Sample records for accelerated particle beam

  1. Acceleration of trapped particles and beams

    E-print Network

    Er'el Granot; Boris Malomed

    2011-07-30

    The dynamics of a quantum particle bound by an accelerating delta-functional potential is investigated. Three cases are considered, using the reference frame moving along with the {\\delta}-function, in which the acceleration is converted into the additional linear potential. (i) A stationary regime, which corresponds to a resonance state, with a minimum degree of delocalization, supported by the accelerating potential trap. (ii) A pulling scenario: an initially bound particle follows the accelerating delta-functional trap, within a finite time. (iii) The pushing scenario: the particle, which was initially localized to the right of the repulsive delta-function, is shoved to the right by the accelerating potential. For the two latter scenarios, the life time of the trapped particle, and the largest velocity to which it can be accelerated while staying trapped, are found. Analytical approximations are developed for the cases of small and large accelerations in the pulling regime, and also for a small acceleration in the stationary situation, and in the regime of pushing. The same regimes may be realized by Airy-like planar optical beams guided by a narrow bending potential channel or crest. Physical estimates are given for an atom steered by a stylus of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and for the optical beam guided by a bending stripe.

  2. Jacobi equations and particle accelerator beam dynamics

    E-print Network

    Ricardo Gallego Torrome

    2012-03-27

    A geometric formulation of the linear beam dynamics in accelerator physics is presented. In particular, it is proved that the linear transverse and longitudinal dynamics can be interpret geometrically as an approximation to the Jacobi equation of an affine averaged Lorentz connection. We introduce a specific notion reference trajectory as integral curves of the main velocity vector field. A perturbation caused by the statistical nature of the bunch of particles is considered.

  3. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  4. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  5. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  6. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  7. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  8. An expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Searfus, R.M.; Hernandez, J.E.

    1989-01-12

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  10. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  11. Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator Carl B. Schroeder1 structure is the transverse instability of the particle beam. INTRODUCTION Plasma-based accelerators have. The electromagnetic wake field response of a hollow plasma channel to a driver (laser or charged particle beam

  12. Imaging by injection of accelerated radioactive particle beams.

    PubMed

    Llacer, J; Chatterjee, A; Alpen, E L; Saunders, W; Andreae, S; Jackson, H C

    1984-01-01

    The process of imaging by detection of the annihilation gamma rays generated from positron emitters which have been injected into a patient by a particle accelerator has been studied in detail. The relationships between patient dose and injected activity have been calculated for C-11, N-13, C-15, F-17, and Ne-19 and measured for C-11 and Ne-19 with good agreement with the calculations. The requirements for imaging of the small amounts of activity that can be injected safely have been analyzed in terms of one specific application of the radioactive beam injection technique, that of Bragg peak localization in support of radiotherapy by heavy ions. The characteristics of an existing camera with sufficient sensitivity and spatial accuracy for that task are described. Results of the calculations of radioactive beam flux requirements are shown. PMID:18234615

  13. BEAM DYNAMICS: Conceptual and technological evolutions of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Teng C.

    2009-06-01

    We give here an ordered list of all types of particle accelerators and exhibit how each type evolves conceptually and/or technologically from the preceding. This is in contrast to the usual “history of particle accelerators" in which unrelated accelerator types are listed in the chronological order. It is hoped that this discussion and understanding of the rationale and logic in the evolution of one accelerator type to the next will help to educe future inventions.

  14. Direct particle acceleration by two identical crossed radially polarized laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Salamin, Yousef I. [Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-07-15

    Electrons and {alpha} particles injected midway between two ultrahigh intensity crossed laser beams of radial polarization are shown to be accelerated in vacuum to several gigaelectron volts and to have average energy gradients in excess of 150 GeV/m. A unique model of the crossing beams is suggested, which maximizes the particle energy gain and minimizes the particle-beam diffraction.

  15. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  16. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  17. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-04

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  18. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines.

  19. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 Automated detection and analysis

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 0 Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations Daniela M (particle) accelerators [Geddes et al. (2009); Tajima & Dawson (1979)] model the acceleration of electrons

  20. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J. [Center for Advanced Accelerators, KERI, Seongju-Dong 28-1, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  1. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  2. Accurate modelling of charged particle beams in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjonaj, E.; Lau, T.; Schnepp, S.; Wolfheimer, F.; Weiland, T.

    2006-11-01

    A higher order, energy conserving discretization technique for beam dynamics simulations is presented. The method is based on the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) formulation. It utilizes locally refined, non-conforming grids which are designed for high spatial resolution along the path of charged particle beams. Apart from this formulation, the paper introduces a class of general symplectic integrators which conserve discrete energy in a modified sense. Specialized split-operator methods with optimum dispersion properties in the direction of particle motion are, additionally, derived. The application examples given in the paper are performed in a high performance computing environment. They include the self-consistent simulation of the RF electron gun developed by the Photo Injector Test Facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ) project and the computation of short range wake fields for ultra-relativistic electron bunches.

  3. The Application of Radiation and Particle Beams from Laser Plasma Wakefield Accelerators to Oncology

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    strengths of electric field as Potential of LWFA for Medical Applications A particle accelerator is a device to recent improvements in laserplasma wakefield accelerator (LWFA) technology, high quality electron beams sources for medical application. Xrays with energies of a few MeV represent the vast majority of the range

  4. Radiological dose calculations for the particle beam fusion accelerator upgrade (PBFA-U)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Y Khater; M. E Sawan

    1995-01-01

    Biological dose rate calculations are performed for different locations in the vicinity of the target chamber and diode of the particle beam fusion accelerator upgrade (PBFA-U) facility. The facility is to be used for research on light ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion. Depending on the diagnostic shots, Bremsstrahlung radiation as well as neutrons are produced. On interacting with the

  5. Applied-B ion diode experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. L. Dreike; E. J. T. Burns; S. A. Slutz; J. T. Crow; D. J. Johnson; P. R. Johnson; R. J. Leeper; P. A. Miller; L. P. Mix; D. B. Seidel; D. F. Wenger

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed with an Applied-B ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I, with peak voltage, current, and power of approximately 1.8 MV, 6 MA, and 6 TW, respectively. The purpose of these experiments was to explore issues of scaling of Applied-B diode operation from the sub-TW level on single module accelerators to the multi-TW level

  6. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  7. Plasmas in particle accelerators: adiabatic theories for bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-03-03

    Three different formalisms for discussing Vlasov's equation for bunched beam problems with anharmonic space charge forces are outlined. These correspond to the use of a drift kinetic equation averaged over random betatron motions; a fluidkinetic adiabatic regime analogous to the theory of Chew, Goldberger, and Low; and an adiabatic hydrodynamic theory.

  8. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis. Previously, we have described the application of a set of algorithms to automate the data analys

  9. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  10. Particle beams in ultrastrong laser fields: direct laser acceleration and radiation reaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-03-01

    Several aspects of the interaction of particle beams with ultrastrong laser fields are discussed. Firstly, we consider regimes when radiation reaction is not essential and it is demonstrated that employing chirped laser pulses, significant improvement of the direct acceleration of particles can be achieved. Results from single- and many-particle calculations of the particle acceleration, in vacuum, by plane-wave fields, as well as in tightly-focused laser beams, show that the mean energies and their spreads qualify them for important applications. Secondly, we investigate the effect of radiation reaction in electron-laser-beam interactions. Signatures of the quantum radiation reaction during the interaction of an electron bunch with a focused superstrong ultrashort laser pulse can be observed in a characteristic behavior of the spectral bandwidth, and the angular spread of the nonlinear Compton radiation on the laser pulse duration. Furthermore, it is shown that the radiation reaction effects can be employed to control the electron dynamics via the nonlinear interplay between the Lorentz and radiation reaction forces. In particular, it is shown that an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head- on with a strong bichromatic laser pulse can be deflected in a controllable way, by changing either the relative phase or the relative amplitude between the two frequency components of the bichromatic field.

  11. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  14. Particle acceleration fields derived from a wavefront-divided laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. C.

    1998-12-01

    In a crossed-laser-beam linear accelerator, the longitudinal acceleration field is obtained by crossing two fundamental Gaussian laser beams with a ? phase difference from one another. We show by numerical calculation that a comparable acceleration field can be obtained by crossing two half-Gaussian laser beams wavefront-divided from a fundamental Gaussian laser beam. Since the relative phase between the two wavefront-divided, half-Gaussian beams is determined by a dielectric step at the splitting point, the ? relative phase can be preserved even though background acoustic noises are present.

  15. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-print Network

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  16. Principles of Charged Particle Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This learning resources comprise a healthy introduction to charged particle acceleration. The site, by Stanley Humphries, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at University of New Mexico, amounts to an online textbook (.pdf) introducing the theory of charged particle acceleration. The book's fifteen chapters (with bibliography) summarize "the principles underlying all particle accelerators" and provide "a reference collection of equations and material essential to accelerator development and beam applications."

  17. Loss-proof self-accelerating beams and their use in non-paraxial manipulation of particles' trajectories.

    PubMed

    Schley, Ran; Kaminer, Ido; Greenfield, Elad; Bekenstein, Rivka; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    Self-accelerating beams--shape-preserving bending beams--are attracting great interest, offering applications in many areas such as particle micromanipulation, microscopy, induction of plasma channels, surface plasmons, laser machining, nonlinear frequency conversion and electron beams. Most of these applications involve light-matter interactions, hence their propagation range is limited by absorption. We propose loss-proof accelerating beams that overcome linear and nonlinear losses. These beams, as analytic solutions of Maxwell's equations with losses, propagate in absorbing media while maintaining their peak intensity. While the power such beams carry decays during propagation, the peak intensity and the structure of their main lobe region are maintained over large distances. We use these beams for manipulation of particles in fluids, steering the particles to steeper angles than ever demonstrated. Such beams offer many additional applications, such as loss-proof self-bending plasmons. In transparent media these beams show exponential intensity growth, which facilitates other novel applications in micromanipulation and ignition of nonlinear processes. PMID:25355605

  18. Loss-proof self-accelerating beams and their use in non-paraxial manipulation of particles’ trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schley, Ran; Kaminer, Ido; Greenfield, Elad; Bekenstein, Rivka; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai

    2014-10-01

    Self-accelerating beams—shape-preserving bending beams—are attracting great interest, offering applications in many areas such as particle micromanipulation, microscopy, induction of plasma channels, surface plasmons, laser machining, nonlinear frequency conversion and electron beams. Most of these applications involve light-matter interactions, hence their propagation range is limited by absorption. We propose loss-proof accelerating beams that overcome linear and nonlinear losses. These beams, as analytic solutions of Maxwell’s equations with losses, propagate in absorbing media while maintaining their peak intensity. While the power such beams carry decays during propagation, the peak intensity and the structure of their main lobe region are maintained over large distances. We use these beams for manipulation of particles in fluids, steering the particles to steeper angles than ever demonstrated. Such beams offer many additional applications, such as loss-proof self-bending plasmons. In transparent media these beams show exponential intensity growth, which facilitates other novel applications in micromanipulation and ignition of nonlinear processes.

  19. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  20. Quality Particle Beams by Laser Injection into Plasma Accelerators using Colliding Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, R. E.; Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Shadwick, B. A.; Mardahl, P.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2001-10-01

    The first self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of electron injection into a plasma wake field by colliding laser pulses are presented. This method for injecting electrons in a laser wake field has been proposed recently by Esarey and coworkers [ E. Esarey, R. F. Hubbard, W. P. Leemans, A. Ting and P. Sprangle, "Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997)]. An intense pump pulse generates a plasma wake field. Forward going and backward going injection pulses collide at some distance behind the pump pulse generating a slow ponderomotive beat wave so that plasma electrons can be trapped in the fast wake field and accelerated to high energies. We have modified XOOPIC [ J. P. Verboncoeur,A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Phys. Comm 87,199 (1995)] to run 2D numerical simulations of the colliding pulse scheme. Our simulations show that injecting particles just above the minimum energy for trapping on an orbit that remains within the region of transverse focussing leads to quality beams, with normalized transverse emittances of a fraction of mm-rad and energy spreads less than a MeV. Results of parameter studies will be presented.

  1. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-31

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies.

  2. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1982-09-21

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  3. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  4. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  5. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N.

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  6. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, T F; Bonini, A L; Lima, R R; Maidana, N L; Malafronte, A A; Pascholati, P R; Vanin, V R; Martins, M N

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed. PMID:23020369

  7. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B. [Franklin Scientific Services (work performed while Mr. Franklin was employed by Defence Research Establishment Atlantic); Barry, P.J. [Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, P.O. Box 1012, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Z7 (CANADA)

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  9. A stochastic model for the semiclassical collective dynamics of charged beams in particle accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salvatore De Martino; Silvio De Siena; Fabrizio Illuminati

    1998-01-01

    A recent proposal (see quant-ph\\/9803068) to simulate semiclassical\\u000acorrections to classical dynamics by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations\\u000ais applied to the specific instance of charged beam dynamics in particle\\u000aaccelerators. The resulting picture is that the collective beam dynamics, at\\u000athe leading semiclassical order in Planck constant can be described by a\\u000aparticular diffusion process, the Nelson process, which is

  10. Production of high power microwaves for particle acceleration with an FEL bunched electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Marchese, G.; Padois, M.; Rullier, J. L.; Donohue, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Among the studies in the framework of high gradient linear electron-positron collider research, the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is a very promising concept, and two projects are in progress, the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN (W. Schnell, Report no. CERN SL/92-51 and CLIC note 184; K. Hübner, CERN/PS 92-43, CLIC note 176; S. Van der Meer, CERN/PS 89-50, CLIC note 97.) and the Relativistic Klystron-TBA project at LBNL (Technical Review Committee, International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report 1995, SLAC-R-95-471, 1995). In a TBA an extremely intense low-energy electron beam, called the drive beam, is bunched at the desired operating frequency, and upon passing through resonant cavities generates radio-frequency power for accelerating the main beam. Among the different approaches to the production of a suitable drive beam, the use of an FEL has been proposed and is under active study at CEA/CESTA.

  11. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  12. RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the transport of charged particle beams through electros- tatic accelerators originate primarily in a fewRESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS J. D. LARSON (*) Oak Ridge National are frequently encounte- red during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples

  13. Improving beam stability in particle accelerator models by using Hamiltonian control

    E-print Network

    J. Boreux; T. Carletti; Ch. Skokos; M. Vittot

    2011-09-21

    We derive a Hamiltonian control theory which can be applied to a 4D symplectic map that models a ring particle accelerator composed of elements with sextupole nonlinearity. The controlled system is designed to exhibit a more regular orbital behavior than the uncontrolled one. Using the Smaller Alignement Index (SALI) chaos indicator, we are able to show that the controlled system has a dynamical aperture up to 1.7 times larger than the original mode

  14. Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators!

    E-print Network

    | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!9! #12;Particle Confinement in Rings ! Charged particlesBeam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators! Alexander Valishev! University/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!2! #12;The Olympic Motto for Accelerators

  15. Space Charge Compensation in Laser Particle Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Space Charge Compensation in Laser Particle Accelerators L.C. Steinhauer and W.D. Kimura STI Optronics, 2755 Northup Way, Bellevue, WA 98004-1495 Abstract. Laser particle acceleration (LPA) involves the acceleration of particle beams by electromagnetic waves with relatively short wavelength compared

  16. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    E-print Network

    C. Labaune; C. Baccou; S. Depierreux; C. Goyon; G. Loisel; V. Yahia; J. Rafelski

    2013-10-08

    The advent of high-intensity pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei, by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  17. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  18. Entanglement of Accelerating Particles

    E-print Network

    W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

    2007-09-03

    We study how the entanglement of a maximally entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair are uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced, and the entanglements of different bipartite systems may change with the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement between accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, for scalar particles, no entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed.

  19. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  20. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  1. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  2. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  3. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  5. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  6. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  7. Solar Flares and particle acceleration

    E-print Network

    Solar Flares and particle acceleration Eduard Kontar School of Physics and Astronomy University and accelerated particles #12;Solar flares and accelerated particles From Emslie et al., 2004, 2005 Free magnetic Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI is designed to investigate particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares

  8. European particle accelerator conference

    SciTech Connect

    Tazzari, S.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following topics: The LEP project, Superconducting RF cavities for accelerator application, Commissioning of super-ACO, Pulsed high-power beams, RF Power sources, Astrid, A storage ring for ions and electrons, Linear collider studies in Europe.

  9. An active particle accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.

    1991-01-01

    Although a static charge is difficult to maintain on macroscopic particles, it is straightforward to construct a small object with a regularly oscillating electric dipole moment. For objects of a given size, one may then construct an accelerator by appropriately matching the frequency and separations of an external array of electrodes to this size. Physically feasible size ranges, an accelerator design, and possible applications of such systems are discussed. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S. (Livermore, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Briggs, Richard J. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  11. Diagnostics of fast processes by charged particle beams at TWAC-ITEP accelerator-accumulator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, A. A.; Demidov, V. S.; Demidova, E. V.; Dudin, S. V.; Kantsyrev, A. V.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Mintsev, V. B.; Smirnov, G. N.; Turtikov, V. I.; Utkin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Sharkov, B. Yu.

    2010-02-01

    A new setup for the experimental investigation of rapid dynamic processes using proton radiography techniques has been created at the TWAC-ITEP terawatt accelerator-accumulator facility. A set of equipment for conducting shock-wave experiments has been designed, constructed, and tested, and an instrumentation-software complex has been developed for the automation of experiments. The first series of experiments with dynamic targets representing high explosives have been carried out, in which the density distribution in detonation waves initiated in these explosives has been measured.

  12. Analysis of Gaussian beam and Bessel beam driven laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Ganguly, A.K.; Moore, C.I. [Omega-P, Inc., P.O. Box 202008, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States)] [Omega-P, Inc., P.O. Box 202008, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States); Ting, A.; Sprangle, P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375-5346 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375-5346 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of Gaussian and Bessel beam driven laser accelerators. The emphasis is on the vacuum beat wave accelerator (VBWA), employing two laser beams of differing wavelengths to impart a net acceleration to particles. Generation of Bessel beams by means of circular slits, holographic optical elements, and axicons is outlined and the image space fields are determined by making use of Huygens{close_quote} principle. Bessel beams{emdash}like Gaussian beams{emdash}experience a Guoy phase shift in the vicinity of a focal region, resulting in a phase velocity that exceeds {ital c}, the speed of light {ital in vacuo}. In the VBWA, by appropriate choice of parameters, the Guoy phases of the laser beams cancel out and the beat wave phase velocity equals {ital c}. The particle energy gain and beam quality are determined by making use of an analytical model as well as simulations. The analytical model{emdash}including the {bold v}{times}{bold B} interaction{emdash}predicts that for equal laser powers Gaussian and Bessel beams lead to identical energy gains. However, three-dimensional, finite-emittance simulations, allowing for detuning, transverse displacements, and including all the electromagnetic field components, show that the energy gain of a Gaussian beam driven VBWA exceeds that of a Bessel beam driven VBWA by a factor of 2{endash}3. The particle beam emerging from the interaction is azimuthally symmetric and collimated, with a relatively small angular divergence. A table summarizing the ratios of final energies, acceleration lengths, and gradients for a number of acceleration mechanisms is given. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. On the possibility of laboratory shock wave studies of the equation of state of a material at gigabar pressures with beams of laser-accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of laboratory shock wave studies of the equation of state of a material with beams of laser-accelerated charged particles at pressures an order of magnitude higher than those reached in current experiments has been discussed. The possibility of the generation of a plane quasistationary shock wave with a pressure of several gigabars behind its front at the irradiation of a target by a laser beam with an energy of several kilojoules and an intensity of about 1017 W/cm2, which is accompanied by the generation of fast electrons with an average energy of 20-50 keV, has been justified.

  14. Self accelerating electron Airy beams

    E-print Network

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental generation and observation of Airy beams of free electrons. The electron Airy beams are generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, that imprints a cubic phase modulation on the beams' transverse plane. We observed the spatial evolution dynamics of an arc-shaped, self accelerating and shape preserving electron Airy beams. We directly observed the ability of electrons to self-heal, restoring their original shape after passing an obstacle. This electromagnetic method opens up new avenues for steering electrons, like their photonic counterparts, since their wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories. Furthermore, these beams can be easily manipulated using magnetic or electric potentials. It is also possible to efficiently self mix narrow beams having opposite signs of acceleration, hence obtaining a new type of electron interferometer.

  15. Particle Acceleration by MHD Turbulence

    E-print Network

    Jungyeon Cho; A. Lazarian

    2005-10-21

    Recent advances in understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence call for revisions in the picture of particle acceleration. We make use of the recently established scaling of slow and fast MHD modes in strong and weak MHD turbulence to provide a systematic study of particle acceleration in magnetic pressure (low-$\\beta$) and gaseous pressure (high-$\\beta$) dominated plasmas. We consider the acceleration by large scale compressions in both slow and fast particle diffusion limits. We compare the results with the acceleration rate that arises from resonance scattering and Transit-Time Damping (TTD). We establish that fast modes accelerate particles more efficiently than slow modes. We find that particle acceleration by pitch-angle scattering and TTD dominates acceleration by slow or fast modes when the spatial diffusion rate is small. When the rate of spatial diffusion of particles is high, we establish an enhancement of the efficiency of particle acceleration by slow and fast modes in weak turbulence. We show that highly supersonic turbulence is an efficient agent for particle acceleration. We find that even incompressible turbulence can accelerate particles on the scales comparable with the particle mean free path.

  16. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Application of the Reduction of Scale Range in a Lorentz Boosted Frame to the Numerical Simulation of Particle Acceleration Devices

    E-print Network

    Vay, J.-L.

    2009-01-01

    simulation of particle acceleration devices. ? J. -L.particle accelerators, (b) free electron lasers and (c) laser wake?eld acceleration.particle acceler- ators. Yet, computer modeling of the wake formation and beam acceleration

  18. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  19. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  20. Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser wakefield simulations towards development of compact particle accelerators C.G.R. Geddes1, D understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability, and particle simulations model, France; 9 Oxford University, UK E-mail: cgrgeddes@lbl.gov Abstract. Laser driven wakefield accelerators

  1. Design, modeling and simulations of a Cabinet Safe System for a linear particle accelerator of intermediate-low energy by optimization of the beam optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, Carlos Omar

    As part of an accelerator based Cargo Inspection System, studies were made to develop a Cabinet Safe System by Optimization of the Beam Optics of Microwave Linear Accelerators of the IAC-Varian series working on the S-band and standing wave pi/2 mode. Measurements, modeling and simulations of the main subsystems were done and a Multiple Solenoidal System was designed. This Cabinet Safe System based on a Multiple Solenoidal System minimizes the radiation field generated by the low efficiency of the microwave accelerators by optimizing the RF waveguide system and by also trapping secondaries generated in the accelerator head. These secondaries are generated mainly due to instabilities in the exit window region and particles backscattered from the target. The electron gun was also studied and software for its right mechanical design and for its optimization was developed as well. Besides the standard design method, an optimization of the injection process is accomplished by slightly modifying the gun configuration and by placing a solenoid on the waist position while avoiding threading the cathode with the magnetic flux generated. The Multiple Solenoidal System and the electron gun optimization are the backbone of a Cabinet Safe System that could be applied not only to the 25 MeV IAC-Varian microwave accelerators but, by extension, to machines of different manufacturers as well. Thus, they constitute the main topic of this dissertation.

  2. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  3. Particle acceleration at planetary bow shock waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Hoppe

    1982-01-01

    One property of the collisionless shocks that may be studied through a comparison of their behavior in a variety of plasma conditions at several different planets is the occurrence of MHD waves, associated with particle beams accelerated at these shocks and flowing backward to the sun. Mercury, Venus, earth and Jupiter observations of one of these wave classes show that

  4. The beam business: Accelerators in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Robert W.; Hamm, Marianne E. [Pleasanton, California (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

  5. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  6. Non-accelerator Particle Physics

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Non-accelerator Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics Research programs of: Prof. Martin that often connect particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology Some questions: - What particles of the neutrino? #12;The techniques: Laboratory experiments, in the style of particle physics · High energy

  7. [Particle beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Recently, particle beam radiotherapy with protons or carbon ions has been used in cancer treatment. Energy deposition with particle beams increases as depth increases. Furthermore, carbon ion beams have stronger biological effects than X-rays or proton beams, because carbon beams generate denser ionization along the pathway of the particles. In Japan, clinical study with carbon ions for cancer therapy was initiated in 1994 at the National Institute of Radiological Science(NIRS). Four treatment facilities are now in operation, including Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center. The experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at NIRS has demonstrated advantages for the following types of cancer. In terms of histological type, adenocarcinomas, sarcomas, and melanomas that are relatively radioresistant to conventional X-ray radiotherapy may be sensitive to carbon ion radiotherapy. Primary sites that may be sensitive include the head and neck region, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissue, and pelvis(for recurrence of rectal cancer). Combined with surgery, cytotoxic drugs, molecular targeted drugs, and immunotherapy, carbon ion radiotherapy promises to be an important modality in the future. PMID:25596047

  8. The effect of plasma inhomogeneities on (i) radio emission generation by non-gyrotropic electron beams and (ii) particle acceleration by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [1]. Here recent progress in an alternative to the plasma emission model using Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts will be presented. In particular, (i) Fourier space drift (refraction) of non-gyrotropic electron beam-generated wave packets, caused by the density gradient [1,2], (ii) parameter space investigation of numerical runs [3], (iii) concurrent generation of whistler waves [4] and a separate problem of (iv) electron acceleration by Langmuir waves in a background magnetised plasma with an increasing density profile [5] will be discussed. In all considered cases the density inhomogeneity-induced wave refraction plays a crucial role. In the case of non-gyrotropic electron beam, the wave refaction transforms the generated wave packets from standing into freely escaping EM radiation. In the case of electron acceleration by Langmuir waves, a positive density gradient in the direction of wave propagation causes a decrease in the wavenumber, and hence a higher phase velocity vph=?/k. The k-shifted wave is then subject to absorption by a faster electron by wave-particle interaction. The overall effect is an increased number of high energy electrons in the energy spectrum. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011) [2] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013) [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012) [4] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 042904 (2014) [5] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 012903 (2014)

  9. The Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Hopkins, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) consists of a long high-gradient accelerator structure (HGS) adjacent to an equal-length Free Electron Laser (FEL). In the FEL, a beam propagates through a long series of undulators. At regular intervals, waveguides couple microwave power out of the FEL into the HGS. To replenish energy given up by the FEL beam to the microwave field, induction accelerator units are placed periodically along the length of the FEL. In this manner it is expected to achieve gradients of more than 250 MV/m and thus have a serious option for a 1 TeV x 1 TeV linear collider. The state of present theoretical understanding of the TBA is presented with particular emphasis upon operation of the ''steady-state'' FEL, phase and amplitude control of the rf wave, and suppression of sideband instabilities. Experimental work has focused upon the development of a suitable HGS and the testing of this structure using the Electron Laser Facility (ELF). Description is given of a first test at ELF with a seven-cell 2..pi../3 mode structure which without preconditioning and with a not-very-good vacuum nevertheless at 35 GHz yielded an average accelerating gradient of 180 MV/m.

  10. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the initiation of a low-current, high-voltage cathode spot. Plasma pressure associated with the cathode spot as well as the large voltage drop at the cathode spot accelerates the charged particles toward the substrate. The ultimate kinetic energy attained by particles exiting the particle holder depends in part on the magnitude of the cathode spot sheath potential difference, which is proportional to the magnitude of the voltage pulse, and the on the electric charge on the dust. The magnitude of the voltage pulse can be controlled directly, whereas the particle s electric charge can be controlled indirectly by controlling the operating parameters of the plasma apparatus.

  11. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  12. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-print Network

    Yves A. Gallant

    2002-01-15

    I review the current status of Fermi acceleration theory at relativistic shocks. I first discuss the relativistic shock jump conditions, then describe the non-relativistic Fermi mechanism and the differences introduced by relativistic flows. I present numerical calculations of the accelerated particle spectrum, and examine the maximum energy attainable by this process. I briefly consider the minimum energy for Fermi acceleration, and a possible electron pre-acceleration mechanism.

  13. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  14. International Aspects of Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The development of particle accelerators -- an activity that started about 1930 and is still on-going -- is very much an international activity. There have been international contributions to this development all along the way. The result is remarkably effective accelerators, for many different activities, spread throughout the world. Because many don't appreciate this story and, furthermore, that it is very much worthy of explicit recognition, this session and this talk have been organized. In the talk, a survey will be made of the start of accelerators: electrostatic machines, cyclotrons, betatrons, linacs, synchrotrons, and colliders. Then a brief survey will be given of the more important contributions to particle accelerators. For each of these concepts we shall discuss the physics behind the concept, the origin of the concept, and the places where development and implementation took place. Some of the various applications of accelerators will then be presented. Finally we shall show, in broad terms, the present distribution of particle accelerators.

  15. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  16. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Birx; L. L. Reginato

    1984-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that

  17. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  18. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  19. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  20. Accelerator based coal positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Cold positron beams produced using solid state moderators have been used profitably for condensed matter and positronium research. The low emittance and energy spread of these beams make the technique attractive as a potential positron source for future linear colliders, reducing or eliminating the need for damping rings. However, the intensities attained so far fall short of the requirements of a high energy linear collider. (approx.10/sup 11/ positrons/pulse at 10 kHz was taken as the positron flux necessary for a linear collider-B anti B factory). This report briefly reviews the state of the art in accelerator produced coal positron beams and indicates some areas in which yields might be improved. The discussion here is limited to electroproduced positrons.

  1. Machine Protection: Availability for Particle Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Apollonio, Andrea; Schmidt, Ruediger

    2015-03-16

    Machine availability is a key indicator for the performance of the next generation of particle accelerators. Availability requirements need to be carefully considered during the design phase to achieve challenging objectives in different fields, as e.g. particle physics and material science. For existing and future High-Power facilities, such as ESS (European Spallation Source) and HL-LHC (High-Luminosity LHC), operation with unprecedented beam power requires highly dependable Machine Protection Systems (MPS) to avoid any damage-induced downtime. Due to the high complexity of accelerator systems, finding the optimal balance between equipment safety and accelerator availability is challenging. The MPS architecture, as well as the choice of electronic components, have a large influence on the achievable level of availability. In this thesis novel methods to address the availability of accelerators and their protection systems are presented. Examples of studies related to dependable MPS architectures are given i...

  2. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more »from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  3. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  4. Computation applied to particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Yan, Y.T. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-07-01

    The rapid growth in the power of large-scale computers has had a revolutionary effect on the study of charged-particle accelerators that is similar to the impact of smaller computers on everyday life. Before an accelerator is built, it is now the absolute rule to simulate every component and subsystem by computer to establish modes of operation and tolerances. We will bypass the important and fruitful areas of control and operation and consider only application to design and diagnostic interpretation. Applications of computers can be divided into separate categories including: component design, system design, stability studies, cost optimization, and operating condition simulation. For the purposes of this report, we will choose a few examples taken from the above categories to illustrate the methods and we will discuss the significance of the work to the project, and also briefly discuss the accelerator project itself. The examples that will be discussed are: (1) the tracking analysis done for the main ring of the Superconducting Supercollider, which contributed to the analysis which ultimately resulted in changing the dipole coil diameter to 5 cm from the earlier design for a 4-cm coil-diameter dipole magnet; (2) the design of accelerator structures for electron-positron linear colliders and circular colliding beam systems (B-factories); (3) simulation of the wake fields from multibunch electron beams for linear colliders; and (4) particle-in-cell simulation of space-charge dominated beams for an experimental liner induction accelerator for Heavy Ion Fusion. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Tongcang; Cannan, Drake; Yin, Xiaobo; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

  6. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Gaume, R.; Wisdom, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    Laser driven particle accelerators require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise electron-beam guiding so fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such next generation machines. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003[1] but with a variety of complications on the laser side. However, fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss the advantages such as the range of materials available and ways to implement them followed by some different test examples we been considered. One important goal is an integrated system that avoids having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  7. Bessel (axicon) beams and laser driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B. [Icarus Research, Inc. (United States); [Omega-P, Inc. (United States); Sprangle, P. Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab. (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Analyses of high gradient acceleration schemes utilizing intense electromagnetic waves generally employ Gaussian laser beams. This is natural since the output from a laser cavity is nearly Gaussian, which can be readily focused to a tight spot with high intensity. There are, however, other beam profiles that can be generated with relative ease and may be more advantageous than Gaussian beams, as determined by the acceleration gradient or the energy gain. Examples of these beams include Bessel and axicon beams. The authors shall present a comparison of Bessel and Gaussian beams for several advanced accelerator schemes.

  8. Influence of proton beam Coulomb explosion in laser proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhan, Rongxin; Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Leifeng; Li, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To further understand proton acceleration driven by the interaction between ultra-intense laser pulse and foil targets, the influence of proton beam Coulomb explosion has been analyzed theoretically and investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Employing different proton layer sizes in the simulations, it is found that proton beam Coulomb explosion plays an important role on proton acceleration, in particular on proton cut off energy. Proton dynamics including the effect of both sheath field and proton beam Coulomb explosion was proposed and discussed in detail. This work may serve to improve the understanding of proton acceleration driven by intense laser-foil interactions.

  9. The effect of plasma inhomogeneities on (i) radio emission generation by non-gyrotropic electron beams and (ii) particle acceleration by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2015-04-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [1]. Here recent progress in an alternative to the plasma emission model using Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts will be presented. In particular, (i) Fourier space drift (refraction) of non-gyrotropic electron beam-generated wave packets, caused by the density gradient [1,2], (ii) parameter space investigation of numerical runs [3], (iii) concurrent generation of whistler waves [4] and a separate problem of (iv) electron acceleration by Langmuir waves in a background magnetised plasma with an increasing density profile [5] will be discussed. In all considered cases the density inhomogeneity-induced wave refraction plays a crucial role. In the case of non-gyrotropic electron beam, the wave refraction transforms the generated wave packets from standing into freely escaping EM radiation. In the case of electron acceleration by Langmuir waves, a positive density gradient in the direction of wave propagation causes a decrease in the wavenumber, and hence a higher phase velocity vph = ?/k. The k-shifted wave is then subject to absorption by a faster electron by wave-particle interaction. The overall effect is an increased number of high energy electrons in the energy spectrum. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3590928 [2] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4812453 [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4768429 [4] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 042904 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4871723 [5] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 012903 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4863494 This research is funded by the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant RPG-311

  10. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two- beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven Michael

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka-band (~30-35 GHz) frequency regions. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. A mapping algorithm is used so that tens or hundreds of thousands of macroparticles can be pushed from the solution of a few hundreds of differential equations. This is a great cost-savings device from the standpoint of CPU cycles. It can increase by several orders of magnitude the number of macroparticles that take place in the simulation, enabling more accurate modeling of the evolution of the beam distribution and enhanced sensitivity to effects due to the beam's halo. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split- operator algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The beam-cavity interaction is analyzed and divided naturally into two distinct times scales. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 TW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are described. The first is the commissioning of the RTA injector. This electron gun produces a 1 MV, 600 A beam over a 250 ns pulse length. The post-injector beamline is described, and the battery of diagnostics is presented, with initial results reported. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Barletta

    2008-01-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator \\/ beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are

  12. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Barletta

    2009-01-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator?beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice

  13. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Barletta; William A

    2009-01-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator\\/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice

  14. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  15. RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    E-print Network

    RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION A. O. Benz Abstract The solar corona is a very be considered as a particle accelerator. The free mobility of charged particles in a dilute plasma to accelerate particles in resonance. From a plasma physics point of view, acceleration is not surprising

  16. Whence particle acceleration

    E-print Network

    Medvedev, M V

    2009-01-01

    We discuss how the electrons in relativistic GRB shocks can reach near-equipartition in energy with the protons. We emphasize the non-Fermi origin of such acceleration. We argue that the dynamics of the electrons in the foreshock region and at the shock front plays an important role. We also demonstrate that PIC simulations can directly probe this physics in the regimes relevant to GRBs.

  17. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  18. Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Relativistic klystrons (RKs) are being developed as an RF power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. In a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA), the drive beam passes through a large number of RF output structures. High conversion efficiency of electron beam energy to RF energy is achieved in this concept by reacceleration of the modulated drive beam between output structures. The authors have conducted experiments studying the RF power extracted from various RK structures driven by modulated induction accelerator current pulses; the studies include work on improving the transport dynamics of the drive beam. They have started a demonstration in which the modulated induction beam current is reaccelerated by passage through subsequent induction accelerator cells.

  19. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in pitch angle. The electrons gaining large pitch angles are easily reflected, hence accelerated, when they encounter a shock. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, upstream large amplitude waves. The above series of process may give a positive feedback to the electron acceleration in converging two shocks.

  20. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  1. Radiobiological effectiveness of laser accelerated electrons in comparison to electron beams from a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Baumann, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kaluza, Malte; Karsch, Leonhard; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Nicolai, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sauerbrey, Roland; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Pawelke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The notable progress in laser particle acceleration technology promises potential medical application in cancer therapy through compact and cost effective laser devices that are suitable for already existing clinics. Previously, consequences on the radiobiological response by laser driven particle beams characterised by an ultra high peak dose rate have to be investigated. Therefore, tumour and non-malignant cells were irradiated with pulsed laser accelerated electrons at the JETI facility for the comparison with continuous electrons of a conventional therapy LINAC. Dose response curves were measured for the biological endpoints clonogenic survival and residual DNA double strand breaks. The overall results show no significant differences in radiobiological response for in vitro cell experiments between laser accelerated pulsed and clinical used electron beams. These first systematic in vitro cell response studies with precise dosimetry to laser driven electron beams represent a first step toward the long term aim of the application of laser accelerated particles in radiotherapy. PMID:22739009

  2. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  3. Fast ion mass spectrometry and charged particle spectrography investigations of transverse ion acceleration and beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Marshall, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion acceleration transverse to the magnetic field in the topside ionosphere was investigated. Transverse acceleration is believed to be responsible for the upward-moving conical ion distributions commonly observed along auroral field lines at altitudes from several hundred to several thousand kilometers. Of primary concern in this investigation is the extent of these conic events in space and time. Theoretical predictions indicate very rapid initial heating rates, depending on the ion species. These same theories predict that the events will occur within a narrow vertical region of only a few hundred kilometers. Thus an instrument with very high spatial and temporal resolution was required; further, since different heating rates were predicted for different ions, it was necessary to obtain composition as well as velocity space distributions. The fast ion mass spectrometer (FIMS) was designed to meet these criteria. This instrument and its operation is discussed.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  5. Accelerators for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanz, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    History has shown that energetic particles can be useful for medical applications. From the time, in 1895 when Roentgen discovered X-rays, and in 1913 when Coolidge developed the vacuum X-ray tube, energetic particles have been an important tool for medicine. Development of the appropriate tool for effective and safe radiotherapy requires an in-depth understanding of the application and constraints. Various solutions are possible and choices must be analyzed on the basis of the suitability for meeting the requirements. Some of the requirements of charged particle therapy are summarized and various accelerator options are described and discussed.

  6. Use of particle beams for lunar prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepfer, A. J.; Eppler, D.; Friedlander, A.; Weitz, R.

    A key issue in choosing the appropriate site for a manned lunar base is the availability of resources, particularly oxygen and hydrogen for the production of water, and ores for the production of fuels and building materials. NASA has proposed two Lunar Scout missions that would orbit the Moon and use, among other instruments, a hard X-ray spectrometer, a neutron spectrometer, and a Ge gamma ray spectrometer to map the lunar surface. This passive instrumentation will have low resolution (tens of kilometers) due to the low signal levels produced by natural radioactivity and the interaction of cosmic rays and the solar wind with the lunar surface. This paper presents the results of a concept definition effort for a neutral particle beam lunar mapper probe. The idea of using particle beam probes to survey asteroids was first proposed by Sagdeev et al., and an ion beam device was fielded on the 1988 Soviet probe to the Mars moon Phobos. During the past five years, significant advances in the technology of neutral particle beams (NPB) have led to a suborbital flight of a neutral hydrogen beam device in the SDIO-sponsored BEAR experiment. An orbital experiment, the Neutral Particle Beam Far Field Optics Experiment (NPB-FOX) is presently in the preliminary design phase. The development of NPB accelerators that are space-operable leads one to consider the utility of these devices for probing the surface of the Moon using gamma ray, X-ray, and optical/UV spectroscopy to locate various elements and compounds. We consider the utility of the NPB-FOX satellite containing a 5-MeV particle beam accelerator as a probe in lunar orbit. Irradiation of the lunar surface by the particle beam will induce secondary and back scattered radiation from the lunar surface to be detected by a sensor that may be co-orbital with or on the particle beam satellite platform, or may be in a separate orbit. The secondary radiation is characteristic of the make-up of the lunar surface. The size of the spot irradiated by the beam is less than 1 km wide along the ground track of the satellite, resulting in the potential for high resolution. The fact that the probe could be placed in polar orbit would result in global coverage of the lunar surface. The orbital particle beam probe could provide the basis for selection of sites for more detailed prospecting by surface rovers.

  7. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)] [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine); Tarakanov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation); Federovskaya, O. V. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)] [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  8. Fermi acceleration and particle pitch angle scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John S. Scott; W. J. Cocke; R. A. Chevalier; Donat G. Wentzel

    1978-01-01

    We suggest that sharp velocity gradients will exist in fluid-like turbulence in nearly collisionless plasma. This implies effective quenching of Fermi acceleration of thermal particles, but the Fermi acceleration coefficient for relativistic particles remains essentially unchanged.

  9. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  10. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils. PMID:24592677

  11. "Accelerators and beams," a multimedia tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, Richard R.

    1997-02-01

    We are developing a computer-based tutorial for charged-particle beam optics under a grant from the DOE. This subject is important to the DOE not only for its use in providing basic research tools but because the physics is the underpinning for accelerators used in industry and medicine. The tutorial, which will be delivered on Macintosh and Windows platforms, uses multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. As such, it integrates our interactive On-Screen Laboratories™ with hypertext, line drawings, photographs, animation, video, and sound. We are targeting an audience from technicians to graduate students in science and engineering. At this time we have about a fourth of the material (about equivalent to a one-semester three-credit-hour upper under-graduate physics course) available in prototype form.

  12. Fermi acceleration and particle pitch angle scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Scott; D. G. Wentzel; W. J. Cocke; R. A. Chevalier

    1978-01-01

    The effect of particle streaming instability on Fermi acceleration is investigated. When velocity gradients in a nearly collisionless plasma are sharp, the gain time for relativistic particles is comparable to that obtained in the absence of pitch-angle scattering. Such an observation leads to the conclusion that Fermi acceleration of thermal particles is quenched, but the Fermi acceleration coefficient for relativistic

  13. Resonance, particle dynamics, and particle transmission in the micro-accelerator platform

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, J.; Hazra, K. S.; Liu, G.; Sozer, E. B.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R. B. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe particle dynamics in the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), a slab-symmetric dielectric laser accelerator (DLA), and model the expected performance of recently fabricated MAP structures. The quality of the structure resonances has been characterized optically, and results are compared with simulation. 3D trajectory analysis is used to model acceleration in those same structures 'as built.' Results are applied to ongoing beam transmission and acceleration tests at NLCTA/E-163, in which transmission of 60 MeV injected electrons through the beam channel of the MAP was clearly observed, despite the overfilling of the structure by the beam.

  14. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Birx; L. L. Reginato

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus capable of acceleration of electrons to energies of at least 1 MeV at currents of at least 100 A over a time interval of at most 1 ..mu..sec. and pulse repetition rates of up to 20 kilohertz, the apparatus comprising: an electron beam injector for generating focused beam of electrons of energy substantially greater than

  15. Simple Laser Accelerator - Optics and Particle Dynamics 

    E-print Network

    Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    1991-01-01

    Particle impact damping is measured for a cantilevered beam vibrating freely in the horizontal plane. Several particle configurations are investigated beginning with a single particle and progressing to multiple layers of particles. The effects...

  16. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan [Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool and Manchester and Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  17. Automation of particle accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a 'mouseable' representation of a typical beamline. This responds actively to changes input from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beamline itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operator. We have incorporated the Fortran beam optics code TRANSPORT for simulation of the beam. The paper describes the experience gained in this process and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in real-time, on an operating beamline. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Neutral particle beam distributed data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, R.T.; Kraimer, M.R.; Novick, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    A distributed data acquisition system has been designed to support experiments at the Argonne Neutral Particle Beam Accelerator. The system uses a host VAXstation II/GPX computer acting as an experimenter's station linked via Ethernet with multiple MicroVAX IIs and rtVAXs dedicated to acquiring data and controlling hardware at remote sites. This paper describes the hardware design of the system, the applications support software on the host and target computers, and the real-time performance.

  19. Thermal wave model for nonlinear longitudinal dynamics in particle accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Fedele; G. Miele; L. Palumbo; V. G. Vaccaro

    1993-01-01

    By using the recently proposed thermal wave model for relativistic charged particle beam propagation, a new approach for studying some nonlinear effects in accelerating machines is developed. By taking into account the interaction of a relativistic charged particle bunch with both RF and the self-induced wakes and neglecting the synchroton radiation emission, we show that the longitudinal dynamics is governed

  20. Detecting the ambient neutralino dark matter particles at accelerator

    E-print Network

    Tai-Fu Feng; Xue-Qian Li; Wen-Gan Ma; Jian-Xiong Wang; Gong-Bo Zhao

    2006-10-30

    In this work, we present a new strategy to investigate the possibility of direct detection of the ambient neutralino matter at accelerator. We calculate the cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering processes of the dark matter particles with the beam particles at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders.

  1. Pointing of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Risse, E.; Kalachnikov, M.P.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.; Witte, J.; Schnuerer, M. [MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany) and LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany) and TU Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, D 10623 Berlin (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Small fluctuations in the acceleration sheath change the pointing of a proton beam accelerated from the rear side of a laser irradiated thin aluminum foil. The proton acceleration was produced with 40 fs pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser at an intensity of approximately 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. This observation has been made with a high spatial resolution Thomson spectrometer. The proton beam pointing has appeared stable in the energy range between the high energy cutoff (3 MeV) and 50% of this value. Deviations of the beam position at lower energies changes in a range of 0-3 mrad. The recorded pictures show wiggled and continuous proton traces which imply a release of the proton beam from the acceleration zone with a velocity chirp.

  2. Frontiers of particle beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-11-01

    First, a review is given of various highly-developed techniques for particle handling which are, nevertheless, being vigorously advanced at the present time. These include soft superconductor radio frequency cavities, hard superconductor magnets, cooling rings for ions and anti-protons, and damping rings for electrons. Second, attention is focused upon novel devices for particle generation, acceleration, and focusing. These include relativistic klystrons and free electron laser power sources, binary power multipliers, photocathodes, switched-power linacs, plasma beat-wave accelerators, plasma wake-field accelerators, plasma lenses, plasma adiabatic focusers and plasma compensators. 12 refs.

  3. Laser focusing of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Channell, P.J.; Elliott, C.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Fontana, J.R. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    We propose a scheme using the Inverse Cerenkov effect to focus particle beams with the potential of high focusing gradients ({approximately}200 kG/cm) and rapid, accurate control of the focusing element. 6 refs.

  4. Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-03-27

    Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

  5. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-print Network

    Byer, Robert L.

    , this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012 expensive and far more compact way to build the particle accelerators that will power future generationsDesign of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators Ken

  6. Stochasticity of particle orbits in a collective particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, G.; Mitchell, H. G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the particle orbit behavior that emerges in the presence of three simultaneous large amplitude waves, such as those generated in the collective particle accelerator experiment conducted at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The stochasticity arising from wave overlap resonance is noted to be able to influence particle dynamics to a degree that affects the outcome of experimental results. The charge buildup within the device decreases the critical current, and could prevent the propagation of the solid beam. A study of lag time as a function of the phase of the backward wave suggests that the proper choice of the injection phases makes possible the avoidance of stochasticity, and the minimization of transit time.

  7. Beam dynamics of low energy muon acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Bogacz

    2006-01-01

    A conceptual design of a muon acceleration scheme based on recirculating superconducting linacs is proposed. In the presented scenario, acceleration starts after ionization cooling at 210 MeV\\/c and proceeds to 20 GeV, where the beam is injected into a neutrino factory storage ring. The key technical issues are addressed, such as the choice of acceleration technology (superconducting versus normal conducting)

  8. Beam trapping in a modified betatron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanakos, C. A.; Dialetis, D.; Marsh, S. J.; Len, L. K.; Smith, T.

    1991-09-01

    Experimental results on the trapping of the beam in the Naval Research Laboratory modified betatron accelerator are reported. These results are in good agreement with a revised model of resistive trapping (see Sprangle and Kapetanakos, 1986). It is indicated that the wall resistivity is responsible for the inward spiral motion of the beam after injection.

  9. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M. (Lombard, IL); Clifft, Benny E. (Park Forest, IL); Bollinger, Lowell M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  10. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  11. Relativistic Shocks: Particle Acceleration and Magnetization

    E-print Network

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Lemoine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We review the physics of relativistic shocks, which are often invoked as the sources of non-thermal particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, and as possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. We focus on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation, and describe the recent progress in the field driven by theory advances and by the rapid development of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In weakly magnetized or quasi parallel-shocks (where the magnetic field is nearly aligned with the flow), particle acceleration is efficient. The accelerated particles stream ahead of the shock, where they generate strong magnetic waves which in turn scatter the particles back and forth across the shock, mediating their acceleration. In contrast, in strongly magnetized quasi-perpendicular shocks, the efficiencies of both particle acceleration and magnetic field generation are suppressed. Particle acceleration, when efficient, modifies the turbulence ...

  12. Conditional Fluid-Particle Accelerations in Turbulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Borgas; P. K. Yeung

    1998-01-01

    .   Simple closures for average fluid-particle accelerations, conditional on fixed local fluid velocity, are considered in isotropic,\\u000a homogeneous and stationary turbulence using exact probability density transport equations and are compared with direct numerical\\u000a simulations (DNS). Such accelerations are common ingredients in Lagrangian stochastic models for fluid-particle trajectories\\u000a in turbulence. One-particle accelerations are essentially trivial, so the focus is on two-particle

  13. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  14. Compression Acceleration of Energetic Charged Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Jokipii

    2002-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are probably the accelerator of most of the energetic charged particles observed in space. In fact, diffusive acceleration by shocks is so efficient and fast, and shocks are so ubiquitous, that one is tempted to suggest that energetic charged particles are all accelerated by collisionless shocks. However, it is quite clear that there are situations where a shock

  15. Plasma based charged-particle accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Bingham; J T Mendonça; P K Shukla

    2004-01-01

    Studies of charged-particle acceleration processes remain one of the most important areas of research in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas. In this paper, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high energy plasma accelerators. We will focus on the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic energies by plasma waves that are created by intense

  16. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Kenneth W. (Park Ridge, IL); Delayen, Jean R. (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium.

  17. Fast Ignition by Photon-Pressure Accelerated Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Sunahara, Atsushi; Morikawa, Takamasa; Endo, Takuma

    2014-10-01

    For enhancing the core heating efficiency in fast ignition, the ion beam generated by radiative pressure acceleration with circularly-polarized ultra-intense laser pulse is used as a core heating driver. In the present study, on the basis of the integrated simulations (PIC simulations for beam generation and Fokker-Planck simulations for core heating) and demonstrated the potential probability for C6+ beam driven fast ignition. From the coupled transport and hydro simulations, it is found that the beam particle (C6+) energy of 100 ~ 200 MeV minimizes the beam energy required for ignition and the beam duration of ~1 ps is suitable for ignition in terms of beam generation and core heating. From 2D PIC simulations for ion beam generation it is found that fast ion beam with ion energy of 210 MeV is obtained when the carbon target with the ion density of 90 ncr (ncr is the laser critical density) is irradiated with the CP laser with the intensity of 6×1022 W/cm2. In this case, 12% energy convergence efficiency of laser to ion beam is obtained. If assuming the laser spot of 24 micron diameter and pulse duration of 700 fs, the required laser energy for beam generation is ~190 kJ and the resultant beam energy of 23 kJ, which satisfy the beam condition required for ignition.

  18. 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference: Accelerator Engineering and Technology, 11th, Vancouver, Canada, May 13-16, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strathdee, A.

    1985-10-01

    The topics discussed are related to high-energy accelerators and colliders, particle sources and electrostatic accelerators, controls, instrumentation and feedback, beam dynamics, low- and intermediate-energy circular accelerators and rings, RF and other acceleration systems, beam injection, extraction and transport, operations and safety, linear accelerators, applications of accelerators, radiation sources, superconducting supercolliders, new acceleration techniques, superconducting components, cryogenics, and vacuum. Accelerator and storage ring control systems are considered along with linear and nonlinear orbit theory, transverse and longitudinal instabilities and cures, beam cooling, injection and extraction orbit theory, high current dynamics, general beam dynamics, and medical and radioisotope applications. Attention is given to superconducting RF structures, magnet technology, superconducting magnets, and physics opportunities with relativistic heavy ion accelerators.

  19. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  20. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  1. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center (APC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25?}m{sup ?3} and 1.6?×?10{sup 28?}m{sup ?3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ?20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?{sub p} to 0.6 ?{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  2. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  3. Vacuum electron acceleration and bunch compression by a flat-top laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wang, P. X.; Ho, Y. K.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y.; Wang, S. J.

    2007-09-01

    The field intensity distribution and phase velocity characteristics of a flat-top laser beam are analyzed and discussed. The dynamics of electron acceleration in this kind of beam are investigated using three-dimensional test particle simulations. Compared with the standard (i.e., TEM00 mode) Gaussian beam, a flat-top laser beam has a stronger longitudinal electric field and a larger diffraction angle. These characteristics make it easier for electrons to be trapped and accelerated by the beam. With a flat-top shape, the laser beam is also applicable to the acceleration of low energy electron and bunch compression.

  4. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-01

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore »uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  5. Adiabatic Compression Acceleration of Fast Charged Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Jokipii; J. Giacalone

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a mode of acceleration of fast, low-rigidity charged particles at shocks and compressions which does not appear to have been discussed previously. The particles propagate along the fluctuating magnetic field without scattering. The acceleration occurs when the disturbance propagates normal to a magnetic field which is turbulent on large scales. If the low-rigidity particles have

  6. How to obtain particles to accelerate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Particle Data Group

    2002-01-01

    Where do the particles come from that are accelerated in a particle accelerator? In this portion of a particle physics tutorial, three sources of particles are described for students. The first source is electrons, which come from heated metals. The second is protons, which are available from ionized hydrogen. Antiparticles are the third source. They are collected by magnetic fields after particles smash targets. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  7. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  8. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics. PMID:17677176

  9. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Andreas J. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fuchs, J.; Antici, P. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Sentoku, Y.; Sotnikov, V.; Bakeman, M.; Cowan, T. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be <0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  10. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  11. Particle acceleration efficiencies in astrophysical shear flows

    E-print Network

    F. M. Rieger; P. Duffy

    2005-02-04

    The acceleration of energetic particles in astrophysical shear flows is analyzed. We show that in the presence of a non-relativistic gradual velocity shear, power law particle momentum distributions $f(p) \\propto p^{-(3+\\alpha)}$ may be generated, assuming a momentum-dependent scattering time $\\tau \\propto p^{\\alpha}$, with $\\alpha > 0$. We consider possible acceleration sites in astrophysical jets and study the conditions for efficient acceleration. It is shown, for example, that in the presence of a gradual shear flow and a gyro-dependent particle mean free path, synchrotron radiation losses no longer stop the acceleration once it has started to work efficiently. This suggests that shear acceleration may naturally account for a second, non-thermal population of energetic particles in addition to a shock-accelerated one. The possible relevance of shear acceleration is briefly discussed with reference to the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C 273.

  12. Particle acceleration efficiencies in astrophysical shear flows

    E-print Network

    Rieger, F M

    2005-01-01

    The acceleration of energetic particles in astrophysical shear flows is analyzed. We show that in the presence of a non-relativistic gradual velocity shear, power law particle momentum distributions $f(p) \\propto p^{-(3+\\alpha)}$ may be generated, assuming a momentum-dependent scattering time $\\tau \\propto p^{\\alpha}$, with $\\alpha > 0$. We consider possible acceleration sites in astrophysical jets and study the conditions for efficient acceleration. It is shown, for example, that in the presence of a gradual shear flow and a gyro-dependent particle mean free path, synchrotron radiation losses no longer stop the acceleration once it has started to work efficiently. This suggests that shear acceleration may naturally account for a second, non-thermal population of energetic particles in addition to a shock-accelerated one. The possible relevance of shear acceleration is briefly discussed with reference to the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C 273.

  13. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  14. TRANSVERSE WAKEFIELD EFFECTS IN THE TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.; Sessler, A.

    1985-08-01

    Transverse wakefield effects in the high-gradient accelerating structure of the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) [1-3] are analyzed theoretically using three different models. The first is a very simple two-particle model due to Wilson [4]; the second, due to Chao, Richter, and Yao [5], is for a beam with uniform charge distribution, constant betatron wavelength, and a linear wake approximation. Both of these models give analytic scaling laws. The third model has a Gaussian beam (represented by 11 superparticles), energy variation across the bunch, acceleration, variation of betatron focusing with energy, and variation of the wakefield from linearity. The three models are compared, and the third model is used to explore the wakefield effects when accelerator parameters such as energy, energy spread, injection energy, accelerating gradient, and betatron wavelength are varied. Also explored are the sensitivity of the beam to the wakefield profile and to the longitudinal charge distribution. Finally, in consideration of wakefield effects, possible parameters of a TBA are presented.

  15. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tzoganis, Vasilis, E-mail: vasileios.tzoganis@cockcroft.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); RIKEN Nishina Centre, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-19

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup ?7} down to below 10{sup ?11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5?keV electron beam are discussed.

  16. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  17. Physical Review Special Topics : Accelerators and Beams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Current and past issues of this free American Physical Society peer-reviewed, electronic journal are available here. The journal is published on an article-by-article basis, and new articles are added to the latest issue. March titles in Physical Review Special Topics--Accelerators and Beams include "Coherent off-axis undulato radiation from short electron bunches."

  18. Principles of high current electron beam acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley Humphries

    1987-01-01

    High current pulsed electron accelerators operate with beam currents exceeding 1 kA, pulse lengths from 20 ns to 1 mus, and output energies up to 50 MeV. Potential applications include pulsed radiography, intense microwave generation, free electron laser drivers, directed energy for defense, and industrial radiation processing applications. This paper gives a tutorial on the principles of high current electron

  19. A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); College of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054 (China); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

  20. Diffusive-Compressive Acceleration of Charged Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Jokipii; J. Giacalone; J. Kóta

    2001-01-01

    We consider the transport of energetic particles in a medium through which gradual (non-shock) compressions exist and propagate. As is the case with shocks, these compressions can accelerate charged particles. We have previously considered such acceleration in the specific context of CIRs (Giacalone, J., Jokipii, and Kóta, Joint SOHO-ACE Symposium Proceedings, in press, 2001). There we suggested that it may

  1. Type II radio bursts and particle acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Švestka; L. Fritzová-Svestková

    1974-01-01

    328 particle events recorded during 30 months from January 1, 1966 to June 30, 1968 (taken from the new Catalog of Solar Particle Events, 1955–1969) are compared with the occurrence of 166 type II radio bursts during the same period. The results of this comparison give a convincing evidence that proton acceleration to higher energies in flares (the ‘second acceleration

  2. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2013-08-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss. PMID:23917432

  3. Feature-based analysis of plasma-based particle acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam, and to investigate transverse particle loss. PMID:24356363

  4. Particle acceleration in relativistic laser channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Pukhov; Z.-M. Sheng; J. Meyer-Ter-Vehn

    1999-01-01

    Energy spectra of ions and fast electrons accelerated by a channeling laser pulse in near-critical plasma are studied using three-dimensional (3D) Particle-In-Cell simulations. The realistic 3D geometry of the simulations allows us to obtain not only the shape of the spectra, but also the absolute numbers of accelerated particles. It is shown that ions are accelerated by a collisionless radial

  5. Acceleration of nitrogen ions to 7.4 gev in the princeton particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    White, M G; Isaila, M; Prelec, K; Allen, H L

    1971-12-10

    Nitrogen ions in charge states N(5+) and N(6+) have been accelerated in the Princeton Particle Accelerator to 4 and 7.4 billion electron volts (Gev), respectively. An external N(5+) beam of 1 x 10(6) particles per second has been obtained and focused to a 6-millimeter-diameter spot. The N(6+) beam was about 2 x 10(5) particles per second. The total charge-changing collision cross section of N(5+) in water vapor was determined as a function of ion energy. The improvement in vacuum necessary to increase the N(5+) beam at least tenfold was calculated. The N(6+) total cross section is probably smaller than that of N(5+) at the higher energies. PMID:17779398

  6. Diffusive Compression Acceleration of Charged Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack R. Jokipii; J. Giacalone; J. Kota

    2003-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of fast charged particles by smo oth compressions and expansions in a collisionless fluid, using the diffusion approximation. If the diffusion length kappa\\/U is of the order of the fluid scale or larger, efficient acceleration occurs which has similarities with both 2nd-order Fermi acceleration and diffusive shock acceleration, but is different from both. A simple, one-dimensional

  7. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwan-Liu Ma; Gregory L. Schussman; Brett Wilson; Kwok Ko; Ji Qiang; Robert Ryne

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next-generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of

  8. Accelerator column models for low-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.P.; Allison, P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes three analytic approaches used to model electrostatic accelerator columns in beam-transport codes for low-current beams and compares the results of each approach with the results obtained by numerically calculating the electric field based on charge distribution on equipotential surfaces. The three analytic approaches described are (1) a cubic energy-gain approximation, (2) a cubic longitudinal electric-field approximation, and (3) the aperture equation. The first two approaches calculate impulse approximations at the apertures, whereas the third is an integration of particle trajectories through the column filed. The conditions under which the solutions tend to break down are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Space experiments with particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Garriott, O. K.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Electron and plasma beams and neutral gas plumes were injected into the space environment by instruuments on Spacelab 1, and various diagnostic measurements including television camera observations were performed. The results yield information on vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interactions, and ionization enhancement by neutral beam injection.

  10. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  11. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  12. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating. PMID:25215682

  13. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  14. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  15. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, H. T.; Mann, G.; Forsyth, R. J.; Keppler, E.

    1999-06-01

    The acceleration of charged particles at corotating interaction regions (CIRs) leads to a quasi-permanent generation of high energy particles in the heliosphere-even in times of a quiet sun. We study this process as a special kind of particle acceleration at collisionless shock waves. Therefore, we analyze the correlation between the fluid description, the flux of high energy particles, and the wave turbulence at these shocks. The forward and reverse shocks at the CIR boundaries are regarded as individual shocks and we analyze their MHD relevant parameters; i.e. Alfvén-Mach numbers, compression ratios, and critical Mach numbers. Furthermore, the role of low frequency plasma waves for an efficient particle acceleration is investigated. The data set is taken from Ulysses measurements of the CIR-series observed between July 1992 and December 1993. The aim of this analysis is to enclose the possible acceleration mechanisms.

  16. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-01

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a compact and affordable accelerator technology. PMID:25373678

  17. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  18. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  19. Production of an Accelerated Oxygen-14 Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2002-05-03

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was Carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 108 ions/sec have been utilized for experiments. Development of Oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 seconds and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of Oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, Oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an Oxygen-14 beam have been performed.

  20. Acceleration of High Intensity Proton Beams

    E-print Network

    Altuna, X; Arimatea, C; Bailey, R; Billen, R; Bohl, T; Collier, Paul; Cornelis, Karel; Crockford, G; Desforges, D; Despas, C; Faugier, A; Ferrari, A; Giachino, R; Hanke, K; Jonker, M; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Niquille, C; Normann, L; Robin, G; Roy, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998 the CERN SPS accelerator finished a five years long program providing 450GeV proton beams for neutrino physics. These experiments required the highest possible beam intensity the SPS can deliver. During the last five years the maximum proton intensity in the SPS has steadily been increased to a maximum of 4.8 1013 protons per cycle. In order to achieve these intensities a careful monitoring and improvement of the vertical aperture was necessary. Improved feedback systems on the different RF cavities were needed in order to avoid instabilities. Also the quality (emittance and extraction spill) of the injector, the CERN PS, had be optimised.

  1. COLLIMATING TOUSCHEK PARTICLES IN AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    E-print Network

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    COLLIMATING TOUSCHEK PARTICLES IN AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINEAR ACCELERATOR Michael P. Ehrlichman- tum would usually be inconsequential to the trajectory of the particles through the accelerator to longitudinal momentum significant to the trajec- tory of scattered particles through the accelerator

  2. Acceleration statistics of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-print Network

    J. Bec; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; M. Cencini; A. Lanotte; S. Musacchio; F. Toschi

    2005-12-09

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations of heavy particle transport in homogeneous, isotropic, fully developed turbulence, up to resolution $512^3$ ($R_\\lambda\\approx 185$). Following the trajectories of up to 120 million particles with Stokes numbers, $St$, in the range from 0.16 to 3.5 we are able to characterize in full detail the statistics of particle acceleration. We show that: ({\\it i}) The root-mean-squared acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}$ sharply falls off from the fluid tracer value already at quite small Stokes numbers; ({\\it ii}) At a given $St$ the normalised acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}/(\\epsilon^3/\

  3. Fluid particle accelerations in fully developed turbulence.

    PubMed

    La Porta, A; Voth, G A; Crawford, A M; Alexander, J; Bodenschatz, E

    2001-02-22

    The motion of fluid particles as they are pushed along erratic trajectories by fluctuating pressure gradients is fundamental to transport and mixing in turbulence. It is essential in cloud formation and atmospheric transport, processes in stirred chemical reactors and combustion systems, and in the industrial production of nanoparticles. The concept of particle trajectories has been used successfully to describe mixing and transport in turbulence, but issues of fundamental importance remain unresolved. One such issue is the Heisenberg-Yaglom prediction of fluid particle accelerations, based on the 1941 scaling theory of Kolmogorov. Here we report acceleration measurements using a detector adapted from high-energy physics to track particles in a laboratory water flow at Reynolds numbers up to 63,000. We find that, within experimental errors, Kolmogorov scaling of the acceleration variance is attained at high Reynolds numbers. Our data indicate that the acceleration is an extremely intermittent variable--particles are observed with accelerations of up to 1,500 times the acceleration of gravity (equivalent to 40 times the root mean square acceleration). We find that the acceleration data reflect the anisotropy of the large-scale flow at all Reynolds numbers studied. PMID:11234005

  4. Shock accelerated electron beams in the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    2003-04-01

    In the solar corona shock waves can be observed as type II radio bursts in dynamic spectra of the solar radio radiation. Some of these type II bursts show sub-structures, so-called "herringbones", which are regarded as signatures of electron beams produced by the associated shock waves. A sample of solar type II radio bursts with "herringbone" - structures has been investigated with respect to their properties in dynamic radio spectra. It is well-known, that the electrons accelerated by a quasi-perpendicular shock establish a shifted loss-cone velocity distribution. The resulting properties of such a distribution for the shock accelerated electrons is compared with the features of "herringbones" in dynamic radio spectra. This study shows that the "herringbones" are mainly produced by nearly perpendicular shocks. The rapid pitch angle diffusion in the velocity space leads to a limited life time of the electron beams associated with the "herringbones".

  5. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  6. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K. W.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Fuerst, J. D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I. V.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC) accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  7. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Leemans; B. Nagler; A. J. Gonsalves; Cs. Tóth; K. Nakamura; C. G. R. Geddes; E. Esarey; C. B. Schroeder; S. M. Hooker

    2006-01-01

    Gigaelectron volt (GeV) electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50MVm-1), requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometres to generate particle energies of interest to high-energy physics.

  8. Laser steering of particle beams: Refraction and reflection ofparticle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B.; Dodd, E.; Lee, S.; Hemker, R.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.

    1999-11-01

    The co-propagation of an intense particle beam with an ionizing laser beam in a working gas/plasma is considered. When the axes of the laser and particle beam are not aligned, then asymmetric plasma lensing results in a net dipole field acting on the particle beam. The particle beam can be steered or bent (as well as focused) by steering the laser. An analogy is made between the bending of the particle beam by collective effects at a plasma boundary and the refraction or reflection of light at an interface. This mechanism of particle steering may be of interest in applications for which permanent magnets are inconvenient of a fast turn on is required. 3-D particle-in-cell simulations and relevance to a recent experiment are discussed.

  9. Twisted waveguides for particle accelerator applications

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Joshua L.

    A novel microwave device for accelerating charged particles based on twisted waveguide is presented. Twisted guides support slow-wave TM modes whose phase velocity could reach the speed of light c. The axial electric field ...

  10. Nonparaxial accelerating Bessel-like beams

    E-print Network

    Chremmos, Ioannis D

    2013-01-01

    A new class of nonparaxial accelerating optical waves is introduced. These are beams with a Bessel-like profile that are capable of shifting laterally along fairly arbitrary trajectories as the wave propagates in free space. The concept expands on our previous proposal of paraxial accelerating Bessel-like beams to include beams with subwavelength lobes and/or large trajectory angles. Such waves are produced when the phase at the input plane is engineered so that the interfering ray cones are made to focus along the prespecified path. When the angle of these cones is fixed, the beams possess a diffraction-free Bessel profile on planes that stay normal to their trajectory, which can be considered as a generalized definition of diffractionless propagation in the nonparaxial regime. The analytical procedure leading to these results is based on a ray optics interpretation of Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction and is presented in detail. The evolution of the proposed waves is demonstrated through a series of numerical...

  11. Adiabatic Compression Acceleration of Fast Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we introduce a mode of acceleration of fast, low-rigidity charged particles at shocks and compressions which does not appear to have been discussed previously. The particles propagate along the fluctuating magnetic field without scattering. The acceleration occurs when the disturbance propagates normal to a magnetic field which is turbulent on large scales. If the low-rigidity particles have speeds much greater than the speed of the disturbance, they can follow the random magnetic field lines, which meander back and forth across the compression. Because of the difference between the downstream and upstream flow speeds, the particles can be accelerated, much as in standard diffusive shock acceleration. In this picture, scattering in pitch angle is not necessary for considerable acceleration to occur. We suggest that this completely scatter-free process may accelerate low-energy superthermal electrons, for which resonant scattering may not be possible, up to energies where they can interact resonantly with longer wavelength waves generated by the ions and subsequently be accelerated by standard diffusive shock acceleration to energies comparable with the ions.

  12. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  13. An Overview of Particle Beam Materials Processing Techniques*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylla, H. F.

    1996-05-01

    Materials processing techniques can lead to the development of new products, create new applications by modifying existing materials, and add significant value to existing product lines. Additionally, there is ever-increasing consumer and regulatory pressure to develop "greener" products utilizing "dry chemistry" which have reduced environmental impact, and where the production process yields only product and no waste. Such processing can result from the use of photons or elementary particles. Accelerated particle beams offer many diverse opportunities, to process materials if economic targets can be met. This mini-symposium, a joint endeavor of the APS Division of the Physics of Beams (DPB) and the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics (FIAP), seeks to review these opportunities and the current state-of-the-art, by assembling leading practitioners of particle beam materials processing for review presentations. Beam processing areas covered in the symposium will include: electron beam processing of biomass, curing of composite materials, sterilization and other applications; ion beams and plasma accelerators for surface processing; proposed next-generation lithography tools that utilize either compact synchrotrons or small ion and electron accelerators; high-volume UV surface processing of polymers and metals using free-electron lasers or excimer lamps, and beam generation of tritium. * This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150.

  14. Solar particle acceleration and propagation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Lin

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results concerning the acceleration of solar radiation are reviewed. Different types of radiations are considered separately including neutrons, electrons, gamma rays, and He-rich events. (AIP)

  15. Statistical phenomena in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1984-09-01

    Particle beams are subject to a variety of apparently distinct statistical phenomena such as intrabeam scattering, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, coherent instabilities, and radiofrequency noise diffusion. In fact, both the physics and mathematical description of these mechanisms are quite similar, with the notion of correlation as a powerful unifying principle. In this presentation we will attempt to provide both a physical and a mathematical basis for understanding the wide range of statistical phenomena that have been discussed. In the course of this study the tools of the trade will be introduced, e.g., the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, noise theory, correlation functions, and beam transfer functions. Although a major concern will be to provide equations for analyzing machine design, the primary goal is to introduce a basic set of physical concepts having a very broad range of applicability.

  16. Particle Beam Excitation Electron Beam Excitation

    E-print Network

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    Microprobe Microanalysis (EMP) Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAMParticle Beam Excitation Electron Beam Excitation Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Electron Projector lens Electron multiplier Fluorescent screen X-Y stage Microchannel plate Immersion lens Measures m

  17. Particle-beam-fusion progress report, July 1979 through December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following chapters are included in this semi-annual progress report: (1) fusion target studies, (2) target experiments, (3) particle-beam source developments, (4) particle beam experiments, (5) pulsed power, (6) pulsed power applications, and (7) electron beam fusion accelerator project. (MOW)

  18. From particle accelerator to radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines the requirements for machines that could perform radiosurgery. It also outlines the characteristics of the narrow beams used for this method. The reasons for limiting human treatments to the pituitary fossa are justified. The experiments, the results of which determined what was possible clinically, are outlined. The two methods of delivery of focused radiation are discussed: Bragg peak and beam crossover. PMID:25376567

  19. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

  20. Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Shocks

    E-print Network

    Donald C. Ellison; Glen P. Double

    2002-04-22

    Monte Carlo techniques are used to model nonlinear particle acceleration in parallel collisionless shocks of various speeds, including mildly relativistic ones. When the acceleration is efficient, the backreaction of accelerated particles modifies the shock structure and causes the compression ratio, r, to increase above test-particle values. Modified shocks with Lorentz factors less than about 3 can have compression ratios considerably greater than 3 and the momentum distribution of energetic particles no longer follows a power law relation. These results may be important for the interpretation of gamma-ray bursts if mildly relativistic internal and/or afterglow shocks play an important role accelerating particles that produce the observed radiation. For shock Lorentz factors greater than about 10, r approaches 3 and the so-called `universal' test-particle result of N(E) proportional to E^{-2.3} is obtained for sufficiently energetic particles. In all cases, the absolute normalization of the particle distribution follows directly from our model assumptions and is explicitly determined.

  1. Participation in the definition, conduct, and analysis of particle accelerator experiments for the first Spacelab Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Burch

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) is a joint endeavor between NASA and the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Sciences (ISAS) in Japan. Its objectives are to use energetic electron beams to investigate beam-atmosphere interactions and beam-plasma interactions in the earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere using the shuttle Spacelab. Two flights of SEPAC have occurred to date (Spacelab 1

  2. Particle acceleration in astrophysical shear flows

    E-print Network

    Frank M. Rieger; Peter Duffy

    2005-01-10

    We consider the acceleration of particles due to a velocity shear in relativistic astrophysical flows. The basic physical picture and the formation of power law momentum spectra is discussed for a non-relativistic velocity field using a microscopic approach. We identify possible sites for shear acceleration in relativistic astrophysical jets and analyze their associated acceleration timescales. It is shown in particular that for a mean scattering time $\\tau$ scaling with the gyro-radius, the acceleration timescale for gradual shear scales in the same manner as the synchrotron cooling timescale, so that losses may no longer be able to stop the acceleration once it has started to work efficiently. Finally, the possible role of shear acceleration is discussed with reference to the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C~273.

  3. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanisms that apply to solar flares are discussed, and their applicability to other astrophysical sites, where transient X-ray and gamma-ray bursts occur, is tested. Two different approaches are used to determine the characteristics of the charged particles, accelerated in association with solar flares: (1) measurement of the energy spectra and composition of charged particles observed in space and believed to be associated with a specific solar flare; and (2) recording of electromagnetic emissions in the visible, ultraviolet, soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray spectral regions, and also high-energy neutrons produced in the solar atmosphere by the particles accelerated in association with the solar flare. It is suggested that, at the present level of knowledge, regions where particle acceleration and interactions occur are unlikely to be specified.

  4. Particle Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    E-print Network

    Matthew G. Baring; Errol J. Summerlin

    2008-07-07

    The acceleration of interstellar pick-up ions as well as solar wind species has been observed at a multitude of interplanetary (IP) shocks by different spacecraft. This paper expands upon previous work modeling the phase space distributions of accelerated ions associated with the shock event encountered on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission at 4.5 AU. A kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is employed here to model the diffusive acceleration process. This exposition presents recent developments pertaining to the incorporation into the simulation of the diffusive characteristics incurred by field line wandering (FLW), according to the work of Giacalone and Jokipii. For a pure field-line wandering construct, it is determined that the upstream spatial ramp scales are too short to accommodate the HI-SCALE flux increases for 200 keV protons, and that the distribution function for H+ somewhat underpopulates the combined SWICS/HI-SCALE spectra at the shock. This contrasts our earlier theory/data comparison where it was demonstrated that diffusive transport in highly turbulent fields according to kinetic theory can successfully account for both the proton distributions and upstream ramp scales, using a single turbulence parameter. The principal conclusion here is that, in a FLW scenario, the transport of ions across the mean magnetic field is slightly less efficient than is required to effectively trap energetic ions within a few Larmor radii of the shock layer and thereby precipitate efficient acceleration. This highlights the contrast between ion transport in highly turbulent shock environs and remote, less-disturbed interplanetary regions.

  5. Particle Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    E-print Network

    Baring, Matthew G

    2008-01-01

    The acceleration of interstellar pick-up ions as well as solar wind species has been observed at a multitude of interplanetary (IP) shocks by different spacecraft. This paper expands upon previous work modeling the phase space distributions of accelerated ions associated with the shock event encountered on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission at 4.5 AU. A kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is employed here to model the diffusive acceleration process. This exposition presents recent developments pertaining to the incorporation into the simulation of the diffusive characteristics incurred by field line wandering (FLW), according to the work of Giacalone and Jokipii. For a pure field-line wandering construct, it is determined that the upstream spatial ramp scales are too short to accommodate the HI-SCALE flux increases for 200 keV protons, and that the distribution function for H+ somewhat underpopulates the combined SWICS/HI-SCALE spectra at the shock. This contrasts our earlier theory/data comparison where it wa...

  6. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Kerstin M; Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Laser-accelerated particles are a promising option for radiation therapy of cancer by potentially combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages of charged particle beams. To design such a treatment unit we consider different dose delivery schemes and analyze the necessary devices in the required particle beam line for each case. Furthermore, we point out that laser-driven treatment units may be ideal tools for motion adaptation during radiotherapy. Reasons for this are the potential of a flexible gantry and the time structure of the beam with high particle numbers in ultrashort bunches. One challenge that needs to be addressed is the secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements. (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) PMID:22930653

  7. Particle Acceleration at High-$?$ Shock Waves

    E-print Network

    Jacek Niemiec

    2005-09-22

    First-order Fermi acceleration processes at ultrarelativistic shocks are studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The accelerated particle spectra are obtained by integrating the exact particle trajectories in a turbulent magnetic field near the shock, with a few ``realistic'' features of the field structure included. We show that the main acceleration process at oblique shocks is the particle compression at the shock. Formation of energetic spectral tails is possible in a limited energy range for highly perturbed magnetic fields. Cut-offs in the spectra occur at low energies in the resonance range considered. We relate this feature to the structure of the magnetic field downstream of the shock, where field compression produces effectively 2D turbulence in which cross-field diffusion is very small. Because of the field compression downstream, the acceleration process is inefficient also in parallel high-$\\gamma$ shocks for larger turbulence amplitudes, and features observed in oblique shocks are recovered. For small-amplitude perturbations, particle spectra are formed in a wide energy range and modifications of the acceleration process due to the existence of long-wave perturbations are observed. The critical turbulence amplitude for efficient acceleration at parallel shocks decreases with shock Lorentz factor. We also study the influence of strong short-wave perturbations downstream of the shock on the particle acceleration processes. The spectral indices obtained do not converge to the ``universal'' value . Our results indicate inefficiency of the first-order Fermi process to generate high-energy cosmic rays at ultrarelativistic shocks with the considered perturbed magnetic field structures.

  8. Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica dell'Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Salerno, INFM Unita di Salerno, and INFN Sezione di Napoli Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)

    2005-12-15

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

  9. Lévy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams.

    PubMed

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schrödinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Lévy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Lévy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Lévy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams. PMID:16486070

  10. Energetic particle acceleration in shear layers

    E-print Network

    M. Ostrowski

    1999-11-05

    A plasma velocity shear layer and/or a tangential flow discontinuity provide conditions allowing for energetic particle acceleration. We review such acceleration processes acting both in non-relativistic and in relativistic flows. In heliospheric conditions shear layers can provide particles with energies compatible with the observed values (from several keV up to MeV), while in relativistic extragalactic jets proton energies even in excess of 10^{19} eV can be obtained. Application of the discussed theory to particular astrophysical objects is severely limited by inadequate knowledge of local physical conditions.

  11. Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection and Particles Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Higashimori, Katsuaki; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    Magnetic reconnection in the earth’s magnetotail involves a variety of plasma processes across many scales from a several 10Re down to ion/electron inertia scales, and those excited waves in many scales show more or less turbulent behavior. The generation of such turbulent waves is believed to be responsible not only to dynamics of magnetic reconnection but also supra-thermal particle acceleration. In this presentation, we review our recent progress on turbulent reconnection and particle acceleration by using Particle-in-cell and MHD simulations. Firstly, we discuss the interplay of magnetic reconnection and turbulence based on a newly developed Reynolds-averaged MHD simulation, and show that the turbulent diffusivity self-consistently generated around the X-type region dramatically enhances the global magnetic reconnection rate. Secondly, we argue that the scattering process of particles with those turbulences plays an important role on plasma heating and particle acceleration. In the earth’s plasma sheet, it is expected that many magnetic reconnection sites with many different scales can be generated. We discuss that the multiple interaction of the energetic particle with those reconnection regions leads to energization of supra-thermal particles.

  12. Kerr Naked Singularities as Particle Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Patil, Mandar

    2011-01-01

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by Kerr naked singularities. We consider a collision between particles dropped in from infinity at rest, which follow geodesic motion in the equatorial plane, with angular momentum of one of the particles in an appropriate finite range of values. The absence of an event horizon and the repulsive nature of angular momentum makes it possible for the initially infalling particle to turn back as an outgoing particle and then collide with another infalling particle. When these particles collide at a location close to what would have been the event horizon in the extremal Kerr blackhole case, the center of mass energy of collision turns out to be arbitrarily large depending on how close is the Kerr naked singularity to extremality. We briefly discuss the possible astrophysical consequences of this process and suggest that the fast rotating Kerr configurations could provide a good cosmic laboratory to probe ultra-high-energy physics.

  13. Diffusive Compression Acceleration of Energetic Particles in the Magnetosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zhang; G. Qin

    2007-01-01

    Diffusive compress acceleration of energetic charged particle is similar to diffusive shock acceleration. The particle acceleration occurs through either drift acceleration or Fermi process. Based on the adiabatic theory of particle motion and the frozen-in-law of space plasma, we can write the rate of particle energy increase and particle pitch-angle change in terms of the divergence of plasma flow. Particles

  14. Ion acceleration by an electron beam with neutral gas ionization by an external source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, Victor I.; Kurilko, Victor I.; Ostrovsky, Alexey O.

    1995-02-01

    The theoretical results for ion acceleration by a high current relativistic electron beam (REB) at the neutral-gas ionization front are presented. For a significant increase in the ion energy it is necessary to control the drift velocity of the ionization front so that it is close to the synchronous particle velocity. The most feasible way for such a control is gas ionization by an external source moving in synchronism with the accelerated particles. This work is devoted to estimating the characteristics of such a source. The space-time distribution of accelerating field is also analyzed and the dynamics of accelerated ion bunch formation is studied.

  15. Educating the next generation in the science and technology of plasmas, beams and accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wiliam Barletta

    2007-01-01

    Accelerators are essential tools for discovery in fundamental physics, biology, and chemistry. Particle beam based instruments in medicine, industry and national security constitute a multi-billion dollar per year industry. More than 55,000 peer-reviewed papers having accelerator as a keyword are available on the Web. Yet only a handful of universities offer any formal training in accelerator science. Several reasons can

  16. Math Bite: Constructing Ecient Particle Accelerators is as Easy as 1+1=2 (Thanks to Vladimir Visnjic)

    E-print Network

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Math Bite: Constructing EÆcient Particle Accelerators is as Easy as 1+1=2 (Thanks to Vladimir of two local waves on the particle beam in an accelerator that promises to save the American taxpayer to the accelerator) of which we only need to know that it is nonnegative and has zeros. The number of sources

  17. Math Bite: Constructing Efficient Particle Accelerators is as Easy as 1+1=2 (Thanks to Vladimir Visnjic)

    E-print Network

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Math Bite: Constructing Efficient Particle Accelerators is as Easy as 1+1=2 (Thanks's ingenious constr* *uction of two local waves on the particle beam in an accelerator that promises to save to the accelerator) of which we only need to know that * *it is nonnegative and has zeros. The number of sources

  18. Electrostatic plasma lens for focusing negatively charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A. A.; Dobrovolskiy, A. M.; Dunets, S. M. [Institute of Physics NAS of Ukraine, Kiev 03028, Ave. Nauki 46 (Ukraine); Litovko, I. V. [Institute for Nuclear Research NAS of Ukraine, Kiev 03650, pr. Nauki 47 (Ukraine); Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M. [High-Current Electronics Institute SB of RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    We describe the current status of ongoing research and development of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating intense negatively charged particle beams, electrons, and negative ions. The physical principle of this kind of plasma lens is based on magnetic isolation electrons providing creation of a dynamical positive space charge cloud in shortly restricted volume propagating beam. Here, the new results of experimental investigations and computer simulations of wide-aperture, intense electron beam focusing by plasma lens with positive space charge cloud produced due to the cylindrical anode layer accelerator creating a positive ion stream towards an axis system is presented.

  19. Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the channel density. For positron beams, matched propagation can be achieved in a hollow plasma channel with external focusing. The efficiency of energy transfer from the wake to a witness beam is calculated for single ultra-short bunches and bunch trains.

  20. Scalar fields and particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon discovered in 2009 by Bañados, Silk and West where particle collisions can achieve arbitrary high center-of-mass (c.m.) energies close to the event horizon of an extreme Kerr black hole, has generated a lot of interest. Although rotation seemed to be an essential requirement, it was later shown that arbitrary high energies can also be achieved for collisions between radially moving particles near the horizon of the electrically charged extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Recently Patil and Joshi claimed that instead of spinning up the black hole one can also crank up the c.m. energy of particle collisions by "charging up" a static black hole with a massless scalar field. In this regard they showed that infinite energies can be attained in the vicinity of the naked singularity of the Janis-Newman-Wincour (JNW) spacetime, which contains a massless scalar field that also becomes infinite at the position of the curvature singularity. In this study we show that Patil and Joshi's claim does not apply for other static black hole systems endowed with a massless scalar field. In particular we consider the well-known Bekenstein black hole and the recently discovered Martínez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole, and show that the expression of the c.m. energy for particle collisions near the event horizons of these black holes is no different than the corresponding case with vanishing scalar field represented by the Schwarzschild solution. Moreover by studying the motion of scalar test charges that interact with the background scalar field in these black hole spacetimes we show that the resulting c.m. energies are even smaller than in the case of free particles. This shows that the infinite energies obtained by Patil and Joshi may not be due to the fact that the black hole contains a massless scalar field, but may be instead related to the geometry of the naked singularity in the JNW spacetime. An analogous case of infinite c.m. energy in the vicinity of a naked singularity is also presented.

  1. Phase control of the microwave radiation in free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    A phase control system for the FEL portion of Two-Beam Accelerator is proposed. The control keeps the phase error within acceptable bounds. The control mechanism is analyzed, both analytically in a ''resonant particle'' approximation and numerically in a multi-particle simulation code. Sensitivity of phase errors to the FEL parameters has been noticed.

  2. Trapping of charged particles by Bessel beams

    E-print Network

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Drozd, Nadbor

    2011-01-01

    There exist two well established methods to trap charged particles: the Penning trap and the Paul trap. The subject of this article is to present a third mechanism for trapping charged particles - trapping by beams of electromagnetic radiation. The essential role is played by the electric field configuration in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis (for nonrelativistic electrons, the magnetic field is less important). Particles are confined to the vicinity of the minimum-energy points. In particular, for beams of electromagnetic radiation carrying orbital angular momentum such points lie on the beam axis.

  3. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the problem of ion and electron energization in solar flares, and is capable of accounting for a wide range of both neutral and charged particle emissions. It is also a component in diffusive shock acceleration, since pitch-angle scattering (which is necessary for multiple shock crossings) is accompanied by diffusion in momentum space, which in turn yields a net systematic energy gain; however, stochastic energization will dominate the first-order shock process only in certain parameter regimes. Although stochastic acceleration has been applied to particle energization in the lobes of radio galaxies, its application to the central regions of AGNs has only recently been considered, but not in detail. We proposed to systematically investigate the plasma processes responsible for stochastic particle acceleration in black hole magnetospheres along with the energy-loss processes which impede particle energization. To this end we calculated acceleration rates and escape time scales for protons and electrons resonating with Alfven waves, and for electrons resonating with whistlers. Assuming either a Kolmogorov or Kraichnan wave spectrum, accretion at the Eddington limit, magnetic field strengths near equipartition, and turbulence energy densities approx. 10% of the total magnetic field energy density, we find that Alfven waves accelerate protons to Lorentz factors approx, equals 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) before they escape from the system. Acceleration of electrons by fast mode and whistler waves can produce a nonthermal population of relativistic electrons whose maximum energy is determined by a competition with radiation losses.

  4. US Particle Accelerator School Cyclotrons: Old but Still New

    E-print Network

    Dai, Pengcheng

    US Particle Accelerator School Cyclotrons: Old but Still New The history of accelerators is a history of inventions William A. Barletta Director, US Particle Accelerator School Dept. of Physics, MIT Economics Faculty, University of Ljubljana #12;US Particle Accelerator School ~ 650 cyclotrons operating

  5. Particle Simulations for Electron Beam-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-cheng; G, Zhou C.; Li, Yang; Cao, Jin-bin; J, Cao B.; Wang, Xue-yi; X, Wang Y.

    1998-12-01

    The computer simulations of high-frequency instabilities excited by the high density electron beam and their nonlinear effect are presented. One-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations are performed with different values of the electron beam-to-plasma density ratio. The results show that for the high electron beam-to-background plasma density ratio, all the Langmuir waves and two electromagnetic waves with left-hand and right-hand circular polarizations (i.e., the "L-O mode" and the "R-X mode") propagating parallel to the magnetic field can be generated and the maximum values of wave electric fields are nearly the same. The electron beam and background plasma are diffused and a part of energetic background electrons are obviously accelerated by the wave-particle interactions. The heating of the beam and background plasma is mainly due to the electrostatic (Langmuir) wave-particle interactions, but the accelerations of a part of energetic background electrons may be mainly due to the electromagnetic wave-particle interactions.

  6. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  7. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  8. Charged-particle beam: a safety mandate

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.C.

    1983-07-15

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a recent development in the field of charged particle beam research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With this experimental apparatus, researchers will characterize intense pulses of electron beams propagated through air. Inherent with the ATA concept was the potential for exposure to hazards, such as high radiation levels and hostile breathing atmospheres. The need for a comprehensive safety program was mandated; a formal system safety program was implemented during the project's conceptual phase. A project staff position was created for a safety analyst who would act as a liaison between the project staff and the safety department. Additionally, the safety analyst would be responsible for compiling various hazards analyses reports, which formed the basis of th project's Safety Analysis Report. Recommendations for safety features from the hazards analysis reports were incorporated as necessary at appropriate phases in project development rather than adding features afterwards. The safety program established for the ATA project faciliated in controlling losses and in achieving a low-level of acceptable risk.

  9. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Sessler

    2008-04-04

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  10. Test particle acceleration by rotating jet magnetospheres

    E-print Network

    F. M. Rieger; K. Mannheim

    2000-11-01

    Centrifugal acceleration of charged test particles at the base of a rotating jet magnetosphere is considered. Based on an analysis of forces we derive the equation for the radial accelerated motion and present an analytical solution. It is shown that for particles moving outwards along rotating magnetic field lines, the energy gain is in particular limited by the breakdown of the bead-on-the-wire approximation which occurs in the vicinity of the light cylinder $r_{L}$. The corresponding upper limit for the maximum Lorentz factor $\\gamma_{max}$ for electrons scales $\\propto B^{2/3} r_{L}^{2/3}$, with $B$ the magnetic field strength at $r_{L}$, and is at most of the order of a $10^2-10^3$ for the conditions regarded to be typical for BL Lac objects. Such values suggest that this mechanism may provide pre-accelerated seed particles which are required for efficient Fermi-type particle acceleration at larger scales in radio jets.

  11. Test Particles with Acceleration-Dependent Lagrangian

    E-print Network

    M. Toller

    2006-02-07

    We consider a classical test particle subject to electromagnetic and gravitational fields, described by a Lagrangian depending on the acceleration and on a fundamental length. We associate to the particle a moving local reference frame and we study its trajectory in the principal fibre bundle of all the Lorentz frames. We discuss in this framework the general form of the Lagrange equations and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws (Noether theorem). We apply these results to a model, already discussed by other authors, which implies an upper bound to the proper acceleration and to another new model in which a similar quantity, called ``pseudo-acceleration'', is bounded. With some simple choices of the fields, we illustrate some other interesting properties of the models and we show that unwanted features may appear, as unstable run-away solutions and unphysical values of the energy-momentum or of the velocity.

  12. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  13. Non-accelerator particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. 9/16/2009 Andy Haas Stanford Student Orientation: Accelerator based Particle Physics 1 Accelerator-based Particle Physics

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    9/16/2009 Andy Haas Stanford Student Orientation: Accelerator based Particle Physics 1 Accelerator, 2009 #12;9/16/2009 Andy Haas Stanford Student Orientation: Accelerator based Particle Physics 2 Stanford Student Orientation: Accelerator based Particle Physics 5 Super B (to be built near Frascati lab

  15. Particle acceleration at perpendicular shock waves: Model and observations

    E-print Network

    Sanahuja, Blai

    Particle acceleration at perpendicular shock waves: Model and observations G. P. Zank,1 Gang Li,1 V the transport of energetic particles, we construct a model for diffusive particle acceleration at highly excitation at quasiparallel shocks in evaluating the particle acceleration timescale ensures

  16. Particles accelerate the detachment of viscous liquids

    E-print Network

    Merlijn S. van Deen; Thibault Bertrand; Nhung Vu; David Quéré; Eric Clément; Anke Lindner

    2013-01-31

    During detachment of a viscous fluid extruded from a nozzle a filament linking the droplet to the latter is formed. Under the effect of surface tension the filament thins until pinch off and final detachment of the droplet. In this paper we study the effect of the presence of individual particles trapped in the filament on the detachment dynamics using granular suspensions of small volume fractions ({\\phi} particle strongly modifies the detachment dynamics. The particle perturbs the thinning of the thread and a large droplet of fluid around the particle is formed. This perturbation leads to an acceleration of the detachment of the droplet compared to the detachment ob- served for a pure fluid. We quantify this acceleration for single particles of different sizes and link it to similar ob- servations for suspensions of small volume fractions. Our study also gives more insight into particulate effects on de- tachment of more dense suspensions and allows to explain the accelerated detachment close to final pinch off observed previously (Bonnoit et al 2012)

  17. Studies on longitudinal beam compression in induction accelerator drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W.-K. Mark; D. D.-M. Ho; S. T. Brandon; C.-L. Chang; A. T. Drobot; A. Faltens; E. P. Lee; G. A. Krafft

    1986-01-01

    Longitudinal beam compression is an integral part of the U.S. induction accelerator development effort for heavy ion fusion. It occurs before final focus and fusion chamber beam transport and is a key process determining initial conditions for final focus hardware. Determining the limits for maximal performance of key accelerator components is an essential element of the effort to reduce driver

  18. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  19. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H. (Golden Valley, MN)

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  20. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 1012 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  1. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas J. Kemp; J. Fuchs; Y. Sentoku; V. Sotnikov; M. Bakeman; P. Antici; T. E. Cowan

    2007-01-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be <0.002mmmrad , which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan , Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying

  2. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy D. Panasenko, A. J. Shu, C. B., Berkeley, California 94720, USA Abstract. Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies

  4. ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG

    E-print Network

    ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG PLASMA CELL A Proposal to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Primary Investigators: R. Assmann, C. Joshi, T. Katsouleas, W. Leemans, R. Siemann. Wang UCLA T. Katsouleas, S. Lee, USC April 1997 Abstract A plasma-based wakefield acceleration (PWFA

  5. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  6. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the machines with which you will be involved in the years to come. Perhaps, we can even turn your frustration with the inadequacy of these machines into marvel at the performance of the accelerators. At the least, we hope to convince you that the accelerators are central, not peripheral, to our science and that the physics of such machines is both fascinating and sophisticated. The plan is the following: First I will give two lectures on basic accelerator physics; then you will hear two lectures on the state of the art, present limitations, the specific parameters of LEP, HERA, TEV2 and SLC, and some extrapolation to the next generation of machines such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), and Large Linear Colliders; finally, I will give two lectures on new acceleration methods.

  7. Self force on an accelerated particle

    E-print Network

    Thomas M. Linz; John L. Friedman; Alan G. Wiseman

    2014-04-28

    We calculate the singular field of an accelerated point particle (scalar charge, electric charge or small gravitating mass) moving on an accelerated (non-geodesic) trajectory in a generic background spacetime. Using a mode-sum regularization scheme, we obtain explicit expressions for the self-force regularization parameters. In the electromagnetic and gravitational case, we use a Lorenz gauge. This work extends the work of Barack and Ori [1] who demonstrated that the regularization parameters for a point particle in geodesic motion in a Schwarzschild spacetime can be described solely by the leading and subleading terms in the mode-sum (commonly known as the $A$ and $B$ terms) and that all terms of higher order in $\\ell$ vanish upon summation (later they showed the same behavior for geodesic motion in Kerr [2], [3]). We demonstrate that these properties are universal to point particles moving through any smooth spacetime along arbitrary (accelerated) trajectories. Our renormalization scheme is based on, but not identical to, the Quinn-Wald axioms. As we develop our approach, we review and extend work showing that that different definitions of the singular field used in the literature are equivalent to our approach. Because our approach does not assume geodesic motion of the perturbing particle, we are able use our mode-sum formalism to explicitly recover a well-known result: The self-force on static scalar charges near a Schwarzschild black hole vanishes.

  8. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  9. Generating Particle Beams of Controlled Dimensions and Divergence: II. Experimental Evaluation of Particle Motion in Aerodynamic Lenses and Nozzle Expansions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peng Liu; Paul J. Ziemann; David B. Kittelson; Peter H. McMurry

    1995-01-01

    A particle-beam-forming apparatus for producing narrow particle beams was developed based on the theory discussed in paper I of this series. It consists of a variable number of aerodynamic lenses (short capillaries and\\/or thin-plate orifices with diameters ranging from 3.5 to 7.0 mm) followed by an accelerating nozzle (3 mm). It was evaluated using monodisperse DOS and NaCl particles (0.02–0.24

  10. Presented at the 2007 Particle Accelerator Conference, Albuquerque, NM ERL 07-4 DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR BEAM DIAGNOSTICS IN ERL INJECTOR*

    E-print Network

    , the deflector was optimized for = 1. CAVITY SHAPE CONSIDERATIONS The amplitude of transverse deflecting voltage.g., adding 1 inches ID beam pipes reduces the impedance to Z = 1.08 MOhm. While multi-cell deflectors deflector [3], where four round rods are used to concentrate electromagnetic field near the axis. In our

  11. uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    H uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle physics for more than counterparts, positrons, can then `surf' the electric field of a wave's wake. Particles have been accelerated accelerator, charged particles such as electrons, protons or their antiparticles are accelerated by an alterna

  12. Polymeric flocculants processing by accelerated electron beams and microwave heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana I. Martin; Elena Mateescu; Gabriela Craciun; Daniel Ighigeanu; Adelina Ighigeanu

    2002-01-01

    Results obtained by accelerated electron beam, microwave and simultaneous microwave and electron beam application in the chemistry of acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers (polymeric flocculants used for wastewater treatment) are presented. Comparative results concerning the molecular weight and Huggins’ constant for the acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers obtained by classical heating, microwave heating, electron beam irradiation and simultaneous microwave and

  13. INTRA BEAM SCATTERING IN LINEAR ACCELERATORS, ESPECIALLY ERLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg H. Hoffstaetter; Michael P. Ehrlichman; Alexander B. Temnykh

    The theories of beam loss and emittance growth by Tou- schek and Intra Beam Scattering have been formulated for beams in storage rings. It is there that these effects have hitherto been important because of their large currents. However, there are linear accelerators where these effects become important when considering loss rates and radia- tion damage. Prime examples are high

  14. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOEpatents

    Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Cobb, Donald D. (Los Alamos, NM); Robiscoe, Richard T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  15. A New Field Line Advection Model for Solar Particle Acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V. Sokolov; I. I. Roussev; T. I. Gombosi; M. A. Lee; J. Kóta; T. G. Forbes; W. B. Manchester; J. I. Sakai

    2004-01-01

    The diffusive acceleration of solar protons at a shock wave driven by a realistic coronal mass ejection is modeled using a new field line advection model for particle acceleration coupled with a global MHD code. The new model described in this Letter includes effects important for the particle acceleration and transport, by means of diffusive shock acceleration, and employs Lagrangian

  16. Radiation from accelerated particles in shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Zhang, B.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs in the shocked regions. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields and for particle acceleration. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The ``jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has properties different from synchrotron radiation calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure of gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. In order to calculate radiation from first principles and go beyond the standard synchrotron model, we have used PIC simulations. We present synthetic spectra to compare with the spectra obtained from Fermi observations.

  17. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the protons become superAlfvenic (above about 1 MeV/nucleon), they too can suffer transit-time acceleration by the fast mode waves and will receive an extra acceleration "kick." The basic overall objective of this 1 year effort was to construct a spatially-dependent version of this acceleration model and this has been realized.

  18. Particle acceleration at shocks in relativistic jets

    E-print Network

    J. G. Kirk

    1997-08-05

    The theory of particle acceleration at shock fronts is briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on the production of the particles responsible for the nonthermal emission from blazars. The flat radio/IR spectra of these sources cannot be produced by diffusive acceleration at a simple nonrelativistic shock front propagating in a homogeneous medium. It can, however, be produced by a single unmodified mildly relativistic shock, if the pressure in the shocked gas is provided by the leptonic component, or, independently of the equation of state, by a relativistic shock which is oblique to the magnetic field. The analytic theory of these shocks makes several simplifications, but Monte-Carlo simulations exist which extend the range of validity. Of particular interest is acceleration in a tangled magnetic field. Here, however, the Monte-Carlo simulations have not yet yielded unambiguous results. The "homogeneous" models of blazar emission are discussed, and is it shown that they imply a geometry of the emitting region which is laminar in form, with an aspect ratio of d/RMkn~421. Identifying these with relativistic shock fronts, a model of acceleration is described, which displays characteristic variations in the synchrotron spectral index with intensity.

  19. Particle acceleration during substorm growth and onset

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Williams; D. G. Mitchell; C. Y. Huang; L. A. Frank; C.T. Russell

    1990-01-01

    The authors present ISEE-1 observations of ion and electron energization made at â¼11 R{sub E} during a substorm event occurring on 2 April 1978. An analysis of the dominant cross-tail current systems in this event has allowed them to uniquely associate particle energization processes with the development and\\/or disruption of the cross-tail currents. They find that significant ion acceleration occurs

  20. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method

    E-print Network

    Yannis Papaphilippou

    2014-06-05

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  1. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre/m) Accelerator Research DESY DESY is one of the world's leading research centres for photon science, particle science, particle physics and atto-second science. The position of a senior scientist in accelerator

  2. The Solar Flare: A Strongly Turbulent Particle Accelerator

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Chapter 5 The Solar Flare: A Strongly Turbulent Particle Accelerator L. Vlahos, S. Krucker, and P) and particle acceleration during such an event are rarely discussed together in the same article. Many the topic of particle acceleration is often presented as an addi- tional complication to be addressed

  3. Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations

    E-print Network

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations Kwan-Liu Ma £ Greg-performance computing, particle accelerators, perception, point-based rendering, scientific visualization, field lines Introduction Particle accelerators have helped enable some of the most remarkable discoveries of the 20th

  4. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre science, particle physics and atto-second science. The position of a tenure track scientist in accelerator and XFEL · Study realistic applications of new accelerator technologies for photon science and particle

  5. Particle acceleration in solar flares: observations versus numerical simulations

    E-print Network

    Particle acceleration in solar flares: observations versus numerical simulations A O Benz, P C processes such as isotropization and magnetic trapping are made. Keywords: Particle acceleration, hard X. As the electric field of reconnection with possible parallel component capable of particle acceleration is limited

  6. Don Melrose Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Radiation in

    E-print Network

    Melrose, Don

    Don Melrose #12;Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Radiation in Space Plasmas D.B. Melrose maser emission fi-om planets and stars. Key words: Acceleration of particles, plasma emission, electron mechanism is ' a process that increases the energy of nonthermal particles. Several different acceleration

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE SUN AND IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    E-print Network

    Reames, Donald V.

    PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE SUN AND IN THE HELIOSPHERE DONALD V. REAMES NASA/ Goddard Space Flight) Abstract. Energetic particles are accelerated in rich profusion at sites throughout the heliosphere. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;414 PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE SUN AND IN THE HELIOSPHERE 4. Impulsive

  8. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  9. The IBA Rhodotron: an industrial high-voltage high-powered electron beam accelerator for polymers radiation processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Van Lancker; Arnold Herer; Marshall R. Cleland; Yves Jongen; Michel Abs

    1999-01-01

    The Rhodotron is a high-voltage, high-power electron beam accelerator based on a design concept first proposed in 1989 by J. Pottier of the French Atomic Agency, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). In December 1991, the Belgian particle accelerator manufacturer, Ion Beam Applications s.a. (IBA) entered into an exclusive agreement with the CEA to develop and industrialize the Rhodotron. Electron beams

  10. Canonical Particle Acceleration in FRI Radio Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Andrew Young; Lawrence Rudnick; Debora Katz; Tracey DeLaney; Namir E. Kassim; Kazuo Makishima

    2005-02-26

    Matched resolution multi-frequency VLA observations of four radio galaxies are used to derive the asymptotic low energy slope of the relativistic electron distribution. Where available, low energy slopes are also determined for other sources in the literature. They provide information on the acceleration physics independent of radiative and other losses, which confuse measurements of the synchrotron spectra in most radio, optical and X-ray studies. We find a narrow range of inferred low energy electron energy slopes, n(E)=const*E^-2.1 for the currently small sample of lower luminosity sources classified as FRI (not classical doubles). This distribution is close to, but apparently inconsistent with, the test particle limit of n(E)=const*E^-2.0 expected from strong diffusive shock acceleration in the non-relativistic limit. Relativistic shocks or those modified by the back-pressure of efficiently accelerated cosmic rays are two alternatives to produce somewhat steeper spectra. We note for further study the possiblity of acceleration through shocks, turbulence or shear in the flaring/brightening regions in FRI jets as they move away from the nucleus. Jets on pc scales and the collimated jets and hot spots of FRII (classical double) sources would be governed by different acceleration sites and mechanisms; they appear to show a much wider range of spectra than for FRI sources.

  11. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

    1999-01-01

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

  12. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  13. The production of accelerated radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-11-01

    During the last few years, substantial work has been done and interest developed in the scientific opportunities available with accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for nuclear physics, astrophysics, and applied research. This interest has led to the construction, development, and proposed development of both first- and second-generation RIB facilities in Asia, North America, and Europe; international conferences on RIBs at Berkeley and Louvain-la-Neuve; and many workshops on specific aspects of RIB production and science. This paper provides a discussion of both the projectile fragmentation, PF, and isotope separator on-line, ISOL, approach to RIB production with particular emphasis on the latter approach, which employs a postaccelerator and is most suitable for nuclear structure physics. The existing, under construction, and proposed facilities worldwide are discussed. The paper draws heavily from the CERN ISOLDE work, the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) study, and the operating first-generation RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve, and the first-generation RIB project currently being constructed at ORNL.

  14. Mechanisms for Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a plasma process in which magnetic energy is rapidly converted to kinetic energy via a change in the magnetic topology. Observations of reconnection in solar flares show it to be an very efficient accelerator of particles, e.g. nonthermal electrons. The traditional picture of acceleration via parallel electric fields near the magnetic X-line does not scale well to large systems such as the solar corona. Recent work has shown that particles may be accelerated by a Fermi mechanism inside contracting magnetic islands. This mechanism was previously explored in terms of particles trapped in contracting islands, gaining energy due to the conservation of the parallel adiabatic invariant. However, this treatment is not strictly applicable in complicated island geometries where particles are poorly trapped. To generalize this theory, we examine this mechanism by means of its local expression: the scalar product of the electric force with the curvature drift. This proves equivalent to conservation of the parallel adiabatic invariant for the case of a trapped particle. We present two-dimensional kinetic simulations which explore the relative importance of this term compared to parallel electric fields. The curvature-drift term dominates in antiparallel reconnection, with a negligible contribution from parallel electric fields. In the guide field simulations, relevant for solar flares, the contribution from parallel electric fields is significant. We explore several simulations with varying system sizes and mass ratios in order to examine how the parallel electric fields and the curvature-drift term would scale to large systems relevant for physical applications. We then compare the 2D results with 3D simulations.

  15. Multiple Accelerating Potential SEM Microanalysis of Individual Atmospheric Particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    There are many significant applications of individual micro- or nano-particle characterization in aerosol and atmospheric sciences, as recent AGU sessions and topical meetings of organizations like the Microbeam Analysis Society have shown. Interpreting the results of individual particle analyses is complicated by the complexity of the matrix corrections involved and the compositional variability of the particles themselves. Even nano-particles can be composites of multiple phases. And due to their large surface areas, particle properties can be dominated by their surface coatings or agglomerations. One way to efficiently characterize such multi-phase objects (for particles larger than ~100 nm) is to utilize multiple accelerating potential (MAP) imaging and x-ray analysis in a high-resolution SEM. Changing the electron beam energy in several steps from 15-20 down to 1-3 keV emphasizes surface features in the electron imaging and reduces the analytical penetration from the µm to nm range. Existing thin-film algorithmic and Monte Carlo microprobe correction procedures can be adapted to correct the analytical data for particle geometric effects. The compositions of surface layers and under-layers can be separated and accurately determined. The results of this non-destructive method compares well in both surface sensitivity and accuracy to other surface-microanalytical techniques involving ion sputtering depth profiling. We have used MAP-SEM analysis to determine the thickness of surface layers thinner than 1 nm and the composition of multi-element surface coatings less than 10 nm thick. We will show examples of multiple accelerating potential analyses for the characterization of complex 1-10 µm atmospheric particles and discuss the practical implementation of algorithmic and Monte Carlo corrections for particle x-ray emission data.

  16. Collective Temperature Anisotropy Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward

    2006-10-01

    Periodic focusing accelerators, transport systems and storage rings have a wide range of applications ranging from basic scientific research in high energy and nuclear physics, to applications such as ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion, and spallation neutron sources. Of particular importance at the high beam currents and charge densities of practical interest, are the effects of the intense self fields produced by the beam space charge and current on determining the detailed equilibrium, stability and transport properties. Charged particle beams confined by external focusing fields represent an example of nonneutral plasma. A characteristic feature of such plasmas is the non-uniformity of the equilibrium density profiles and the nonlinearity of the self fields, which makes detailed analytical investigation very difficult. The development and application of advanced numerical tools such as eigenmode codes [1] and Monte-Carlo particle simulation methods [2] are often the only tractable approach to understand the underlying physics of different instabilities familiar in electrically neutral plasmas which may cause a degradation in beam quality. Two such instabilities are the electrostatic Harris instability [2] and the electromagnetic Weibel instability [1], both driven by a large temperature anisotropy which develops naturally in accelerators. The beam acceleration causes a large reduction in the longitudinal temperature and provides the free energy to drive collective temperature anisotropy instabilities. Such instabilities may lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which will make focusing the beam difficult, and may impose a limit on the beam luminosity and the minimum spot size achievable in focusing experiments. This paper reviews recent advances in the theory and simulation of collective instabilities in intense charged particle beams caused by temperature anisotropy. We also describe new simulation tools that have been developed to study these instabilities. The results of the investigations that identify the instability growth rates, levels of saturations, and conditions for quiescent beam propagation will also be discussed. [1] E.A. Startsev and R.C. Davidson, Phys.Plasmas 10, 4829 (2003). [2] E.A. Startsev, R.C. Davidson and H. Qin, Phys.Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8,124201 (2005).

  17. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ken; Byer, Robert L

    2012-03-01

    We present a new concept for a beam position monitor with the unique ability to map particle beam position to a measurable wavelength. Coupled with an optical spectrograph, this beam position monitor is capable of subnanometer resolution. We describe one possible design, and through finite-element frequency-domain simulations, we show a resolution of 0.7 nm. Because of its high precision and ultracompact form factor, this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." PMID:22378457

  18. Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC'07)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2007-08-01

    The twenty-second Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC'07, took place at the Albuquerque Convention Centre in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico, from Monday to Friday, 2007 June 25 to 29. It was attended by over 1350 delegates from 25 different countries (63% North America, 24% Europe, 11% Asia and 2% Other), and was held under the auspices of the two professional societies that oversee and make holding this series of conferences possible, the Division of Physics of Beams within APS, and the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society within IEEE. As host of the conference, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is especially thanked for their many contributions and assistance both prior to and during the conference. The Convention Center was an ideal location for information sharing and discussions between the interdisciplinary aspects of the accelerator community, as well as for related meetings and ad-hoc 'rump' sessions.

  19. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  20. Wave-Particle Interactions and Particle Acceleration in Turbulent Plasmas: Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, Harald; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Mueller, Hans; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Farrugia, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Wave-particle interactions and acceleration processes are present in all key regions inside and outside of the heliosphere. Spacecraft observations measure ion distributions and accelerated ion populations, which are the result of one or several processes. For instance STEREO measures energetic particles associated with interplanetary discontinuities and in the solar wind. Voyager and IBEX provide unique data of energetic particles from the termination shock and the inner and outer heliopause. The range of plasma conditions covered by observations is enormous. However, the physical processes causing particle acceleration and wave-particle interaction and determining the particle distributions are still unknown. Currently two mechanisms, the so-called pumping mechanism (Fisk and Gloeckler, 2010) and merging/contracting island (Fermo, Drake & Swisdak, 2010) are discussed as promising models. In order to determine these individual processes, numerical models or theoretical considerations are needed. Hybrid simulations, which include all kinetic processes self-consistently on the ion level, are a very proven, powerful tool to investigate wave-particle interaction, turbulence, and phase-space evolution of pickup and solar wind ions. In the framework of this study we performed 3D multi-species hybrid simulations for an ion/ion beam instability to study the temporal evolution of ion distributions, their stability, and the influence of self-generated waves. We investigated the energization of ions downstream of interplanetary discontinuities and shocks and downstream of the termination shock, the turbulence, and growth rate of instabilities and compared the results with theoretical predictions. The simulations show that ions can be accelerated downstream of collisionless shocks by trapping of charged particles in coherent wave fronts.

  1. Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic Pulse Propagating to plasma physics and particle accelerators. The interaction physics of fields with particles has also been, Colchester CO4 3SQ, U.K. Abstract. The motion of a charged particle driven by an electromagnetic pulse

  2. Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert B. Decker

    1988-01-01

    We review the basic techniques and results of numerical codes used to model the acceleration of charged particles at oblique, fast-mode, collisionless shocks. The emphasis is upon models in which accelerated particles (ions) are treated as test particles, and particle dynamics is calculated by numerically integrating along exact phase-space orbits. We first review the case where ions are sufficiently energetic

  3. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  4. Diffusive Compression Acceleration of Energetic Particles in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Qin, G.

    2007-12-01

    Diffusive compress acceleration of energetic charged particle is similar to diffusive shock acceleration. The particle acceleration occurs through either drift acceleration or Fermi process. Based on the adiabatic theory of particle motion and the frozen-in-law of space plasma, we can write the rate of particle energy increase and particle pitch-angle change in terms of the divergence of plasma flow. Particles are accelerated whenever the plasma with its embedded magnetic fields is compressed. This is a first-order particle acceleration mechanism. Shock is just an extreme profile of compression, but particle acceleration does not have to have a shock present. In this acceleration theory, diffusion is only needed to keep the particles near the acceleration site long enough to get the particles to much higher energies than their initial energies. Inside the magnetosphere, a shock is unlikely, but plasma compression still occurs. Using a model map of magnetospheric convection pattern, we found that the compression of magnetospheric plasma can play important roles in particle acceleration and trapping. It is a large-scale phenomenon. The strongest compression acceleration occurs ~6-12 Re on the night-side and there particles can double their energies in matter of a few minutes. The acceleration has a correlation with the speed of external solar wind that drives the magnetospheric convection and the location of plasmapause that indicates the level of magnetospheric convection. Energetic electrons accelerated at near- Earth tail will drift to the dawn side and emit whistler waves or other electron-related waves, and energetic ions will drift to dusk side and emit ion cyclotron waves and form partial ring current there. When magnetospheric convection is enhanced, particularly during a fast sunward flow in the tail, the acceleration becomes stronger and particle acceleration site gets closer to the Earth. These could change the radiation belt content and disrupt the magnetospheric current system.

  5. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Sc?rer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin, S Mangles, L O Silva, R Fonseca and P A Norreys Electro-optic shocks from blowout laser wakefields D F Gordon, A Ting, M H Helle, D Kaganovich and B Hafizi Onset of self-steepening of intense laser pulses in plasmas J Vieira, F Fiúza, L O Silva, M Tzoufras and W B Mori Analysis of laser wakefield dynamics in capillary tubes N E Andreev, K Cassou, F Wojda, G Genoud, M Burza, O Lundh, A Persson, B Cros, V E Fortov and C-G Wahlstrom Characterization of the beam loading effects in a laser plasma accelerator C Rechatin, J Faure, X Davoine, O Lundh, J Lim, A Ben-Ismaïl, F Burgy, A Tafzi, A Lifschitz, E Lefebvre and V Malka Energy gain scaling with plasma length and density in the plasma wakefield accelerator P Muggli, I Blumenfeld, C E Clayton, F J Decker, M J Hogan, C Huang, R Ischebeck, R H Iverson, C Joshi, T Katsouleas, N Kirby, W Lu, K A Marsh, W B Mori, E Oz, R H Siemann, D R Walz and M Zhou Generation of tens of GeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a moving double layer formed by ultraintense lasers at intensity 1021-1023Wcm-2 Lu-Le Yu, Han Xu, Wei-Min Wang, Zheng-Ming Sheng, Bai-Fei Shen, Wei Yu and Jie Zhang Carbon ion acceleration from thin foil targets irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast, ultraintense laser pulses D C Carroll, O Tresca, R Prasad, L Romagnani, P S Foster, P Gallegos, S Ter-Avetisyan, J S Green, M J V Streeter, N Dover, C A J Palmer, C M Brenner, F H Cameron, K E Quinn, J Schreiber, A P L Robinson, T Baeva, M N Quinn, X H Yuan, Z Najmudin, M Zepf, D Neely, M Borghesi and P McKenna Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse S Y Kalmykov, S A Yi, A Beck, A F Lifschitz, X Davoine, E Lefebvre, A Pukhov, V Khudik, G Shvets, S A Reed, P Dong, X Wang, D Du, S Bedacht, R Zgadzaj, W Henderson, A Bernstein, G Dyer, M Martinez, E Gaul, T Ditmire and M C Downer Effects of laser prepulses on laser-induced proton generation D Batani, R Jafer, M Veltcheva, R Dezulian, O Lundh, F Lindau, A Persson, K Osvay, C-G Wahlström, D C Carroll, P McKenna, A Flacco and V Malka Proton accelerati

  6. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also described.

  7. Seminar Ia, cetrti letnik, stari program LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF PARTICLES IN ACCELERATORS

    E-print Network

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Seminar Ia, cetrti letnik, stari program LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF PARTICLES IN ACCELERATORS Author motion of charged particles in particle accelerators. The technique of acceleration by electromagnetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 6 Conclusion 15 1 Introduction Particle accelerator physics primarily deals with interaction

  8. Test of a Diamond Detector Using Unbunched Beam Halo Particles

    E-print Network

    Dehning, B; Pernegger, H; Dobos, D; Frais-Kolbl, H; Griesmayer, E

    2010-01-01

    A pCVD diamond detector has been evaluated as a beam loss monitor for future applications in the LHC accelerator. The test monitor was mounted in the SPS BA5 downstream of a LHC collimator during the LHC beam set-up. CVD diamond particle detectors are already in use in the CERN experiments ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and Alice. This is a proven technology with high radiation tolerance and very fast signal read-out. It can be used for single-particle detection, as well as for measuring particle cascades, for timing measurements on the nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems. Despite the read-out being made through 250 m of CK50 cable, the tests have shown a very good signal-to-noise ratio of 6.8, an excellent double-pulse resolution of less than 5 ns and a high dynamic range of 1:350 MIP particles. The efficiency of particle detection is practically 100% for charged particles.

  9. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  10. Application of Real-time Digitization Technique in Beam Measurement for Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Lei; Gao, Xingshun; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Beam measurement is very important for accelerators. With the development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques, digital beam measurement becomes a research hot spot. IQ (In-phase & Quadrature-phase) analysis based method is an important beam measurement approach, the principle of which is presented and discussed in this paper. The State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics in University of Science and Technology of China has devoted efforts to the research of digital beam measurement based on high-speed high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion, and a series of beam measurement instruments were designed for China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system (ADS).

  11. The TRIUMF-ISAC Post-Accelerator for Radioactive Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.

    1998-04-01

    The ISAC radioactive ion beam facility under construction at TRIUMF comprises a 500 MeV proton beam (I <= 100 ?A) from the TRIUMF cyclotron impinging on a thick target, an on-line source to ionize the radioactive products, a mass-separator for mass selection, an accelerator complex and experimental areas. The accelerator chain comprises a 35 MHz RF Quadrupole (RFQ) to accelerate beams of q/A >= 1/30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 105 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of q/A >= 1/6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. The accelerators have several noteworthy features. Both linacs are required to operate cw to preserve beam intensity. The RFQ, a four vane split-ring structure, has no bunching section; instead the beam is pre-bunched at 11.7 MHz with a single gap pseudo saw tooth buncher. The variable energy DTL is based on a unique separated function approach. Five independent interdigital H-mode (IH) structures operating at 0^circ synchronous phase provide the acceleration while quadrupole triplets and three gap bunching cavities between tanks provide transverse and longitudinal focussing respectively. Details of the accelerator design as well as the present status will be presented.

  12. Particle acceleration by laser fields in a dielectric disk-loaded waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Romea, R.D.; Kimura, W.D. [STI Optronics, Bellevue, Washington98004-1495 (United States)] [STI Optronics, Bellevue, Washington98004-1495 (United States); Fontana, J.R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1998-06-01

    A new method is proposed for accelerating relativistic charged particle beams in a vacuum by a laser. The laser propagates in an overmoded waveguide interrupted periodically by thin dielectric disks spaced many wavelengths apart. The particle beam travels along the waveguide axis, passing through irises in the disks. The disks correct for slippage of the particle phase relative to the laser wave. This concept exploits the inverse of familiar radiation processes (transition radiation, diffraction radiation). Several practical accelerator issues are incorporated in a systems analysis. Acceleration gradients in the GeV/m range are projected using lasers with {approximately}100GW power. This represents more than an order of magnitude stronger coupling of the laser energy compared to other laser acceleration schemes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  14. Acceleration of charged particles in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eraker, J. H.; Simpson, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the measurements of the high-intensity bursts of electrons with energies of up to 600 keV, discovered in Mercury's magnetosphere during the two nightside encounters of the Mariner 10 with the planet in 1974 and 1975 (Simpson et al., 1974; Simpson, 1975; and Christon and Simpson, 1979). The results provide strong evidence for particle acceleration during explosive magnetic field reconnection within Mercury's magnetotail and suggest a rapid release of magnetic free energy through instabilities occurring in regions of magnetic field reconnection in the planetary magnetotail.

  15. G4beamline Particle Tracking in Matter Dominated Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Roberts, K.B. Beard, S. Ahmed, D. Huang, D.M. Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    The G4beamline program is a useful and steadily improving tool to quickly and easily model beam lines and experimental equipment without user programming. It has both graphical and command-line user interfaces. Unlike most accelerator physics codes, it easily handles a wide range of materials and fields, being particularly well suited for the study of muon and neutrino facilities. As it is based on the Geant4 toolkit, G4beamline includes most of what is known about the interactions of particles with matter. We are continuing the development of G4beamline to facilitate its use by a larger set of beam line and accelerator developers. A major new feature is the calculation of space-charge effects. G4beamline is open source and freely available at http://g4beamline.muonsinc.com

  16. Two-Beam Accelerator: structure studies and 35 GHz experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Kuenning, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) shows great promise for achieving high accelerating gradients, perhaps >250 MV/m, for such machines as electron linear colliders. This paper presents the results of studies of candidate structures for a TBA. Also, the hardware and program for 35 GHz high-gradient testing are described. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Mexico D.F., 01000 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  18. Acceleration of ampere class H{sup -} ion beam by MeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, M.; Inoue, T.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M.; Watanabe, K.; Tobari, H.; Dairaku, M.; Sakamoto, K. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The H{sup -} ion accelerator R and D to realize the international thermonuclear experimental reactor neutral beam is ongoing at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The required performance for the prototype MeV accelerator developed at JAEA is 1 MeV, 500 mA (current density of 200 A/m{sup 2}) H{sup -} ion beam at the beamlet divergence angle of less than 7 mrad. Up to 2005, 836 keV, 146 A/m{sup 2} H{sup -} ion beam was successfully accelerated as the highest record of the current density at MeV class energy beams. In the present work, high current negative ion beam acceleration test was performed by increasing the beam extraction apertures from 3x3 (9 apertures) to 3x5 (15 apertures). By fixing the air leak at the source chamber due to backstream ions as well as the improvement of voltage holding capability by a new fiber reinforced plastic insulator ring, the performance of the MeV accelerator was improved. So far, H{sup -} ion beam of 320 mA was successfully accelerated up to 796 keV with the beam divergence angle of 5.5 mrad. The accelerated drain current including the electron reaches close to the power supply limit for the MeV test facility. The heat flux by the backstream ion during the above beam acceleration was estimated to be 360 W/cm{sup 2}. The Cs leakage to the accelerator during the test campaign (Cs total input of 5.0 g) was 0.26 mg (7.0 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). This is considered to be the allowable level from the viewpoint of voltage holding.

  19. A Low Energy Beam Transport Design with high SCC for TAC Proton Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Caliskan, A; Sultansoy, S; Yilmaz, M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a low energy beam transport (LEBT) channel for the proton linac section of the Turkic Accelerator Complex (TAC) has been designed by using TRACE 2D and TRAVEL codes. The LEBT channel is located between an ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structure. The aims of the design studies are perfect matching between input and output beams with two solenoid magnets, small emittance growth and sufficient space for beam diagnostics. Total length of such LEBT channel is about 1.3 m. The current of H- ion beam from ion source is 80 mA. In the beam dynamical simulations, we have taken into account some space charge compensation (SCC) factors between %93.75 and %100. The results of both codes have been compared for the selected SCC factors. Additionally, beam aperture study for % 95 SCC factor has been done to discard unwanted particles and increase the beam brightness.

  20. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  1. Simplified charged particle beam transport modeling using commonly available commercial software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Douglas; K. Beard; J. Eldred; P. Evtushenko; A. Jenkins; S. W. Moore; L. Osborne; D. Sexton; C. Tennant

    2007-01-01

    Particle beam modeling in accelerators has been the focus of considerable effort since the 1950s. Many generations of tools have resulted from this process, each leveraging both prior experience and increases in computer power. However, continuing innovation in accelerator technology results in systems that are not well described by existing tools, so the software development process is on-going. We discuss

  2. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  3. A new high intensity electron beam for wakefield acceleration studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Conde; Wei Gai; C. Jing; R. Konecny; W. Liu; J. G. Power; H. Wang; Z. Yusof

    2003-01-01

    A new RF photocathode electron gun and beamline have been built for the study of electron beam driven wakefield acceleration. The one and a half cell L-band gun operates with an electric field on the cathode surface of 80 MV\\/m, and generates electron bunches with tens of nanocoulombs of charge and rms bunch lengths of a few picoseconds. The beam

  4. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 10 6 neutrons s -1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 ?m diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  5. Canonical Particle Acceleration in FRI Radio Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Young, A; Katz, D; Delaney, T A; Kassim, N E; Makishima, K; Young, Andrew; Rudnick, Lawrence; Katz, Debora; Laney, Tracey De; Kassim, Namir E.; Makishima, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Matched resolution multi-frequency VLA observations of four radio galaxies are used to derive the asymptotic low energy slope of the relativistic electron distribution. Where available, low energy slopes are also determined for other sources in the literature. They provide information on the acceleration physics independent of radiative and other losses, which confuse measurements of the synchrotron spectra in most radio, optical and X-ray studies. We find a narrow range of inferred low energy electron energy slopes, n(E)=const*E^-2.1 for the currently small sample of lower luminosity sources classified as FRI (not classical doubles). This distribution is close to, but apparently inconsistent with, the test particle limit of n(E)=const*E^-2.0 expected from strong diffusive shock acceleration in the non-relativistic limit. Relativistic shocks or those modified by the back-pressure of efficiently accelerated cosmic rays are two alternatives to produce somewhat steeper spectra. We note for further study the poss...

  6. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai (San Diego, CA)

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  7. Neutral-particle-beam production and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.; Pyle, R.

    1982-07-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first is a discussion of the interactions of neutral beams with confined plasmas, the second is concerned with the production and diagnosis of the neutral beams. In general we are dealing with atoms, molecules, and ions of the isotopes of hydrogen, but some heavier elements (for example, oxygen) will be mentioned. The emphasis will be on single-particle collisions; selected atomic processes on surfaces will be included.

  8. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  9. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  10. GPU accelerated particle visualization with Splotch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivi, M.; Gheller, C.; Dykes, T.; Krokos, M.; Dolag, K.

    2014-07-01

    Splotch is a rendering algorithm for exploration and visual discovery in particle-based datasets coming from astronomical observations or numerical simulations. The strengths of the approach are production of high quality imagery and support for very large-scale datasets through an effective mix of the OpenMP and MPI parallel programming paradigms. This article reports our experiences in re-designing Splotch for exploiting emerging HPC architectures nowadays increasingly populated with GPUs. A performance model is introduced to guide our re-factoring of Splotch. A number of parallelization issues are discussed, in particular relating to race conditions and workload balancing, towards achieving optimal performances. Our implementation was accomplished by using the CUDA programming paradigm. Our strategy is founded on novel schemes achieving optimized data organization and classification of particles. We deploy a reference cosmological simulation to present performance results on acceleration gains and scalability. We finally outline our vision for future work developments including possibilities for further optimizations and exploitation of hybrid systems and emerging accelerators.

  11. Turn-By Beam Extraction during Acceleration in a Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2014-02-01

    A synchrotron to accelerate protons or carbon ions for medical applications is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single beam bunches with maximum beam energy of 1.18 GeV and 400 MeV/u for protons and carbon ions respectively will be extracted from the synchrotron at 15 Hz. For protons, the maximum required energy for irradiating a tumor is ˜206 MeV. A pencil-like proton beam containing ˜5.4×107 p/bunch delivers a therapeutic dose of 2.5 Gy in ˜1.5 minutes to treat a tumor of 1 liter volume. It will take ˜80 minutes with bunches containing 4.5×104 ions/bunch to deliver the same dose of 2.5 Gy with a 400 MeV/u pencil-like carbon beam. This extended treatment time when using carbon ions is not acceptable. In addition, the synchrotron cannot be controlled with a beam bunch containing such a low number of carbon ions. To overcome these two problems of the extended treatment time and the low bunch intensity required for the treatment when carbon ions are used, we have devised a method to “peel” the required 4.5×104 carbon-ions/bunch from the accelerating carbon beam bunch containing ˜108 ions/bunch and deliver them to the tumor on a “turn-by-turn” basis. Unlike other methods of beam extraction from a synchrotron, such as resonance extraction, this method does not allow for any beam losses during the extraction and the carbon beam can be peeled off in less than 15 ms during the acceleration or deceleration cycle of the synchrotron. Thus, this turn-by-turn beam extraction method provides beam with variable energy and precisely controlled beam current during the 30 ms acceleration or deceleration time.

  12. Acoustic Phenomena in Particle Accelerators: Applications for Diagnostics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseev, V. I.; Petrenko, V. V.

    1997-05-01

    In linear accelerators, the ultrasound excited in metal walls of accelerating structures by pulsed RF-fields, dark currents, electron emission, breakdowns and other energy dissipation processes can be used for undisturbing diagnostics of structures at high RF-power levels. In circular accelerators and storage rings, the types and intensities of ultrasound waves excited in conducting walls of beam pipes by beam induced currents depend strongly on the beam space-time characteristics and represent the circulating beam performances. The portable acoustic system for undisturbing diagnostics and control is described.

  13. Rapidly accelerating Mathieu and Weber surface plasmon beams.

    PubMed

    Libster-Hershko, Ana; Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-09-19

    We report the generation of two types of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams which are solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. These beams preserve their shape while propagating along either elliptic (Mathieu beam) or parabolic (Weber beam) trajectories. We show that owing to the nonparaxial nature of the Weber beam, it maintains its shape over a much larger distance along the parabolic trajectory, with respect to the corresponding solution of the paraxial equation-the Airy beam. Dynamic control of the trajectory is realized by translating the position of the illuminating free-space beam. Finally, the ability of these beams to self-heal after blocking obstacles is demonstrated as well. PMID:25279631

  14. Beam profile effects on NPB (neutral particle beam) performance

    SciTech Connect

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, D.; Arranz, F.; Arroyo, J. M.; Barrera, G.; Brañas, B.; Casal, N.; García, M.; López, D.; Martínez, J. I.; Mayoral, A.; Ogando, F.; Parro, M.; Oliver, C.; Rapisarda, D.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-10-01

    The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator will be a 9 MeV, 125 mA cw deuteron accelerator prototype for verifying the validity of the 40 MeV accelerator design for IFMIF. A beam dump designed for maximum power of 1.12 MW will be used to stop the beam at the accelerator exit. The conceptual design for the IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump is based on a conical beam stop made of OFE copper. The cooling system uses an axial high velocity flow of water pressurized up to 3.4 × 10 5 Pa to avoid boiling. The design has been shown to be compliant with ASME mechanical design rules under nominal full power conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been performed to take into account the possible margin on the beam properties at the beam dump entrance. This analysis together with the study of the maintenance issues and the mounting and dismounting operations has led to the complete design definition.

  16. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed. PMID:24593461

  17. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A. A., E-mail: a.adonin@gsi.de; Hollinger, R. [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  18. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, A. A.; Hollinger, R.

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  19. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association PARTICLE PHYSICS· DESY has openings for: DESY-Fellowships (f/m) DESY DESY is one accelerators and detectors for photon science and particle physics. The position Fellows in experimental

  20. Scattering and acceleration of particles in astrophy-: D. B. MELROSE

    E-print Network

    Melrose, Don

    Scattering and acceleration of particles in astrophy-: Lecture 1 D. B. MELROSE School of Physics, acceleration mechanisms are reviewed qualitatively. 2. - Nonthermal particles in astrophysical and space, University of Sydney - Sydney NSW 2006, Australia 1. - Introduction Energetic particles are a characteristic

  1. High Power Particle Beams and Pulsed Power for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hansjoachim; An, Wladimir; Engelko, Wladimir; Giese, Harald; Frey, Wolfgang; Heinzel, Annette; Hoppé, Peter; Mueller, Georg; Schultheiss, Christoph; Singer, Josef; Strässner, Ralf; Strauß, Dirk; Weisenburger, Alfons; Zimmermann, Fritz

    2002-12-01

    Several industrial scale projects with economic and ecologic potential are presently emanating from research and development in the fields of high power particle beams and pulsed power in Europe. Material surface modifications with large area pulsed electron beams are used to protect high temperature gas turbine blades and steel structures in Pb/Bi cooled accelerator driven nuclear reactor systems against oxidation and corrosion respectively. Channel spark electron beams are applied to deposit bio-compatible or bio-active layers on medical implants. Cell membranes are perforated with strong pulsed electric fields to extract nutritive substances or raw materials from the cells and to kill bacteria for sterilization of liquids. Eletrodynamic fragmentation devices are developed to reutilize concrete aggregates for the production of high quality secondary concrete. All activities have a large potential to contribute to a more sustainable economy.

  2. Beams of different masses in electrostatic accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Andersen; K. Gjotterud; T. Holtebekk; O. Lonsjo

    1958-01-01

    The use of the Hâsup +\\/ beam to obtain yield curves for (p, gamma ; ) reactions is shown to introduce an additional energy spread of about 0.5 kev at ; 500 kev proton energy. A simple explanation for thin effect is suggested. It is ; also found that the use of the Hâsup +\\/ beam leads to lower values

  3. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  4. Surfatron acceleration of a relativistic particle by electromagnetic plane wave

    E-print Network

    A. I. Neishtadt; A. A. Vasiliev; A. V. Artemyev

    2010-11-09

    We study motion of a relativistic charged particle in a plane slow electromagnetic wave and background uniform magnetic field. The wave propagates normally to the background field. Under certain conditions, the resonance between the wave and the Larmor motion of the particle is possible. Capture into this resonance results in acceleration of the particle along the wave front (surfatron acceleration). We analyse the phenomenon of capture and show that a captured particle never leaves the resonance and its energy infinitely grows. Scattering on the resonance is also studied. We find that this scattering results in diffusive growth of the particle energy. Finally, we estimate energy losses due to radiation by an accelerated particle.

  5. Turbulent Particle Acceleration in the Diffuse Cluster Plasma

    E-print Network

    J. A. Eilek; J. C. Weatherall

    1999-06-30

    In situ particle acceleration is probably occuring in cluster radio haloes. This is suggested by the uniformity and extent of the haloes, given that spatial diffusion is slow and that radiative losses limit particle lifetimes. Stochastic acceleration by plasma turbulence is the most likely mechanism. Alfven wave turbulence has been suggested as the means of acceleration, but it is too slow to be important in the cluster environment. We propose, instead, that acceleration occurs via strong lower-hybrid wave turbulence. We find that particle acceleration will be effective in clusters if only a small fraction of the cluster energy density is in this form.

  6. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets Due to Weibel Instability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-I. Nishikawa; P. Hardee; G. Richardson; R. Preece; H. Sol; G. J. Fishman

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient

  7. High efficiency beam splitting for H/sup -/ accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Stipp, V.; Krieger, C.; Madsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beam splitting for high energy accelerators has typically involved a significant loss of beam and radiation. This paper reports on a new method of splitting beams for H/sup -/ accelerators. This technique uses a high intensity flash of light to strip a fraction of the H/sup -/ beam to H/sup 0/ which are then easily separated by a small bending magnet. A system using a 900-watt (average electrical power) flashlamp and a highly efficient collector will provide 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ splitting of a 50 MeV H/sup -/ beam. Results on the operation and comparisons with stripping cross sections are presented. Also discussed is the possibility for developing this system to yield a higher stripping fraction.

  8. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  9. Compressional acceleration of energetic particles driven by magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.

    Based on a quasilinear method developed for cosmic ray studies we have established a magnetospheric particle transport equation in the phase space of location and momentum This new particle transport theory differs from the conventional theory using canonical variables by taking into account the effect of large-scale electric field that drives the magnetospheric convection The new transport equation now includes essentially all the basic particle transport mechanisms streaming convection drift focusing adiabatic energy change acceleration by parallel electric field and diffusion in location momentum and pitch angle It can become a theoretical foundation for developing future numerical models of particle transport including particle acceleration in the magnetosphere In this paper we will concentrate on the discussion of particle acceleration in relation to the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma Using a model map of magnetospheric convection pattern we have found that the compression of magnetospheric plasma can play important roles in particle acceleration and trapping The compressional particle acceleration is similar to the first-order Fermi acceleration that occurs at shock waves in other space plasma settings The strongest compressional acceleration occurs in near-Earth magnetotail This mechanism may possibly be the cause of the in-situ acceleration of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt particularly during magnetic storm periods In addition we will discuss the condition and possibility of stochastic acceleration of particles during

  10. Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

  11. Field-aligned electron beams observed simultaneously with upflowing ion beams in the auroral acceleration region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Yoshioka; W. Miyake; T. Mukai; M. Ito

    2000-01-01

    Upgoing, counterstreaming, and downgoing field-aligned electron beams observed simultaneously with upward ion beams in the auroral acceleration region on Akebono (Exos-D) satellite are studied statistically. These electron beams are narrowly collimated within the local loss cone, generally have lower energies per charge than the potential drop above the satellite, and are associated only with low-energy (<2 keV) ion beams. Their

  12. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  13. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  14. Energy Effciency of Particle Accelerators - A Networking Effort within the EUCARD2 Program

    E-print Network

    Stadlmann, J; Gehring, R; Jensen, E; Parker, T; Seidel, M

    2014-01-01

    EuCARD is an Integrating Activity Project for coordinated Research and Development on Particle Accelerators, co-funded by the European Commission under the FP7 Capacities Programme. Within the network EnEfficient [1] we address topics around energy efficiency of research accelerators. The ambitious scientific research goals of modern accelerator facilities lead to high requirements in beam power and beam quality for those research accelerators. In conjunction with the user’s needs the power consumption and environmental impact of the research facilities becomes a major factor in the perception of both funding agencies and the general public. In this Network we combine and focus the R&D done individually at different research centers into a series of workshops. We cover the topics “Energy recovery from cooling circuits “, “Higher electronic efficiency RF power generation“, “Short term energy storage systems”, “Virtual power plants” and “Beam transfer channels with low power consumption?...

  15. Transverse Resistive Wall Instability in the Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, Andrew M.; Neil, V.K.

    1990-06-01

    The transverse resistive wall instability in the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is investigated analytically and numerically. Without any damping mechanism, we find one to four e-folds in 100 m, depending on the design. It is found that Landau damping, due to energy spread within a beam slice, is not effective, due to rapid synchrotron oscillations in the FEL ponderomotive well. Damping due to an energy sweep along the beam is also considered and it is found that a small variation in energy along the beam, decreasing from head to tail, can significantly reduce growth. We conclude that the resistive wall instability is not a severe design constraint on a TBA.

  16. A Magnetorestrictive Tuning System for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Ying Tai; Jordan Cormier; William Espinola; Zhixiu Han; Chad Joshi; Anil Mavanur; Livia Racz; Kenneth Shepard; Edward Daly; Kirk Davis

    2005-05-16

    Energen, Inc. has designed, built, and demonstrated several fast and slow tuners based on its magnetostrictive actuators and stepper motor. These tuners are designed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities, which are important structures in particle accelerators that support a wide spectrum of disciplines, including nuclear and high-energy physics and free electron lasers (FEL). In the past two years, Energen's work has focused on magnetostrictive fast tuners for microphonics and Lorentz detuning compensation on elliptical-cell and spoke-loaded cavities. These tuners were custom designed to meet specific requirements, which included a few to 100 micron stroke range, hundreds to kilohertz operation frequency, and cryogenic temperature operation in vacuum or liquid helium. These tuners have been tested in house and at different laboratories, such as DESY, Argonne National Lab, and Jefferson Lab. Some recent results are presented in this paper.

  17. Collection and focusing of laser accelerated ion beams for therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Orzhekhovskaya, Anna; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2011-03-01

    Experimental results in laser acceleration of protons and ions and theoretical predictions that the currently achieved energies might be raised by factors 5-10 in the next few years have stimulated research exploring this new technology for oncology as a compact alternative to conventional synchrotron based accelerator technology. The emphasis of this paper is on collection and focusing of the laser produced particles by using simulation data from a specific laser acceleration model. We present a scaling law for the “chromatic emittance” of the collector—here assumed as a solenoid lens—and apply it to the particle energy and angular spectra of the simulation output. For a 10 Hz laser system we find that particle collection by a solenoid magnet well satisfies requirements of intensity and beam quality as needed for depth scanning irradiation. This includes a sufficiently large safety margin for intensity, whereas a scheme without collection—by using mere aperture collimation—hardly reaches the needed intensities.

  18. Accelerators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Particle Data Group

    2002-01-01

    What is the purpose of particle accelerators? On this web page, part of a particle physics tutorial, students read that accelerators solve two problems. The accelerators provide an increase in momentum to produce particles of small wavelength, and the fast-moving particles can create new particles when smashed together. A photograph of the inside of a particle accelerator is provided. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  19. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'Hara, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  20. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, C.; Nakamura,K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.B.; Schroeder, C.; Hooker, S.M.

    2006-05-04

    GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radio frequency based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) and hence require tens to hundreds of meters to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometers to generate particle energies of interest to the frontiers of high-energy physics.Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) in which particles are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser pulse produce electric fields several orders of magnitude stronger (10-100 GV/m) and so offer the potential of very compact devices. However, until now it has not been possible to maintain the required laser intensity, and hence acceleration, over the several centimeters needed to reach GeV energies.For this reason laser-driven accelerators have to date been limited to the 100 MeV scale. Contrary to predictions that PW-class lasers would be needed to reach GeV energies, here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channeling a 40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We anticipate that laser-plasma accelerators based on capillary discharge waveguides will have a major impact on the development of future femtosecond radiation sources such as x-ray free electron lasers and become a standard building block for next generation high-energy accelerators.

  1. Short-pulse dielectric two-beam acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Jing

    2012-08-01

    We are exploring a new parameter space of the two-beam acceleration (TBA) scheme based on an ultra-short (~20 ns) rf pulse in a dielectric TBA. All two-beam accelerators (TBAs) use an electron drive beam to generate high-power rf in a decelerator and extract this power to drive an accelerating structure to high gradient. Typically, the rf pulse is on the order of hundreds of ns or greater in order to maintain good rf-to-beam efficiency. However, recent scaling arguments show that the rf breakdown threshold improves with decreasing rf pulse length, so it desirable to find a way to run at short-pulse length with good efficiency. In this paper, we discuss how we chose the design parameters of a short-pulse TBA for a TeV linear collider module. We then present plans for an experimental program to demonstrate TBA at Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) facility including high-power rf generation, high-gradient acceleration, and staging.

  2. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Transport and acceleration of high current uranium ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; Keller, R.; Spaedtke, P.; Mueller, R.W; Bolle, J.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the transport of beams produced by the high current ion source, MEVVA, and of the injection of these beams into the GSI heavy ion RFQ linac. This configuration has provided initial tests of the MEVVA ion source in an injector environment, and of the RFQ with uranium as the accelerated species. Beam currents of 78 mA of titanium and 19 mA of uranium, at an extraction voltage of 40 kV, have been transported through a 4.7 m long beam transport channel, and up to 40 mA of uranium has been transported through a single-gap accelerating column at a voltage of about 150 kV. A current of up to 5 mA of UT has been measured at the exit detector of the RFQ.

  4. Ultra-low emittance proton beams from a laser virtual cathodeplasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Andreas; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Cowan, Thomas; Fuchs, Julien

    2004-11-01

    One key property of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams is their ultra-low transverse emittance. In recent experiments, it was found to be <0.004 mm mrad [Cowan et al., Phys.Rev.Lett.92, 204801 (2004)], at least 10^4 times smaller than the emittance of conventional thermal ion sources. We investigate the reasons for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by checking several candidates for emittance-generation mechanisms, apart from the geometrical effect that is caused by the roughness of the target surface; it is not considered here. As our main tool we use 1D particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles [see Kemp et al., Phys. Plasmas, Sept 2004], and analytical work. Our restriction to 1D detains us from looking at geometrical effects, but it does allow to study the transverse width of the proton beam in momentum space, which is the relevant information for the beam emittance. We find that the lower emittance limit is mainly determined by electron-ion collisions during the initial acceleration phase from the cold rear target surface. Another possible mechanism responsible for the experimentally determined emittance is an ion-acoustic beam plasma instability. We find that it is not important for the fastest ions, while it could play a role for the lower energy ions. This work was supported by DOE/NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-01NV14050.

  5. Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration in Plasma Channels C for the first time in a high gradient laser wakefield accelerator by guiding the drive laser pulse. Channels formed by hydrodynamic shock were used to guide acceleration relevant laser intensities of at least 1E18

  6. Electron beam\\/converter target interactions in radiographic accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. McCarrick; G. Caporaso; F. Chambers; Y.-J. Chen; S. Falabella; F. Goldin; G. Guethlein; D. Ho; R. Richardson; J. Weir

    2003-01-01

    Linear induction accelerators used in X-ray radiography have single-pulse parameters of the order 20 MeV of electron beam energy, 2 kA of beam current, pulse lengths of 50-100 ns, and spot sizes of 1-2 mm. The thermal energy deposited in a bremsstrahlung converter target made of tantalum from such a pulse is ?80 kJ\\/cc, more than enough to bring the

  7. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D E Anderson; S Eylon; E Henestroza; T L Houck; Lidia S M; D L Vanecek; G A Westenskow; S. S. Yu

    1998-01-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5\\

  8. Using Nonlinear RF Acceleration for FEL Beam Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    We consider a new approach to condition an electron beam using nonlinear effects in the RF field. We demonstrate that such effects can generate a desirable--for the FEL interaction--radial variation of the particle's energy in the beam, and calculate the induced energy spread in the limit of weak field.

  9. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; Alexander Pukhov

    2002-04-05

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Dw between beams and duration tL of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. The first approach assumes tL ª 2/wp. Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with tL >> 2/wp?1 detuned by Dw ~ 2wp from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2wp of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M.N. Rosenbluth, C.S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29 (1972) 701], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented.

  10. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

  11. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We also investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle.

  12. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Behnam Pourhassan; Ujjal Debnath

    2015-06-10

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We also investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle.

  13. Accelerated Particle Electrophoretic Motion and Separation in Converging-Diverging

    E-print Network

    Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

    -speed electrophoresis. The effects of electric field, particle size, particle trajectory, and channel structure electric field in the converg- ing-diverging section. In addition, we find that particle trajectory hasAccelerated Particle Electrophoretic Motion and Separation in Converging-Diverging Microchannels

  14. Cavitation Inception on Microparticles: A Self-Propelled Particle Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manish Arora; Claus-Dieter Ohl; Knud Aage Mørch

    2004-01-01

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 mum are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled

  15. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-print Network

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  16. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research CentreD-Students (f/m) DESY DESY is one of the world's leading research centres for photon science, particle and astroparticle physics as well as accelerator physics. The Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ in Zeuthen (near

  17. Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks - Regulated injection and high efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Eichler

    1979-01-01

    Particle acceleration in supernova remnants and radio galaxies proceeds with high efficiency, and at the same time puts out most of the cosmic ray power at moderately relativistic energies. This suggests that there is a regulated injection mechanism that selects only a very small fraction of particles out of the thermal pool, but enough that, when accelerated to moderately relativistic

  18. Applications of pyroelectric particle accelerators Jeffrey A. Geuther, Yaron Danon *

    E-print Network

    Danon, Yaron

    Applications of pyroelectric particle accelerators Jeffrey A. Geuther, Yaron Danon * Rensselaer mounted to the crystal. By using the combined fields of two polarized crystals, the acceleration potential can be doubled, with one crystal acting as a particle emitter and the other crys- tal serving

  19. Entanglement of Uniformly Accelerating Schrodinger, Dirac, and Scalar Particles

    E-print Network

    W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

    2007-09-10

    We study how the entanglement of an entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair is uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced when a relativistic particle is accelerated, and more bipartite systems emerge, the entanglements of some of which may change as the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement of a pair of accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, no such entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed for scalar particles.

  20. Wave-particle interaction and peculiarities of propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Tsap, Yu. T.

    2006-08-01

    Consequences of wave-particle interaction in the propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares are considered. i. Strong diffusion energetic particles on small-scale waves (Trakhtengerts 1984) gives time delays of gamma ray line emission vs hard X-ray emission when electron and protons are accelerated simultaneously. ii. Anomalous propagation of relativistic electrons along the flare loop with velocity of 30 times less compared with light velocity (Yokoyama et al 2002) is explained in terms of the collective effects of interaction of electrons with plasma turbulence. A cloud of high-energetic electrons responsible for microwave emission generates whistler waves and a turbulent "wall" in the loop is formed. The electrons undergo strong resonant scattering and the emission front propagates with the wave phase velocity, which is much lower than particle velocity. iii. Absence of linear polarization (? 0.07%) in H? emission of some flares (Bianda et al 2005) is interpreted in terms of pitch-angle scattering of proton beams on small-scale Alfven waves. References Bianda M., Benz F.O., Stenflo J.O. et al 2005, A&A, 434, 1183 Trakhtengerts V.Yu. 1984, Relaxation of Plasma with Anisotropic Velocity Distribution, in A.A.Galeev and R.N.Sudan (eds.) Basic Plasma Physics II, North-Holland Physics Publishing Yokoyama T., Nakajima H., Shibasaki K, et al. 2002, ApJ, 576, L87

  1. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Ersfeld, B.; Islam, M. R.; Burgess, R. T. L.; Vieux, G.; Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; van der Geer, S. B.; de Loos, M. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is ~1? mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  2. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.V.; /Oak Ridge; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  3. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Velardi, L; Siciliano, M V; Delle Side, D; Nassisi, V

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence. PMID:22380322

  4. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Velardi, L.; Siciliano, M. V.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V. [Department of Physics and I.N.F.N., LEAS Laboratory, University of Salento, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  5. Diffusive Compression Acceleration of Energetic Particles with an Application to Shock Acceleration near Injection Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2007-08-01

    The behavior of energetic charged particles accelerated by a continuous plasma compression profile is explored in the framework of diffusion. At high enough energies, the accelerated particles have a power-law spectrum with a slope generally steeper than a shock spectrum with the same compression ratio. The spectral slope depends on the ratio of the diffusion coefficient to the product of the upstream plasma speed and the thickness of the compression region. In the limit of large diffusion, the spectrum becomes identical to that of diffusive shock acceleration, and when diffusion is small enough, it is consistent with adiabatic acceleration by a single passage through the compression region. For particles with a diffusion coefficient that increases with energy, the spectral shape of the accelerated particles changes from an adiabatic compressional acceleration spectrum at low energies to a shock spectrum at high energies. The flux level of the high-energy asymptotic shock spectrum is generally lower than that from a calculation with diffusive shock acceleration. When this result is applied to particles accelerated to high energies by shocks, the particle injection energy and efficiency can be determined once the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient and the spectrum of the source particles are known. A threshold criterion for particle injection to shock acceleration can be set from the injection efficiency calculation.

  6. Two beams two orthogonal views particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarek Azzem, S.; Bouamama, L.; Simoëns, S.; Osten, W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new technique for recording the two views off-axis digital holography using only two beams, each one acting as an object beam for its proper view and as a reference for the other view. This technique allows one to obtain two orthogonal views of the same volume simultaneously using only two beams. This leads one to avoid the large focusing distance inherent to off-axis digital holography and gives the real position of any object in the working volume by crossing the two view data. Furthermore, the lateral resolution should be the same as the vertical one. The proposed technique was improved experimentally using a metallic wire in an L shape and four moving particles.

  7. Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB

    E-print Network

    Liska, Richard

    Laser and Particle Beams http://journals.cambridge.org/LPB Additional services for Laser, J. Limpouch, R. Liska and P. Váchal Laser and Particle Beams / Volume 30 / Issue 03 / September 2012 of annularlaserbeamdriven plasma jets from massive planar targets. Laser and Particle Beams,30, pp 445457 doi:10.1017/S

  8. Cavitation inception on microparticles: a self-propelled particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2004-04-30

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 microm are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled by considering the momentum of the particle and the displaced liquid. The analysis suggests that all particles which cause cavitation are accelerated into translatory motion, and separate from the cavities they themselves nucleate. Thus, in the research of cavitation nuclei the link is established between developed cavitation bubbles and their origin. PMID:15169155

  9. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  10. Clinical evidence of particle beam therapy (carbon).

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-04-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) is unique as it possesses well-localized and superior-depth dose distribution in addition to less repairable radiobiological effects. The use of CIRT for various diseases has been explored as clinical trials at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. Since 1994, when the first clinical study of cancer therapy with carbon ion beams was started, about 50 clinical studies have been completed safely and effectively. These studies revealed that intractable cancers such as inoperable bone and soft-tissue sarcomas can be cured safely in a shorter overall treatment time, as can cancers in the head, neck, lung, liver, prostate, and postoperative pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. The number of patients receiving CIRT has reached 6,000, and the therapy was approved as a highly advanced medical technology in 2003. Based on these experiences, we embarked on the research and development of new-generation beam delivery facilities such as a 3D scanning method with a pencil beam and a compact rotating gantry. Clinical research using pencil-beam scanning has been in operation since May 2011. PMID:22426888

  11. Waveguides in three-dimensional photonic bandgap materials for particle-accelerator on a chip architectures.

    PubMed

    Staude, Isabelle; McGuinness, Christopher; Frölich, Andreas; Byer, Robert L; Colby, Eric; Wegener, Martin

    2012-02-27

    The quest for less costly and more compact high-energy particle accelerators makes research on alternative acceleration mechanisms an important enterprise. From the multitude of suggested concepts, the photonic accelerator design by B. M. Cowan [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 011301 (2008)] stands out by its distinct potential of creating an accelerator on a chip [Proposal E-163, SLAC (2001)]. Herein, electrons are accelerated by the axial electric field of a strongly confined optical mode of an air waveguide within a silicon-based three-dimensional photonic band-gap material. Using a combination of direct laser writing and silicon double inversion, we here present the first experimental realization of this complex structure. Optical spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence for the existence of an accelerating waveguide mode with axial polarization. PMID:22418367

  12. LEADS: A graphical display computer program for linear and electrostatic accelerator beam dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian-Qin

    1995-02-01

    A computer program LEADS (linear and electrostatic accelerator dynamics simulation) has been developed. The code, which is written in about 6600 statements of MS FORTRAN 5.1, is suitable to run on IBM PC and compatible computers; 330 KB of memory is needed to run the code. LEADS calculates beam optical systems consisting of different kinds of electrostatic lenses (including uniform field DC accelerating tubes), dipoles and quadrupoles, single-gap rf resonators, two-gap rf resonators (QWRs: quarter wave resonators) and three-gap rf resonators (SLRs: split loop resonators). Second order terms are included for quadrupoles and dipoles. The effects of a foil charge-stripper on the beams are included also. Powell optimization techniques [1] are used to solve for the given optical conditions. The stability conditions of particle motions in rf periodic structures can be found. Beam envelopes and phase space diagrams both in transverse and longitudinal planes can be displayed graphically on the computer monitor.

  13. Crystal-Assisted Beam Extraction and Collimation at the U-70 Circular Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Afonin, A G; Bellucci, S; Belov, S A; Bini, S; Gorlov, V N; Giannini, G; Ermolaev, A D; Ivanova, I V; Krylov, D M; Maisheev, V A; Savin, D A; Syshchikov, E A; Terekhov, V I; Chepegin, V N; Chesnokov, Yu A; Chirkov, P N; Yazynin, I A

    2011-01-01

    New crystal technique - array of bent strips and a fan-type reflector, based on thin straight plates - have been used for research of extraction and collimation a circulating beam in the U-70 accelerator at the energy 50 GeV and 1.3 GeV. It is shown, that new devices can effectively steer a beam in a wide energy range. For protons with energy 50 GeV efficiency of extraction and collimation about 90 % has been achieved which is record for this method. Reduction of particle losses in 2-3 times was observed also in accelerator at application of different crystals in comparison with the usual one-stage collimation scheme of beam with a steel absorber.

  14. Acceleration of beam ions during major radius compression in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Bitter, M.; Hammett, G.W.; Heidbrink, W.; Hendel, H.; Kaita, R.; Scott, S.; Strachan, J.D.; Tait, G.; Bell, M.G.

    1985-09-01

    Tangentially co-injected deuterium beam ions were accelerated from 82 keV up to 150 keV during a major radius compression experiment in TFTR. The ion energy spectra and the variation in fusion yield were in good agreement with Fokker-Planck code simulations. In addition, the plasma rotation velocity was observed to rise during compression.

  15. Atomic physics with ion accelerators - Beam-foil spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Martinson; A. Gaupp

    1974-01-01

    A survey is given of research in atomic spectroscopy with accelerated, excited ions (beam-foil spectroscopy). After a short experimental section recent studies of atomic energy levels (particularly multiply excited configurations), radiative transition probabilities, a auto-ionization mechanisms, fine- and hyperfine-structure effects and radiative corrections are summarized.

  16. GeV electron beams from cm-scale laser driven plasma based accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim

    2006-10-01

    GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometres to generate particle energies of interest to high-energy physics. Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFA) produce electric fields of order 10-100 GV/m enabling compact devices. Previously, the required laser intensity was not maintained over the distance needed to reach GeV energies, and hence acceleration was limited to the 100 MeV scale [1-3]. In this talk, results will be presented on the first demonstration of the generation of GeV-class beams using an intense laser beam. Laser pulses with peak power ranging from 10-50 TW were guided by a hydrogen filled capillary discharge waveguide [4]. Production of high-quality electron beams with 1 GeV energy by channelling a ˜40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide was observed [5]. Results will be discussed on the dependence of the electron beam characteristics on capillary properties, plasma density and laser parameters. [1] S.P.D. Mangles et al., Nature 431, 535-538 (2004). [2] C.G.R. Geddes et al., Nature 431, 538-541 (2004). [3] J. Faure et al., Nature 431, 541-544 (2004). [4] D.J. Spence and S.M. Hooker, Phys. Rev. E 63, 015401 (2001).[5] W.P. Leemans et al., submitted for publication.

  17. Performance of the CREAM calorimeter in accelerator beam test

    E-print Network

    Yoon, Y S; Bagliesi, M G; Bigongiari, G; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Jeon, J A; Kang, T G; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Nam, S W; Park, H; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    The CREAM calorimeter, designed to measure the spectra of cosmic-ray nuclei from under 1 TeV to 1000 TeV, is a 20 radiation length (X0) deep sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter is comprised of 20 layers of tungsten interleaved with 20 layers of scintillating fiber ribbons, and is preceded by a pair of graphite interaction targets providing about 0.42 proton interaction lengths (\\lambda int). The calorimeter was placed in one of CERN's SPS accelerator beams for calibration and testing. Beams of 150 GeV electrons were used for calibration, and a variety of electron, proton, and nuclear fragment beams were used to test the simulation model of the detector. In this paper we discuss the performance of the calorimeter in the electron beam and compare electron beam data with simulation results.

  18. Benchmark of numerical tools simulating beam propagation and secondary particles in ITER NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Dlougach, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Serianni, G.; Singh, M.

    2015-04-01

    Injection of high energy beams of neutral particles is a method for plasma heating in fusion devices. The ITER injector, and its prototype MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), are large extrapolations from existing devices: therefore numerical modeling is needed to set thermo-mechanical requirements for all beam-facing components. As the power and charge deposition originates from several sources (primary beam, co-accelerated electrons, and secondary production by beam-gas, beam-surface, and electron-surface interaction), the beam propagation along the beam line is simulated by comprehensive 3D models. This paper presents a comparative study between two codes: BTR has been used for several years in the design of the ITER HNB/DNB components; SAMANTHA code was independently developed and includes additional phenomena, such as secondary particles generated by collision of beam particles with the background gas. The code comparison is valuable in the perspective of the upcoming experimental operations, in order to prepare a reliable numerical support to the interpretation of experimental measurements in the beam test facilities. The power density map calculated on the Electrostatic Residual Ion Dump (ERID) is the chosen benchmark, as it depends on the electric and magnetic fields as well as on the evolution of the beam species via interaction with the gas. Finally the paper shows additional results provided by SAMANTHA, like the secondary electrons produced by volume processes accelerated by the ERID fringe-field towards the Cryopumps.

  19. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Zharkova; K. Arzner; A. O. Benz; P. Browning; C. Dauphin; A. G. Emslie; L. Fletcher; E. P. Kontar; G. Mann; M. Onofri; V. Petrosian; R. Turkmani; N. Vilmer; L. Vlahos

    2011-01-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions\\u000a of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional\\u000a magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in\\u000a a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared.

  20. Beam by design: Laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, Erik; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever-increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation are reviewed. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create microstructures and nanostructures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. An overview of laser-based techniques for the generation of fully coherent x rays, mode-locked x-ray pulse trains, light with orbital angular momentum, and attosecond or even zeptosecond long coherent pulses in free-electron lasers is presented. Several methods to generate femtosecond pulses in storage rings are also discussed. Additionally, various schemes designed to enhance the performance of light sources through precision beam preparation including beam conditioning, laser heating, emittance exchange, and various laser-based diagnostics are described. Together these techniques represent a new emerging concept of "beam by design" in modern accelerators, which is the primary focus of this article.

  1. Shock accelerated electron beams in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    2002-12-01

    In the solar corona shock waves can be produced by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. Type II radio bursts represent the signature of such shock waves in the solar radio radiation. Shock accelerated electron beams appear as rapidly drifting emission stripes (so-called "herringbones") within type II radio bursts. A large sample of "herringbones" and solar type III radio bursts is statistically analysed concerning their properties in dynamic radio spectra. Type III bursts are regarded as being associated with electron beams immediately generated by the flare process. The analysis shows that the drift rates of "herringbones" are significantly smaller (about one half) than those of type III bursts in the same frequency range. Thus, electron beams related to type III bursts have a higher velocity than those generated by coronal shock waves. The velocity of electron beams associated with "herringbones" is found to be about 30,000 km/s. These beams are considered to be produced by shock drift acceleration. Then, the accelerated electrons establish a shifted loss-cone distribution in the upstream region of the associated shock wave. Such a distribution leads to a plasma instabilities leading to the emission of radio waves as observed as "herringbones".

  2. Diffusive Compression Acceleration of Energetic Particles with an Application to Shock Acceleration near Injection Energies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of energetic charged particles accelerated by a continuous plasma compression profile is explored in the framework of diffusion. At high enough energies, the accelerated particles have a power-law spectrum with a slope generally steeper than a shock spectrum with the same compression ratio. The spectral slope depends on the ratio of the diffusion coefficient to the product of

  3. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  4. Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA.

  5. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  6. Laser-driven ion acceleration with hollow laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabetz, C.; Busold, S.; Cowan, T.; Deppert, O.; Jahn, D.; Kester, O.; Roth, M.; Schumacher, D.; Bagnoud, V.

    2015-01-01

    The laser-driven acceleration of protons from thin foils irradiated by hollow high-intensity laser beams in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) is reported for the first time. The use of hollow beams aims at reducing the initial emission solid angle of the TNSA source, due to a flattening of the electron sheath at the target rear side. The experiments were conducted at the PHELIX laser facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH with laser intensities in the range from 1018 W cm-2 to 1020 W cm-2 . We observed an average reduction of the half opening angle by (3.07 ±0.42 )° or (13.2 ±2.0 )% when the targets have a thickness between 12 ?m and 14 ?m. In addition, the highest proton energies were achieved with the hollow laser beam in comparison to the typical Gaussian focal spot.

  7. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  8. Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-07-01

    KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

  9. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than ?D. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed. PMID:24593445

  10. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P., E-mail: pierluigi.veltri@igi.cnr.it; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)] [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’ Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’ Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than ?{sub D}. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  11. Neutron sources for BNCT using low-power research reactors or compact charged particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Yale D.; Nigg, David W.; Mitchell, Hannah E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Jones, James L.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1986, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in the development of epithermal neutron sources for BNCT. The INEL effort was instrumental in the implementation of an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recently, the INEL's effort has been directed toward developing advanced filter designs for use with low- power research reactors such as the 250W and 1MW class TRIGA reactors which are located at various sites and universities throughout the world. This work has focused on utilizing advanced filter materials that more effectively reduce fast neutron contamination in the epithermal neutron beam and at the same time optimize neutron economy. The INEL has also been involved in developing two concepts of producing neutron sources for BNCT using charged particle accelerators. The first concept involves the use of an electron accelerator/photoneutron source. The second concept involves the use of a charged particle beam in which the particle energy is just above the threshold energy of the reaction. This paper will review the progress made by INEL in modifying the WSU TRIGA reactor and conceptual development of an electron accelerator based photoneutron source for BNCT. The near threshold particle accelerator development will be discussed in a separate paper.

  12. Focused transport of intense charged particle beams. Final technical report FY/93

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Many recent developments in accelerator technology have increased the need for a better understanding of the physics of intense-beam transport. Of particular interest to the work described here is the appearance, as beam intensities are increased, of a class of nonlinear phenomena which involve the collective interaction of the beam particles. Beam intensity, used as a measure of the importance of space-charge collective behavior, depends on the ratio of current to emittance. The nonlinear beam dynamics, and any resulting emittance growth, which are characteristic of the intense-beam regime, can therefore occur even at low currents in any accelerator system with sufficiently high intensity, especially in the low beta section. Furthermore, since emittance of a beam is difficult to reduce, the ultimate achievement of necessary beam luminosities requires the consideration of possible causes of longitudinal and transverse emittance growth at every stage of the beam lifetime. The research program described here has addressed the fundamental physics which comes into play during the transport, acceleration and focusing of intense beams. Because of the long term and ongoing nature of the research program discussed here, this report is divided into two sections. The first section constitutes a long term revue of the accomplishments which have resulted from the research effort reported, especially in pioneering the use of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation techniques for simulation of the dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in particle accelerators. The following section emphasizes, in more detail, the accomplishments of the FY 92/93 period immediately prior to the termination of this particular avenue of support. 41 refs.

  13. Educating the next generation in the science and technology of plasmas, beams and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Wiliam

    2007-11-01

    Accelerators are essential tools for discovery in fundamental physics, biology, and chemistry. Particle beam based instruments in medicine, industry and national security constitute a multi-billion dollar per year industry. More than 55,000 peer-reviewed papers having accelerator as a keyword are available on the Web. Yet only a handful of universities offer any formal training in accelerator science. Several reasons can be cited: 1) The science and technology of non-neutral plasmas cuts across traditional academic disciplines. 2) Electrical engineering departments have evolved toward micro- and nano-technology and computing science. 3) Nuclear physics departments have atrophied. 4) With few exceptions, interest at individual universities is not extensive enough to support a strong faculty line. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed an educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Governed and supported by a consortium of nine DOE laboratories and two NSF university laboratories, USPAS offers a responsive and balanced curriculum of science, engineering, and hands-on courses. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  14. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    E-print Network

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  15. A study of phase control in the FEL (free electron laser) two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, J.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed for the analysis of a steady-state free electron laser (FEL) and is applied to the two-beam accelerator (TBA). Conditions are derived for the design of a FEL TBA with rf output power and phase insensitive to errors in both beam current and energy. An example is presented of a suitably phase insensitive TBA design with 100 reaccelerations employing untapered FEL sections and with low power rf input to each section. The theoretical analysis is confirmed by a single particle FEL simulations. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. PHASE AND AMPLITUDE CONTROL OF THE RADIO FREQUENCY WAVE IN THE TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenning, R.W.; Sessler, A.M.

    1985-07-01

    The sensitivity of the radio frequency (rf) wave generated by the free electron laser portion of a Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is analyzed, both analytically and numerically in a 'resonant particle' approximation. It is shown that the phase of the rf wave is strongly dependent upon errors in the wiggler strength and wavelength and upon the electron beam characteristics of energy and current. The resulting phase error is shown to be unacceptable for a TBA, given reasonable errors in various components. A feedback system is proposed which will keep the rf wave phase within acceptable bounds. However, the feedback system is, at best, cumbersome and a simpler system would be desirable.

  17. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  18. A phenomenological cost model for high energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based facilities have enabled forefront research in high-energy physics for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of colliders has progressed immensely, while beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  19. Multistaging in free-space laser particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Kimura, W.D. (STI Optronics, Inc., 2755 Northup Way, Bellevue, Washington 98004-1495 (United States))

    1993-10-15

    One important issue with regard to acceleration of electrons in free space using intense laser beams is the phase slippage of the electrons relative to the electromagnetic field. This arises from a phase velocity mismatch between the electron and light wave. Left uncontrolled this slippage can result in degradation of the [ital e]-beam characteristics (e.g., emittance) and dispersion of the electron bunches. By a method similar to microwave accelerators, multistaging offers a means to control the [ital e]-beam evolution by tuning each successive stage. The phase of the electron bunches relative to the laser field at the entrance of each section determines the acceleration and/or focusing that ensues in that section; therefore, the entrance phase is a natural tuning parameter. It is shown that by controlling the entrance phase it is possible to preserve the [ital e]-beam quality, both transverse (emittance) and longitudinal (bunching, energy spread). Calculations of the longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics are performed to determine the evolution of a finite-emittance [ital e] beam from stage to stage. By this method the conditions on entrance phase that allow successful [ital e]-beam trapping are found. It is also shown that conditions that assure [ital e]-beam trapping automatically preserve the overall beam quality.

  20. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented. PMID:21908658

  1. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association PARTICLE PHYSICS· DESY has openings for: DESY-Fellowships (f/m) DESY DESY is one of the world's leading research centres for photon science, particle and astroparticle physics as well

  2. Particle acceleration in time-developing magnetic reconnection process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuya Sato; Hiroshi Matsumoto; Keisuke Nagai

    1982-01-01

    Particle trajectories and acceleration are numerically studied in time-varying electric and magnetic fields that are obtained by a previous MHD simulation of an externally driven reconnection. Electron and proton orbits are traced under the influence of the developing reconnection fields for various initial particle positions and velocities. A method of continuation of local analytic solution in a particle-pushing algorithm is

  3. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 ? 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  4. Beam-driven acoustic solitary waves in the auroral acceleration region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Victor A.; Hudson, Mary K.

    1995-10-01

    The formation of ion acoustic solitary structure driven by electron and ion beams in the auroral acceleration region is studied using two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations. The beams are consistently present in regions of moderate potential drop (<=1 keV) where weak double layers have been observed on both S3-3 anad Viking spacecraft. The presence of more than one ion species introduces the ion two-stream instability besides the ion acoustic one into the system and modifies previous analysis and simulation results of solitary wave formation. Solitary structures form as a result of the microinstability development. The numerical simulation results show that positively peaked (?>0) localized structures are formed in the system driven by a dense (nib~ncne/2) ion beam. The solitary waves move in the direction of the ion beam velocity. By contrast, negative potential solitary structures form when the ion beam density is reduced to 10% (nib~0.1 ne) and electron drift relative to background ions is sustained by an applied electric field. In this case, solitary waves drift downward at subsonic speeds relative to the background ions, which may carry the localized pulses upward. Evolving solitary waves do not carry any significant net potential drop and therefore cannot contribute much to the auroral particle acceleration. They are found to be a consequence of the larger-scale V-shaped potential distribution in the auroral region.

  5. Particle-acceleration timescales in TeV blazar flares

    E-print Network

    Joni Tammi; Peter Duffy

    2008-12-01

    Observations of minute-scale flares in TeV Blazars place constraints on particle acceleration mechanisms in those objects. The implications for a variety of radiation mechanisms have been addressed in the literature; in this paper we compare four different acceleration mechanisms: diffusive shock acceleration, second-order Fermi, shear acceleration and the converter mechanism. When the acceleration timescales and radiative losses are taken into account, we can exclude shear acceleration and the neutron-based converted mechanism as possible acceleration processes in these systems. The first-order Fermi process and the converter mechanism working via SSC photons are still practically instantaneous, however, provided sufficient turbulence is generated on the timescale of seconds. We propose stochastic acceleration as a promising candidate for the energy-dependent time delays in recent gamma-ray flares of Markarian 501.

  6. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  7. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  8. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  9. NOTE: Blood irradiation with accelerator produced electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, M. J.; Cheung, T.; Yu, P. K. N.; Stokes, M. J.

    2000-11-01

    Blood and blood products are irradiated with gamma rays to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD). A simple technique using electron beams produced by a medical linear accelerator has been studied to evaluate irradiation of blood and blood products. Variations in applied doses for a single field 20 MeV electron beam are measured in a phantom study. Doses have been verified with ionization chambers and commercial diode detectors. Results show that the blood product volume can be given a relatively homogeneous dose to within 6% using 20 MeV electrons without the need to rotate the blood bags or the beam entry point. The irradiation process takes approximately 6.5 minutes for 30 Gy applied dose to complete as opposed to 12 minutes for a dual field x-ray field irradiation at our centre. Electron beams can be used to satisfactorily irradiate blood and blood products in a minimal amount of time.

  10. On Shock Accelerated Electron Beams In The Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    Electron beams accelerated at coronal shock waves appear as rapidly drifting emission stripes (so-called "herringbones") withih solar type II radio bursts. Such shock waves can be produced eihter by flares or by coronal masse ejections. A large sample of solar type III radio bursts and "herringbones" within solar type II radio bursts is statistically analyzed with respect to their properties in dynamic radio spectra. The analysis reveals that the drift rate of the "herringbones" are significanlty smaller (about one half) than those of type III bursts in the same frequency range. Consequently, the electron beams related to type III bursts have a higher velocity than those produced by coronal shock waves. The velocity of electromn beams assiciated with the "herringbones" is deduced to be 40,000 km/s. This result is discussed in terms of the different velocity distribution functions of electron beams associated to type III bursts and "herringbone" bursts.

  11. Electron beam ion sources for use in second generation synchrotrons for medical particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; Ritter, E; Schmidt, M; Schwan, A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclotrons and first generation synchrotrons are the commonly applied accelerators in medical particle therapy nowadays. Next generation accelerators such as Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotrons (RCMS), direct drive accelerators, or dielectric wall accelerators have the potential to improve the existing accelerator techniques in this field. Innovative accelerator concepts for medical particle therapy can benefit from ion sources which meet their special requirements. In the present paper we report on measurements with a superconducting Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIS-SC, under the aspect of application in combination with RCMS as a well proven technology. The measurements indicate that this ion source can offer significant advantages for medical particle therapy. We show that a superconducting EBIS can deliver ion pulses of medically relevant ions such as protons, C(4 +) and C(6 +) ions with intensities and frequencies required for RCMS [S. Peggs and T. Satogata, "A survey of Hadron therapy accelerator technology," in Proceedings of PAC07, BNL-79826- 2008-CP, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, 2007; A. Garonna, U. Amaldi et al., "Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C(6 +)/H2(+) ion sources," in Proceedings of EBIST 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, July 2010]. Ion extraction spectra as well as individual ion pulses have been measured. For example, we report on the generation of proton pulses with up to 3 × 10(9) protons per pulse and with frequencies of up to 1000 Hz at electron beam currents of 600 mA. PMID:24593601

  12. Charged-particle acceleration in braking plasma jets.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the mechanism of the charged particle acceleration in space plasma systems. We consider the interaction of nonrelativistic particles with a sub-Alfvenic plasma jet originated from the magnetic reconnection. The sharp front with increased magnetic field amplitude forms in the jet leading edge. Propagation of the jet in the inhomogeneous background plasma results in front braking. We show that particles can interact with this front in a resonance manner. Synchronization of particle reflections from the front and the front braking provides the stable trapping of particles in the vicinity of the front. This trapping supports the effective particle acceleration along the front. The mechanism of acceleration is potentially important due to the prevalence of the magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. PMID:24730957

  13. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    PubMed

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100???m long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5???m transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length. PMID:24483670

  14. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, C. Benedetti, Cs. Toth, C. G. R. Geddes, W. P. Leemans

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, C. Benedetti, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes, W. P. Leemans LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Plasma accelerators may beam. Plasma wake excitation driven by lasers or particle beams is examined, and the implications

  15. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Chiping; Wei Haofei [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2010-11-04

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  16. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  17. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Alexander (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer, such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  18. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, A.

    1985-11-26

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  19. Simulating relativistic beam and plasma systems using an optimal boosted frame

    E-print Network

    Vay, J.-L.

    2009-01-01

    beams, and for three particle acceleration related problems:proof-of-principle acceleration of test-particles to 10 GeVparticle accelerators. Yet, computer modeling of the wake formation and beam acceleration

  20. Black holes as particle accelerators: a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masashi

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly rotating Kerr black holes can accelerate particles to arbitrarily high energy if the angular momentum of the particle is fine-tuned to some critical value. This phenomenon is robust as it is founded on the basic properties of geodesic orbits around a near-extremal Kerr black hole. On the other hand, the maximum energy of the acceleration is subjected to several physical effects. There is convincing evidence that the particle acceleration to arbitrarily high energy is one of the universal properties of general near-extremal black holes. We also discuss gravitational particle acceleration in a more general context. This article is intended to provide a pedagogical introduction to and a brief overview of this topic for non-specialists.

  1. A GPU Accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Capability For Houdini

    E-print Network

    Sanford, Mathew

    2012-10-19

    on the desired result. One common fluid simulation technique is the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. This method is highly parellelizable. I have implemented a method to integrate a Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) accelerated SPH capability into the 3D...

  2. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andy

    2006-07-26

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  3. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Zharkova, Valentina V; Benz, Arnold O; Browning, Phillippa; Dauphin, Cyril; Emslie, A Gordon; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Kontar, Eduard P; Mann, Gottfried; Onofri, Marco; Petrosian, Vahe; Turkmani, Rim; Vilmer, Nicole; Vlahos, Loukas

    2011-01-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared. While these studies show considerable promise in accounting for the various observational manifestations of solar flares, they are limited by a number of factors, mostly relating to available computational power. Not the least of these issues is the need to explicitly incorporate the electrodynamic feedback of the accelerated particles themselves on the environment in which they are accelerated. A brief prognosis for future advancement is offered.

  4. Black holes as particle accelerators: a brief review

    E-print Network

    Tomohiro Harada; Masashi Kimura

    2014-11-18

    Rapidly rotating Kerr black holes can accelerate particles to arbitrarily high energy if the angular momentum of the particle is fine-tuned to some critical value. This phenomenon is robust as it is founded on the basic properties of geodesic orbits around a near-extremal Kerr black hole. On the other hand, the maximum energy of the acceleration is subjected to several physical effects. There is convincing evidence that the particle acceleration to arbitrarily high energy is one of the universal properties of general near-extremal black holes. We also discuss gravitational particle acceleration in more general context. This article is intended to provide a pedagogical introduction to and a brief overview of this topic for non-specialists.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    E-print Network

    Frank M. Rieger; Peter Duffy

    2005-11-02

    Gradual shear acceleration of energetic particles in gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets is considered. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of universal structured jets, and characteristic acceleration timescales are determined for a power-law and a Gaussian evolution of the bulk flow Lorentz factor $\\gamma_b$ with angle $\\phi$ from the jet axis. The results suggest that local power-law particle distributions may be generated and that higher energy particles are generally concentrated closer to the jet axis. Taking several constraints into account we show that efficient electron acceleration in gradual shear flows, with maximum particle energy successively decreasing with time, may be possible on scales larger than $r \\sim 10^{15}$ cm, provided the jet magnetic field becomes sufficiently weak and/or decreases rapidly enough with distance, while efficient acceleration of protons to ultra-high energies $> 10^{20}$ eV may be possible under a wide range of conditions.

  6. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Arzner, K.; Benz, A. O.; Browning, P.; Dauphin, C.; Emslie, A. G.; Fletcher, L.; Kontar, E. P.; Mann, G.; Onofri, M.; Petrosian, V.; Turkmani, R.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2011-09-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared. While these studies show considerable promise in accounting for the various observational manifestations of solar flares, they are limited by a number of factors, mostly relating to available computational power. Not the least of these issues is the need to explicitly incorporate the electrodynamic feedback of the accelerated particles themselves on the environment in which they are accelerated. A brief prognosis for future advancement is offered.

  7. A GPU Accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Capability For Houdini 

    E-print Network

    Sanford, Mathew

    2012-10-19

    on the desired result. One common fluid simulation technique is the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. This method is highly parellelizable. I have implemented a method to integrate a Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) accelerated SPH capability into the 3D...

  8. Particle Acceleration Around 5-dimensional Kerr Black Hole

    E-print Network

    Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Naresh Dadhich; Bobomurat Ahmedov; Husan Eshkuvatov

    2013-12-11

    On the lines of the 4-dimensional Kerr black hole we consider the particle acceleration near a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole which has the two rotation parameters. It turns out that the center of mass energy of the two equal mass colliding particles as expected diverges for the extremal black hole and there is a symmetry in the results for $\\theta = 0, \\pi/2$. Because of the two rotation parameters, $r=0$ can be a horizon without being a curvature singularity. It is shown that the acceleration of particles to high energies near the 5-D extreme rotating black hole avoids fine-tuning of the angular momentum of particles.

  9. Particle Acceleration in three dimensional Reconnection Regions: A New Test Particle Approach

    E-print Network

    Rudiger Schopper; Guido T. Birk; Harald Lesch

    2001-06-29

    Magnetic Reconnection is an efficient and fast acceleration mechanism by means of direct electric field acceleration parallel to the magnetic field. Thus, acceleration of particles in reconnection regions is a very important topic in plasma astrophysics. This paper shows that the conventional analytical models and numerical test particle investigations can be misleading concerning the energy distribution of the accelerated particles, since they oversimplify the electric field structure by the assumption that the field is homogeneous. These investigations of the acceleration of charged test particles are extended by considering three-dimensional field configurations characterized by localized field-aligned electric fields. Moreover, effects of radiative losses are discussed. The comparison between homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric field acceleration in reconnection regions shows dramatic differences concerning both, the maximum particle energy and the form of the energy distribution.

  10. Compressive-Diffusive Acceleration of Energetic Charged Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Jokipii; J. Kota; J. Giacalone

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of the acceleration of charged particles in a compressing di~@usive medium and apply it to recent ACE observations in the interplanetary medium. It has been recognized that the phenomenon of di~@usive shock acceleration can readily be generalized to the case where the the shock isreplaced by a gradual change in the velocity of the ~Bow over

  11. Stochastic and compression acceleration of energetic particles in the heliosheath

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest surprising results from Voyager observations in the inner heliosheath is that anomalous cosmic rays do not appear to be accelerated at the termination shock region where the Voyager spacecraft have encountered. Various models of particle acceleration have been put forward to explain the production and transport of anomalous cosmic rays. Some of the models are based

  12. The phase of particle acceleration in the flare development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Švestka

    1970-01-01

    Evidence is given that the particle acceleration in flares is confined to the initial phase of the flare development preceding the Ha flare maximum and lasting for less than 10 min. The impulsive acceleration process is confined to a relatively small limited volume of about 5 × 1027 cm3 in the region of highest magnetic gradient in the flare, and

  13. Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    E-print Network

    physics as well as accelerator physics. DESY's optical laser group is responsible for research in high-power, high-repetition rate or fiber laser development be- neficial · Basic knowledgeAccelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre

  14. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Behnam Pourhassan; Ujjal Debnath

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and rotating modified Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle. We also investigate the center of mass energy for extremal black hole.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Behnam Pourhassan; Ujjal Debnath

    2015-06-30

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and rotating modified Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle. We also investigate the center of mass energy for extremal black hole.

  16. Relativistic Particle Acceleration in a Folded Current Sheet

    E-print Network

    S. Zenitani; M. Hoshino

    2005-05-24

    Two-dimensional particle simulations of a relativistic Harris current sheet of pair plasmashave demonstrated that the system is unstable to the relativistic drift kink instability (RDKI) and that a new kind of acceleration process takes place in the deformed current sheet. This process contributes to the generation of non-thermal particles and contributes to the fast magnetic dissipation in the current sheet structure. The acceleration mechanism and a brief comparison with relativistic magnetic reconnection are presented.

  17. Microbunching and Beam Break Up in DUV FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shaftan, T.; Carr, L.; Loos, H.; Sheehy, B.; Graves, William S.; Huang, Z.; Limborg, C.G.; /Brookhaven /MIT /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    We present the results of electron beam longitudinal modulation studies in the DUV-FEL accelerator. For bunch length determination we used the 'zero-phasing' method, based on a measurement of the chirped electron bunch energy spectra. The measurements revealed a spiky structure in the longitudinal phase space [1]. A model based on space charge effect is considered [2] to explain of the obtained phenomena. The analysis of the energy spectra has shown a sensitivity of the structure to the electron beam peak current, energy and longitudinal non-uniformity of the RF gun drive laser. Analytical calculations have demonstrated a qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Several experiments have been made to compare with theory; measured results are reviewed in this paper. The obtained effect is briefly discussed in relation to high brightness accelerators.

  18. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A. [I. E. Tamm Theoretical Physics Division of P. N. Lebedev Institute, Leninskii pr 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ko, C. M., E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, JhongLi 320, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  19. Acceleration Gap Effects on the Longitudinal Compression of Intense Ion Beams in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Adam; Davidson, Ronald

    2007-11-01

    Longitudinal compression of space-charge-dominated ion beams to high currents in nanosecond pulses for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications is achieved by imposing a time-dependent velocity tilt to the charge bunch across the acceleration gap of a linear induction accelerator. The subsequent neutralization of the beam by a pre-formed plasma allows the intense charge bunch to compress above the traditional space-charge limit for quiescent propagation and longitudinal focusing. The detailed physics and implications of acceleration-gap effects and focusing aberration on optimum current compression are reviewed. Quantitative examples using particle-in-cell simulations explore the dependency of the axial compression on effects such as the finite-size acceleration gap, voltage waveform, and the beam's initial temperature, pulse length, intended fractional velocity tilt, kinetic energy uncertainty, and distribution function.

  20. Recent progress of laser driven particle acceleration at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xue-Qing; Lin, Chen; Lu, Hai-Yang; Zhu, Kun; Zou, Yu-Bin; Wang, Hong-Yong; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Shuan; Zhu, Jiao; Geng, Yi-Xing; Fu, He-Zheng; Shang, Yong; Cao, Chao; Shou, Yin-Ren; Song, Wei; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Yuan, Zhong-Xi; Guo, Zhi-Yu; He, Xian-Tu; Chen, Jia-Er

    2013-10-01

    Recently, radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) has been proposed and extensively studied, which shows that circularly polarized (CP) laser pulses can accelerate mono-energetic ion bunches in a phase-stable-acceleration (PSA) way from ultrathin foils. It is found that self-organizing proton beam can be stably accelerated to GeV in the interaction of a CP laser with a planar target at 1022 W/cm2. A project called Compact LAser Plasma proton Accelerator (CLAPA) is approved by MOST in China recently. A prototype of laser driven proton accelerator (1 to 15 MeV/1 Hz) based on the PSA mechanism and plasma lens is going to be built at Peking University in the next five years. It will be upgraded to 200 MeV later for applications such as cancer therapy, plasma imaging and fast ignition for inertial confine fusion.

  1. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  2. Results of the SINGAP Neutral Beam Accelerator Experiment at JAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, H. P. L. de; Svensson, L. [CEA Cadarache, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Inoue, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Fubiani, G. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE) Universite Paul Sabatier, Bt 3R2, 118 Route de Narbonne (France)

    2009-03-12

    IRFM (CEA Cadarache) and JAEA Naka have entered into a collaboration in order to test a SINGAP accelerator at the JAEA Megavolt Test Facility (MTF) at Naka, Japan. Whereas at the CEA testbed the acceleration current was limited to 0.1 A, at JAEA 0.5 A is available. This allows the acceleration of 15 H- beamlets in SINGAP to be tested and a direct comparison between SINGAP and MAMuG to be made. High-voltage conditioning in the SINGAP configuration has been quite slow, with 581 kV in vacuum achieved after 140 hours of conditioning. With 0.1 Pa of H2 gas present in the accelerator 787 kV could be achieved. The conditioning curve for MAMuG is 200 kV higher. SINGAP beam optics appears in agreement with calculation results. A beamlet divergence better than 5 mrad was obtained. SINGAP accelerates electrons to a higher energy than MAMuG. Measurements of the power intercepted on one of the electron dumps have been compared with EAMCC code calculations. Based on the experiments described here, electron production by a SINGAP accelerator scaled up to ITER size was estimated to be too high for comfort.

  3. Accelerated cone beam CT reconstruction based on OpenCL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Wang; Lei Zhu; Kebin Jia; Jie Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is a fundamental technology for cross-platform parallel programming. The emerging of OpenCL provides portable and efficient access to the power of modern processors. This revolutionary new technology is applied to accelerate the reconstruction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in this paper. An OpenCL-based implementation of the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm is

  4. Negative hydrogen ion source research and beam parameters for accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timofey V. Zolkin

    2006-01-01

    H beams are useful for multi-turn charge-exchange stripping injection into circular accelerators. Studies on a modified ion source for this purpose are presented. This paper includes some theory about a H magnetron discharge, ion-electron emission, emittance and problems linked with emittance measurement and calculations. Investigated parameters of the emittance probe for optimal performance give a screen voltage of 150 V

  5. Particle Acceleration in (by) Accretion Discs

    E-print Network

    J. I. Katz

    1992-05-04

    I present a model for acceleration of protons by the second-order Fermi process acting on randomly scrambled magnetic flux arches above an accretion disc. The accelerated protons collide with thermal protons in the disc, producing degraded energetic protons, charged and neutral pions, and neutrons. The pions produce gamma-rays by spontaneous decay of $\\pi^0$ and by bremsstrahlung and Compton processes following the decay of $\\pi^\\pm$ to $e^\\pm$.

  6. Particle Acceleration in Superluminal Strong Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  7. Simulation studies on electron beam formation in high density plasmas in Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bhavesh; Joshi, Chandrashekhar

    2014-10-01

    In recent experimental work based on Laser Wakefield Acceleration, Rao et al. have demonstrated production of monoenergetic, 35 MeV electron bunch using 3 TW pulse and high density, 5.8 × 10 cm-3 plasma. The electron beam formation in such scenario relies greatly on physical processes like relativistic self-focusing and modulation instability. Further, in view of the fact that the laser pulse has a pulse-length several times the plasma wavelength, it may be surmised that the beam electrons may gain energy by direct laser acceleration in addition to that from the longitudinal fields. In present work, laser wakefield acceleration and electron bunch formation for this relatively low intensity laser pulse and a high density plasma is studied using particle-in-cell code OSIRIS. The objective here is to decipher the role of various physical mechanisms responsible for production of the surprisingly narrow energy electron bunch.The electrons are trapped only after the laser pulse is longitudinally compressed such that there is little overlap between the trapped electrons and the laser field. Thus the acceleration of beam electrons is due to the wakefield. This research is supported by DOE grant number DE-SC0010064 and the plan programme 11P-1401 ``Strong Field Science.''

  8. Manipulation of dielectric particles with nondiffracting parabolic beams.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C; Petrov, Dmitri

    2014-12-01

    The trapping and manipulation of microscopic particles embedded in the structure of nondiffracting parabolic beams is reported. The particles acquire orbital angular momentum and exhibit an open trajectory following the parabolic fringes of the beam. We observe an asymmetry in the terminal velocity of the particles caused by the counteracting gradient and scattering forces. PMID:25606766

  9. Particle Acceleration in an Evolving Network of Unstable Current Sheets

    E-print Network

    L. Vlahos; H. Isliker; F. Lepreti

    2004-02-26

    We study the acceleration of electrons and protons interacting with localized, multiple, small-scale dissipation regions inside an evolving, turbulent active region. The dissipation regions are Unstable Current Sheets (UCS), and in their ensemble they form a complex, fractal, evolving network of acceleration centers. Acceleration and energy dissipation are thus assumed to be fragmented. A large-scale magnetic topology provides the connectivity between the UCS and determines in this way the degree of possible multiple acceleration. The particles travel along the magnetic field freely without loosing or gaining energy, till they reach a UCS. In a UCS, a variety of acceleration mechanisms are active, with the end-result that the particles depart with a new momentum. The stochastic acceleration process is represented in the form of Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW), which allows to estimate the evolution of the energy distribution of the particles. It is found that under certain conditions electrons are heated and accelerated to energies above 1 MeV in much less than a second. Hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave spectra are calculated from the electrons' energy distributions, and they are found to be compatible with the observations. Ions (protons) are also heated and accelerated, reaching energies up to 10 MeV almost simultaneously with the electrons. The diffusion of the particles inside the active region is extremely fast (anomalous super-diffusion). Although our approach does not provide insight into the details of the specific acceleration mechanisms involved, its benefits are that it relates acceleration to the energy release, and it well describes the stochastic nature of the acceleration process.

  10. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the “leaky light sail,” is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 1019W/cm2. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2×1020W/cm2.

  11. Quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in low density pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Mengze [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Liming [Bejing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiment is performed using 30 TW, 30 fs, and 800?nm laser pulses, focused onto pure nitrogen plasma having relatively low densities in the range of 0.8×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3} to 2.7×10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. Electron beams having a low divergence of ?3??mrad (full-width at half-maximum) and quasi-monoenergetic peak energies of ?105??MeV are achieved over 4-mm interaction length. The total electron beam charge reached to 2 nC, however, only 1%–2% of this (tens of pC) had energies >35?MeV. We tried different conditions to optimize the electron beam acceleration; our experiment verifies that lower nitrogen plasma densities are generating electron beams with high quality in terms of divergence, charge, pointing stability, and maximum energy. In addition, if LWFA is to be widely used as a basis for compact particle accelerators in the future, therefore, from the economic and safety points of view we propose the use of nitrogen gas rather than helium or hydrogen.

  12. Particle trajectories and acceleration during 3D fan reconnection

    E-print Network

    S. Dalla; P. K. Browning

    2008-11-07

    Context. The primary energy release in solar flares is almost certainly due to magnetic reconnection, making this a strong candidate as a mechanism for particle acceleration. While particle acceleration in 2D geometries has been widely studied, investigations in 3D are a recent development. Two main classes of reconnection regimes at a 3D magnetic null point have been identified: fan and spine reconnection Aims. Here we investigate particle trajectories and acceleration during reconnection at a 3D null point, using a test particle numerical code, and compare the efficiency of the fan and spine regimes in generating an energetic particle population. Methods. We calculated the time evolution of the energy spectra. We discuss the geometry of particle escape from the two configurations and characterise the trapped and escaped populations. Results. We find that fan reconnection is less efficent than spine reconnection in providing seed particles to the region of strong electric field where acceleration is possible. The establishment of a steady-state spectrum requires approximately double the time in fan reconnection. The steady-state energy spectrum at intermediate energies (protons 1 keV to 0.1 MeV) is comparable in the fan and spine regimes. While in spine reconnection particle escape takes place in two symmetric jets along the spine, in fan reconnection no jets are produced and particles escape in the fan plane, in a ribbon-like structure.

  13. Thermal Particle Injection in Nonlinear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Donald C. Ellison; Pasquale Blasi; Stefano Gabici

    2005-07-05

    Particle acceleration in collisionless astrophysical shocks, i.e., diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), is the most likely mechanism for producing cosmic rays, at least below 10^{15} eV. Despite the success of this theory, several key elements, including the injection of thermal particles, remains poorly understood. We investigate injection in strongly nonlinear shocks by comparing a semi-analytic model of DSA with a Monte Carlo model. These two models treat injection quite differently and we show, for a particular set of parameters, how these differences influence the overall acceleration efficiency and the shape of the broad-band distribution function.

  14. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets due to Weibel Instability

    E-print Network

    K. -I. Nishikawa; P. Hardee; G. Richardson; R. Preece; H. Sol; G. J. Fishman

    2003-06-04

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The ``jitter'' radiation (Medvedev 2000) from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Donald C. Ellison; Anne Decourchelle; Jean Ballet

    2003-08-19

    A number of supernova remnants (SNRs) show nonthermal X-rays assumed to be synchrotron emission from shock accelerated TeV electrons. The existence of these TeV electrons strongly suggests that the shocks in SNRs are sources of galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In addition, there is convincing evidence from broad-band studies of individual SNRs and elsewhere that the particle acceleration process in SNRs can be efficient and nonlinear. If SNR shocks are efficient particle accelerators, the production of CRs impacts the thermal properties of the shock heated, X-ray emitting gas and the SNR evolution. We report on a technique that couples nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration, including the backreaction of the accelerated particles on the structure of the forward and reverse shocks, with a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution. Compared to models which ignore CRs, the most important hydrodynamical effects of placing a significant fraction of shock energy into CRs are larger shock compression ratios and lower temperatures in the shocked gas. We compare our results, which use an approximate description of the acceleration process, with a more complete model where the full CR transport equations are solved (i.e., Berezhko et al., 2002), and find excellent agreement for the CR spectrum summed over the SNR lifetime and the evolving shock compression ratio. The importance of the coupling between particle acceleration and SNR dynamics for the interpretation of broad-band continuum and thermal X-ray observations is discussed.

  17. Particle Acceleration by Fast Modes in Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Huirong Yan; A. Lazarian; V. Petrosian

    2008-05-08

    We address the problem of particle acceleration in solar flares by fast modes which may be excited during the reconnection and undergo cascade and are subjected to damping. We extend the calculations beyond quasilinear approximation and compare the acceleration and scattering by transit time damping and gyroresonance interactions. We find that the acceleration is dominated by the so called transit time damping mechanism. We estimate the total energy transferred into particles, and show that our approach provides sufficiently accurate results We compare this rate with energy loss rate. Scattering by fast modes appears to be sufficient to prevent the protons from escaping the system during the acceleration. Confinement of electrons, on the other hand, requires the existence of plasma waves. Electrons can be accelerated to GeV energies through the process described here for solar flare conditions.

  18. Particle Acceleration by Compressive Pump Mechanism: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, J.; Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    We study particle acceleration my compressive velocity and density fluctuations in a simple one-dimensional system similar that suggested by Fisk and Gloeckler (2008,2012). We solve the diffusive Parker-equation numerically assuming a periodic velocity and corresponding density fluctuations. The simulation is time-dependent and discuss adiabatic cooling/heating from large-scale expansion/compression and the back-reaction of accelerated particles on the core fluid. The predicted momentum spectra will be discussed. We also investigate how effective the compressive acceleration mechanism can be in producing seed particles for acceleration in the lower corona. Fisk, L.A. and G. Gloeckler, 2008: Astrophys. J., 686, 1466 Fisk, L.A. and G. Gloeckler, 2012: Space Sci. Rev., 173, 433

  19. A review of transport theory. [particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Frank C.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which energy change terms arise in the transport equation and how the various terms relate to the modes of energy exchange between the particles and plasma are shown. It is argued that the transport equation cannot be used to describe the initial acceleration of thermal particles by plasma shocks or relativistic shocks where the energetic particle speeds are never much greater than the flow speeds. In most other situations, it describes almost any acceleration process that can be caused by a moving plasma. It describes shock acceleration for both parallel shocks and oblique ones, and stochastic acceleration by the turbulent motion of the scatterers as well as by their motion across the magnetic field.

  20. Particle Acceleration Asymmetry in a Reconnecting Nonneutral Current Sheet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valentina V. Zharkova; Mykola Gordovskyy

    2004-01-01

    The acceleration of electrons and protons caused by a super-Dreicer electric field directed along the longitudinal component By of the magnetic field is investigated. The three-component magnetic field in a nonneutral current sheet occurring at the top of the reconnecting flaring loops on the charged particle trajectories and energies is considered. Particle trajectories in the reconnecting current sheet (RCS) and

  1. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration in Refracting Coronal Shock Waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rami Vainio; Josef I. Khan

    2004-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are known to be correlated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares. The current paradigm of particle acceleration in these events attributes it to CME-driven shock waves in the solar corona and in interplanetary space. Even in small gradual SEP events related to CMEs with speeds in the (possibly submagnetosonic) range of

  2. Covariant Quantum Green's Function for an Accelerated Particle

    E-print Network

    T. Garavaglia

    2001-04-03

    Covariant relativistic quantum theory is used to study the covariant Green's function, which can be used to determine the proper time evolved wave functions that are solutions to the covariant Schr\\"odinger type equation for a massive spin zero particle. The concept of covariant action is used to obtain the Green's function for an accelerated relativistic particle.

  3. Particle acceleration by ultra-relativistic shocks: theory and simulations

    E-print Network

    Abraham Achterberg; Yves A. Gallant; John G. Kirk; Axel W. Guthmann

    2001-07-27

    We consider the acceleration of charged particles near ultra-relativistic shocks, with Lorentz factor Gamma_s >> 1. We present simulations of the acceleration process and compare these with results from semi-analytical calculations. We show that the spectrum that results from acceleration near ultra-relativistic shocks is a power law, N(E) \\propto E^{-s}, with a nearly universal value s \\approx 2.2 - 2.3 for the slope of this power law. We confirm that the ultra-relativistic equivalent of Fermi acceleration at a shock differs from its non-relativistic counterpart by the occurence of large anisotropies in the distribution of the accelerated particles near the shock. In the rest frame of the upstream fluid, particles can only outrun the shock when their direction of motion lies within a small loss cone of opening angle theta_c \\approx 1/Gamma_s around the shock normal. We also show that all physically plausible deflection or scattering mechanisms can change the upstream flight direction of relativistic particles originating from downstream by only a small amount: Delta theta ~ 1/Gamma_s. This limits the energy change per shock crossing cycle to Delta E ~ E, except for the first cycle where particles originate upstream. In that case the upstream energy is boosted by a factor ~ Gamma_s^2 for those particles that are scattered back across the shock into the upstream region.

  4. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vesztergombi, G. [KFKI-RMKI. 1525-H Budapest P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  5. Collisionless Shocks -- Magnetic Field Generation and Particle Acceleration

    E-print Network

    J. Trier Frederiksen; C. B. Hededal; T. Haugboelle; A. Nordlund

    2003-03-16

    We present numerical results from plasma particle simulations of collisionless shocks and ultra-relativistic counter-streaming plasmas. We demonstrate how the field-particle interactions lead to particle acceleration behind the shock-front. Further, we demonstrate how ultra relativistic counter-streaming plasmas create large scale patchy magnetic field structures and that these field structures propagate down-stream of the shock front. These results may help explain the origin of the magnetic fields and accelerated electrons responsible for afterglow synchrotron radiation from gamma ray bursts.

  6. Reversed Gravitational Acceleration for High-speed Particles

    E-print Network

    Hans C. Ohanian

    2011-11-17

    Examination of the free-fall motion of particles of extremely high-speed in the Schwarzschild geometry reveals that the gravitational acceleration of such particles is reversed when measured in Schwarzschild coordinates. High-speed particles decelerate when moving radially downward, and they accelerate when moving upward. The onset of this abnormal behavior occurs at a speed of 1/Sqrt(3) times the local value of the speed of light. However, the gravitational force always remains attractive. PACS numbers: 04.20.-q, 04.20.Cv, 01.65+g

  7. In-situ Particle Acceleration in Collisionless Shocks

    E-print Network

    C. B. Hededal; T. Haugboelle; J. T. Frederiksen; Å. Nordlund

    2005-02-18

    The outflows from gamma ray bursts, active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets in general interact with the surrounding media through collisionless shocks. With three dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations we investigate such shocks. The results from these experiments show that small--scale magnetic filaments with strengths of up to percents of equipartition are generated and that electrons are accelerated to power law distributions N(E)~E^{-p} in the vicinity of the filaments through a new acceleration mechanism. The acceleration is locally confined, instantaneous and differs from recursive acceleration processes such as Fermi acceleration. We find that the proposed acceleration mechanism competes with thermalization and becomes important at high Lorentz factors.

  8. A high-brightness circular charged-particle beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Bemis, T.; Bhatt, R.; Chen, C.; Zhou, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2007-11-12

    A method is presented for the design of a high-brightness nonrelativistic circular beam system including a charged-particle emitting diode, a diode aperture, a circular beam tunnel, and a focusing magnetic field that matches the beam from the emitter to the beam tunnel. The applied magnetic field is determined by balancing the forces throughout the gun and transport sections of the beam system. The method is validated by three-dimensional simulations.

  9. Concentrated ion beam emitted from an enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, S. F.; Wang, C. X. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Tang, D. L.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2013-01-28

    An enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator with an outlet diameter of 150 mm is experimentally demonstrated to produce a concentrated ion beam, especially at a high discharge voltage, with a high current utilization efficiency of up to {approx}0.9. Numerical investigation based on the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method is performed to study the ion dynamics and elucidate the origin of the ion beam characteristics. The simulation results reveal that the equipotential lines play an important role in the surface near the anode emitting the ions. The ion emitting surface is determined by the magnetic field lines near the anode and the magnetic mirror contributes to the concentrated beam significantly. The high current utilization efficiency results from the appropriate obliquity of the magnetic mirror.

  10. A PSO Accelerated Immune Particle Filter for Dynamic State Estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Akhtar; A. R. Ahmad; E. M. Abdel-Rahman; T. Naqvi

    2011-01-01

    Particle Filter (PF) is a flexible and powerful Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) technique to solve the nonlinear state\\/parameter estimation problems. The generic PF suffers due to degeneracy or sample impoverishment, which adversely affects its performance. In order to overcome this issue of the generic PF, a Particle Swarm Optimization accelerated Immune Particle Filter (PSO-acc-IPF) is proposed in this work. It

  11. Tunneling of Dirac particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    E-print Network

    Usman A. Gillani; K. Saifullah

    2011-03-23

    Hawking radiation from black holes has been studied as a phenomenon of quantum tunneling of particles through their horizons. We have extended this approach to study the tunneling of Dirac particles from a large class of black holes which includes those with acceleration and rotation as well. We have calculated the tunneling probability of incoming and outgoing particles, and recovered the correct Hawking temperature by this method.

  12. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  13. Solid particle acceleration in a high Reynolds number channel flow: DNS and LES with stochastic modelling of subgrid acceleration

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Solid particle acceleration in a high Reynolds number channel flow: DNS and LES with stochastic for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;Solid particle acceleration.vinkovic@univ-lyon1.fr Abstract. Inertial particle acceleration statistics are analyzed using DNS in the case

  14. Acceleration of inertial particles in wall bounded flows: DNS and LES with stochastic modelling of the subgrid acceleration

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Acceleration of inertial particles in wall bounded flows: DNS and LES with stochastic modelling)" DOI : 10.1088/1742-6596/318/5/052026 #12;Acceleration of inertial particles in wall bounded flows: DNS particle acceleration statistics are analyzed using DNS for turbulent channel flow. Along with effects

  15. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-print Network

    Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration, time- varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We ex- tend histogram in conventional particle accelerators. LWFAs accelerate particles to high energies of 1GeV within 3cm compared

  16. Constraints on Particle Acceleration from the Diffuse Isotropic Gamma-Ray Background

    E-print Network

    Karl Mannheim

    2000-05-26

    Gamma rays trace accelerated particles, and the observed flux of extragalactic gamma rays therefore constrains the global efficiency for particle acceleration. Extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei can account for the gamma ray background if their particle acceleration efficiency considerably exceeds ~ 18 per cent which would imply that particle acceleration is an essential part of the thermodynamics in these sources.

  17. Beam loading in the nonlinear regime of plasma-based acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoufras, Michail

    2008-11-01

    An analytical theory for the interaction of a negatively charged bunch with a nonlinear plasma wave is developed to make it possible to design efficient laser- and/or beam-driven accelerators that generate truly monoenergetic electron beams. This theory allows us to choose the charge, the shape and the placing of the beam so that the efficiency is maximized and the beam quality optimized. For intense drivers the nonlinear wake is described by the trajectory of the blowout radius and beam loading arises when the radial space-charge force of the beam acts back on the trajectory. Starting from the nonlinear theory by W. Lu et al. [1], an equation for the wakefield in the presence of an electron bunch is derived. The shape of the ion channel in an unloaded wake is determined and the modification of the wake due to the presence of flat-top electron bunches is studied. It is shown that the energy spread of an externally injected flat-top (or Gaussian) electron bunch can be kept low by choosing the correct charge per unit length and the analytical results are confirmed with PIC simulations. The bunch profile that leads to zero energy spread is found to be trapezoidal. The conversion efficiency from the fields of the bubble to the accelerating electrons is determined, and it is shown that for optimal bunches it approaches 100%. The differences between nonlinear and linear [2] theory are described and the advantages of operating in the nonlinear regime are discussed. [1] W. Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 13, 056709 (2006). [2] T. Katsouleas et al., Particle Accelerators, 1987, 22, pp. 81-99.

  18. PARTICLE PRODUCTION AND SURVIVAL IN MUON ACCELERATION

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    and survival of an adequate supply of low-emittance muons will determine the available luminosity in a high-energy" of muons for obtaining low-emittance beams needed in high energy colliders. The short lifetimeof muons of protons needed at the pion source for every muon required in the finalhigh-energy collideris estimated

  19. High energy electron beam processing experiments with induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. L.; Birx, D. L.; Dave, V. R.

    1995-05-01

    Induction accelerators are capable of producing very high electron beam power for processing at energies of 1-10 MeV. A high energy electron beam (HEEB) material processing system based on all-solid-state induction accelerator technology is in operation at Science Research Laboratory. The system delivers 50 ns 500 A current pulses at 1.5 MeV and is capable of operating at high power (500 kW) and high (˜ 5 kHz) repetition rate. HEEB processing with induction accelerators is useful for a wide variety of applications including the joining of high temperature materials, powder metallurgical fabrication, treatment of organic-contaminated wastewater and the curing of polymer matrix composites. High temperature HEEB experiments at SRL have demonstrated the brazing of carbon-carbon composites to metallic substrates and the melting and sintering of powders for graded-alloy fabrication. Other experiments have demonstrated efficient destruction of low-concentration organic contaminants in water and low temperature free-radical cross-linking of fiber-reinforced composites with acrylated resin matrices.

  20. Particle acceleration in turbulence and weakly stochastic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Grzegorz; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M; Lazarian, A

    2012-06-15

    In this Letter we analyze the energy distribution evolution of test particles injected in three dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of different magnetic reconnection configurations. When considering a single Sweet-Parker topology, the particles accelerate predominantly through a first-order Fermi process, as predicted in and demonstrated numerically in . When turbulence is included within the current sheet, the acceleration rate is highly enhanced, because reconnection becomes fast and independent of resistivity and allows the formation of a thick volume filled with multiple simultaneously reconnecting magnetic fluxes. Charged particles trapped within this volume suffer several head-on scatterings with the contracting magnetic fluctuations, which significantly increase the acceleration rate and results in a first-order Fermi process. For comparison, we also tested acceleration in MHD turbulence, where particles suffer collisions with approaching and receding magnetic irregularities, resulting in a reduced acceleration rate. We argue that the dominant acceleration mechanism approaches a second order Fermi process in this case. PMID:23004254