveys of 272 Manitoba nursing students yielded 5 themes related to health promotion and tobacco use: identity, central beliefs/attitudes, learning the facts, limited practice options, and role conflict. Students expressed considerable uncertainty about individual autonomy, themselves as role models, and their use of health…

Chalmers, Karen; Seguire, Marilyn; Brown, Judy

2003-01-01

205

Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

2013-01-01

206

Group Experiential Learning with Undergraduate Nursing Students: An Interdisciplinary Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined an interdisciplinary, collaborative experiential group learning approach, in which undergraduate nursing students met in small groups led by counseling doctoral student co-leaders. Statistical analysis suggests that the teaching method lead to learning of group concepts. Discussion addresses anecdotal observations,…

Pistole, M. Carole; Kinyon, Jane; Keith, Cynthia Bozich

2008-01-01

207

Experiences of Transfer Students in a Collaborative Baccalaureate Nursing Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community college students who transfer to universities face innumerable challenges. While documented in the American literature on transfer, there has been relatively little published research on transfer in Canada. This paper explores the experience of nursing students transferring from three community colleges to a large urban university in…

Cameron, Cherylyn

2005-01-01

208

Socializing Students toward a Career in Nursing Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate nursing students at an historically black college were socialized to research in three projects: (1) collaboration with a community coalition on environmental justice, involving a large-scale survey; (2) study of compliance with a health advisory; and (3) 6-week summer immersion at a research university. Many students developed an…

Powell, Dorothy L.; Green, Pauline M.; Slade, Diann S.

2002-01-01

209

42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...audit trail for all transactions. At all times the fund must contain monies representing...capital contribution. The school must at all times maintain all monies relating to... (i) Nursing student loans to full-time or half-time students; (ii)...

2012-10-01

210

Senior Nursing Students Comfort Levels with Computer Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the rationale for investigating the comfort levels in utilizing computer technology by senior level students in a baccalaureate nursing program. Students were surveyed before and after being exposed to various learning activities requiring interaction with computer technology. These structured learning activities included: use…

Draude, Barbara J.; McKinney, Susan H.

211

Second Life ®: A New Strategy in Educating Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to discuss how the University of Michigan School of Nursing designed and implemented a virtual hospital unit in Second Life® to run virtual simulations. Three scenarios were developed about topics that represent areas that contribute to patient safety, as well as key student learning challenges. Fifteen students completed a 6-question survey evaluating their experience.

Michelle Aebersold; Dana Tschannen; Marc Stephens; Patricia Anderson; Xuefeng Lei

212

Chemistry for Student Nurses: Applications-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New chemistry materials were devised for pre university National Certificate (NC) nursing students studying chemistry at a further education college. Previously, preliminary work showed that students felt that the chemistry taught to them was irrelevant, boring and difficult. It was hoped that through an applications-led style curriculum…

El-Farargy, Nancy

2009-01-01

213

Second-career baccalaureate nursing students: a lived experience.  

PubMed

Second-career baccalaureate nursing programs and the students enrolled in them have been a topic of interest since these programs were first introduced into the academic setting in the 1970s. The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to develop an understanding of the meaning of the lived experience of being a second-career baccalaureate nursing student. Five second-career baccalaureate nursing students participated in unstructured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Data analysis was guided by the phenomenological method of van Manen. The themes identified were Questioning One's Place in the World; Seeing One's Place in the World in Another Way; Preparing for the Plunge; Trying Transitions; A Bundle of Emotions; Faculty Control, Student Imbalance; and Almost There and Scared. Implications of this research related to curriculum revision are presented. PMID:17912990

Kohn, Paula Scharf; Truglio-Londrigan, Marie

2007-09-01

214

Comparison of Efficacy and Age Discrimination between Psychology and Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considered two types of age discrimination (youth and elder) and related scale scores for 108 psychology students and 81 nursing students. The current study found that although the nursing students had a significantly larger number of courses related to aging, both nursing and psychology students reported low levels of age…

Karlin, Nancy J.; Emick, Jessica; Mehls, Elizabeth Emick; Murry, Francie R.

2005-01-01

215

[Knowledge and truths about nursing: discourse of new students].  

PubMed

It is a study with a qualitative approach that proposes to analyze truths regimes that pass by and along Nursing as a profession, as manifested by students entering in the Graduate Course 2004/2, 2005/1 and 2005/2. The Discourse Analysis has been used as a methodological option for analyzing the data, under Michel Foucault's approaches. Three great themes have come out of such context of analysis and discussion: the traversing of gender knowledges in Nursing practice; Nursing as a knowledge made hierarchical; making as a might in Nursing's academic and professional day-by-day. Social conceptions became self evident, going through invisible knowledges that legitimate health and nursing practices, making them unquestionable. PMID:18578313

Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; Eidt, Olga Rosaria; Canabarro, Simone; Corbellini, Valéria Lamb; Creutzberg, Marion

2008-01-01

216

Nursing information technology knowledge, skills, and preparation of student nurses, nursing faculty, and clinicians: a U.S. survey.  

PubMed

Because health care delivery increasingly requires timely information for effective decision making, information technology must be integrated into nursing education curricula for all future nurse clinicians and educators. This article reports findings from an online survey of deans and directors of 266 baccalaureate and higher nursing programs in the United States. Approximately half of the programs reported requiring word processing and e-mail skill competency for students entering nursing undergraduate programs. Less than one third of the programs addressed the use of standardized languages or terminologies in nursing and telehealth applications of nursing. One third of the programs cited inclusion of evidence-based practice as part of graduate curricula. Program faculty, who were rated at the "novice" or "advanced beginner" level for teaching information technology content and using information technology tools, are teaching information literacy skills. The southeastern central and Pacific regions of the United States projected the greatest future need for information technology-prepared nurses. Implications for nurse educators and program directors are discussed. PMID:12938896

McNeil, Barbara J; Elfrink, Victoria L; Bickford, Carol J; Pierce, Susan T; Beyea, Suzanne C; Averill, Carolyn; Klappenbach, Cari

2003-08-01

217

Self-esteem and student nurses: a cross-cultural study of nursing students in Thailand and the UK.  

PubMed

Self-esteem is a key feature in a person's perception of their own worth. This report is of a study of the reported self-esteem levels of two groups of student nurses: one in Thailand and one in the UK. Purposive samples of 120 Thai students and 101 UK undergraduate nursing students were given the Culture-Free Self-Esteem Inventory (CFSEI-2). The CFSEI-2 is a self-reported inventory, which measures an individual's perception of self. The findings of the study indicate that the perceptions of own self-esteem in undergraduate student nurses in the UK and in Thailand were comparable to the normal ranges of self-esteem as assessed by the instrument. An independent sample t-test revealed that there were no significant differences in mean overall and subscale self-esteem scores between UK and Thai nursing students. There were no indications of differences in levels of self-esteem for UK and Thai nursing students experiencing different parts of their training. PMID:12084018

Sasat, Siriphan; Burnard, Philip; Edwards, Deborah; Naiyapatana, Wassana; Hebden, Una; Boonrod, Wallapa; Arayathanitkul, Bussarin; Wongmak, Waraporn

2002-01-01

218

The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

Carrick, Jo Anne

2010-01-01

219

Teaching Reflection to Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study in an Irish Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching nursing students to reflect on their practice is now officially considered an essential component of nursing education in a number of countries. The aim of this study was to explore nurse teachers' perceptions and experiences of using reflection with diploma nursing students in an Irish context. One of the central themes to emerge, upon…

O'Connor, Aideen; Hyde, Abbey

2005-01-01

220

ATTITUDES OF BACCALAUREATE STUDENT NURSES TOWARD AGING AND THE AGED: RESULTS OF A LONGITUDINAL STUDY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controversy exists as to whether student nurses hold positive or negative feelings toward the elderly. It is also questionable whether the amount of geriatric and gerontology content in the nursing curriculum influences the student nurses' attitudes toward aging and the elderly.The purpose of this longitudinal study conducted between 1982?1986 was to identify the effects of a baccalaureate nursing program on

Patricia M. Melanson

1990-01-01

221

Dreams Deferred but not Deterred: A Qualitative Study on Undergraduate Nursing Student Attrition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A qualitative study using grounded theory was conducted to examine the reasons that a sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students withdrew from their nursing programs. The sample consisted of 11 nursing students who left generic baccalaureate nursing programs located in an urban area of a southeastern state. A semi-structured interview…

Wells, Marcia I.

2007-01-01

222

Beginning Students' Definitions of Nursing: An Inductive Framework of Professional Identity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews with 114 beginning nursing students were distilled into an inductive framework of professional nursing identity based on their definitions of nursing. Multiple categories were classified into three themes: nursing as noun, verb, and transaction. Results show the extent of students' understanding of the profession. (Contains 21…

Cook, Tom H.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Bess, Carolyn J.

2003-01-01

223

[Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].  

PubMed

The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship. PMID:23671991

Jubin, Patricia

2013-03-01

224

Student Acceleration: Redefining an Educational Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from Florida high schools indicate that the original purpose of student acceleration, to accomplish traditional academic objectives faster, has shifted toward curricular increahment. Discussion and tables illustrate how advanced placement, dual enrollment, and early admission have evolved during the 1978-84 years. (5 references) (MLF)

Bickel, Robert

1986-01-01

225

How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

2006-01-01

226

No place to turn: Nursing students' experiences of moral distress in mental health settings.  

PubMed

While researchers have documented the significant issue of moral distress among nurses, few have explored moral distress among mental health nurses. In addition, no research to date has explored nursing students' experiences of moral distress during mental health clinical rotations, despite nursing students typically reporting negative attitudes towards mental health nursing. This manuscript reports on a qualitative study involving seven Canadian baccalaureate nursing students, who reported on their experiences of moral distress during a 13-week clinical rotation on inpatient psychiatric units. Overall, nursing students reported significant moral distress related to the perceived lack of nurses talking meaningfully to patients on the unit, a hierarchical power structure for physicians, a lack of information given to patients about their psychiatric medications, and an inability of their nursing instructors to advocate for ethical change on the units. Several students made a specific connection between their moral distress and not wanting to pursue a career in mental health nursing. PMID:23980930

Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad; Van Daalen-Smith, Cheryl

2014-06-01

227

Nursing student experiences with face-to-face learning.  

PubMed

Face-to-face learning has been the mainstay of nursing student learning. Despite moves to online learning, face-to-face learning persists. This study focuses on how nursing students experience face-to-face learning and why it not only survives, but thrives. This study was anchored in a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, with Gadamerian concepts and van Manen's lifeworlds as frameworks to understand students' experiences of face-to-face learning. Patterns and themes were extracted from audiore-corded face-to-face interviews. Participants confirmed that face-to-face learning continues to be valued as a strong methodology in nursing education. Their experiences focused on humanism, the importance of "presence," physical proximity, classroom as "the real thing," immediacy of feedback, and learning and knowing by human connections and interaction. The study findings were a rich source for understanding how nursing students process learning experiences. Increased understanding of the meaning and essence of face-to-face learning is essential as we decide how nursing content will be taught. PMID:21956259

Gruendemann, Barbara J

2011-12-01

228

Nursing and midwifery students' perceptions of instructors' unethical behaviors  

PubMed Central

Background: Although nursing faculties may believe that they possess a core of knowledge about ethical interactions with students, they may unwittingly risk crossing an ethical boundary in the learning environment. The ethical dimension in education exists because the instructor has authority to contribute to or impede the students’ acquisition of knowledge. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the views of Iranian baccalaureate nursing and midwifery students regarding the occurrence rate of their faculties’ unethical behaviors. Materials and Methods: In this study, 115 subjects, including 61 nursing and 54 midwifery students, completed a questionnaire (response rate = 67.6%). The questionnaire consisted of demographic data and 27 short statements which described the faculties’ unethical behaviors. Reliability of instrument was confirmed (0.92) using Cronbach-Alpha. Results: Delaying in announcing the exam results (40%), lack of a positive learning environment (35.7%), failure to keep regularly scheduled office appointments (35.7%), and failure to update lecture notes when teaching a course (31.3%) were reported by the students as the main faculties’ unethical behaviors. Data analysis confirmed that there were no statistically significant differences between nursing and midwifery students’ responses (the two-tailed t-test was not significant at alpha 0.05 levels; P > 0.05). Conclusion: The study findings suggest that more emphasis should be put on faculties being accessible for consultation out of class time, announcing the exam results in a timely manner, and creating a positive learning environment.

Rafiee, Ghazanfar; Moattari, Marzieh

2013-01-01

229

An Analysis of Graduate Nursing Students' Innovation-Decision Process  

PubMed Central

This study's purpose was to examine the innovation-decision process used by graduate nursing students when deciding to use computer applications. Graduate nursing students enrolled in a mandatory research class were surveyed before and after their use of a mainframe computer for beginning data analysis about their general attitudes towards computers, individual characteristics such as “cosmopoliteness”, and their desire to learn more about a computer application. It was expected that an experimental intervention, a videotaped demonstration of interactive video instruction of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); previous computer experience; and the subject's “cosmopoliteness” wolud influence attitudes towards computers and the desire to learn more about a computer application.

Kacynski, Kathryn A.; Roy, Katrina D.

1984-01-01

230

Teaching pharmacology to advanced practice nursing students: issues and strategies.  

PubMed

A pharmacology course should prepare the advanced practice nursing student to understand the cellular mechanisms of drug action and physiologic outcomes (pharmacodynamics); mechanisms of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs (pharmacokinetics); and the clinical use of drugs in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease (pharmacotherapeutics). The goal of a pharmacology course for advance nursing practice is to provide practitioners with knowledge that provides a rational basis for pharmacologic management of patients with complex health problems. A pharmacology course should teach the student the principles of pharmacology along with the process of pharmacologic reasoning. PMID:9086927

Schwertz, D W; Piano, M R; Kleinpell, R; Johnson, J

1997-02-01

231

Nursing student voices: reflections on an international service learning experience.  

PubMed

For the past decade participation in service and experiential learning in higher education has increased. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of BSN and MSN students participating in a multidisciplinary service-learning course in a rural, underserved village in Belize. Researchers analyzed student journals utilizing qualitative data analysis techniques. There were eight consistent themes found in the student journals. The findings indicate that international service learning opportunities increase students' awareness of their place in a global society and the potential contribution they can make in society. For the past decade, service and experiential learning in higher education, including nursing education, has become increasingly important. Simply put, service and experiential learning combine community service activities with a student's academic study for the sole purpose of enriching the academic experience. As faculty, we feel the goal of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education is to produce an educated professional who will become a responsible citizen. PMID:23367657

Main, E Eve; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Kerby, Molly

2013-01-01

232

Student Persistence in Associate Degree Nursing Programs at Mississippi Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine factors of student persistence and attrition in addition to strategies that may help students persist in associate degree nursing programs at community colleges. Data were collected from nursing students enrolled in first-year associate degree nursing programs at participating Mississippi community colleges…

Fleming, Kathryn Lee

2010-01-01

233

Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward the Aged as a Function of Death Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 139-item questionnaire was constructed to account for additional variance in the attitudes and behaviors of student nurses toward the aged. This study was conducted to examine the effects of death anxiety on the attitudes and behaviors of student nurses toward old persons. To this end, 150 student nurses were surveyed. Eight scales were…

Blackie, Norman K.

234

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern. 31.3121(b...b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a...

2013-04-01

235

26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern. 31.3306(c...c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a...

2013-04-01

236

Predictors of Nursing Students' Performance in a One-Semester Organic and Biochemistry Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an effort to empower nursing students to successfully persist in chemistry, predictors of success for undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a one-semester organic and biochemistry course were identified. The sample consisted of 308 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in Chemistry 108 (Principles of Organic and Biochemistry) during a period of seven semesters. In this study, Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a

Robert J. van Lanen; Nancy M. Lockie; Thomas McGannon

2000-01-01

237

Complementary and alternative medicine use among undergraduate nursing & midwifery students in Turkey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by nursing and midwifery students. A cross-sectional survey was performed among nursing and midwifery students. Second, third and fourth year students were taken in the sample group. The mean age of the students was 21.37 ± 2.23. 72.4% of the participants had knowledge about CAM. The sources of information were firstly books/magazines (65.5%) and school (60.3%). 93.5% of the students preferred to use both CAM and medical treatments at their illnesses. The rate of the students, who use CAM in patient care, was 72.7%. Hot and cold application (51.6%), massage (50.9%) and exercise (48.7%) were the most chosen methods by students, to use in patient care and to recommend them to the patients. They also pointed that, CAM affects the psychology of patients positively (65.5%), accelerates the healing process (59.6%). 86.5% of the participants pointed that; they want the integration of CAM, especially massage (74.2%) and meditation (46.9%) into the curriculum. The majority of the students reported that using and recommending CAM to their patients is beneficial. These methods should be integrated into the curriculum. PMID:23083897

Çamurdan, Çi?dem; Gül, Asiye

2013-09-01

238

A multidiscipline exploration of college students' perceptions of academic dishonesty: are nursing students different from other college students?  

PubMed

As a result of the proliferation of technology, academic dishonesty in colleges and universities is on the rise and is a global issue. The problem of cheating behaviors in students is so pervasive that it is almost commonplace. Most students do not see their cheating actions as out of the ordinary or morally wrong. The process of neutralization is a major concern when students incorporate cheating into "normal" student culture. In a Gallup poll conducted in 2006, nursing was perceived to be the most honest of 23 professions and the one with highest ethical standards (Saad, L., 2006. Nursing tops the list of most honest and ethical professions. The Gallup Poll. www.galluppoll.com/content/?ci=25888&pg=1 (retrieved 30.07.08.)). With such a high ethical expectation of the profession, one would assume that academic dishonesty would be nonexistent in nursing programs. Yet it has been documented that nursing students engage in academically dishonest behaviors that they do not perceive as such. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of academic dishonesty in undergraduate students and to determine whether undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of academic dishonesty were different from undergraduate students majoring in other disciplines. Results of the study revealed clear differences in student perceptions of academic dishonesty by disciplines they were majoring in. Students majoring in nursing most frequently recognized academic dishonest behaviors compared to the other students sampled in this study. PMID:19342132

Arhin, Afua Ottie; Jones, Karin A

2009-10-01

239

Nursing students' perception of class size and its impact on test performance: a pilot study.  

PubMed

The combination of increasing student enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs and the faculty shortage has contributed to larger class sizes that may affect both student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to identify baccalaureate nursing students' satisfaction with enrollment in small and large nursing courses. The authors also sought to determine whether a significant difference existed between test scores of students enrolled in small and large nursing courses. A survey was completed by 110 students, and test scores were compared between students in a small and a large nursing class using analysis of variance. The findings indicated that perceived satisfaction of students was significantly higher for those enrolled in the small nursing course versus the large course; however, no significant difference was found between test scores. To improve student satisfaction that can positively affect student retention, further research is needed on class size in the nursing discipline. PMID:22007713

Lee, Shirleatha; Dapremont, Jill; Sasser, Jason

2011-12-01

240

Practising for progression into nursing: a collaborative approach to the preparation of potential nursing students.  

PubMed

A collaborative project was undertaken between the Clinical Skills Laboratory at the Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences (FHSCS) at Kingston University/St George's University of London (KU/SGUL) and Kingston Borough Schools Vocational Development Service. The project was designed to address the challenge of preparing potential health care students to make informed decisions about a career in health care through the development of a strong interface between the FHSCS and local schools and colleges. School students were invited to attend sessions in the clinical skills/simulation laboratory working alongside student nurses to learn fundamental nursing skills. An evaluative study undertaken into the project showed that the experience in the simulation laboratory was viewed very positively by students and helped them to learn new skills as well as to make or affirm positive career choices for nursing. Of the 30 school students participating in this study, 12 applied for and were accepted into the pre-registration nursing programme at this university. PMID:23142235

Rush, Susan; Shepherd, Lindsay; Firth, Terry; Marks-Maran, Di

2013-09-01

241

Comparing Clinical Competencies between Nursing Students with Degrees and Traditional Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing students with second degrees have become the focus of great interest in the last two decades in terms of being an answer to the nursing shortage. They are thought to possess greater ability to critically think and engage in self directed learning behaviours, and possess greater motivation to master clinical skills. The purpose of this…

Williams, P. Renee; Walker, Jean T.; Martin, Tina; Northington, LaDonna; Waltman, Patricia; Beacham, Tracilia; Grant, LaVerne

2008-01-01

242

Comparing clinical competencies between nursing students with degrees and traditional students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing students with second degrees have become the focus of great interest in the last two decades in terms of being an answer to the nursing shortage. They are thought to possess greater ability to critically think and engage in self directed learning behaviours, and possess greater motivation to master clinical skills. The purpose of this study is to compare

P. Renee Williams; Jean T. Walker; Tina Martin; LaDonna Northington; Patricia Waltman; Tracilia Beacham; LaVerne Grant

2008-01-01

243

Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

244

Chinese nursing students' attitudes toward traditional Chinese medicine.  

PubMed

In this study, we examined Chinese nursing students' attitudes toward and use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Survey questionnaires were distributed to 439 nursing students, 263 of whom (60%) returned them. Of the respondents, 92% had used TCM, while 48% had used TCM at least once during the previous year. Forty-five percent of respondents reported positive attitudes toward TCM use, 52% had neutral attitudes, and only 3% reported negative attitudes. The majority of respondents (76%) reported no change in their attitude toward TCM after studying nursing. Mean scores related to the adequacy of the current curriculum in TCM training and the state of respondents' TCM knowledge were generally low. Of the respondents who had used TCM during the past year, the most common use was for upper respiratory tract infection. The most common type of TCM used by respondents was herbal tea or soup. Final-year nursing students were more likely to have used TCM during the previous year, report they would like more courses on TCM, and consult Western medicine physicians before using TCM; they were also less likely to develop more negative attitudes toward TCM after studying nursing. PMID:16722501

Hon, Kam-lun Ellis; Twinn, Sheila F; Leung, Ting F; Thompson, David R; Wong, Yin; Fok, Tai F

2006-05-01

245

Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.  

PubMed

Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. PMID:21627050

Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

2011-09-01

246

Clinically Speaking: ESP for Refugee Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program designed to provide instruction in specialized English for Southeast Asian and other refugees redeveloping their skills as licensed practical nurses (LPNs) contained two language proficiency tracks and provided language instruction incorporating high school equivalency test practice material in the specialized English course. Technical…

Hansen, Adele G.; Marston, John

247

Final-year student nurses' perceptions of role transition.  

PubMed

Role transition can be both challenging and exciting. This study presents the findings of phase one of a two-part study conducted by Deasy et al (2011), which explored final-year student nurses' (n=116) perceptions and expectations of role transition. The students were registered on four-year BSc nursing programmes at an Irish university. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16). A response rate of 84% was achieved. Over half of respondents said they were adequately prepared for the post of registered nurse. Respondents generally perceived themselves to be competent across a range of domains: managing workloads; prioritizing care delivery; interpersonal skills; time management skills; ethical decision making; and providing health information and education. In contrast, not all were confident about their knowledge and many expected the transition to be problematic. Most expected to be supported and to receive constructive feedback. Recommendations include nurturing supportive work environments to reduce stress and increase confidence. PMID:22875356

Doody, Owen; Tuohy, Dympna; Deasy, Christine

248

Emotional intelligence and its role in recruitment of nursing students.  

PubMed

This article considers the concept of emotional intelligence and how it can be used in the recruitment and development of nursing students. The links between emotional intelligence and the qualities of compassion and caring are examined. The ethical difficulties surrounding the use of emotional intelligence tests are explored and the value of using a variety of recruitment methods is emphasised. The article suggests that emotional intelligence is an ability which may be developed through nurse education programmes, even if not fully present at interview. The contribution of service users to the recruitment of nursing students is examined, suggesting that they offer some important observations about interviewees. These observations may be more valid than the insights gained from the use of emotional intelligence tests. PMID:23909180

Lyon, Steven Robert; Trotter, Fiona; Holt, Barrie; Powell, Elaine; Roe, Andrew

249

Solution-focused approach therapy for mental health nursing students.  

PubMed

Solution-focused therapy is a model of therapy that builds on the client's strengths, is future-focused and can be generally offered as a brief intervention. It can be used across multiple clinical settings and is not limited to being useful for clients accessing mental health services. Learning the underlying principles and developing a foundation level of skill in the approach was found to be achievable in an undergraduate nursing course, with students reporting an increase in their knowledge of the model and confidence in basic therapeutic skills in just one day of training. In this paper, we introduce the solution-focused approach in relation to nursing practice. We describe the template used for the training day offered to undergraduate mental health nurses. Students reported that this method of learning a therapeutic approach was helpful and increased both their knowledge and skill base. PMID:24280922

Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

250

The learning experiences of international doctoral students with particular reference to nursing students: a literature review.  

PubMed

One of the key challenges for the advancement of nursing globally is the development of doctorally prepared educators and leaders in a context where there is a shortage of provision of doctoral nursing programmes. For the short term future, many nurses wishing to undertake a doctorate will need to complete this education in the USA, the UK or Australia. Very little is known however about the nature of their learning experiences in these countries. This paper presents a literature review on the international doctoral student experience, with specific reference to nursing. A thorough review of the literature from 1990 to 2009 was undertaken which yielded only three empirical studies related to nursing. The review was then expanded to include subjects other than nursing which yielded 16 studies in total. This paper presents key themes that appear to be generic to international doctoral students, and draws out specific implications for nursing. The review found that international doctoral students' learning experiences were strongly influenced by the extent to which they could engage with three key elements of doctoral programmes: The first months represented a critical time of transition and most international students seemed to want and expect considerable support and structured in-put during this period. Most studies concluded that there was a need for greater institutional support and supervisor training. The three nursing-specific papers were entirely consistent with these themes. The existing evidence is extremely heterogeneous and of variable methodological quality. In order to ensure that doctoral nursing students are getting a high quality and appropriate PhD experience, there is a need for more research specifically with this group. There is also a need to investigate the different stages of the doctoral process in nursing, including, for example, writing up and examination processes and post-doctoral career outcomes. PMID:19619877

Evans, Catrin; Stevenson, Keith

2010-02-01

251

Implementing a leadership course and mentor model for students in the National Student Nurses' Association.  

PubMed

To help student development as responsible and accountable leaders, a mentor model was incorporated into an established voluntary leadership course offered each semester. The student joins the National Student Nurses' Association, completes leadership projects, and contracts for the course grade. The mentor model is a leadership option that pairs senior students wanting to mentor with junior students wishing to be mentored. The authors describe the outcomes of the leadership-mentor experience. PMID:17627211

Gardner, Elaine A; Schmidt, Cheryl K

2007-01-01

252

Validation of an Empathy Scale in Pharmacy and Nursing Students  

PubMed Central

Objective. To validate an empathy scale to measure empathy in pharmacy and nursing students. Methods. A 15-item instrument comprised of the cognitive and affective empathy domains, was created. Each item was rated using a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. Concurrent validity was demonstrated with the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Professional Students (JSE-HPS). Results. Reliability analysis of data from 216 students (pharmacy, N=158; nursing, N=58) showed that scores on the empathy scale were positively associated with JSE-HPS scores (p<0.001). Factor analysis confirmed that 14 of the 15 items were significantly associated with their respective domain, but the overall instrument had limited goodness of fit. Conclusions. Results of this study demonstrate the reliability and validity of a new scale for evaluating student empathy. Further testing of the scale at other universities is needed to establish validity.

Chen, Aleda M. H.; Yehle, Karen S.; Plake, Kimberly S.

2013-01-01

253

Nursing students' response to tobacco cessation curricula in Minnesota baccalaureate nursing programs.  

PubMed

Ensuring that RNs entering the profession possess the skills necessary to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions to patients can substantially increase the number of smokers who are provided with such treatments. Quantitative descriptive survey data were collected in spring 2007 from two samples: 675 baccalaureate nursing students in their senior coursework and directors of 10 Minnesota baccalaureate nursing programs. Two of 10 programs contained all items of content and these students were significantly more knowledgeable, whereas 8 of the programs did not cover the content adequately and students were less knowledgeable. Minimal clinical application was reported by students in all 10 of the programs. Essential competencies regarding health promotion for tobacco cessation need to be established. Programs need to include all three domains of learning including cognitive, skill acquisition, and attitudes or beliefs. PMID:19650612

Lenz, Brenda K

2009-10-01

254

Adult student satisfaction in traditional and accelerated RN-to-BSN programs.  

PubMed

The pressures and complexities that the registered nurse (RN) encounters in today's health care system have motivated many RNs to return to college to obtain their baccalaureate degrees. Competition among institutions of higher education has led faculty to develop and offer more nontraditional delivery models of nursing education. In developing these new models of educational delivery, it is important for faculty to determine what items of education are essential to adult learners. A survey was conducted to assess two delivery formats, traditional and accelerated, for a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program for RNs. The goal of the research was to determine what items of education are essential to students and whether one group of students was more satisfied with one delivery system over the other. Items of importance and the concomitant level of satisfaction were surveyed by using an adult students' priorities scale. The survey was distributed to 53 RN students. The results demonstrated that the students in the accelerated format were more satisfied with the institution, program, and services than the students in the traditional format. PMID:15011190

Boylston, Mary T; Peters, Mary Anne; Lacey, Margaret

2004-01-01

255

How to enhance nursing students' intention to use information technology: the first step before integrating it in nursing curriculum.  

PubMed

Today, in the 21st century, information technology has an important and critical role in the healthcare delivery system. Nursing educators already know and understand that they should integrate nursing informatics into the nursing curriculum to prepare future nurses for the new world of information technology. However, as of now, the core program of nursing studies in Israel does not put an emphasis on the skills required to properly use nursing informatics. The present research is the first step toward achieving this target by recognizing the importance of the human factor. The main goal is to examine the correlation between nursing students' attitudes and a number of variables: self-efficacy, threat, challenge, and innovativeness. This quantitative study used a convenience sample of nursing students in a bachelor's degree program at a large academic center in central Israel. Results show significant positive correlations between nursing students' attitudes to computer use and self-efficacy, a sense of challenge in using a computer, a sense of threat in using a computer, and previous experience with computers. The insights of these results will benefit nursing educators by helping them find creative ways to expose the students to the world of information technology and to improve the quality of future nurses. PMID:24784490

Gonen, Ayala; Sharon, Dganit; Offir, Ana; Lev-Ari, Lilac

2014-06-01

256

Using Gaming To Help Nursing Students Understand Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An ethics game involves nursing students in defending actions in ethics-based scenarios. Benefits include increased confidence, ability to see multiple perspectives, values clarification, and exposure to decision-making models, professional responsibilities, ethical principles, social expectations, and legal requirements. Difficulties include…

Metcalf, Barbara L.; Yankou, Dawn

2003-01-01

257

Predictors of Attrition in American Indian Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of 150 American Indian nursing students in a tribal college, 38 completed the program. Completers were significantly older and had higher Test of Adult Basic Education math and language scores. High school grade point average and number of dependents were not significant predictors of completion. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

Manifold, Carol; Rambur, Betty

2001-01-01

258

Attitudes toward a Simulation Based Chemistry Curriculum for Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chemistry anxiety exists among nursing students as well as other allied health professions. The causes for this anxiety may be attributed to three variables. Chemistry: (1) is perceived as difficult; (2) involves a multitude of facts; and (3) is not connected to reality. A curriculum with a simulation format has been developed to help Israeli…

Dori, Yehudit

259

Caring for Students with Type 1 Diabetes: School Nurses' Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study used a Husserlian phenomenological approach to obtain an understanding of the essences of five experienced Taiwanese school nurses' lived experience of caring for students with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis entailed a modified method from…

Wang, Yueh-Ling; Volker, Deborah L.

2013-01-01

260

Impact of Nursing Learning Environments on Adaptive Competency Development in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Kolb's experiential learning theory was used as a framework to study 179 generic baccalaureate students' perceptions of the different types of learning environments and adaptive competencies. Clinical experience and preceptorships contributed more to competency development than did nursing or nonnursing classes. (JOW)

Laschinger, Heather K. Spence

1992-01-01

261

It's the anxiety: facilitators and inhibitors to nursing students' career interests in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Increasing the rate of recruitment of nursing students into mental health nursing (MHN) is vital to long-term sustainability of health care system support for people diagnosed with mental illness. However MHN is not a popular career path; this raises questions about what attitudes and beliefs may divert or attract students to this specialisation. The current research involved a survey of undergraduate nursing students at a regional university in Australia to clarify the nature of relationships between attitudes (e.g., the value of mental health nursing, stereotypes of people with mental illness) and how they may be antecedents to considering MHN as a career path. Through a structural equation model, it was ascertained that anxiety surrounding mental illness leads to less interest in MHN as a future career and suggests that anxiety is (a) partly due to negative stereotypes, and (b) countered by preparedness for a MHN role. Beliefs on how MHN can make a valuable contribution to people's well-being did not affect interest in pursuing MHN. These findings reconfirm the need to reduce anxiety about mental illness by educational approaches that effectively prepare students for MHN, combined with challenging negative stereotypes. PMID:24350751

Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Harris, Scott; Bradshaw, Julie

2014-01-01

262

The Experiences of International Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight female Nigerians studying nursing in the United States experienced social isolation, became resolved to acceptance of antagonistic attitudes encountered in the program, and persisted in spite of obstacles. From their experiences, recommendations for the adjustment of international students were developed. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

Sanner, Susan; Wilson, Astrid H.; Samson, Linda F.

2002-01-01

263

Critical thinking of nursing students, graduate nurses and expert nurses in simulated clinical situations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical thinking is a thought process used by nurses for clinical decision making. This descriptive correlational study focused on the relationships among critical thinking, decision making and clinical nursing expertise during a clinical simulation. A mid-range theory was developed from the work of Benner (1984) and Paul (1992). As persons develop clinical expertise from novice to expert level, through acquisition

Cheryl Marie Martin

1998-01-01

264

Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

Beard, Kenya V.

2009-01-01

265

Packing a Bag for the Journey Ahead: Preparing Nursing Students for Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Never has it been more important to nurture and support students pursuing a nursing education. Nursing shortage in the U.S. is a well-documented problem that is worsened by demographic factors such as the aging nursing workforce, the aging of the general population, and a declining number of young people in the workforce. The nursing profession…

Worrell, Mary Mullaly

2005-01-01

266

Attachment styles as predictors of empathy in nursing students.  

PubMed

Previous studies have traced a relationship between the attachment styles of nurses working as in healthcare teams and their empathy which is an essential characteristic required of people concerned with managing relationships, supporting social events, and improving the of nurse-patient relationships. Since determining the effective variables in the quality of nurse-patient relationships in clinical settings is of paramount importance, current investigation is an effort to examine the relationship between attachment styles and empathy in nursing students. 260 university students (male = 130 and female = 130) were chosen as the sample of the study based upon specific inclusion criteria. All participants completed the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Data was collected and analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis with SPSS (v.18). The results showed that secure and insecure attachment styles have significant positive and negative correlation with empathy respectively. Based on the results of regression analysis, it was shown that secure attachment style is predicting 53% of the variance empathy variable, whereas insecure attachment styles are explaining up to 76% of the variance empathy variable collectively. The increase of attention to instructions that focus on empathetic relationships with patients and that are based upon the secure attachment style can result in positive changes in the area of nurse-patient relations and in increasing attention to medical ethics. Findings are consistent with prediction derived from attachment theory and add to our understanding of relationship between attachment styles with empathy in nursing students. The meaning and limitations of this study and suggestions for further research are also discussed. PMID:23908761

Khodabakhsh, Mohammadreza

2012-01-01

267

Attachment styles as predictors of empathy in nursing students  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have traced a relationship between the attachment styles of nurses working as in healthcare teams and their empathy which is an essential characteristic required of people concerned with managing relationships, supporting social events, and improving the of nurse-patient relationships. Since determining the effective variables in the quality of nurse-patient relationships in clinical settings is of paramount importance, current investigation is an effort to examine the relationship between attachment styles and empathy in nursing students. 260 university students (male = 130 and female = 130) were chosen as the sample of the study based upon specific inclusion criteria. All participants completed the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Data was collected and analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis with SPSS (v.18). The results showed that secure and insecure attachment styles have significant positive and negative correlation with empathy respectively. Based on the results of regression analysis, it was shown that secure attachment style is predicting 53% of the variance empathy variable, whereas insecure attachment styles are explaining up to 76% of the variance empathy variable collectively. The increase of attention to instructions that focus on empathetic relationships with patients and that are based upon the secure attachment style can result in positive changes in the area of nurse-patient relations and in increasing attention to medical ethics. Findings are consistent with prediction derived from attachment theory and add to our understanding of relationship between attachment styles with empathy in nursing students. The meaning and limitations of this study and suggestions for further research are also discussed.

Khodabakhsh, Mohammadreza

2012-01-01

268

Recognizing bioethical issues and ethical qualification in nursing students and faculty in South Korea.  

PubMed

The role of nursing faculty members in charge of ethics education is important. Although all nursing students receive the same bioethics education, their experiences differ, related to ethical qualification, which depends on the personal socialization process. This Korean study aimed to provide nursing faculty members with the basic data to help them develop as bioethics experts and provide nursing students with knowledge to improve their ethical decision-making abilities. We used a survey design to assess recognition of bioethical issues and ethical qualification in nursing students and faculty members. A total of 1225 undergraduate students and 140 faculty members participated in this study. The results revealed that nursing students and nursing faculty members generally understood the seriousness of various bioethical issues and both considered the most serious issue to concern abortion. Ethical behavior can be improved by education, and accordingly, nursing ethics should be a mandatory subject, rather than an elective one. PMID:23361146

Choe, Kwisoon; Song, Eunju; Kang, Youngmi

2013-03-01

269

Using low-fidelity simulation with sophomore nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program.  

PubMed

Opportunities to achieve competency in the psychomotor and cognitive outcomes required of the nursing profession are limited due to shortages of clinical sites and situations. One solution is to use simulation to replicate some of the essential aspects of a clinical situation so it may be readily understood and managed when it occurs in reality. A program developed for sophomore students integrated the pharmacology, health assessment, and pathophysiology theory courses using low-fidelity simulation and computer-assisted instruction. The objectives of the program were based on Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies. The simulation strategies were evaluated using the Educational Practice Scale for Simulation, the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning questionnaire, and the Simulation Design Scale. The initial findings are encouraging for promoting active and diverse methods of learning, high and positive expectations for students, self-confidence, and collaborative team-building opportunities. PMID:22916632

Sharpnack, Patricia A; Madigan, Elizabeth A

2012-01-01

270

Adult student satisfaction in an accelerated RN-to-BSN program: a follow-up study.  

PubMed

This mixed-method study revealed accelerated RN-to-BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) students' levels of satisfaction with a wide range of college services in a small university. Building on seminal research on the topic [Boylston, M. T., Peters, M. A., & Lacey, M. (2004). Adult student satisfaction in traditional and accelerated RN-to-BSN programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20, 23-32.], the Noel-Levitz Adult Student Priorities Survey (ASPS) and qualitative interview data revealed primary factors involved in nontraditional (adult) accelerated RN-to-BSN student satisfaction. The ASPS assesses both satisfaction with and importance of the following factors: academic advising effectiveness, academic services, admissions and financial aid effectiveness, campus climate, instructional effectiveness, registration effectiveness, safety and security, and service excellence. Of these factors, participants considered instructional effectiveness and academic advising effectiveness as most important and concomitantly gave high satisfaction ratings to each. In contrast, convenience of the bookstore, counseling services, vending machines, and computer laboratories were given low importance ratings. The participants cited convenience as a strong marketing factor. Loss of financial aid or family crisis was given as a reason for withdrawal and, for most students, would be the only reason for not completing the BSN program. Outcomes of this investigation may guide faculty, staff, and administrators in proactively creating an educational environment in which a nontraditional student can succeed. PMID:18804082

Boylston, Mary T; Jackson, Christina

2008-01-01

271

Preferences for teaching methods in a baccalaureate nursing program: how second-degree and traditional students differ.  

PubMed

Accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs are in great demand in the United States. Currently there are 197 such programs, but little research has been conducted on student characteristics and program outcomes. This quantitative study explores preferences of second-degree students and traditional generic students with regard to teaching methods and relationships with faculty. The results indicate that statistically significant differences exist between the two groups of students. Three areas of significance are ability for self-directed learning, expectations of faculty and classroom structure, and obtaining a grade that really matters. PMID:17944259

Walker, Jean T; Martin, Tina M; Haynie, Lisa; Norwood, Anne; White, Jill; Grant, LaVerne

2007-01-01

272

Comparison of Students in Three Different Levels of Nursing Education on Biographical, Cognitive Structure, Perception of Environment, Personality-Value Structure and Attitudes toward Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison was made of nursing students entering five nursing schools (three diploma programs, one associate degree program, and one baccalaureate) in the Memphis, Tennessee, area in 1974 and 1975. The study was undertaken to compare nursing students in three levels of nursing education on five clusters of variables deemed to influence learning…

Zurhellen, Joan H.

273

The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Who Study Abroad: A Qualitative Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nurse Researchers need to explore study abroad programs and identify their impact on the development of cultural competence and global perspectives in nursing students. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of nursing students who study abroad and to identify benefits and impediments that may be used to spawn future…

Edmonds, Michelle Lynn

2010-01-01

274

Academic Profile Results for Selected Nursing Students. Research Report 2002-05.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of an ongoing effort to gather information on the impact of college courses on students academic skills, a small group of nursing students (n=35) at Boise State University, Idaho, enrolled in an upper division nursing course agreed to take the Academic Profile, a test that measures general academic skills. The results for these nursing

Belcheir, Marcia J.

275

An Exploration of Professional Values Held by Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the professional values of Senior Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Nursing students as measured by the Nurses Professional Values Scale, a 44 question questionnaire based on the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses. A t-test and ANOVA was used to reveal any differences in professional values between the two groups of students.

Tara Lynn Hayes

2006-01-01

276

Predictors of first semester attrition and their relation to retention of generic associate degree nursing students  

Microsoft Academic Search

In community college nursing programs the high rate of attrition was a major concern to faculty and administrators. Since first semester attrition could lead to permanent loss of students and low retention in nursing programs, it was important to identify at-risk students early and develop proactive approaches to assist them to be successful. The goal of nursing programs was to

Donna Katherine Jackson

2002-01-01

277

Perceptions of nursing undergraduate students concerning the human dimension in the learning process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to identify and interpret the perceptions presented by undergraduate students of a Nursing course after internship in Mental Health. Twelve nursing undergraduate students at the Nursing School of ABC Foundation - Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil were interviewed. These interviews using a semi-structure script were performed and recorded in August 2004. Through Content Analysis, thematic modality, four

Simone de Oliveira Camillo; Ana Lúcia da Silva; Alan Jefferson do Nascimento

2007-01-01

278

Learning on clinical placement:the experience of six Australian student nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns about the adequacy of clinical education in nursing courses in Australia have escalatedsince the transfer of pre-registration nursing education into the tertiary sector. This descriptive, interpretative study, informed by the tradition of critical social science, sought to understand the clinical learning experiences of undergraduate nursing students. At the same time, it fostered an active participation of students in their

Carol A. Nolan

1998-01-01

279

Student Outcomes of the Healing Web: Evaluation of a Transformative Model for Nursing Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Healing Web model of nursing education was used with 95 nursing students. Compared to 322 in the traditional program, Healing Web students scored higher in caring abilities, leadership, and assertiveness. They identified collaboration and awareness of different nursing roles as benefits of the experience. (SK)

Nelson, Margot L.; Howell, Jacquelyn K.; Larson, June C.; Karpiuk, Kathryn L.

2001-01-01

280

Factors associated with career decision in Taiwanese nursing students: A questionnaire survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vocational decisions of nursing students have always been a concern for nursing educators and administrators. It is unclear, however, what factors play a role in determining the professional choices made by these students. Limited research into this area has been undertaken in Taiwan. This study, therefore, was designed to investigate the factors associated with career choices in Taiwan's nursing

Hui-Ling Lai; Tai-Chu Peng; Fwu-Mei Chang

2006-01-01

281

Perspectives on patient safety among undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Incorporating patient safety principles in academic and clinical education for health science professionals is necessary to support widespread adoption of safety practices. It is vital to understand nursing students' perspectives on patient safety and the extent to which patient safety is addressed in the classroom and clinical settings. In this cross-sectional study, students in all 4 years of an undergraduate program were asked to complete the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey. Eighty-one percent (238 of 293) of students completed the questionnaire. Responses were favorable, with students reporting confidence in learning about a variety of patient safety competencies. Of note, there were decreasing levels of confidence in the third-year and fourth-year students and low-to-moderate correlation between classroom and clinical responses. These results support the importance of consistently engaging students in safety principles early in and throughout their health care programs. PMID:22766076

Duhn, Lenora; Karp, Stacey; Oni, Oluwabusola; Edge, Dana; Ginsburg, Liane; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

2012-09-01

282

Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

2002-01-01

283

Role Perceptions of Freshman and Senior Nursing and Medical Students and Attitudes toward Collaborative Decision Making.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing (n=109) and medical (n=108) students from a large Canadian research university were surveyed to determine differences between first- and fourth-year students' perceptions of necessary competencies. Nursing students' perceptions of competencies important for medicine were more congruent than medical students' perceptions of those important…

Laschinger, Heather K. Spence; Weston, Wayne

1995-01-01

284

Nursing care plans versus concept maps in the enhancement of critical thinking skills in nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program.  

PubMed

Appropriate and effective critical thinking and problem solving is necessary for all nurses in order to make complex decisions that improve patient outcomes, safety, and quality of nursing care. With the current emphasis on quality improvement, critical thinking ability is a noteworthy concern within the nursing profession. An in-depth review of literature related to critical thinking was performed. The use of nursing care plans and concept mapping to improve critical thinking skills was among the recommendations identified. This study compares the use of nursing care plans and concept mapping as a teaching strategy for the enhancement of critical thinking skills in baccalaureate level nursing students. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test was used as a method of comparison and evaluation. Results indicate that concept mapping enhances critical thinking skills in baccalaureate nursing students. PMID:22856062

Sinatra-Wilhelm, Tina

2012-01-01

285

An interactive web-based learning unit to facilitate and improve intrapartum nursing care of nursing students.  

PubMed

First clinical exposures are stressful situations for nursing students, especially, when practicing on the labour ward. The purpose of this study was to develop intrapartum nursing care web-based learning to facilitate students' acquisition of conceptual knowledge and performance skills. This web-based learning unit integrated the 5E-model and information technology with the lecture content. Eighty four nursing students were recruited in the study. The control group received traditional teaching, while the experimental group was supplemented with the web-based learning unit on intrapartum nursing care. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had significant higher scores in conceptual knowledge and performance skill. The students also had significant lower scores in ignorance - related stress when compared to those of the control group. The students supplemented with the web-based course showed a strong positive attitude toward the new learning method. PMID:21078535

Gerdprasert, Sailom; Pruksacheva, Tassanee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

2011-07-01

286

Analysis of graduates' perceptions of an accelerated bachelor of science program in nursing.  

PubMed

Rapid expansion of second-degree programs as one approach to addressing the nursing shortage by increasing the number of graduates in shorter periods of time prompted the need for program evaluation to identify the outcomes, strengths, and best practices of these programs. This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry to analyze the responses of 28 of 56 recent graduates of an accelerated baccalaureate program. Respondents rated components of the program from preadmission to graduation on a Likert scale and responded to open-ended questions regarding strengths and weaknesses of the program. Analysis included descriptive statistics for quantitative data and content analysis for qualitative data. The analysis showed a high degree of similarity between the quantitative and qualitative data. Highly rated program components, that is, opportunity for graduate course work and integration with graduate students, clinical skill practice and experiences, variety of teaching methodologies, peer and faculty support, were reflected in the themes of cohort bonding, variety of clinical experiences, and supportive faculty and staff. Outcomes of program satisfaction, National Council Licensure Examination pass rates, successful nursing employment, and graduate school attendance were supported by the data. PMID:21272836

Kemsley, Martha; McCausland, Linda; Feigenbaum, Janice; Riegle, Elizabeth

2011-01-01

287

Establishing Student Competency in Qualitative Research: Can Undergraduate Nursing Students Perform Qualitative Data Analysis?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To learn the skills of qualitative analysis, 28 nursing students selected research questions, interviewed each other, and conducted data analysis. Students' analyses had 89% agreement with the instructor's on the topic of lab-to-clinic skill transfer, 96% agreement on the influence of experience, and 61% on nervousness during clinical supervision.…

Reising, Deanna L.

2003-01-01

288

An integrative literature review of study abroad programs for nursing students.  

PubMed

Nurse researchers need to explore study abroad programs and identify their impact on the development of cultural competence and global perspectives in nursing students. Despite the anecdotal professional and personal benefits that have been attributed to study abroad in other disciplines, current nursing literature regarding this topic is limited and has only emerged in nursing research within the last decade. There is a significant gap in the existing body of knowledge with respect to American nursing students who study abroad and the reported benefits of and impediments to their experiences. Much of the nursing research conducted with American nursing students has been quantitative as opposed to qualitative studies with European and Australian nursing students. Many samples are homogenous and therefore exclude diverse populations. Further research involving all methodological designs is warranted to better understand this type of engaged learning. PMID:22416538

Edmonds, Michelle L

2012-01-01

289

Supporting Student Nurses Learning in and through Clinical Practice: The Role of the Clinical Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A clinical guide is an experienced nurse who supports nursing students throughout the program, particularly in clinical placements. More than a mentor, a guide is fully involved in promoting deep learning in clinical settings. (SK)

Andrews, Margaret; Roberts, Debbie

2003-01-01

290

The Reticent Student: Implications for Nurse Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The shift toward emancipatory, dialogic teaching methods may subjugate rather than empower reticent students. Educators should use strategies to adapt their teaching to deal with shyness or communication anxiety. (SK)

Leonard, Teresa C.; Johnson, Joyce Y.

1998-01-01

291

Nursing, nutrition and physiotherapy students: career choice.  

PubMed

In the perspective of career choice, entering university encompasses meanings of self-accomplishment and social status, which are permeated by concepts and ideals people construct in their lives. This study aimed to analyze regimes of truth that permeate career choice in nursing, physiotherapy and nutrition. This qualitative-descriptive study was carried out with undergraduate freshmen. Data were collected through focus groups, evaluated by discourse analysis from a Foucaultian perspective. The following themes emerged from the analysis: career choice: crowning a process of social differentiation, reflexes of professions' history of acknowledgement; career choice beyond professional projects. Discourse highlights that scientific knowledge acquires status in relations of power between different professions and society and is essential that health professional education is linked to public policies that expand the participation of different professions so as to meet demands in favor of integral care. PMID:19669052

Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; Creutzberg, Marion; Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Melo, Denizar da Silva; Corbellini, Valéria Lamb

2009-01-01

292

Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

2007-01-01

293

Influence of international service-learning on nursing student self-efficacy toward cultural competence.  

PubMed

One method of gaining knowledge, skills, and experience with different cultures for nurses and nursing students is through an international immersion program of training in language, culture, and community nursing. This article presents a qualitative and quantitative research study of the influence of a 2-week service-learning medical experience of a nursing student group who traveled abroad to Belize, Central America. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(8):474-478.]. PMID:25054475

Long, Tracey

2014-08-01

294

Psychometric testing of an instrument measuring core competencies of nursing students: an application of Mokken scaling.  

PubMed

Assessing the core competencies of nursing students provides information about students' learning outcomes for educational evaluation and improvement. The aim of this study was to develop the Nursing Students Core Competencies scale to measure 8 core competencies of nursing students in Taiwan. The study employed factor analysis and Mokken scaling analysis for psychometric testing of this instrument between a group of nursing graduates and their evaluators. The results indicated that the Nursing Students Core Competencies scale has demonstrated evidence of internal consistency, structural validity, unidimensionality, and a hierarchy of items for students' self-assessment and instructor's rating. The use of Mokken scaling analysis extends the knowledge of developing competence assessment tools; it can be used to reveal the domains or items of competency nursing students perceive that are easy or difficult, providing information for curricular design. PMID:23644266

Perng, Shoa-Jen; Watson, Roger

2013-01-01

295

Assessing outcomes of a study abroad course for nursing students.  

PubMed

There is little debate about the importance of preparing nursing graduates to provide culturally sensitive care to an increasingly diverse society. However, it is difficult for nurse educators to fit learning experiences that help students develop cultural competence into already full programs and create mechanisms to evaluate the results. This article describes a study to assess the impact of a study abroad program on developing cultural competence, including cultural awareness, sensitivity, knowledge, and skills. Results from the Cultural Awareness Survey, reflective journals, and interviews illustrate how the study abroad experience influenced the development of components of cultural competence and might influence clinical practice. Results suggest effective teaching strategies to assist students in becoming culturally competent are experiential in nature and include role modeling, reflective activities, and group discussion. PMID:22616405

Carpenter, Linda J; Garcia, Alexandra A

2012-01-01

296

[Learning to care: nursing students' experiences with children with cancer].  

PubMed

This article reports the experience with situations occurring during the practice of the discipline Fundamentals of Human Care of the Nursing Graduation Course of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil. It documents the perceptions of 12 students of the 4th semester of the Nursing Course at the Oncology Pediatrics Unit of a teaching hospital, who daily recorded their relationship with patients and their families. These records express not only the students' learning, but also changes on their conception as to oncology wards, and the acknowledgment of the importance of affection in their treatment process. It also points out that under standing children and their family life history helps to improve care. PMID:17907650

Rodrigues, Carla Daiane Silva; Culau, Janice Maria da Cunha; Nunes, Dulce Maria

2007-06-01

297

Redesigning nursing tutorials for ESL students: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Increased enrolments of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students who speak English as a second language (ESL) can help create a multilingual and culturally diverse workforce that is better prepared to meet the needs of increasingly diverse health populations. However, although ESL enrolments are increasing, attrition rates for ESL students tend to be higher than those of native speakers of English, partly due to academic failure. At the same time, concerns have been expressed in some quarters about the low levels of English language of entering students. As it is unlikely that language entry levels to university will be raised, sustainable programmes that help ESL students better meet the academic challenges they may face need to be developed. So far, models of ESL support have been mostly an adjunct to their degree, voluntary and not well attended. This paper discusses a model using tutorials integrated into the first year nursing curriculum that were specifically designed for ESL students with low levels of English language proficiency. The paper also examines students' perceptions of such tutorials, which they found beneficial to their learning. PMID:23721384

San Miguel, Caroline; Townsend, Lisa; Waters, Cheryl

2013-04-01

298

Critical thinking and learning styles of nursing students at the Baccalaureate nursing program in Korea.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to examine the critical thinking dispositions and learning styles, as well as the relationships between critical thinking and learning styles of nursing students enrolled in Baccalaureate nursing programs in Korea. The convenient sample consisted of 724 students from five cities. The learning style inventory of Kolb (1976) and critical thinking disposition inventory of Rudd et al (2000) were used for collecting data. Learning styles of the subjects were Diverging 315 (43.5%), Accommodating 223 (30.4%), Assimilating 78 (10.8%), and Converging 65 (9.0%). There were no significant differences in learning styles among grades (p=.197). The level of critical thinking significantly differed among learning styles (p=.000), and grades (p=.043). Critical thinking positively related to learning styles (r=.219) and grades (r=.097). This study suggested that adopting Abstract Conceptualization and Active Experimentation modes of pedagogy may promote critical thinking. PMID:18844547

Gyeong, Ju An; Myung, Sook Yoo

2008-05-01

299

Student exchange for nursing students: Does it raise cultural awareness'? A descriptive, qualitative study.  

PubMed

With free movement for citizens within the European Union and with distant parts of our globe becoming more accessible, cultural awareness and cultural competence are becoming important skills for nurses. Internationalisation and raising awareness of other cultural contexts are essential elements in Swedish higher education, thus explaining the variety of student exchange programmes that are available. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of student exchange and their experiences. Data were collected through group interviews and then analysed following the principles of content analysis. Our analysis resulted in three categories: Preparing to go abroad, Reasons for going abroad and From expectation to experience. Cultural aspects and cultural awareness were emphasised as strong motivational factors, both personal and professional, behind participation in student exchange programmes. Information was also highlighted as a crucial means of reaching potential students as well as the power of knowledge through personal experience. This study highlights the importance of student exchange in expanding the individual student's personal and professional horizons. It also stresses the importance of including a transcultural nursing element in nursing curricula. PMID:24406034

Bohman, Doris M; Borglin, Gunilla

2014-05-01

300

A tailored program of support for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) nursing students in a graduate entry Masters of Nursing course: A qualitative evaluation of outcomes.  

PubMed

This paper aims to firstly explain why a support program is necessary and describe briefly the support program for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) nursing students enrolled in a two year accelerated Master of Nursing program at the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, the University of Sydney. Secondly, it aims to address the underpinning pedagogical approach to delivery of the program and finally this paper reports the findings of a qualitative evaluation of the program. The program was introduced in semester 1, 2008 and aimed to facilitate improved student satisfaction by addressing the academic, communication and relational challenges identified as having a significant impact on both CALD students' academic achievement and their performance on clinical placement. Teaching and support strategies included interactive delivery, activities in small groups and the use of video clips, reflective feedback sessions, and open discussions. An evaluation, based on 13 semi-structured interviews explored the consequences of the program on student satisfaction and to determine whether the student learning experience had been enhanced. PMID:20537587

Boughton, Maureen A; Halliday, Lesley E; Brown, Lynne

2010-11-01

301

Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.  

PubMed

This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies. PMID:24267932

Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

2013-01-01

302

Perceptions of senior baccalaureate nursing students and nurse leaders. A look at elements of success in the workplace.  

PubMed

This article compares the perceptions of senior baccalaureate students and nurse leaders (administrators, managers, academic leaders, and advanced practice nurses) regarding the qualities that are needed to be successful in the current nursing shortage. The congruence between the two groups' responses validates the importance of valuing practice-oriented-education as well as the power within and between the education and practice arenas to strategize and solve problems together at a highly tumultuous time. PMID:14997685

DeMarco, Rosanna; Aroian, Jane

2003-01-01

303

Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated

Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

2012-01-01

304

Nursing Students as Change Agents and Problem Solvers in the Community: Community-based Nursing Education in Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nursing school operates nine community nursing centers in which students practice community-based learning and act as problem solvers and change agents. Examples include effecting systemwide change in school health services, coordinating multiple agencies to meet a health need, and solving a patient's complex problems involving multiple…

Kiehl, Ermalynn M.; Wink, Diane M.

2000-01-01

305

Treating Nurses and Student Nurses with Chemical Dependency: Revising Policy in the United States for the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than a century, the US nursing profession has been aware of substance abuse problems among its practitioners and student nurses but has generally dealt with the issue by taking disciplinary action rather than pursuing nonpunitive options. The latter course would allow more healthcare providers, following successful rehabilitation, to…

Monroe, Todd; Pearson, Frances

2009-01-01

306

A Study of Values of Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Graduate Nurses from a Secular and a Nonsecular Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the professional values of senior nursing students and graduate nurses in two kinds of institutions found little difference between them. Values identified most frequently by all related to patient care rather than social issues of the profession. (MSE)

Schank, Mary Jane; Weis, Darlene

1989-01-01

307

Exploring Educational Issues: International Nursing Students Enrolled in Professional Nursing Programs in South Texas and Their Perceptions of Educational Barriers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study explores educational challenges as manifested in the experiences of the English language learner (ELL) nursing students enrolled in a professional nursing program in San Antonio, Texas. Eleven participants were interviewed for this study using 7 open-ended questions. The research methodology applied in this study was…

Sparks, Wanda R.

2009-01-01

308

Home environmental hazard education for undergraduate and prelicensure nursing students.  

PubMed

This paper presents a Healthy Homes education module for undergraduate and prelicensure nursing students. The education module, which is based on the National Center for Healthy Housing's framework for Healthy Homes, was developed, implemented, and evaluated in three phases. Phase 1 included nine Web-based recorded lectures on the Healthy Homes principles and on home assessment and referral. In the next phase, a Healthy Homes clinical laboratory simulation (home visit scenario and four rooms of an apartment) was created. Phase 3 involved piloting home visits by students who, under the supervision of a clinical instructor, conducted Healthy Homes assessments of clients living in two low-income subsidized housing sites. Using a pretest-posttest format, students' knowledge of Healthy Homes concepts significantly increased after completing the Phase 1 Web-based lectures. Student evaluations, which were collected after each phase, were consistently positive. PMID:22909044

Polivka, Barbara J; Chaudry, Rosemary Valedes; Mac Crawford, J

2012-10-01

309

Survey of critical thinking and clinical decision making in nursing student of Kerman University  

PubMed Central

Context: The ability to think critically is an essential element in nursing education and more specifically in nurses’ clinical decision making (CDM). Aims: Critical thinking (CT) and CDM ability as well as their relationship were examined among nursing students of Kerman University. Settings and Design: Study was designed in four towns: Kerman, Bam, Jiroft, and Zarand, settled in Kerman province. Materials and Methods: This research was a cross-sectional descriptive correlation study. 300 nursing students with different level of education were asked to fill two questionnaires including: (1) California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) and (2) Lauri and Salantera (2002) CDM instrument. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed with SPSS12 and descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: Nursing students yielded a low score (mean = 5/40 from 20) of CT and a mild score (mean = 12.8 from 20) of CDM. We found positively correlation between male and CT and CDM score with mean score of the nursing student. Also CDM score in male was more than female but not significant, and Jirofts CDM nursing student was significantly better than other city. Conclusions: Although students that answers evaluation question in CCTST better can gave better CDM score but there isn’t relationship between CT and CDM of nursing student. The finding showed that mean score of nursing student CT was low. Reason can be either due to the defects of nursing education program, teaching, and learning strategies.

Noohi, Esmat; Karimi-Noghondar, Maryam; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

2012-01-01

310

Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

2013-01-01

311

The Effects of Simulation on Nursing Students' Critical Thinking Scores: A Quantitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation has become the innovative method of incorporating clinical and theoretical knowledge and experiences for nursing students. It is essential for educators to offer strategies that develop students' critical- thinking abilities. This experiment used the Health Sciences Reasoning Test to determine if critical-thinking scores improved in the associate degree in nursing student after exposure to multiple clinical simulation scenarios (Facione

Joann Sullivan-Mann; Carrie A. Perron; Angela N. Fellner

2009-01-01

312

Valuing of altruism and honesty in nursing students: a two-decade replication study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Title. Valuing of altruism and honesty in nursing students: a two-decade replication study Aim. This paper reports a study investigating changes in the self-reported values of nursing students over the period 1983-2005 in the light of changes in student demography. Background. Nurses' values have been studied by both qualitative and survey methods over half a century. Generally idealism and altruism

Martin Johnson; Carol Haigh; Natalie Yates-Bolton

2007-01-01

313

Using Nursing Diagnosis to Describe the Clinical Competence of Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Graduating Students: A Comparative Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared perceptions of clinical competence of professional and technical nursing students with the expectations of their nursing faculty by using a nursing diagnosis framework. Results of the study are reported and implications discussed. (CT)

Lee, Helena A.; Strong, Kathleen A.

1986-01-01

314

[Nursing students' satisfaction and perception of their first clinical placement: observational study].  

PubMed

Background. Clinical learning environments are defined as an interactive network of forces within the clinical context that influence students' learning outcomes. Nursing students' satisfaction could be strictly related to their learning outcomes. Aim. To analyze the first year nursing students' clinical learning experience and to identify the main determinants of students' satisfaction. Methods. The observational study was carried out in five Italian nursing degree courses. 420 students filled out the validated Italian version of the "Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision plus Nurse Teacher (CLES+T) scale" after the conclusion of their first clinical placement. Results. The mean values of the main sub-dimensions of CLES+T varied from 4.02 (pedagogical atmosphere) to 3.30 (supervisory relationship). Students were mainly satisfied with their clinical placement, however the findings showed statistical significantly differences among the five nursing courses. Discussion. The main determinants of the overall students' satisfaction are the nurse manager's leadership style and the integration between theoretical knowledge and everyday practice of nursing through the relationship among students, clinical tutors and nurse teacher. Conclusion. Our results may contribute to better understand nursing students' perception of their first clinical placement. However, further research are needed to evaluate which organizational factors and clinical training models may enhance the clinical learning experience. PMID:24762772

Comparcini, Dania; Simonetti, Valentina; Tomietto, Marco; Galli, Francesco; Fiorani, Catia; Di Labio, Luisa; Cicolini, Giancarlo

2014-01-01

315

Wikipedia as an evidence source for nursing and healthcare students.  

PubMed

Where students once were confined to the University library, they are now at liberty to wander through cyber-space at will. There is evidence to suggest that student have been very quick to exploit the opportunities that the Internet can offer them. Students frequently cited search engines such as Google and Web 2.0 information sharing sites such as Wikipedia as the first places they look when seeking information for an assignment. Although a number of disciplines have accepted that Wikipedia can be viewed as an accurate and legitimate evidence source nurse educators tend to view Wikipedia with a degree of suspicion. The purpose of this paper is to carry out an exploratory study of health and health related content on a sample of Wikipedia site with the overall intention of assessing the quality of their source and supporting information. A 10% sample of health related Wikipedia entries were evaluated, with a total of 2598 references assessed. In total 1473 (56%) of the references citied on the Wikipedia pages reviewed could be argued to come from clearly identifiable reputable sources. This translates to a mean number of reputable sources of M=29 per Wikipedia entry. The quality of the evidence taken obtained from the 2500 plus references from over 50 Wikipedia pages was of sufficiently sound quality to suggest that, for health related entries, Wikipedia is appropriate for use by nursing students. PMID:20646799

Haigh, Carol A

2011-02-01

316

Does mindfulness decrease stress and foster empathy among nursing students?  

PubMed

This pilot study of baccalaureate nursing students explored the effects of an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course on stress and empathy. The course was intended to provide students with tools to cope with personal and professional stress and to foster empathy through intrapersonal knowing. A convenience sample of 16 students participated in the course, used guided meditation audiotapes at home, and completed journal assignments. Stress and empathy were measured using paired sample t tests. Participation in the intervention significantly reduced students' anxiety (p > .05). Favorable trends were observed in a number of stress dimensions including attitude, time pressure, and total stress. Two dimensions of empathy--personal distress and fantasy--also demonstrated favorable downward trends. Regular home meditation was correlated with additional benefit. Participants reported using meditation in daily life and experiencing greater well-being and improved coping skills as a result of the program. Findings suggest that being mindful may also decrease tendencies to take on others' negative emotions. Coping with stress and fostering the affective domain are important facets of nursing education that may be facilitated by mindfulness training. PMID:15303583

Beddoe, Amy E; Murphy, Susan O

2004-07-01

317

The experience of international nursing students studying for a PhD in the U.K: A qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Educating nurses to doctoral level is an important means of developing nursing capacity globally. There is an international\\u000a shortage of doctoral nursing programmes, hence many nurses seek their doctorates overseas. The UK is a key provider of doctoral\\u000a education for international nursing students, however, very little is known about international doctoral nursing students'\\u000a learning experiences during their doctoral study. This

Catrin Evans; Keith Stevenson

2011-01-01

318

The lived experience of participation in student nursing associations and leadership behaviors: a phenomenological study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological research study was to obtain vivid descriptions of the lived experience of nurses who participated in a student nursing association (SNA) as students. Nursing graduates from five nursing programs in Long Island, New York were identified using a purposive sampling strategy. During individual interviews, the themes of the lived experiences of the participants emerged: (1) leadership: communication, collaboration and resolving conflict, (2) mentoring and mutual support, (3) empowerment and ability to change practice, (4) professionalism, (5) sense of teamwork, and (6) accountability and responsibility. Recommendations from the study included an orientation and mentoring of new students to the SNA by senior students and faculty. Additionally, nursing faculty could integrate SNA activities within the classroom and clinical settings to increase the awareness of the benefits of participation in a student nursing organization. Recommendations for future research include a different sample and use of different research designs. PMID:23189510

Lapidus-Graham, Joanne

2012-01-01

319

SAFETY: an integrated clinical reasoning and reflection framework for undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Nurse educators can no longer focus on imparting to students knowledge that is merely factual and content specific. Activities that provide students with opportunities to apply concepts in real-world scenarios can be powerful tools. Nurse educators should take advantage of student-patient interactions to model clinical reasoning and allow students to practice complex decision making throughout the entire curriculum. In response to this change in nursing education, faculty in a pediatric course designed a reflective clinical reasoning activity based on the SAFETY template, which is derived from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing RN practice analysis. Students were able to prioritize key components of nursing care, as well as integrate practice issues such as delegation, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act violations, and questioning the accuracy of orders. SAFETY is proposed as a framework for integration of content knowledge, clinical reasoning, and reflection on authentic professional nursing concerns. PMID:23244194

Hicks Russell, Bedelia; Geist, Melissa J; House Maffett, Jenny

2013-01-01

320

[Nursing students' perceptions of the factors in the field of general clinical experience which facilitate learning].  

PubMed

Learning through clinical experience forms an integral part of student nurses' academic and professional foundation. The extent to which learning is facilitated for student nurses is determined by the structuring of the field of clinical experience as well as by student nurses' perception of the field of clinical experience. The purpose of this study is to determine student nurses' perception of factors in the field of general clinical experience which facilitate learning. Literature pertaining to factors in the field of general clinical experience which impact on the learning by students was studied. A descriptive, exploratory survey was done through the medium of a questionnaire completed by B.Cur-students. The results of this study indicate, despite the fact that student nurses experience some aspects pertaining to learning in the general clinical field negatively, their overall impression is positive and favourable. Factors restraining learning were identified. Recommendations are made to counter the restraining factors. PMID:9791346

van Velden, C E; van Wyk, N C; van Niekerk, S E

1998-03-01

321

The impact of a virtual community on student engagement and academic performance among baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to present findings from a study which evaluated the effectiveness of a virtual community (an emerging pedagogical application) on student engagement and academic performance. Virtual communities mirror real-life through unfolding patient histories and relationship development over time. Students also become more engaged in learning by creating personally meaningful knowledge of a concept (Rogers & Stone, 2007). Virtual communities offer one teaching strategy to assist students in learning complex, health-related content in a contextualized manner. This quasi-experimental study involved first-semester baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a course at two campuses of a nursing program at a large university in the Southwest. Three key strategies assessed the impact of the virtual community on student engagement and learning: third-party observational measurement, end-of-class student/faculty surveys, and use of knowledge items in student exams for the class. Significant differences between the control and experimental group were found regarding learning engagement and communication exchanges; the groups appeared similar in ratings of quality of instruction and academic performance. Use of virtual communities can help nursing educators address the recent Carnegie Foundation study's (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010) counsel to implement "pedagogies of contextualization" in which theoretical and factual information about diseases and conditions are placed in the context of a patient's experience. PMID:23006650

Giddens, Jean; Hrabe, David; Carlson-Sabelli, Linnea; Fogg, Louis; North, Sarah

2012-01-01

322

The Efficacy of Academic Acceleration for Gifted Minority Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study supported the use of acceleration for gifted minority students in math. The gifted minority students in this study viewed taking accelerated math courses as exciting and beneficial for preparation for high school and college and particularly liked the challenges they encountered while taking advanced classes. They enjoyed working ahead…

Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Peternel, George

2010-01-01

323

Assessing critical thinking in baccalaureate nursing students: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attainment of critical thinking skills of students before and after curriculum revision of a baccalaureate nursing program. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) was used to measure the critical thinking ability of the students at program entry, midpoint, and at exist. The sample consisted of three cohorts of students: cohort 1 (n = 55) was the baseline class before curriculum revision, whereas cohorts 2 (n = 55) and 3 (n = 73) were the first two classes to experience the revised curriculum. The results revealed that cohort 2 achieved significantly higher critical thinking scores than the baseline cohort. Cohort 2 also improved dramatically on all subscales from test 1 to test 3. However, cohort 3 failed to demonstrate improved critical thinking scores over time. Findings have implications for measuring critical thinking. PMID:12120107

Beckie, T M; Lowry, L W; Barnett, S

2001-04-01

324

Self-confidence, gender and academic achievement of undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the self-confidence levels of nursing students and the factors related to such self-confidence. Data were obtained via a questionnaire for socio-demographic characteristics and a 'Self-Confidence Scale' prepared by the researchers. High self-confidence levels were noted in 78.6% of female students and 92.3% of male students. While 84.5% of second-year students had high self-confidence levels, this rate was 76% in fourth-year students. Female nursing students were significantly less self-confident than male students. Self-confidence should be nurtured in a caring nursing curriculum; however, there is a lack of clarity as to what confidence means, how it is perceived by students and what educators can do to instil self-confidence in nursing students. PMID:22583626

Kukulu, K; Korukcu, O; Ozdemir, Y; Bezci, A; Calik, C

2013-04-01

325

International nursing students and what impacts their clinical learning: literature review.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the sparse literature about international nursing students' clinical learning experiences, and also draws on the literature about international higher education students' learning experiences across disciplines as well as nursing students' experiences when undertaking international clinical placements. The paper aims to identify factors that may impact international nursing students' clinical learning with a view to initiating further research into these students' attributes and how to work with these to enhance the students' clinical learning. Issues commonly cited as affecting international students are socialisation, communication, culture, relationships, and unmet expectations and aspirations. International student attributes tend to be included by implication rather than as part of the literature's focus. The review concludes that recognition and valuing of international nursing students' attributes in academic and clinical contexts are needed to facilitate effective strategies to support their clinical practice in new environments. PMID:22939701

Edgecombe, Kay; Jennings, Michele; Bowden, Margaret

2013-02-01

326

Factors influencing career decisions: perspectives of nursing students in three types of programs.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of motivating factors and characteristics of the nursing profession on students selecting nursing as a career. Students from three types of programs in North Carolina (N = 495) were asked to complete a survey during the first month of their nursing program. Motivating factors influencing the decision to become a nurse were past experience with a loved one or self being ill and/or hospitalized, past health care work experience, and having a family member or friend who was a nurse. Characteristics about the nursing profession influencing career decisions were care and concern for others, job security, and variety of work settings. None of the motivating factors nor characteristics of the nursing profession differed among students from each program type. Data from this survey can be used to developed appropriate recruitment strategies for each program type. PMID:12710808

Larsen, Pamala D; McGill, Joan S; Palmer, Stephanie J

2003-04-01

327

Teaching civility to undergraduate nursing students using a virtue ethics-based curriculum.  

PubMed

As professionals, nurses are expected to engage in respectful relationships with clients, other health care professionals, and each other. Regulatory bodies set standards and codes of ethics for professional behavior in nursing that clearly communicate expectations for civility. However, the wealth of literature on incivility in the profession indicates that nurses often fall short of meeting these standards in their interactions with other nurses. Currently, few effective strategies exist for nurse educators to teach civility to nursing students and prepare them to engage in healthy relationships with their colleagues. This article argues for the use of virtue ethics as a philosophical framework for teaching civility to undergraduate nursing students. The pedagogical strategies proposed may help students contribute to the development of healthy workplaces. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(6):313-319.]. PMID:24814354

Russell, Martha Joan

2014-06-01

328

Student Nurse Attrition: Use of an Exit-Interview Procedure To Determine Students' Leaving Reasons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attrition from a nursing program in Wales was studied through exit interviews with 105 students who left from 1996-1999. Academic difficulties, wrong career choice, and family, health, and financial problems were key reasons. Almost half had at least two reasons for leaving, suggesting a complex interplay of factors. (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

Glossop, Christine

2002-01-01

329

The impact of the school of nursing curriculum on generic baccalaureate nursing students' ability to think critically at Austin Peay State University  

Microsoft Academic Search

Curricula in Schools of Nursing are beginning to reflect more criteria that have the potential to enhance students' ability to think critically. The purpose of this causal comparative study was to assess the impact of the Austin Peay State University School of Nursing curriculum on generic baccalaureate nursing students' ability to think critically by administering the Critical Thinking Assessment Test

Joe Ann Mallory Burgess

2003-01-01

330

Impact of organ donation education on US undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Experts advocate educational programs addressing misinformation regarding donation decisions to increase the potential donor pool. However, few researchers have measured outcomes with nursing students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, registering as an organ donor, and family discussions. This quasi-experimental study used a pretest-posttest design with a control group. The research group consisted of 42 volunteers and the control group consisted of 73 volunteers. The written survey included 15 true-false knowledge items and 8 Likert items asking about attitude toward donation, registering as an organ donor, and family discussion. Normally distributed data showed no significant differences between groups on the pretest. The research group had no change in knowledge level 3 months later, but the control group had a significantly decreased knowledge level at that point. More members of the research group than the control group registered as organ donors after the intervention (?2 = 4.5, P= .03). The control group had no change in registering as an organ donor between the pretest and posttest. Family discussions did not differ significantly from pretest to posttest in either group. One lecture/laboratory experience did make a difference in registering as an organ donor but not in discussing the decision with family members. Students can learn about organ donation from more than one specific class. Recommendations for educators and future research are provided. PMID:24919740

Kurz, Jane McCausland

2014-06-01

331

Enhancing nursing students' clinical placement experiences: a quality improvement project.  

PubMed

Clinical experience is recognised as the core of nursing education. Quality clinical placements across a variety of venues are vital to the development of capable and competent professionals. However there is evidence, both anecdotal and empirical, suggesting that students' clinical placement experiences are fraught with problems. The quality improvement project described in this paper aimed to improve the clinical learning experience of nursing students by strengthening communication and partnerships between the university and the two local health services. To achieve this goal, clinicians' perceptions of the problems related to clinical placements and their recommendations for improvement were explored. Focus groups, brainstorming sessions, personal interviews and surveys were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data. Problems and priority issues were identified as more than five hundred clinicians expressed their concerns, claims and issues. Key findings from the project are described under five themes: communication breakdown between the university and clinicians; mentorship; preparation for clinical placements; clinical competence; and graduates' readiness for practice. Utilising a quality improvement framework this project promoted vigorous debate and dialogue between university and health service partners. The nature and extent of the problems surrounding clinical placements were examined, high priority issues targeted for improvement, and the subsequent results measured through feedback from clinicians and students. The success of this project, although impressive in the early stages, will depend upon ongoing communication and evaluation to ensure sustainability of the improvements made. PMID:17083320

Levett-Jones, Tracy; Fahy, Kathleen; Parsons, Kimberly; Mitchell, Amanda

2006-10-01

332

Student nurses need more than maths to improve their drug calculating skills.  

PubMed

Nurses need to be able to calculate accurate drug calculations in order to safely administer drugs to their patients (NMC, 2002). Studies have shown however that nurses do not always have the necessary skills to calculate accurate drug dosages and are potentially administering incorrect dosages of drugs to their patients (Hutton, M. 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application. Nursing Standard 13(11), 35-38; Kapborg, I. 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, Student Nurses and Physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4), 389-395; O'Shea, E. 1999. Factors contributing to medication errors: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 8, 496-504; Wilson, A. 2003. Nurses maths: researching a practical approach. Nursing Standard 17(47), 33-36). The literature indicates that in order to improve drug calculations strategies need to focus on both the mathematical skills and conceptual skills of student nurses so they can interpret clinical data into drug calculations to be solved. A study was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of implementing several strategies which focussed on developing the mathematical and conceptual skills of student nurses to improve their drug calculation skills. The study found that implementing a range of strategies which addressed these two developmental areas significantly improved the drug calculation skills of nurses. The study also indicates that a range of strategies has the potential ensuring that the skills taught are retained by the student nurses. Although the strategies significantly improved the drug calculation skills of student nurses, the fact that only 2 students were able to achieve 100% in their drug calculation test indicates a need for further research into this area. PMID:16876919

Wright, Kerri

2007-05-01

333

Learning together: Using simulations to develop nursing and medical student collaboration.  

PubMed

Collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a core educational requirement cited by the Institute of Medicine Health Professions Education Report (2003). This descriptive study supports the Nursing Education Simulation Framework for designing simulations used as an interdisciplinary teaching strategy in health professions curricula. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the framework for the collaborative medical and nursing management of a surgical patient with complications. Simulation design features, student satisfaction, and self-confidence were measured. Results indicate both medical and nursing student groups'perceptions of the design features of the collaborative simulation were positive. Feedback and guided reflection were identified by both student groups as important simulation design features. Data analyzed from the Collaboration Scale suggest that designing simulations that place medical and nursing students together is beneficial for both the medical students and the nursing students. PMID:20397478

Reese, Cynthia E; Jeffries, Pamela R; Engum, Scott A

2010-01-01

334

Factors related to the nursing student-patient relationship: the students' perspective.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' perceptions of factors related to three types of student-patient relationship identified in an earlier study: mechanistic, authoritative and facilitative. Another aim was to identify which factors predict the type of relationship. A convenience sample of 310 Bachelor of Health Care students was recruited. The data were collected by using a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Data analysis used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, one-way analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regression. Older age was the only significant predictor of a facilitative relationship, whereas fourth-year studies and support received from a person other than supervisor predicted an authoritative relationship. Furthermore, students in authoritative and facilitative relationships had a more positive perception of the patient's attributes as a patient and of patient's improved health and commitment to self-care than students in a mechanistic relationship. A positive perception of the atmosphere during collaboration was more common among students in an authoritative relationship than in a mechanistic relationship. The findings of this study offer useful clues for developing nursing education and empowering patients with a view to improving the quality of nursing care. PMID:17935835

Suikkala, Arja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko

2008-07-01

335

The nurses' self-concept instrument (NSCI): a comparison of domestic and international student nurses' professional self-concepts from a large Australian University.  

PubMed

Professional self-concept is a critical driver of job satisfaction. In Australia, as international nursing enrolments rise, nursing is increasingly characterised by a professional body of international nurses who may differ from domestic Australian nurses in their nursing self-concept. At present, little is known about the extent to which domestic and international students nurses' self-concepts may differ. The present study aimed to elucidate and contrast domestic and international nursing students' self-concepts from one large Australian university. A total of 253 domestic (n=218) and international (n=35) undergraduate nursing students from a large public university in Sydney, Australia completed the Nurses' Self-Concept Instrument (NSCI). Multiple-Indicator-Multiple-Indicator-Cause (MIMIC) modelling was used to assess the effects of student group (domestic and international) on the latent self-concept factors of the NSCI. Domestic and international students' professional self-concepts were similarly high. MIMIC modelling demonstrated that domestic students had a higher patient care self-concept in comparison to international students. Results imply that it may be useful for Australian universities to foster strategies that enhance specific domains of self-concepts (e.g., care) which may be underdeveloped for at least some cultural groups within the international nursing student population compared with domestic nursing students. PMID:22000976

Angel, Elizabeth; Craven, Rhonda; Denson, Nida

2012-08-01

336

Research brief: using a Wiki to support student nurses learning discipline specific health terminology.  

PubMed

This study aimed to clarify whether a collaborative exercise using a Wiki to teach nursing students health-specific terminology resulted in better learning. In one New Zealand School of Nursing a list of health-related and discipline-specific terms was created, first-year nursing students were expected to learn these before their initial clinical practice. However, students found the terms difficult to learn. The use of a collaborative Wiki exercise to create a glossary of health terms was seen as a way to aid student learning, while also providing a learning environment where students would develop collaborative skills. PMID:24839746

Honey, Michelle; Doherty, Iain

2014-03-01

337

Teaching Nursing Research: Use of a Research Video To Enhance Students' Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A video containing narratives from a phenomenological study of Alzheimer's patients introduces nursing students to concepts, processes, methods, and ethical issues in research. It engages students in qualitative thinking and helps demonstrate the relevance of research to practice. (SK)

Sorrell, Jeanne M.; Cangelosi, Pamela R.

2002-01-01

338

Development and Evaluation of a Series of CAL Modules on Cell Biology for Undergraduate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a project at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom) that developed and evaluated modules for computer assisted instruction to teach cell biology to undergraduate nursing students. Topics include instructional effectiveness, feedback, and student attitudes. (LRW)

Wharrad, Heather; Kent, Christine; Allcock, Nick; Wood, Barry

2000-01-01

339

Nursing students' appraisal of their professional portfolios in demonstrating clinical competence.  

PubMed

Portfolios are increasingly used to demonstrate and assess competence in nursing practice, yet when introduced in our Australian nursing school, reactions from students were mostly negative. A follow-up survey sought students' perceptions about the portfolio. Respondents acknowledged the portfolio's intrinsic worth but reported little extrinsic value beyond passing the assessment. The authors discuss the implications and suggests strategies to improve portfolio use in undergraduate nursing education. PMID:19726966

Taylor, Christine; Stewart, Lyn; Bidewell, John

2009-01-01

340

Enhancing the ability of nursing students to perform a spiritual assessment.  

PubMed

According to the literature, a majority of nurses and nursing students report a lack of comfort and ability to perform a spiritual assessment. The researchers designed and implemented an intervention program to address the 4 barriers most frequently identified as obstacles to performing a spiritual assessment. They discuss this study and suggest teaching interventions to assist nursing students to assess and implement spiritual care. Researcher-developed tools are presented and can be made available for use. PMID:17496821

Hoffert, Donna; Henshaw, Christine; Mvududu, Nyaradzo

2007-01-01

341

An Exploratory Study of Nursing and Medical Students Health Promotion Counselling Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-ratings of self-efficacy for engaging patients in health-promotion activities were made by 41 nursing and 60 medical students. Nursing students had significantly higher knowledge and ability scores for counseling patients about exercise, nutrition, and injury prevention. Confidence in knowledge was stronger than counseling ability in both…

Laschinger, Heather K. Spence; Tresolini, Carol P.

1999-01-01

342

Enhancing Nursing Students' Medication Knowledge: The Effect of Learning Materials Delivered by Short Message Service  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using mobile phone short message service (SMS) to enhance knowledge of medications among nursing students. A quasi-experimental design was used. A convenience sample of 111 nursing students who were taking a pharmacology course at a university in southern Taiwan received an invitation to…

Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

2013-01-01

343

Undergraduate Nursing Students' Clinical Experiences in Rural and Remote Areas: Recruitment Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two urban Australian nursing students' stories of their experiences in clinical placements in rural and Aboriginal communities indicate their interest in and enthusiasm for returning to rural nursing after graduation. Unfortunately, many urban students are disadvantaged financially by the added expense of their rural clinical rotation. Assisting…

Neill, Jane; Taylor, Kerry

2002-01-01

344

Utilizing Undergraduate Nursing Students To Provide Health Education in Elementary Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes one elementary school's experience utilizing undergraduate nursing students as an alternative resource for providing health education. Nursing students observed in the classroom, prepared teaching plans, and presented topics. Participants reported that the experience was effective in relation to the levels of achievement attained by…

Drott, Patricia M.

2001-01-01

345

Filipino Nursing Students' Behavioral Intentions toward Geriatric Care: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anchored on the key constucts of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), this paper seeks to test a model that explores the influence of knowledge, attitude, and caring behavior on nursing students' behavioral intention toward geriatric care. A five-part survey-questionnaire was administered to 839 third and fourth year nursing students from a…

de Guzman, Allan B.; Jimenez, Benito Christian B.; Jocson, Kathlyn P.; Junio, Aileen R.; Junio, Drazen E.; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N.; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F.

2013-01-01

346

The Development of Nursing Students' Spirituality and Spiritual Care-Giving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a survey of 35 first-year and 18 fourth-year nursing students, most expressed strong awareness of personal spirituality and spiritual health and were able to identify behaviors that facilitated spiritual nursing care. Fourth-year students were more patient centered, focusing on supporting patients' beliefs. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

Pesut, Barbara

2002-01-01

347

Clinical environment as a learning environment: student nurses’ perceptions concerning clinical learning experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to describe student nurses’ perceptions of clinical learning experiences in the context of the clinical learning environment. We use the phenomenological approach by Colaizzi. The data was collected by unstructured interviews. Altogether 16 student nurses were asked to describe the significance of clinical learning experiences and good and bad learning experiences. Four elements sum

Mikaela von Bonsdorff

2003-01-01

348

Predictors of First Semester Attrition and Their Relation to Retention of Generic Associate Degree Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to develop a model showing the relationship of academic, socioeconomic, and motivational variables to students' attrition in a community college nursing program, in order to determine the students who pass, or not pass, first semester, generic, and associate degree nursing courses. The theoretical framework used in the…

Sandiford, Janice R.; Jackson, D. Kathy

349

Using Self-Efficacy to Assess the Readiness of Nursing Educators and Students for Mobile Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to assess the self-efficacy of nursing faculty and students related to their potential use of mobile technology and to ask what implications this technology has for their teaching and learning in practice education contexts. We used a cross-sectional survey design involving students and faculty in two nursing

Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Burton, Pamela A.; Park, Caroline L.; Qayyum, Adnan

2012-01-01

350

Individual differences in nurse and teacher training students' attitudes toward and use of information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students in both nurse and teacher training are now expected to learn to make effective use of IT for their profession. However, they enter training with a variety of experience in IT which will affect how they respond to further IT skills training. In this survey, 154 nursing and 128 teacher training students reported on the uses they had made

Jocelyn Wishart; Rod Ward

2002-01-01

351

[Sleep patterns and fatigue of nursing students who work].  

PubMed

It has been observed there is currently a growing interest in developing research regarding the sleep patterns of workers who must wake up very early or who work nights. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the levels of fatigue and the sleep patterns of nursing students who study during the day and work at night. Participants were thirty students who completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Sleep Journal for thirty days. It was found that sleep duration was longer among men compared to women on days off work, and when on vacation from school compared to the regular school period. Participants showed high levels of fatigue and sleepiness, characterized by the incidence of excessive daytime sleepiness. In conclusion, night workers who endure sleep deprivation have additional wake hours due to studying, thus causing high levels of fatigue, which may harm their performance at school and at work. PMID:23223735

Ferreira, Luciane Ruiz Carmona; de Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo

2012-10-01

352

National Association of School Nurses ISSUE BRIEF: School Health Nurse's Role in Education: Privacy Standards for Student Health Records  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a reprint of the National Association of School Nurses' "Issue Brief" on Privacy Standards for Student Health Records. It distinguishes between the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HI-PAA), clarifies which of these laws governs the privacy of student health…

Pohlman, Katherine; Schwab, Nadine

2003-01-01

353

Concept mapping. Does it improve critical thinking ability in practical nursing students?  

PubMed

Critical thinking is an essential skill taught at all levels of nursing education. This article reports on a study designed to determine if concept mapping is superior to traditional care planning as a teaching method for practical nursing students. Specifically, the study evaluated the effects of concept mapping as a teaching methodology on the development of critical thinking skills. A control group consisting of students taught through the traditional methodology was compared to two groups of students taught with concept mapping. Data were collected using the National League for Nursing Critical Thinking in Clinical Nursing Practice/PN Examination. Results indicated that students who were taught the nursing process using the traditional care planning method scored statistically significantly better on the examination than students taught with the concept mapping method. PMID:21923002

Maneval, Rhonda E; Filburn, Monica J; Deringer, Susan O; Lum, Glen D

2011-01-01

354

A capstone teaching project for undergraduate nursing students: development of a visual teaching-learning tool.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe an original teaching-learning capstone project designed to promote active learning by senior nursing students as they transition to professional practice. The centerpiece of the capstone experience is the creation of a three-dimensional educational tool called a Visual Project, which addresses the learning needs of patients, their families, or the nursing staff. Students create their project during the spring semester of their senior year, when they are paired with an experienced, baccalaureate-prepared nurse preceptor. Students present their projects to both the nursing unit in which they worked and the faculty and students of the nursing school. Students consistently express a sense of accomplishment when they present their projects and recognize that they themselves have undergone the same teaching-learning process that was the focus of their project. PMID:17547348

Epstein, Carol D

2007-05-01

355

Facilitating the career transition of second-career students into professional nursing.  

PubMed

This article describes the approaches used by the Second Careers and Nursing (SCAN) program to socialize second-career students into professional nursing. The pre-licensure phase of the program is guided by Schlossberg's transition theory of moving in, moving through, and moving out. Moving in involves setting expectations, from the admission interview to the two-day intensive orientation. Moving through entails imparting and instilling nursing's cultural content and values through the program's formal and informal curriculum. Moving out strengthens students' feelings of pride and their commitment to becoming professional nurses during a concentrated internship, NCLEX-RN preparation, and coaching for their first RN position. The article also reports on the socialization outcomes and lessons learned during the pre-licensure phase. Outcomes provide evidence that the SCAN program has successfully transitioned non-nursing college graduates into professional nursing by socializing them into the profession's knowledge, skills, and behaviors while they internalize nursing's values and goals. PMID:23586199

Dela Cruz, Felicitas A; Farr, Shirley; Klakovich, Marilyn D; Esslinger, Phyllis

2013-01-01

356

Nursing students' attitudes to health promotion to: implications for teaching practice.  

PubMed

For several decades now the World Health Organization has indicated the need for a reorientation of the health services away from focusing solely on illness and disease to one that considers both disease prevention and health promotion. Successive publications that guide public health policy both nationally and internationally reiterate the need for health promotion and the principles of health for all to become integral to the fabric of health care delivery. The role of the nurse as health promoters is well recognized. However despite acknowledgement by professional nursing bodies and nurse educators that health promotion forms a central tenet of undergraduate nurse education curricula, there are varied approaches to teaching and learning and little formal evaluation of the consequences of approaches taken. The aims of this study are to identify current health promotion curricular content within the Irish undergraduate nursing programme context; to measure nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion and to examine nursing students' reported lifestyle behaviours. PMID:21215497

Mooney, Bróna; Timmins, Fiona; Byrne, Gobnait; Corroon, Ann Marie

2011-11-01

357

Characteristics of unsafe undergraduate nursing students in clinical practice: an integrative literature review.  

PubMed

Providing quality clinical experiences for nursing students is vital to the development of safe and competent professional nurses. However, clinical educators often have difficulty identifying and coping with students whose performance is unsatisfactory. The purposes of this integrative review were to examine the extent and quality of the literature focusing on unsafe nursing students in clinical settings and to describe the characteristics of nursing students considered unsafe in clinical settings. A structured literature search yielded 11 relevant articles: five theoretical articles and six research studies. Analysis of findings revealed three themes: ineffective interpersonal interactions, knowledge and skill incompetence, and unprofessional image. The themes reflected the attitudes, actions, and behaviors that influenced students' ability to develop a safe milieu for client care. The findings provide clarity for early identification of students in need of increased support and facilitate clinical educators in meeting students' learning needs to ensure patient safety. PMID:21598859

Killam, Laura A; Luhanga, Florence; Bakker, Debra

2011-08-01

358

Facilitating student retention in online graduate nursing education programs: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Online education, a form of distance education, provides students with opportunities to engage in lifelong learning without the restrictions of time and space. However, while this approach meets the needs of employed nursing professionals, it poses some challenges for educators. Student retention is one such challenge. Student retention rates serve as measures of program quality and are reported to accrediting bodies. Therefore, it is imperative that administrators and program faculty implement comprehensive programs to ensure student retention. This review of the literature was designed to identify strategies to improve student retention in online graduate nursing education programs. The review includes 23 articles that address models, research, and best practices supported in nursing and higher education. The findings indicate that student retention in online programs is a multidimensional problem requiring a multifaceted approach. Recommendations for facilitating retention in online nursing programs include ensuring social presence and program and course quality, and attentiveness to individual student characteristics. PMID:24529796

Gazza, Elizabeth A; Hunker, Diane F

2014-07-01

359

Nursing student perceptions of intraprofessional team education using high-fidelity simulation.  

PubMed

High-fidelity simulation in health professional programs helps educators and students meet the challenges of increasingly complex clinical practice settings. Simulation has been used primarily to train nursing students either in interprofessional teams or within their respective nursing training levels. However, students' experiences of learning alongside others in different levels or years of the nursing program have not been explored. BSN students (N = 48) were placed in intraprofessional teams (i.e., one student from each nursing level) to manage acute pediatric and adult simulation scenarios. Students were instructed to manage the clinical scenario based on their level of clinical competence and education. Following debriefing, students responded to a satisfaction survey regarding their simulation experiences and their perceptions of learning within an intraprofessional nursing team. Project results suggest that intraprofessional educational experiences provide rich learning opportunities for both third-year and fourth-year nursing students. In addition, simulation provides a context within which to support intraprofessional nursing student education. PMID:20669872

Leonard, Brenda; Shuhaibar, Elaine L H; Chen, Ruth

2010-11-01

360

Public health intervention model: impact on Australian community and mental health nursing students' practice.  

PubMed

Recent Australian health care reform in all jurisdictions of government, have attempted to address the need to curtail the burden of chronic disease by adopting and or referring to a primary health care (PHC) approach. In this way, community health nurses are challenged to demonstrate their understanding and capacity to practice according to primary health care principles. Evaluated in this paper is the impact a community health nursing curriculum adaptation of the Public Health Intervention Model (PHIM) has had on students' understanding and application of PHC to community nursing practice. A thematic analysis was utilized to review student assessment tasks. Generated themes support the PHIM adaptation, as a means to facilitate students' cognitive learning of community nursing practice interventions 'greater than treating the wound', and thus this model is particularly pertinent to future Bachelor of Nursing curriculum development and Australian Community Health Nursing. PMID:20597856

Woods, Michelle A

2010-01-01

361

The role of the nurse teacher in clinical practice: an empirical study of Finnish student nurse experiences.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the role of the nurse teacher (NT) in supporting student nurse education in clinical practice. The paper draws on the outcomes of a study aimed at exploring student nurse experiences of the pedagogical relationship with NTs during their clinical placements. The participants (N=549) were student nurses studying on pre-registration nursing programmes in Finland. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation and ANOVA. The study showed that the core aspect of NTs work in clinical practice revolved around the relationship between student, mentor and NT. Higher levels of satisfaction were experienced in direct proportion to the number of meetings held between the student and NT. However, whilst the importance of this relationship has been reported elsewhere, an additional aspect of this relationship emerged in the data analysis. Those NT who facilitated good face to face contact also used other methods to enhance the relationship, particularly e-mail, virtual learning environment and texting. This outcome suggests that NT's interpersonal and communicative skills are as important as their clinical knowledge and skills in promoting effective learning in the clinical practice area. The paper argues for such approaches to be utilised within the emergent opportunities afforded by new communication and educational technologies. PMID:19232789

Saarikoski, Mikko; Warne, Tony; Kaila, Päivi; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

2009-08-01

362

Treating Nurses and Student Nurses with Chemical Dependency: Revising Policy in the United States for the 21st Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

For more than a century, the US nursing profession has been aware of substance abuse problems among its practitioners and\\u000a student nurses but has generally dealt with the issue by taking disciplinary action rather than pursuing nonpunitive options.\\u000a The latter course would allow more healthcare providers, following successful rehabilitation, to remain in the profession.\\u000a Since the early 1980s, the American

Todd Monroe; Frances Pearson

2009-01-01

363

Part 1. Undergraduate nursing evidence-based practice education: envisioning the role of students.  

PubMed

Nursing educators have embraced the integration of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the nursing education curriculum in numerous ways. As this review of the nursing pedagogy literature demonstrates, most of these approaches built upon long-standing commitments to helping students understand the scientific research process, think critically, and develop the information literacy skills that will enable them to find the evidence that can inform their practice. Many reports in the nursing pedagogy literature recounted various strategies used to teach EBP to nursing students. Another category of nursing pedagogy articles discussed ways that EBP education can be suffused throughout the nursing school curriculum. Few educators, however, have envisioned students as having a role beyond that of the mere recipients of EBP education. Nonetheless, a small but growing number of nurse educators have begun to envision students as enablers of practice change in clinical settings. These innovators advocate a pedagogical paradigm that places students into socially meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses as a means to promote the uptake of EBP in clinical settings. PMID:20129587

Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J; Branson, Jessica

2010-01-01

364

Student satisfaction with a Website designed for three nursing courses.  

PubMed

The website described was not designed to replace classroom teaching, but to serve as an additional tool for students attending a traditional course. Based on my experience and the data obtained from the evaluation questionnaire, the following points can be made: students are enthusiastic about the Internet and will access a web page that accompanies a particular course or courses a website can allow for objectives, not normally engendered by traditional methods, to be achieved. These may include, for instance, fostering a sense of community, providing new means of communication between professor and student and serving as a portal to the vast resources of the Internet. A single-theme website can effectively address the learning needs of students at different levels, in this case both undergraduate and graduate students A well-designed website can increase the visibility of the educational institution that sponsors it It is not easy to measure a website's effectiveness in helping students achieve traditional course objectives or its impact on student learning. The questionnaire results confirm students' satisfaction with the website and their belief that it was an important and useful learning tool. This is significant and positive. Future research is needed to measure the degree to which a website can increase learning in a particular area. The site required about 150 hours to construct and about 6-8 hours per week to maintain. This is a considerable amount of faculty time. Although I cannot speak for others, I firmly believe that this is a worthwhile investment. The website is clearly appreciated by students, and it seems logical to conclude that it is fulfilling some learning needs that may not be met by other methods. In addition, it provides the educator with a new vehicle for communication. It is exhilarating to create with new formats and to use expertise in a given area to reach students, foster community, and establish a presence beyond the classroom. Creating and maintaining a web page is labor intensive, but it is, in my opinion, worth the effort. I strongly urge nurse educators to explore the possibilities of developing websites to accompany individual courses and to consider even more interactive web pages that include online discussion groups and provide space for posting student work. An active website needs frequent maintenance and updates. I recommend that academic administrators recognize web authoring as a valid and legitimate activity and provide nursing faculty with necessary support. This might include workshops on web authoring or Internet use, released time or credited time for initial website design, and credit allocation for site maintenance. The Internet is the most extensive collection of information available. As webmaster and pathophysiology expert, I am guiding my students; as a teacher, I am both assuming and recognizing a new role. As a teacher, I need to assume the responsibility for guiding students to worthwhile resources in the subject area. The website is a portal to the world, but a portal that I oversee. PMID:10890841

Zwolski, K

2000-01-01

365

Clinical Scholar Model: providing excellence in clinical supervision of nursing students.  

PubMed

The Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) is a practice-education partnership focused on improving the outcomes of clinical nursing education by bridging the academic and service settings. An expert clinical nurse serves as a clinical scholar (CS) to coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the clinical education of nursing students in collaboration with school of nursing faculty. This article describes the model's evolution, how the model is differentiated from traditional clinical instruction roles and responsibilities, and the benefits to the collaborating clinical agency and school of nursing. PMID:16465092

Preheim, Gayle; Casey, Kathy; Krugman, Mary

2006-01-01

366

Nursing students' learning motivation toward technical knowledge and their ethics regarding patients' rights.  

PubMed

Nursing students must develop their abilities to provide appropriate nursing services. They need to acquire the level of nursing knowledge to pass the national examination according to Japanese law. Moreover, even if the awareness of the rights of people who receive nursing services increases, students must not have a sense of resistance toward those rights. Therefore, we investigated the factors associated with students' motivation to pass their examination and such a sense of resistance. We produced items related to reasons students wanted to become registered nurses with reference to job satisfaction and their learning environment (e.g., teachers' manners and school events unrelated to the examination). There were 3,417 female nursing students analyzed in 29 vocational schools that allow graduation after a 3-year study period (average age, 21.93 years [standard deviation, 5.44]). Older and third-year students had a stronger motivation to pass the examination and a weaker sense of resistance to people's rights compared with younger and first- to second-year students. Students who answered a "Lack of enthusiasm for becoming a registered nurse" had a weakened motivation and a strengthened sense of resistance. Factors enhancing students' motivation to pass their examination were "Professional commitment," "Desire for companionship," and "School events unrelated to the national examination." Factors strengthening students' sense of resistance to people's rights were "Living stability" and "Social appraisal." Teachers must develop methods to teach ethics so that their students respect the rights of people who receive nursing services and to ensure that they acquire the necessary nursing knowledge. PMID:23728504

Kudo, Yasushi; Hayashi, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

2013-01-01

367

Effective pedagogies for teaching math to nursing students: a literature review.  

PubMed

Improving mathematical competency and problem-solving skills in undergraduate nursing students has been an enduring challenge for nurse educators. A number of teaching strategies have been used to address this problem with varying degrees of success. This paper discusses a literature review which examined undergraduate nursing student challenges to learning math, methods used to teach math and problem-solving skills, and the use of innovative pedagogies for teaching. The literature was searched using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Education Resource Information Center databases. Key search terms included: math*, nurs*, nursing student, calculation, technology, medication administration, challenges, problem-solving, personal response system, clickers, computer and multi-media. Studies included in the review were published in English from 1990 to 2011. Results support four major themes which include: student challenges to learning, traditional pedagogies, curriculum strategies, and technology and integrative methods as pedagogy. The review concludes that there is a need for more innovative pedagogical strategies for teaching math to student nurses. Nurse educators in particular play a central role in helping students learn the conceptual basis, as well as practical hands-on methods, to problem solving and math competency. It is recommended that an integrated approach inclusive of technology will benefit students through better performance, increased understanding, and improved student satisfaction. PMID:22922029

Hunter Revell, Susan M; McCurry, Mary K

2013-11-01

368

Confidence-weighted testing: a descriptive study of Japanese nursing students.  

PubMed

Nurses' lack of self-confidence in their own nursing skills is one of the main reasons that novice nurses leave the profession in Japan. Nursing education must help students gain self-confidence in their nursing skills in order to allow more novice nurses to stay in their profession. In this study, we evaluated whether confidence-weighted testing feedback actually improves students' self-confidence in their basic nursing skills. Confidence-weighted testing, which provides quantifiable results, might allow students to objectively assess their skill-related self-confidence. Sixty-seven first-year nursing students took two confidence-rating examinations on the knowledge and practical skills related to pulse and blood pressure measurement of immobile patients. Feedback was given to each participant after the first examination. After the first examination with confidence-weighted testing feedback, students showed higher levels of self-confidence in their practical skills, but not in knowledge. The improvement of self-confidence in practical skills suggests that there is still room for improvement in confidence-weighted testing feedback in knowledge. Further research is required to identify more effective feedback methods to improve students' self-confidence levels in knowledge using the results of confidence-weighted testing. PMID:23855641

Aoyama, Michiyo; Tamura, Yumi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Yada, Mamiko; Miyawaki, Ikuko

2013-12-01

369

Perceived benefits of study abroad programs for nursing students: an integrative review.  

PubMed

Study abroad programs that off er health care experiences in another country have become an important method in nursing education to increase students' understanding of cultural competence and intercultural sensitivity and to present them with new ideas and opportunities for personal and career development. Despite the many alleged positive attributes associated with such programs, a gap exists in the overall understanding of the benefits obtained by undergraduate nursing students who study abroad. Using Cooper's framework, 13 studies that explored the benefits of study abroad programs for undergraduate nursing students were reviewed. Findings suggest that participation in a study abroad experience is associated with many benefits for nursing students, including various forms of personal and professional growth, cultural sensitivity and competence, and cognitive development. Although research outcomes are encouraging, the nursing literature regarding this topic is limited, and more rigorous research studies are needed to support this educational practice. PMID:24256000

Kelleher, Seán

2013-12-01

370

Motivation and international clinical placements: shifting nursing students to a global citizenship perspective.  

PubMed

Nursing programs are increasingly offering international clinical experiences as part of nursing curricula. The purpose of this study was to understand what motivates student nurses to take part in these experiences. Related to motivation, student awareness of emerging nursing discourses on global citizenship was also examined. As part of a qualitative study, nine undergraduate nursing students were interviewed about their motivations for choosing a clinical placement to a low-income country. While students appeared to have a sincere desire to make a difference, closer examination of the data revealed that the majority approached their international clinical placement in ways that could be construed as paternalistic to some degree, rather than reflective of broader professional imperatives such as social justice. This finding suggests that additional education preparation may be needed prior to these experiences; global citizenship frameworks may be helpful in shifting perspectives towards a more critical enquiry of global issues. PMID:24739330

Burgess, Caroline A; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Astle, Barbara

2014-01-01

371

[Nursing students' perception of the learning process in a hospital setting].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identijf how nursing students perceive and experience the learning process during curricular practice in a hospital setting. A qualitative, retrospective, documentary study was developed in an undergraduate nursing course. Data were comprised of 162 posts made by 34 students in the online discussion forum of the Learning Management System Moodle, during the first half of 2011. The following themes emergedfrom t he thematic content analysis: "nursing students' understanding about the professional practice," and "the teaching and learning process in the perspective of nursing students." The study demonstrated that the forum was a place for reporting experiences such as the description of the physical area, performing procedures, perception of nursing care activities, conJlicts with peers, coping with death and learning evaluation. The online discussion forum needs to be used by professors as a space of interaction so as to contribute to professional training. PMID:24930279

Alves, Elcilene Andreíne Terra Durgante; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

2014-03-01

372

Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

2002-01-01

373

Examination of Academic Self-Regulation Variances in Nursing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multiple workforce demands in healthcare have placed a tremendous amount of pressure on academic nurse educators to increase the number of professional nursing graduates to provide nursing care both in both acute and non-acute healthcare settings. Increased enrollment in nursing programs throughout the United States is occurring; however, due to…

Schutt, Michelle A.

2009-01-01

374

Messy boundaries: the benefits to teenage patients of being cared for by young nursing students.  

PubMed

Aims To record some of the advantages expressed by young inpatients at a district general hospital in relation to the blurring of professional boundaries when they are being cared for by children's nursing students of an age similar to their own. Method A phenomenological study to explore the lived experience of young people in hospital and of younger children's nursing students (aged under 20 years old) caring for them. Individual unstructured interviews were conducted with nine young patients and 11 children's nursing students. Findings Young people in hospital appreciate the company of younger nursing students. In relation to identity development and psychosocial wellbeing, these interactions could be highly beneficial. However, 'messy boundaries' can create ambivalence in professional identity for the students. Conclusion 'Messy boundaries' can enable therapeutic interactions that are beneficial to psychosocial wellbeing, but students may need support in balancing these with professional detachment. PMID:24708335

Shepherd, Jean

2014-04-01

375

A Strategy for Involving On-campus and Distance Students in a Nursing Research Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On-campus and distance nursing students conducted research projects and presented student posters (Year 1) and research papers (Year 2). Evaluations by on-site (n=55) and off-site students (n=93) indicated that students valued their active participation in the research process and the opportunity to present their work. There was a clear preference…

Shuster, George F.; Learn, Cheryl Demerth; Duncan, Robert

2003-01-01

376

Rediscovering the essence of nursing: exploring the impact of in clinical experience in Thailand for undergraduate nursing students from Australia.  

PubMed

Cultural competence is now widely recognised as an essential characteristic for undergraduate nursing students. Clinical experience in foreign countries has become increasingly popular as a strategy to enhance cultural awareness and competence. However, published research articulating the experience and outcomes of these initiatives is relatively rare, particularly from an Australian perspective. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative, exploratory research project. Individual semi-structure interviews were conducted with eight undergraduate nursing students before, during and at the conclusion of a four week clinical placement in Surin, Thailand. Data analysis identified the following major themes: first interview - anticipation; second interview - making a difference; contrasting worlds; and part of the group; third interview - reality check and group dynamics. These findings suggest that international clinical experience has potential benefits beyond the development of cultural competence. The importance of caring in nursing and the importance of group dynamics were particularly valued by student participants. PMID:21256636

Reid-Searl, Kerry; Dwyer, Trudy; Moxham, Lorna; Happell, Brenda; Sander, Teresa

2011-11-01

377

Toward a qualified yes: personal characteristics of postbaccalaureate nursing students and implementation of the clinical nurse leader role.  

PubMed

Anecdotal and research data suggest that psychological type and explanatory style influence individuals' day-to-day functioning. The assessment of these characteristics among postbaccalaureate students will support faculty in planning for students' educational programs and guide them as they provide support for the expansive role functions of, among others, the graduates of the newly proposed clinical nurse leader program. This article is a report of one study included in a longitudinal project examining the influence of psychological type and explanatory style on students' academic success. The questions addressed in this article are as follows: "How do psychological type and explanatory style differ between entering baccalaureate students and entering postbaccalaureate students?" and "How do experiences of depression and fatigue differ between these two groups of novice nursing students?" Findings suggest that postbaccalaureate students, although similar in psychological type to baccalaureate students, are significantly less depressed, less fatigued, and less positive in explanatory style than traditional baccalaureate students, indicating a potential need for support in addressing the demands of the roles that they will encounter as nurses. PMID:16459285

Dzurec, Laura Cox; Allchin, Lynn; Engler, Arthur J; Szarlan, John; Polifroni, E Carol; Brewer, Thomas

2006-01-01

378

Educating nursing students about quality care and safe practices in the AIDS epidemic.  

PubMed Central

Nursing students, as future health care providers, need comprehensive instruction about AIDS--the many manifestations of both the disease itself and the pandemic. As health educators and practitioners, nurses play a major role in safeguarding the health care setting and the community by their efforts in preventing transmission of the AIDS virus. Nurses are and will continue to be responsible for administering the major portion of the direct health care that AIDS patients require and for teaching basic nursing skills to other care givers. According to a 1987 survey of 461 nursing programs conducted by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, AIDS content is being incorporated into the curriculums of the majority of programs that responded. Students require an in-depth knowledge of AIDS to enable them to address effectively the needs of AIDS patients and their families. Because of the complex psychosocial, ethical, and legal issues, careful attention must be given to the development of students' skills in making clinical decisions that will promote effective nursing intervention when addressing problems in nursing care. Curriculums should also include assessment of the special needs of members of minority groups that are disproportionately affected by AIDS. Schools of nursing in colleges and universities can serve as key resources for developing curriculums, policies, and practice patterns that will assist the nursing community and the public in responding to the AIDS epidemic.

Spero, J R

1988-01-01

379

Nursing students' immediate responses to distressed clients based on Orlando's theory  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Nowadays, problem solving skills, clinical decision making ability and making a proper relationship to clients are essential necessities for nursing graduates; however there are few studies which investigated nursing students’ responses to clients with problematic situations based on nursing theories addressing interactions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nursing students’ immediate responses to distressed clients’ behaviors focusing on collaborative Orlando’s theory. METHODS: This exploratory study was assessed 60 nursing students’ responses to a simulated clients’ questionnaire based on Orlando’s theory in 2008. All of the students were enrolled in bachelor degree of nursing. The data were analyzed by dimensional content analysis to specify the key categories, according to concepts of Orlando’s theory. RESULTS: According to Orlando’s theory, students’ immediate responses to physical and mental problems of distressed clients were classified into 6 main categories: physical caring, uncertainty, assuring, recommending, asking information and explaining. The most frequent responses to clients’ behaviors were physical caring, assuring and recommending and most of the students were unable to respond to mental problems. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students responded to clients’ needs automatically and they did not consider clients’ ability in decision making. Medical diagnosis, physical caring and assuring were their main concerns and they were confused in responding to mental problems. Orlando’s theory emphasizes on nurse-client interactions and considers nurses’ perceptions, thoughts, and feelings. It views clients as a participant in care giving, so teaching this theory can enhance students’ communication skills and improve quality of nursing care.

Abdoli, Samereh; Safavi, Shadi Satat

2010-01-01

380

A collaborative health promotion effort: nursing students and Wendy's Team Up.  

PubMed

Community health nursing students, faculty, and Wendy's fast food restaurant conducted a 2-day health fair that provided health screening, counseling, and educational opportunities for the community, an exciting learning experience for the students, funds for the school of nursing, and good public relations for Wendy's. The authors describe the planning, implementation, and evaluation of this health fair as a student learning activity. PMID:1491827

Krupa, K C; Quick, M M; Andrews, A; Engelke, M K; Vincent, P

1992-01-01

381

Undergraduate nursing education in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing education in the United States began in the 1870s with hospital training schools modeled after the Nightingale plan. Presently there are three educational paths that students may take to become a registered nurse (RN). These are the baccalaureate degree (BS), the associate degree (AD) and the diploma. Accelerated nursing programs are also available for people who have a baccalaureate

Susan A. LaRocco

2010-01-01

382

From the Adult Student's Perspective: Accelerated Degree Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A qualitative study of an accelerated, cohort-based degree program identified four elements supporting adult learning: program structure, relationships, student identity, and beliefs about learning. A model of adult engagement in accelerated programs was developed with these components: adult competence, commitment to action, and work identity.…

Kasworm, Carol E.

2003-01-01

383

Clinical teachers as caring mothers from the perspectives of Jordanian nursing students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this transcultural qualitative study was to discover, describe and explain the meaning of a caring student-teacher encounter within the context of clinical education. Clinical teachers are registered nurses who have completed a university undergraduate nursing degree program and at least 1 year of post-registration clinical experience. They are employed as full-time staff of the faculty of nursing. Among the 19 Jordanian undergraduate nursing students interviewed, "clinical nurse teachers as caring mothers," emerged as an important theme. This paper describes the clinical teachers in their mothering roles, such as supporting, negotiating, reinforcing, transforming and releasing nursing students throughout their clinical practice. Understanding students' cultural beliefs and values provides possible predictors that could facilitate positive student-teacher relationships that could be used to plan the clinical education for nursing students. There is also a need to develop workshops in clinical teaching that would incorporate cultural awareness, especially in a multicultural student-teacher groups. PMID:12550150

Lopez, Violeta

2003-01-01

384

The relationship of ethics education to moral sensitivity and moral reasoning skills of nursing students.  

PubMed

This study described the relationships between academic class and student moral sensitivity and reasoning and between curriculum design components for ethics education and student moral sensitivity and reasoning. The data were collected from freshman (n = 506) and senior students (n = 440) in eight baccalaureate nursing programs in South Korea by survey; the survey consisted of the Korean Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire and the Korean Defining Issues Test. The results showed that moral sensitivity scores in patient-oriented care and conflict were higher in senior students than in freshman students. Furthermore, more hours of ethics content were associated with higher principled thinking scores of senior students. Nursing education in South Korea may have an impact on developing student moral sensitivity. Planned ethics content in nursing curricula is necessary to improve moral sensitivity and moral reasoning of students. PMID:22691600

Park, Mihyun; Kjervik, Diane; Crandell, Jamie; Oermann, Marilyn H

2012-07-01

385

Laughing at myself: beginning nursing students' insight for a professional career.  

PubMed

PURPOSE. This study examined the phenomenon and meaning of laughing at oneself as described by the lived experiences of student nurses. BACKGROUND. Studies in older populations revealed that maturity and experience, not necessarily age, made a difference in the ability to laugh at oneself, but little research has been conducted on nursing students and the ability to laugh at oneself. A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative design and phenomenological method was used. Face-to-face interviews with nine female nursing students were recorded and transcribed. Meaning statements were identified in the language of the participants and synthesized by the researcher. RESULTS. Findings suggest that beginning nursing students bring the experience of laughing at oneself into the nursing profession and it provides them with valuable insights into the challenges facing them in a nursing career. IMPLICATIONS. Major themes were that the ability to laugh at oneself helps nursing students to maintain a balanced perspective and to not take themselves too seriously. A potential for laughing at oneself helps in keeping a balance between tragedy and comedy in life. Other implications for nursing job satisfaction and job retention are discussed. PMID:19954466

Stein, Jeanne Venhaus; Reeder, Francelyn

2009-01-01

386

Supportive relationship: Experiences of Iranian students and teachers concerning student-teacher relationship in clinical nursing education  

PubMed Central

Background: Student-teacher relationship is a salient issue in nursing education and has long-lasting implication in professional development of nursing students. Nowadays, this relationship in clinical settings is different from the past due to changing in nursing education paradigm. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of students and teachers about student-teacher relationship in the context of clinical nursing education in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study that has been carried out adopting conventional qualitative content analysis approach, six bachelor nursing students and six clinical teachers in school of Nursing and Midwifery, were selected through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interview and participant observation were used for data collection. Interviews transcribed verbatim and analyzed using conventional content analysis through the process of data reduction and condensation, coding and also generating the categories and themes. Results: Results of the study showed the existence of a type of relationship in clinical education in which supportive actions of clinical teachers were prominent. These supportive actions appeared as three major categories including educational support, emotional support and social support which emerged from data. Conclusion: The results of this study explicit the ways that support could be provided for students in their relationship with clinical teachers. It also determines the teachers’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive relationship on students’ learning and the best possible outcomes of their education in clinical settings.

Heydari, Abbas; Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

2013-01-01

387

Differentiating Curriculum for Gifted Students by Providing Accelerated Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gifted students come to education with unique learning characteristics. They can learn faster, deeper, and broader, and they come to school with readiness, with starting points different from their classmates and need to be allowed to move forward with a faster pace. In order to provide challenging curriculum for gifted students, eight options for acceleration have been available on the

Den-Mo Tsai

2007-01-01

388

Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

2006-01-01

389

Effective classroom teaching methods: a critical incident technique from millennial nursing students' perspective.  

PubMed

Engaging nursing students in the classroom environment positively influences their ability to learn and apply course content to clinical practice. Students are motivated to engage in learning if their learning preferences are being met. The methods nurse educators have used with previous students in the classroom may not address the educational needs of Millennials. This manuscript presents the findings of a pilot study that used the Critical Incident Technique. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the teaching methods that help the Millennial generation of nursing students feel engaged in the learning process. Students' perceptions of effective instructional approaches are presented in three themes. Implications for nurse educators are discussed. PMID:24429374

Robb, Meigan

2013-01-01

390

Interprofessional education between nurse prescribing and medical students: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Prescriptive authority has been extended in the UK to include non-medical healthcare professionals. However, uptake and use of prescribing by these professionals are inconsistent. Collaborative practice is key for its successful implementation, and such practice is a benefit of interprofessional education (IPE). This study explored the feasibility of IPE between nurse prescribers at Anglia Ruskin University and 3rd year medical students at the University of Cambridge. Three focus groups and three individual interviews were undertaken with nurse and medical prescribing students, following shared learning sessions on drug interactions, prescription writing and legal issues and accountability. Benefits included the opportunity for mutual understanding of prescribing training and role. Medical students valued the opportunity to be able to gain an insight into nurses' views about prescribing. The level and breadth of pharmacology knowledge of medical and nursing students differed. Location of sessions, scheduling of classes and balancing of students acted as barriers to learning. PMID:23025499

Courtenay, Molly

2013-01-01

391

The meaning of participation in an international service experience among baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

Nine nursing students volunteered their spring break to provide nursing service in a rural, economically challenged area of Guatemala. The students were involved in all aspects of planning and preparation for the international experience. All nine students participated in a qualitative study which sought to describe the meaning of participation in an international service experience among baccalaureate nursing students. Data were collected through reflection journals, evening group conversations in Guatemala, written narratives, and a post-experience focus group interview. Six themes were uncovered using content analysis: (a) Clarification of career path/goals, (b) Improved understanding of social justice and globalization issues, (c) Motivation to continue service work, (d) Discovering the reciprocity of relationships with others, (e) Appreciation for the whole person, and (f) Finding a way to respect the sacredness of the experience. This study lends support for the positive benefits of short-term international experiences for nursing students. PMID:16646887

Evanson, Tracy A; Zust, Barbara L

2004-01-01

392

"Well, was it worth it?" The value of teletutorials for bachelor of nursing students.  

PubMed

The Deakin University Faculty of Nursing conducts a Bachelor of Nursing degree which is available via the distance education mode. The faculty has as its central focus the value of nursing practice and espouses a belief in students' active learning. This paper examines the use of teletutorials as a process for realising the philosophy of the faculty in relation to students' learning outcomes. Although expensive in terms of financial and human resources, teletutorials bridged the gap between the faculty's philosophical statements and students' perceptions and needs. PMID:2102694

Thompson, D; Taylor, B

393

Prerequisites for electronic learning: Iranian postgraduate nursing students' points of view  

PubMed Central

Background: Nursing education is mostly conducted through electronic educational programs. We aimed at assessing the Iranian postgraduate nursing students’ skills and attitudes regarding the electronic education. Materials and Methods: Ninety-seven postgraduate nursing students were surveyed using questionnaires assessing their individual-social and educational characteristics, electronic education skills, and attitudes toward the electronic education. Results: Scores of the students’ skills in using computer and the Internet were significantly associated with gender and the number of hours working with computer and the Internet at home and work. Conclusion: Prerequisites for performing electronic education programs are present at moderate levels in Iran.

Yaghoubi, Alireza; Abdollahzadeh, Farahnaz; Rahmani, Azad; Kazemi, Leila; Ghabili, Kamyar; Golzari, Samad E. J.; Dehdilani, Marjan

2013-01-01

394

Attitudes to absenteeism among diploma nursing students in Ireland – an exploratory descriptive survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nurse education within Ireland is currently in a transition period. October 2002 heralds the national implementation of a third-level four-year degree based programme for the preparation of nurses, to replace the current three-year diploma system. Anecdotally, one concern expressed by nurse educators regarding this move, is the regulation and monitoring of student non-attendance. This study explores the views of those

Fiona Timmins; Michael Kaliszer

2002-01-01

395

Nursing education and beliefs towards tobacco cessation and control: a cross- sectional national survey (GHPSS) among nursing students in Greece  

PubMed Central

Background Within the healthcare system, nurses have the ability to influence their patients' smoking habits through counselling. Therefore, it is of great importance to appropriately train health professionals on smoking cessation strategies with the aim to help them provide advice to their patients. In light of the above, the objective of this study was to assess the association between Greek nursing students' beliefs towards tobacco control/smoking cessation and the professional training received. Methods During February 2009, we conducted a cross sectional national survey among all 3rd year nursing students of the two university based nursing departments in Greece (University of Athens, University of the Peloponnese). The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) questionnaire was applied and following written informed consent 73% provided a completed questionnaire (n = 192/263 enrolled students). Results Overall, 33% were current active smokers, while 74% reported ever to experiment smoking. In regards to their beliefs towards tobacco control policies, non smokers were more positive in regards to banning smoking in restaurants (94% vs. 61%, p < 0.001), in bars and cafes (82% vs. 34%, p < 0.001), and all public places (93% vs. 51%, p < 0.001) when compared to current smokers. In comparison with students who had not received training on the importance of asking patients about their smoking habits, those that did were more likely to believe that nurses should have a role in smoking cessation and should act as role models for their patients. Conclusions Resources should be invested in improving the quality of undergraduate education in nursing departments in Greece with respect to tobacco control and smoking cessation.

2011-01-01

396

Differences in preferences for rural job postings between nursing students and practicing nurses: evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Lao People's Democratic Republic  

PubMed Central

Background A discrete choice experiment was conducted to investigate preferences for job characteristics among nursing students and practicing nurses to determine how these groups vary in their respective preferences and to understand whether differing policies may be appropriate for each group. Methods Participating students and workers were administered a discrete choice experiment that elicited preferences for attributes of potential job postings. Job attributes included salary, duration of service until promotion to permanent staff, duration of service until qualified for further study and scholarship, housing provision, transportation provision, and performance-based financial rewards. Mixed logit models were fit to the data to estimate stated preferences and willingness to pay for attributes. Finally, an interaction model was fit to formally investigate differences in preferences between nursing students and practicing nurses. Results Data were collected from 256 nursing students and 249 practicing nurses. For both groups, choice of job posting was strongly influenced by salary and direct promotion to permanent staff. As compared to nursing students, practicing nurses had significantly lower preference for housing allowance and housing provision as well as lower preference for provision of transportation for work and personal use. Conclusions In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, nursing students and practicing nurses demonstrated important differences in their respective preferences for rural job posting attributes. This finding suggests that it may be important to differentiate between recruitment and retention policies when addressing human resources for health challenges in developing countries, such as Laos.

2013-01-01

397

Examining the Effectiveness of a Preceptorship on Clinical Competence for Senior Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preceptorships are models of training in which a nurse, referred to as a preceptor, is assigned to one nursing student, for the purpose of facilitating learning in the clinical setting. There is a problem in the lack of documented evidence of the effectiveness of preceptorship programs in the education of nursing students, particularly the…

Shepard, Leslee H.

2009-01-01

398

Development of Guidelines Related to Riverside Community College Nursing Student Mandatory Assignment to AIDS Patients in the Clinical Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop Associate Degree nursing program guidelines for Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, regarding mandatory nursing student assignment to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, and student refusal of such assignments in a clinical setting. During the 1990 fall semester, RCC's Nursing

Kross, Carolyn Sue

399

Effects of Two Interventive Approaches on the Academic Achievement of Nursing Students at a Traditional Black College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of two intervention methods on academic achievement as represented by spring semester grades in senior nursing curriculum courses were examined. The students were enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing education program at a predominantly black college. The sample of nursing students was divided into three groups based on the intervention…

Frierson, Henry T., Jr.; And Others

400

Modeling students' conceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a multiple choice test designed to probe students' conceptual understanding of the relationships among the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration. The test was administered to more than 800 students enrolled in standard or honors introductory physics courses or a second-year physics majors course. The test was found to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test score with grade, course level, and the Force Concept Inventory were moderate to strong. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the common incorrect response that velocity must be in the direction of the acceleration or net force, up to 30% of students gave ``partially correct'' responses, for example that velocity can be either opposite to or in the direction of the acceleration or net force but not zero. The data also suggests that for some students their evolution of understanding may progress through this kind of partially incorrect understanding.

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Heckler, Andrew F.

2009-11-01

401

Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.  

PubMed

The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

2013-07-01

402

In real time: exploring nursing students' learning during an international experience.  

PubMed

Abstract Nursing education has increasingly turned to international learning experiences to educate students who are globally minded and aware of social injustices in local and global communities. To date, research with international learning experiences has focused on the benefits for the students participating, after they have completed the international experience. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how nursing students learn during the international experience. The sample consisted of eight nursing students who enrolled in an international learning experience, and data were collected in "real time" in Zambia. The students were observed during learning activities and were interviewed three times. Three major themes emerged from the thematic analysis: expectations shaped students' learning, engagement facilitated learning, and critical reflection enhanced learning. Implications are discussed, related to disrupting media representations of Africa that shape students' expectations, and educational strategies for transformative learning and global citizenship. PMID:24150212

Afriyie Asenso, Barbara; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Astle, Barbara

2013-01-01

403

Student, tutor and staff nurse perceptions of the clinical learning environment.  

PubMed

The aim of this exploratory study was to describe and compare student nurses (n=142), staff nurses (n=54) and nurse tutors (n=8) perceptions of the clinical learning environment (CLE), and to identify factors that enhanced or inhibited student learning. The setting was a private hospital in Penang, Malaysia. Data were collected using a structured, self-administered questionnaire that consisted of six a priori subscales. Principal component analysis supported a six factor solution and a reduction in the number of items from 44 to 34. Participants' overall perception of the CLE was positive, though there were significant differences in 5 of the 6 subscales between the three groups. For students and their tutors, the most positive component of the CLE was 'supervision by clinical instructors'. Staff nurses reported more favourably on the learner friendliness of the CLE than did students or tutors. Factors that enhanced student learning included students' and staff nurses' attitude towards student learning, variety of clinical opportunities, sufficient equipment, and adequate time to perform procedures. Factors that hindered student learning were: overload of students in the clinical unit, busy wards, and students being treated as workers. PMID:22277167

Chuan, Ooi Loo; Barnett, Tony

2012-07-01

404

Five reasons for the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health.  

PubMed

Prevention is better than cure. Public health plays an important role in promoting prevent medicine. To obtain the abilities to provide appropriate nursing services, learning public health is necessary for students who want to become registered nurses. When teachers teach public health to nursing students, it is important to motivate them to learn it. Therefore, we investigated the reasons for the lack of motivation to learn public health by conducting a questionnaire survey. The subjects were female nursing students in 29 vocational schools in Kanagawa and Chiba prefectures of Japan that allow graduation after a 3-year study period. We asked the students whether or not they had completed the subject of public health and analyzed those students who answered affirmatively. We analyzed 1,553 respondents whose average age was 22.6 ± 5.2 years (range, 18 to 45). Using factor analysis, we discovered the 5 reasons that lead to the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health: "Difficulties acquiring knowledge of public health," "Inappropriate attitudes of public health teachers," "Thinking lightly about the national examination in the field of public health," "Lack of understanding the importance of learning public health," and "Future plans that do not specialize in public health." Using multiple linear regression analysis, these 5 reasons were significant predictors for the lack of students' motivation. Older students also had significantly less motivation to learn public health than did younger students. When teachers instruct their students, they should teach public health better with the present knowledge. PMID:24172685

Kudo, Yasushi; Hayashi, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Emiko; Tsunoda, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

2013-01-01

405

Pathways to Information Literacy: An Information Literacy Skills Program for B.S. Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A joint program of instruction was created between the University of Northern Colorado's Michener Library and School of Nursing. This expanded bibliographic instruction program was based on a proposal that outlined the need for information literacy instruction in nursing education, enumerated the possible benefits of such instruction to students

Fox, Lynne M.; And Others

406

Discussion Time: A Developmental Project to Facilitate the Socialization of Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to develop and implement a curriculum for a series of group sessions designed to assist students in associate degree nursing programs in the socialization process of becoming a nurse. During the curriculum development phase of the project, specific plans and procedures were formulated for 10 monthly sessions that were…

Steinhoff, Mary E.

407

Changing Answers on Multiple-Choice Examinations Taken by Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The answer sheets of 122 nursing students showed that 119 changed at least 1 answer; 93.3% of those who changed answers either gained or did not lose points by changing; changing answers on psychiatric nursing exams made more difference than on medical-surgical tests. However, those who made the smallest number of changes tended to have higher…

Nieswiadomy, Rose M.; Arnold, Wilda K.; Garza, Chris

2001-01-01

408

A Comparison of the Performance of Registered Nurse Students in Flexible and Traditional Clinical Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment was conducted at the University of Maryland at Baltimore to determine if performances would differ for registered nurses enrolled in a baccalaureate program in nursing depending on whether they participated in a flexible clinical scheduling (FLEX) program or in the traditional (non-FLEX) program. Fifty-four students took part in the…

Wolfe, Mary L.; Sands, Rosetta F.

409

How Do Turkish Nursing Students Plan Their Career after the Graduation?: A Questionnaire Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research was planned as a cross-sectional and descriptive study for the purpose of determining nursing students' expectations from a workplace and what department, area, and positions they want to work in after graduation. The research population was comprised of the four university-based schools of nursing in Ankara province. The sample was…

Yildirim, Dilek; Kececi, Ayla; Bulduk, Serap

2011-01-01

410

A Clinical Experience for Pharmacy Students in a Skilled Nursing Facility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the University of California-San Francisco, a multidisciplinary teaching group from dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social/behavioral sciences leads a multidisciplinary student team in a clinical experience in a nursing home. The program provides specialized experience in geriatric care and encourages teamwork. (MSE)

Leeds, Andrew L.

1993-01-01

411

Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

2010-01-01

412

Increasing Physical Activity in Nursing Home Residents Using Student Power, Not Dollars  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing home programs committed to providing quality care need to investigate innovative ways to meet today's budget challenges. The purpose of this article is to describe a creative collaboration between a nonprofit nursing home facility and a suburban university. Through service-learning, undergraduate students planned and implemented…

Romack, Jennifer L.

2004-01-01

413

Retention and Application of Information Technology Skills among Nursing and Midwifery Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pre-registration nursing and midwifery students are under considerable pressure to acquire the necessary information technology (IT) skills by the time they embark on a professional nursing career. There is a multitude of research findings detailing the use of computer-based learning materials, IT training initiatives and how such materials are…

Ip, Barry; Jones, Steve; Jacobs, Gabriel

2007-01-01

414

Supporting student nurses learning in and through clinical practice: the role of the clinical guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practice learning is an important part of the curriculum and accounts for approximately 50% of the pre-qualifying nursing programme in the United Kingdom. However, the nature of practice learning is very often ill defined, and mentors and nurse teachers apply a range of models to enhance learning in practice settings.Supporting students to learn is an important function for both educators

Debbie Roberts

2003-01-01

415

The Effect of a High-Fidelity Home Health Simulations on Nursing Students' Clinical Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With an increasing number of patients receiving nursing care in outpatient settings, it is the responsibility of nursing education programs to provide students with adequate training to enable them to develop the skills necessary to provide safe, effective care in diverse environments, including the home. Providing care to patients in their own…

Crytzer, Michele Leigh

2011-01-01

416

Critical Thinking Skills of Baccalaureate Nursing Students at Program Entry and Exit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The critical-thinking skills and dispositions of 38 nursing students were measured at entry and graduation using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test and Dispositions Inventory. Nursing curriculum significantly improved critical-thinking abilities, especially evaluation and inductive reasoning. Dispositions also improved. (SK)

Thompson, Cesarina; Rebeschi, Lisa M.

1999-01-01

417

Facilitated Unfolding of Human Relations Skills in the Baccalureate Nursing Student  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A course called "growth groups" was developed in an upper division baccalaureate nursing program to facilitate the unfolding of human relations skills in the nursing student. This article explains the unique dimensions of the course, its philosophical assumptions, its implementations, and its evaluation. (Editor/TA)

Ceriale, Linda

1976-01-01

418

The Values Profile of Nursing Undergraduate Students: Implications for Education and Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Values Scale results were compared for 152 nursing and 111 management undergraduates. Personal development and altruism were most important for nursing students, who had significantly lower means than the management sample on a t-test for lifestyle, advancement, autonomy, authority, creativity, economic, and risk values. (SK)

Thorpe, Karran; Loo, Robert

2003-01-01

419

Irish nursing students' changing levels of assertiveness during their pre-registration programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Stress and bullying have been found to be common problems in a number of studies of Irish nursing and midwifery. Victims of bullying need high levels of assertiveness to enable them to withstand the stress of victimisation. It was deemed important to measure nursing students' level of assertiveness prior to, and near completion of, their pre-registration education programme.Aim. To

Cecily M. Begley; Michèle Glacken

2004-01-01

420

Retention and application of information technology skills among nursing and midwifery students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pre?registration nursing and midwifery students are under considerable pressure to acquire the necessary information technology (IT) skills by the time they embark on a professional nursing career. There is a multitude of research findings detailing the use of computer?based learning materials, IT training initiatives and how such materials are beneficial to learners. There is, however, relatively little in terms of

Barry Ip; Steve Jones; Gabriel Jacobs

2007-01-01

421

Predicting Graduation Status of Nursing Students Using Entering GPA and Grades in Algebra, Biology, and Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was undertaken at Morton College, in Illinois, to examine the relationship of entering grade point average (GPA) and grades in prerequisite support courses in algebra, biology, and chemistry to graduation in the college's nursing program. A sample was developed of 255 students admitted to the nursing program in 1990, 1991, and 1992 and…

Spahr, Anthony E.

422

Enabling nursing students to focus on the Ottawa Charter and the nurses role in tackling inequalities in health through international exchange.  

PubMed

Student nurses in a transatlantic exchange program explored the role of registered nurses in five countries' public health systems. The Ottawa Charter provided a framework for students to examine the nurse's responsibilities in public health. Students took practice placements in geographically rural a reason another continent and explored inequalities in health care. If nurses are to understand their role in the health care system then they must be taught the scope of their practice including their role in health promotion,public health practice and community development. For this project nursing instructors developed an assignment relevant to the aims and suitable for students in all five nursing programs. Only three of 48 students offered an assignment which focused on building healthy public policy. Nurse educators need to explore this further to ensure nurses of the future are aware of their role and responsibilities in this area and have skills to work effectively to influence and build healthy policy. The international student exchange supported the students' developing understanding of the breadth of initiatives around the globe where nurses are actively engaged in addressing inequalities of health. Findings from an analysis of their assignments are presented in this evaluative report. PMID:20556881

Aarts, C; Nordstrom, P M; Koskinen, L; Juhansoo, T; Mitchell, M P; Marquis, F; Chassé, F; Critchley, K; Campbell, B; Hemingway, A

2010-07-01

423

Perceptions of nursing: confirmation, change and the student experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has identified a number of negative societal perceptions of nursing related to gendered stereotyping, subordination to doctors, low academic standards, limited career opportunities and poor pay and conditions, and importantly how these perceptions may affect levels of recruitment into nursing. Focusing specifically on nurses, research has also considered the extent to which these societal perceptions are realities in their

David A Brodie; Gavin J Andrews; Justin P Andrews; Gail B Thomas; Josephine Wong; Lorna Rixon

2004-01-01

424

Work Values Evolution in a Baccalaureate Student Nurse Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Differences related to degree aspiration, desired nursing career specialty, and other nursing-related biographical variables were found among the four classes of a sample of 408 full-time non-RN female subjects in a baccalaureate nursing program. These differences were associated with shifts in the work values patterns of the subjects. (Author)

Dietrich, Marie C.

1977-01-01

425

The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true…

de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

2009-01-01

426

Self-esteem and self-efficacy as predictors of attrition in associate degree nursing students.  

PubMed

There is a serious and growing shortage of nurses in the United States, and the high rate of student attrition from nursing programs has further added to this problem. The challenge for schools of nursing is to recruit increased numbers of qualified candidates into their programs and to determine ways to decrease the rate of student attrition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life stressors were significantly related to student attrition in first-semester associate degree nursing students. A descriptive correlational design and nonprobability convenience sample of first-semester associate degree nursing students was used. Data were gathered using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Holmes and Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale. Findings indicated that self-esteem was significantly associated with student attrition. Results from this study provide the basis for targeted interventions designed to decrease student attrition rates in associate degree nursing programs. PMID:23691923

Peterson-Graziose, Virginia; Bryer, Jennifer; Nikolaidou, Maria

2013-06-01

427

Undergraduate nursing student's attitudes towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

The aim of this quantitative study was to determine the attitudes of Australian nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS. This research study was conducted among second year undergraduate nursing students at a university in South Australia, during August 2007. The survey tool consisted of six demographic questions and the AIDS Attitude Scale. This questionnaire was completed by 396 students, giving a response rate of 94.7%. The vast majority (95.7%) of students participating in this study demonstrated very positive attitudes towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS and only 4.3% demonstrated negative attitudes. No statistically significant differences were found in attitude score based on participants' age, gender, previous HIV/AIDS education, previous nursing experience or previous experience of caring for someone with HIV/AIDS. A statistically significant difference in AIDS attitude score was found in relation to participants' country/region of citizenship, with nursing students from China, East Asia, South East Asia, and Central Asia and Middle East having more negative attitudes than students from other countries/regions. As an increasing number of nursing students have been recruited to Australia from these countries/regions, nurse educators need to be aware of such differences when planning and delivering HIV/AIDS educational programs in tertiary institutions. PMID:21333413

Pickles, David; King, Lindy; Belan, Ingrid

2012-01-01

428

Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

Messmer, Sherry

2009-01-01

429

Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

Roediger, Jeanette

430

Beyond Basic Skills: A Collaboration between a Resource Center and a Department of Nursing for High-Risk Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a multifaceted intervention program for high-risk nursing students, indicating that it provides reading guides, active learning techniques, and master tutors. Discusses outcomes from the first year of implementation, highlighting positive results for the master tutors, learning contracts, and reading guides. Reviews future program…

Smukler, Barbara; Kramer, Deborah

1996-01-01

431

Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

Biggers, Thompson; And Others

432

Survey of alcohol and other drug use attitudes and behaviors in nursing students.  

PubMed

Statewide nursing student alcohol and other drug (AOD) use attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Response was 929/2017 (46%) (practical nursing [n = 173/301] 57.3%; diploma and associate degree in nursing [n = 282/417] 67.6%; bachelor of science in nursing [n = 474/1299] 36.5%). Nearly 44% reported inadequate substance abuse education. Past-year AOD use included tobacco 36.9%, marijuana 6.8%, sedatives 4.6%, and opioids 2.6%. Past-year AOD-related events included blackouts 19.8%, class/work under the influence 6.3%, patient care under the influence 3.9%, lowered grades/job evaluations 6.6%, and legal charges 3.6%. Heavy drinking was reported by 28.9%. Practical nursing (PN) students most often reported tobacco use and sedative use, whereas Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN) students most often reported marijuana use. Family histories of alcohol-related problems and drug-related problems were reported, respectively, by 48.1% and 19.2% of respondents; 51.1% reported at least one of these. PN students most often reported such family histories. Nursing educational systems should proactively address student AOD prevention, education, and assistance. PMID:19591059

Baldwin, Jeffrey N; Bartek, Jean K; Scott, David M; Davis-Hall, R Ellen; DeSimone, Edward M

2009-01-01

433

Defining pass/fail nursing student clinical behaviors phase I: moving toward a culture of safety.  

PubMed

Achieving safe patient care underlies all of clinical nursing education. Nurse educators are professionally, legally, and ethically expected to anticipate safety risks for patients and prevent students from causing harm to patients in the clinical arena. When a student's behavior or behaviors pose a threat to patient safety, that student may be subject to a failing grade in the clinical nursing course. However, determining what student behaviors will result in failure in a clinical nursing course is challenging for even the most experienced nurse educators. Moving from a culture of blame to a culture of safety is also challenging. The authors developed a multiphase project to facilitate that move. Phase I, the focus of this article, began with a qualitative study. Focus groups of part-time and ranked faculty in baccalaureate nursing programs were conducted. The goal was to begin to identify faculty perspectives regarding nursing student behaviors that result in failure in a clinical course. One major theme (context and patterns) and five subthemes (safety, thinking, ethics, communication, and standards) with clarifiers emerged from this study. Plans for the next four phases of the multiphased project are presented. PMID:21834376

Tanicala, Martha L; Scheffer, Barbara K; Roberts, Melina S

2011-01-01

434

Nursing Students' Smoking Behaviors and Smoking-Related Self-Concept.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purposes of this pilot study were to describe: (a) the relationships between baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students' smoking-related current self-concept, possible selves, and smoking behaviors; (b) the smoking behaviors of a selected sample of BSN nurs...

M. B. Smith

2003-01-01

435

Students practice essential components of community health nursing in home health care.  

PubMed

Because home health differs from community health nursing, using home health agencies as clinical sites to teach community health nursing may be inappropriate. This retrospective descriptive study compared the perceptions of students who took community health before it included a home health placement with those whose course included home health. Mailed surveys were returned from 28(63.6%) of the 44 students enrolled prior to the home health placements and from 30(60%) of the 50 students enrolled afterwards. Students whose experience included home health rated the home visit experience significantly better in terms of providing them an opportunity to perform health promotion and to care for family as client. They found the course more relevant, felt safer in making home visits, and were more likely to consider working in community health nursing. This study supports using home health agencies as clinical placements for community health nursing if they are supplemented with aggregate-level experiences. PMID:8950713

Bradley, P J

1996-12-01

436

Dose and sequence of simulation and direct care experiences among beginning nursing students: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Accumulating suggests human patient simulation is an effective instructional technique. Simulated clinical experiences may be a reasonable substitute for direct care experiences. Educators and regulators need to know what mix of simulation and direct care promotes learning and how these experiences can be designed to help nursing students achieve essential outcomes. The goal of this pilot study was to identify a model to promote development of clinical judgment among beginning nursing students. Principles related to types of learning and practice (blocked by type or interleaved) were used in exploring simulation and direct care design schema. Using a 50% interleaved simulation design schema, robust clinical judgment scores and positive perceptions of learning were identified among beginning students participating in a basic nursing concepts and skills course. Further study is warranted to determine whether this schema is effective in other nursing courses or with novice-level students from diverse health care disciplines. PMID:23061524

Schlairet, Maura C; Fenster, Mark J

2012-12-01

437

Retention of African-American students in baccalaureate nursing programs: are we doing enough?  

PubMed

With the increasing minority population in the United States, much attention has been given to the lack of diversity among health care professionals, specifically nursing. Since the 1960s, the federal government has provided financial resources to institutions of higher education whose purpose was to diversify the health care profession. Historically, these resources have supported initiatives that primarily focused on the recruitment of minority students into higher education. These efforts temporarily increased the enrollment of students from varying racial and ethnic backgrounds. However, without established retention initiatives in place, the attrition rates for students from diverse backgrounds far exceeded the enrollment rates. Consequently, the nursing workforce continues to be a predominantly White female profession. In order for schools of nursing to create a workforce reflective of its patient population, both nursing education and institutions of higher education must be committed to implementing initiatives to increase the retention and graduation rates of minority students. PMID:15176015

Childs, Gwendolyn; Jones, Rosalind; Nugent, Katherine E; Cook, Pamela

2004-01-01

438

Predicting Student Nurse Academic Failures: An Analysis of Four Baccalaureate Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was done of pre-admission or early performance predictors of persistence versus academic failure among baccalaureate program nursing students. As part of a larger longitudinal research project, 155 students from four successive classes of students admitted to the program were studied, using multiple predictor and criterion variables. The…

Wold, Jean E.; Worth, Charles

439

Nursing students'experience of care planning activities in clinical education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarises a research studyinquiring into the experiences of nursing students of their practice of individualised care planning as a learning activity. The survey was conducted in the final stage of the students' education and concerned three groups of students in the years 1990, 1992 and 1993 who were asked to evaluate their main clinical placements in surgical, medical

Ingrid Thorell-Ekstrand; Hjördis Bjorvell

1995-01-01

440

Barriers and Gateways: A Study of Nursing Students' Utilisation of Learning Support Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 150 first-year nursing students indicated that 65% had been referred to the learning development center. Older students admitted through nontraditional access points were more likely to self-refer; younger students were more reluctant to access learning support resources, although they lacked effective learning strategies. (SK)

Stewart, Lyn; Mort, Pam; McVeigh, Carol

2001-01-01

441

Characteristics of "Best" and "Worst" Clinical Teachers as Perceived by Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Faculty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Characteristics that distinguished "best" and "worst" clinical teachers as perceived by baccalaureate nursing students and faculty were identified and comparisons were made of student and faculty perceptions. Twenty-eight clinical teachers and their 173 undergraduate students participated in the study, which was conducted at seven university…

Mogan, Judith; Knox, Janet E.

442

Information literacy skill development and life long learning: exploring nursing students' and academics' understandings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives The aim of this study was to map information literacy (IL) skill development in the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) content; identify educational practices in courses to asses students' information literacy (IL) skills; explore BN students' understandings of their IL skill development; and explore students' and academics' understandings of the link between IL skills and life long learning. Design The

Robyn Nayda; Elaine Rankin

443

Effectiveness of a Low-fidelity Simulation Experience in Building Confidence among Advanced Practice Nursing Graduate Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundHuman patient simulators are increasingly being integrated into nursing curricula; however, there is a gap in the literature supporting the use of human patient simulators among advanced practice nursing students.

Jennifer Tiffen; Nicole Graf; Susan Corbridge

2009-01-01

444

Accelerated Learning, Suggestopedia, and the Adult Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the possibility of conducting adult education courses based on the Accelerated Learning (A.L.) methodology and of evaluating its advantages and disadvantages vis a vis more traditional methods. It is not clear that the A.L. materials produce better results. Further study is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the entire A.L.…

Schlick-Renner, Monique; Truscott, Sandra

1994-01-01

445

Accelerated Learning, Suggestopedia, and the Adult Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of suggestopedia and accelerated learning (AL) techniques in a 10-week French-as-a-Second-Language course for 13 adult learners. Course organization, lesson plans, and results, focusing on the effectiveness of AL techniques in short-term courses, are examined. (two references) (MDM)

Schlisk-Renner, Monique; Truscott, Sandra

1994-01-01

446

Strategy to Educate Nurse Practitioner Students About the 5-a-day Initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: To be able to describe a strategy to educate nurse practitioner students about the 5-A-Day InitiativeStudents (n=28) enrolled in a nurse practitioner program completed an assignment designed to evaluate their personal consumptions of fruits and vegetables. The Five-A-Day Initiative was discussed prior to this assignment and involved: learning about the 5-A-Day Initiative (knowledge and comprehension), completing three-day diet

K. S. Calabro; J. D. Radcliffe; R. Anding

1996-01-01

447

A service-learning experience to teach baccalaureate nursing students about health policy.  

PubMed

Incorporating health promotion strategies in practice, and in particular within healthy public policy based on the Ottawa Charter, is widely recognized as within the mandate of nursing, although evidence suggests that nurses are reluctant to take on this role. An innovative strategy was developed to facilitate baccalaureate nursing students' learning about healthy public policy by immersing them in a real-world service-learning experience. Students partnered with a population, assessed the determinants of health, and implemented a population health promotion strategy that included attention to a health policy issue. Students identified strengths and weaknesses of the existing policy and were required to propose recommendations for change that addressed the social justice issues. Students presented their work to faculty, students, and community partners and developed a written position paper on the topic. Students evaluated the service-learning experience as an excellent experiential learning opportunity. PMID:21417191

O'Brien-Larivée, Catherine

2011-06-01

448

Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

Delahoyde, Theresa

449

The status of academic integrity amongst nursing students at a nursing education institution in the Western Cape.  

PubMed

Honesty is regarded as a basic ethical value in all educational programmes, and academic integrity is of undisputed importance in educational environments. The literature reviewed revealed that academic dishonesty is wide-ranging and also encountered in the nursing education environment. This phenomenon is of concern to the nursing fraternity because of the proven positive correlation between unethical academic practices and future unethical professional behaviour. Limited research data regarding academic dishonesty at nursing education institutions in South Africa and this correlation motivated the present study. The purpose was to examine the status of academic integrity amongst nursing students at a nursing education institution in the Western Cape. Formulated objectives guided investigation of several variables which impact upon academic integrity, for example the incidence of and student perceptions around academic dishonesty.A quantitative, descriptive survey design was used, with a self-reported questionnaire (based on literature review and study objectives) designed to obtain information about academic dishonesty. Provision was also made for qualitative input from the respondents by including three open-ended questions.It was found that academic dishonesty was a reality at the nursing education institution where this study was done. Cheating associated with plagiarism and assignments was identified as the main problem area. An unacceptably high level of dishonesty in completion of practical records was also an area of concern. The main recommendations are development and implementation of a code of honour and implementation of comprehensive academic integrity policies at the nursing education institution, with practical measures aimed at combating cheating in tests and examinations. PMID:23327765

Theart, Cecilia J; Smit, Ilze

2012-01-01

450

The professional socialization of graduating students in generic and two-plus-two baccalaureate completion nursing programs.  

PubMed

This non-experimental, descriptive study explored the differences in professional socialization between graduating students of two-plus-two baccalaureate completion nursing programs and generic baccalaureate nursing (BSN) programs. The survey population was graduating students from NLN-accredited baccalaureate nursing programs in a 15-state region. Autonomy, noted as a mark of professionalism, was measured by the Nursing Activity Scale developed by Schutzenhofer. No significant difference was found between the level of professional socialization of graduating students of two-plus-two baccalaureate completion nursing programs and generic BSN programs. No significant difference was found in professional socialization between students from the two basic RN education programs prior to BSN completion. A positive, but not significant, correlation was found between professional socialization and years of employment as an RN. No significant relationship was found between professional role socialization and area of major nursing experience for the baccalaureate completion nursing students. PMID:15344370

Clark, Connie L

2004-08-01

451

[Option and evasion of a bachelor's degree programme in nursing evaded students' perception].  

PubMed

Qualitative study, developed in a Federal University in southern Brazil aiming to know the motives for choosing and evading a Bachelor's degree programme in Nursing, in the evaded students 'perception. The data were collected through a questionnaire sent by e-mail to 19 evaded students. The 9 questionnaires that returned were submitted to Qualitative Textual Analysis, and two categories emerged motives to opt for the nursing programme and motives to evade from the nursing programme. The results showed that the option for the programme is associated to personal vocation, perception of Nursing as a profession of care, and its closeness to the health area. Evasion seems to be related to passing the first option of undergraduate programme, ignorance about the profession, financial difficulties, and professional depreciation. We demonstrated that greater emphasis should be put on promoting knowledge about the nursing work, areas of activity and attributions. PMID:23155591

Barlem, Jamila Geri Tomaschewski; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Bordignon, Simoní Saraiva; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; da Silveira, Rosemary Silva; Zacarias, Caroline Ceolin

2012-06-01

452

Utilising the Hand Model to promote a culturally safe environment for international nursing students.  

PubMed

The rising number of international students studying outside their own country poses challenges for nursing education. Numbers are predicted to grow and economic factors are placing increasing pressure on tertiary institutions to accept these students. In adapting to a foreign learning environment international students must not only adapt to the academic culture but also to the social cultural context. The most significant acculturation issues for students are English as a second language, differences in education pedagogy and social integration and connectedness. Students studying in New Zealand need to work with M?ori, the indigenous people, and assimilate and practice the unique aspects of cultural safety, which has evolved in nursing as part of the response to the principles underpinning the Treaty of Waitangi. The Hand Model offers the potential to support international nursing students in a culturally safe manner across all aspects of acculturation including those aspects of cultural safety unique to New Zealand. The model was originally developed by Lou Jurlina, a nursing teacher, to assist her to teach cultural safety and support her students in practising cultural safety in nursing. The thumb, represents 'awareness', with the other four digits signifying 'connection', 'communication', 'negotiation' and 'advocacy' respectively. Each digit is connected to the palm where the ultimate evaluation of The Hand Model in promoting cultural safety culminates in the clasping and shaking of hands: the moment of shared meaning. It promotes a sense of self worth and identity in students and a safe environment in which they can learn. PMID:22225732

Mackay, Bev; Harding, Thomas; Jurlina, Lou; Scobie, Norma; Khan, Ruelle

2012-03-01

453

Learning and engagement with a virtual community by undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

Virtual communities are an emerging innovative teaching application in nursing education. The purpose of this multisite study was to examine variables associated with student-perceived benefits and utility among undergraduate nursing students using a virtual community. The study involved 350 student participants enrolled in 5 baccalaureate nursing programs using a virtual community. Data were collected using surveys, with a descriptive and comparative approach for data analysis. The relationship between the use of the virtual community and perceived benefits among learners was substantial: r = .416 (