Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated radiative transfer

  1. Application of nonlinear Krylov acceleration to radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A. T.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    The iterative solution technique used for radiative transfer is normally nested, with outer thermal iterations and inner transport iterations. We implement a nonlinear Krylov acceleration (NKA) method in the PDT code for radiative transfer problems that breaks nesting, resulting in more thermal iterations but significantly fewer total inner transport iterations. Using the metric of total inner transport iterations, we investigate a crooked-pipe-like problem and a pseudo-shock-tube problem. Using only sweep preconditioning, we compare NKA against a typical inner / outer method employing GMRES / Newton and find NKA to be comparable or superior. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of applying diffusion-based preconditioning to grey problems in conjunction with NKA. (authors)

  2. Growth and decay of acceleration waves in non-ideal gas flow with radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lal; Singh, Raghwendra; Ram, Subedar

    2012-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the study of the propagation of acceleration waves along the characteristic path in a non-ideal gas flow with effect of radiative heat transfer. It is shown that a linear solution in the characteristic plane can exhibit non-linear behavior in the physical plane. It is also investigated as to how the radiative heat transfer under the optically thin limit will affect the formation of shock in planer, cylindrical and spherically symmetric flows. We conclude that there exists critical amplitude such that any compressive waves with initial amplitude greater than the critical one terminate into shock waves while an initial amplitude less than the critical one results in the decay of the disturbance. The critical time for shock formation has been computed. In this paper we also compare/contrast the nature of solution in ideal and non ideal gas flows.

  3. Implicit Monte Carlo diffusion - an acceleration method for Monte Carlo time dependent radiative transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N A

    2000-10-01

    We present a method for accelerating time dependent Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations by using a discretization of the diffusion equation to calculate probabilities that are used to advance particles in regions with small mean free path. The method is demonstrated on problems with on 1 and 2 dimensional orthogonal grids. It results in decreases in run time of more than an order of magnitude on these problems, while producing answers with accuracy comparable to pure IMC simulations. We call the method Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion, which we abbreviate IMD.

  4. Grey transport acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.

    1988-10-01

    A new iterative method for solving hte time-dependent multifrequency radiative transfer equations is described. The method is applicable to semi-implicit time discretizations that generate a linear steady-state multifrequency transport problem with pseudo-scattering within each time step. The standard ''lambda'' iteration method is shown to often converge slowly for such problems, and the new grey transport acceleration (GTA) method, based on accelerating the lambda method by employing a grey, or frequency-independent transport equation, is developed. The GTA method is shown, theoretically by an iterative Fourier analysis, and experimentally by numerical calculations, to converge significantly faster than the lambda method. In addition, the GTA method is conceptually simple to implement for general differencing schemes, on either Eulerian or Lagrangian meshes. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Introduction of Parallel GPGPU Acceleration Algorithms for the Solution of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godoy, William F.; Liu, Xu

    2011-01-01

    General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is a recent technique that allows the parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate calculations performed sequentially by the central processing unit (CPU). To introduce GPGPU to radiative transfer, the Gauss-Seidel solution of the well-known expressions for 1-D and 3-D homogeneous, isotropic media is selected as a test case. Different algorithms are introduced to balance memory and GPU-CPU communication, critical aspects of GPGPU. Results show that speed-ups of one to two orders of magnitude are obtained when compared to sequential solutions. The underlying value of GPGPU is its potential extension in radiative solvers (e.g., Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates) at a minimal learning curve.

  6. A grey diffusion acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, P.F.

    1991-07-01

    The equations of thermal radiative transfer describe the emission, absorption and transport of photons in a material. As photons travel through the material they are absorbed and re-emitted in a Planckian distribution characterized by the material temperature. As a result of these processes, the material can change resulting in a change in the Planckian emission spectrum. When the coupling between the material and radiation is strong, as occurs when the material opacity or the time step is large, standard iterative techniques converge very slowly. As a result, nested iterative algorithms have been applied to the problem. One algorithm, is to use multifrequency DSA to accelerate the convergence of the multifrequency transport iteration and a grey transport acceleration (GTA) followed by a single group DSA. Here we summarize a new method which uses a grey diffusion equation (GDA) to directly solve the multifrequency transport (S{sub N}) problem. Results of Fourier analysis for both the continuous and discretized equations are discussed and the computational efficiency of GDA is compared with the DSA and GTA nested algorithms. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  8. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1988-01-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  9. Non-LTE radiative transfer with lambda-acceleration - Convergence properties using exact full and diagonal lambda-operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the convergence properties of Lambda-acceleration methods for non-LTE radiative transfer problems in planar and spherical geometry. Matrix elements of the 'exact' A-operator are used to accelerate convergence to a solution in which both the radiative transfer and atomic rate equations are simultaneously satisfied. Convergence properties of two-level and multilevel atomic systems are investigated for methods using: (1) the complete Lambda-operator, and (2) the diagonal of the Lambda-operator. We find that the convergence properties for the method utilizing the complete Lambda-operator are significantly better than those of the diagonal Lambda-operator method, often reducing the number of iterations needed for convergence by a factor of between two and seven. However, the overall computational time required for large scale calculations - that is, those with many atomic levels and spatial zones - is typically a factor of a few larger for the complete Lambda-operator method, suggesting that the approach should be best applied to problems in which convergence is especially difficult.

  10. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-11-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present results from simulations that couple particle kinetics with hydrodynamics (HD) of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration and transport with the RADYN HD code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by accelerated electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using two different electron spectra, one an ad hoc power law and the other predicted by the model of stochastic acceleration by turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, the later model, even with energy flux \\ll {10}10 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, can cause “explosive” chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- and downflows (and HD shocks). This is partly because our acceleration model, like many others, produces a spectrum consisting of a quasi-thermal component plus a power-law tail. We synthesize emission-line profiles covering different heights in the lower atmosphere, including Hα 6563 Å, He ii 304 Å, Ca ii K 3934 Å, and Si iv 1393 Å. One interesting result is the unusual high temperature (up to a few times 105 K) of the formation site of He ii 304 Å, which is expected owing to photoionization-recombination under flare conditions, compared to those in the quiet Sun dominated by collisional excitation. When compared with observations, our results can constrain the properties of nonthermal electrons and thus the poorly understood particle acceleration mechanism.

  11. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  12. An accelerated lambda iteration method for multilevel radiative transfer. III. Noncoherent electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, G. B.; Hummer, D. G.

    1994-10-01

    Since the mass of the electron is very small relative to atomic masses, Thomson scattering of low-energy photons (hν<radiation field which is considerably faster than previous methods based on straightforward evaluation of the scattering integral. This procedure is implemented in our multilevel radiative code (MALI), which now takes full account of the effects of noncoherent electron scattering on level populations, as well as on the emergent spectrum. Calculations using model atmospheres of hot, low-gravity stars display not only the expected broad wings of strong emission lines but also effects arising from the scattering of photons across continuum edges. In extreme cases this leads to significant shifts of the ionization equilibrium of helium.

  13. Accelerating 3D radiative transfer for realistic OCO-2 cloud-aerosol scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Massie, S. T.; Platnick, S. E.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The recently launched NASA OCO-2 satellite is expected to provide important information about the carbon dioxide distribution in the troposphere down to Earth's surface. Among the challenges in accurately retrieving CO2 concentration from the hyperspectral observations in each of the three OCO-2 bands are cloud and aerosol impacts on the observed radiances. Preliminary studies based on idealized cloud fields have shown that they can lead to spectrally dependent radiance perturbations which differ from band to band and may lead to biases in the derived products. Since OCO-2 was inserted into the A-Train, it is only natural to capitalize on sensor synergies with other instruments, in this case on the cloud and aerosol scene context that is provided by MODIS and CALIOP. Our approach is to use cloud imagery (especially for inhomogeneous scenes) for predicting the hyperspectral observations within a collocated OCO-2 footprint and comparing with the observations, which allows a systematic assessment of the causes for biases in the retrievals themselves, and their manifestation in spectral residuals for various different cloud types and distributions. Simulating a large number of cases with line-by-line calculations using a 3D code is computationally prohibitive even on large parallel computers. Therefore, we developed a number of acceleration approaches. In this contribution, we will analyze them in terms of their speed and accuracy, using cloud fields from airborne imagery collected during a recent NASA field experiment (SEAC4RS) as proxy for different types of inhomogeneous cloud fields. The broader goal of this effort is to improve OCO-2 retrievals in the vicinity of cloud fields, and to extend the range of conditions under which the instrument will provide useful results.

  14. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  15. The solution of radiative transfer problems in molecular bands without the LTE assumption by accelerated lambda iteration methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Kunze, D.; Hummer, D. G.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method based on the use of approximate transfer operators, which was designed initially to solve multilevel NLTE line formation problems in stellar atmospheres, is adapted and applied to the solution of the NLTE molecular band radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres. The matrices to be constructed and inverted are much smaller than those used in the traditional Curtis matrix technique, which makes possible the treatment of more realistic problems using relatively small computers. This technique converges much more rapidly than straightforward iteration between the transfer equation and the equations of statistical equilibrium. A test application of this new technique to the solution of NLTE radiative transfer problems for optically thick and thin bands (the 4.3 micron CO2 band in the Venusian atmosphere and the 4.7 and 2.3 micron CO bands in the earth's atmosphere) is described.

  16. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  17. Dynamics of Radiation Pressure Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, A.; Benedetti, C.; Pegoraro, F.; Veghini, S.

    2010-02-02

    We describe recent theoretical results on Radiation Pressure Acceleration of ions by ultraintense, circularly polarized laser pulses, giving an insight on the underlying dynamics and suggestions for the development of applications. In thick targets, we show how few-cycle pulses may generate single ion bunches in inhomogeneous density profiles. In thin targets, we present a refinement of the simple model of the accelerating mirror and a comparison of its predictions with simulation results, solving an apparent paradox.

  18. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  19. An accelerated lambda iteration method for multilevel radiative transfer. I - Non-overlapping lines with background continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, G. B.; Hummer, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for solving multilevel transfer problems when nonoverlapping lines and background continuum are present and active continuum transfer is absent. An approximate lambda operator is employed to derive linear, 'preconditioned', statistical-equilibrium equations. A method is described for finding the diagonal elements of the 'true' numerical lambda operator, and therefore for obtaining the coefficients of the equations. Iterations of the preconditioned equations, in conjunction with the transfer equation's formal solution, are used to solve linear equations. Some multilevel problems are considered, including an eleven-level neutral helium atom. Diagonal and tridiagonal approximate lambda operators are utilized in the problems to examine the convergence properties of the method, and it is found to be effective for the line transfer problems.

  20. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  1. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  2. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  3. Radiative Transfer: Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Emde, Claudia; Buras, Robert; Kylling, Arve

    Solar and terrestrial radiation is the driver of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and can be exploited by remote sensing algorithms to determine atmospheric composition. For this purpose, accurate radiative transfer models are needed. Here, a modern radiative transfer tool developed over many years at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics is explained. As an application, the remote sensing of cloud microphysics using the angular distribution of reflected solar radiance in the rainbow and backscatter glory is shown, with special emphasis on the polarization of radiation.

  4. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C

    2001-10-17

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  5. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  6. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  7. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  8. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  9. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  10. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. PMID:22847673

  11. Radiation safety at accelerator facilities NCRP activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Kenneth R.

    1997-02-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued 13 reports, dating back to 1949, giving guidance and recommendations for radiation protection at accelerator facilities. There are six current reports on the topics of neutron radiation; facility and shielding design; alarms and access control systems; and equipment design, performance, and use. Scientific Committee 46 (SC 46) is currently overseeing the development of two reports that will provide up-to-date guidance for the design of medical accelerator facilities and shielding. SC 46 has also proposed that a report be written to provide guidance for the design and shielding of industrial accelerator and large irradiator facilities. This paper describes the status and contents of these reports.

  12. Radiative processes of uniformly accelerated entangled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, G.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2016-05-01

    We study radiative processes of uniformly accelerated entangled atoms, interacting with an electromagnetic field prepared in the Minkowski vacuum state. We discuss the structure of the rate of variation of the atomic energy for two atoms traveling in different hyperbolic world lines. We identify the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the generation of entanglement as well as to the decay of entangled states. Our results resemble the situation in which two inertial atoms are coupled individually to two spatially separated cavities at different temperatures. In addition, for equal accelerations we obtain that one of the maximally entangled antisymmetric Bell state is a decoherence-free state.

  13. On Radiative Acceleration of Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Takahara, F.

    1997-10-01

    The formation and acceleration of relativistic jets by radiative forces in black hole systems are investigated. Under a variety of circumstances, we calculate the bulk acceleration and radiative cooling of a confined plasma cell, immersed in different types of radiation fields and interacting by Compton scattering. Both non-relativistic (cold) and relativistic (hot) jet plasma, comprising mixtures of electron-proton and electron-positron components, are treated. We pay attention to some conceivable effects, previously neglected, which may possibly enhance the bulk acceleration; among them are an anisotropically radiating accretion disk surface, beamed secondary radiation from the inner jet, and scattering in the energy dependent Klein-Nishina regime. Our results are discussed in the context of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole candidates, and the conditions necessary for successfully reproducing their observed properties are highlighted. In particular, the velocities of the recently discovered superluminal jets in Galactic black hole candidates (Lorentz factors of Γ ~ 2.5) are readily and very robustly accounted for if the jet is composed primarily of electron-positron pairs and the disk luminosity is near the Eddington value; the jet kinetic power can be consistent with optical depth and pair annihilation constraints. On the other hand, severe difficulty is met in attaining the velocities of AGN jets (Γ ~ 10), which can only be realized when a significant amount of beamed secondary radiation is present. We also contemplate additional important issues, such as global energetics.

  14. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dana, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of dust scattering on observable optical and infrared parameters, and the accuracy of approximate solutions were examined. The equation of radiative transfer in a static and homogeneous, but not necessarily uniform, distribution gas and dust around a central empty core with a point source of energy at its center was solved. The dust properties were characterized by a phenomenological extinction cross section, albedo and parameters describing the anisotropy of dust scattering. For ultraviolet photons, ionization equilibrium equations for the gas were solved, and for infrared photons a self-consistent dust temperature was calculated. Ray tracing was used to solve for the angular dependence of the intensity.

  15. Radiative Transfer Under Inhomogeneous Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendicho, P. Fabiani

    1998-06-01

    We present, for the first time, three dimensional (3D) radiative transfer (RT) results with realistic atomic models (multilevel) and without using the local thermodinamical equilibrium approximation (non-LTE). We have developed a new code based on efficient iterative methods (Trujillo Bueno, and Fabiani Bendicho 1995; Fabiani Bendicho, Trujillo Bueno and Auer 1997) characterized by a very high convergence rate. With this 3D multilevel code and using a schematic atmospheric model we are able to demonstrate that one may need self-consistent multidimensional RT calculations in order to interpret high spatial resolution solar spectroscopic observations.

  16. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, J.L.; Juras, R.C.

    1998-11-04

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in eaeh area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundan~ circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several vears at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  17. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juras, R. C.; Blankenship, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in each area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundant circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several years at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  18. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  19. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarela-tivistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  20. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-09-15

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover, the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarelativistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  1. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  2. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  3. Stochastic Radiative transfer and real cloudiness

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.

    1995-09-01

    Plane-parallel radiative transfer modeling of clouds in GCMs is thought to be an inadequate representation of the effects of real cloudiness. A promising new approach for studying the effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity is stochastic radiative transfer, which computes the radiative effects of ensembles of cloud structures described by probability distributions. This approach is appropriate because cloud information is inherently statistical, and it is the mean radiative effect of complex 3D cloud structure that is desired. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  5. FAMOUS, faster: using parallel computing techniques to accelerate the FAMOUS/HadCM3 climate model with a focus on the radiative transfer algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanappe, P.; Beurivé, A.; Laguzet, F.; Steels, L.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, O.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Aina, T.; Allen, M.

    2011-09-01

    We have optimised the atmospheric radiation algorithm of the FAMOUS climate model on several hardware platforms. The optimisation involved translating the Fortran code to C and restructuring the algorithm around the computation of a single air column. Instead of the existing MPI-based domain decomposition, we used a task queue and a thread pool to schedule the computation of individual columns on the available processors. Finally, four air columns are packed together in a single data structure and computed simultaneously using Single Instruction Multiple Data operations. The modified algorithm runs more than 50 times faster on the CELL's Synergistic Processing Element than on its main PowerPC processing element. On Intel-compatible processors, the new radiation code runs 4 times faster. On the tested graphics processor, using OpenCL, we find a speed-up of more than 2.5 times as compared to the original code on the main CPU. Because the radiation code takes more than 60 % of the total CPU time, FAMOUS executes more than twice as fast. Our version of the algorithm returns bit-wise identical results, which demonstrates the robustness of our approach. We estimate that this project required around two and a half man-years of work.

  6. FAMOUS, faster: using parallel computing techniques to accelerate the FAMOUS/HadCM3 climate model with a focus on the radiative transfer algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanappe, P.; Beurivé, A.; Laguzet, F.; Steels, L.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, O.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Aina, T.; Allen, M.

    2011-06-01

    We have optimised the atmospheric radiation algorithm of the FAMOUS climate model on several hardware platforms. The optimisation involved translating the Fortran code to C and restructuring the algorithm around the computation of a single air column. A task queue and a thread pool are used to distribute the computation to several processors. Finally, four air columns are packed together in a single data structure and computed simultaneously using Single Instruction Multiple Data operations. The modified algorithm runs more than 50 times faster on the CELL's Synergistic Processing Elements than on its main PowerPC processing element. On Intel-compatible processors, the new radiation code runs 4 times faster and on graphics processors, using OpenCL, more than 2.5 times faster, as compared to the original code. Because the radiation code takes more than 60 % of the total CPU time, FAMOUS executes more than twice as fast. Our version of the algorithm returns bit-wise identical results, which demonstrates the robustness of our approach.

  7. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic plane-parallel flows accelerated from their base like accretion disk winds are numerically examined under the special relativistic treatment. We first solve the relativistic transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained flux, we then solve the hydrodynamical equation, and obtain the new velocity field and the mass-loss rate as an eigen value. We repeat these double-iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. Under this double iteration, we solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation and relativistic flows in the vertical direction, simultaneously. The flows are gradually accelerated, as the optical depth decreases towards the surface. The mass-loss rate dot{J} is roughly expressed in terms of the optical depth τb and terminal speed βs of the flow as dot{J} ˜ 10 τ_b β _s^{-3/4}.

  8. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Many spectacular and violent phenomena in the high-energy universe exhibit nonthermal radiation spectra, from which we infer power-law energy distributions of the radiating particles. Relativistic magnetic reconnection, recognized as a leading mechanism of nonthermal particle acceleration, can efficiently transfer magnetic energy to energetic particles. We present a comprehensive particle-in-cell study of particle acceleration in 2D relativistic reconnection in both electron-ion and pair plasmas without guide field. We map out the power-law index α and the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum as functions of three key parameters: the system size (and initial layer length) L, the ambient plasma magnetization σ, and the ion/electron mass ratio (from 1 to 1836). We identify the transition between small- and large-system regimes: for small L, the system size affects the slope and extent of the high-energy spectrum, while for large enough L, α and the cutoff energy are independent of L. We compare high energy particle spectra and radiative (synchrotron and inverse Compton) signatures of the electrons, for pair and electron-ion reconnection. The latter cases maintain highly relativistic electrons, but include a range of different magnetizations yielding sub- to highly-relativistic ions. Finally, we show how nonthermal acceleration and radiative signatures alter when the radiation back-reaction becomes important. These results have important implications for assessing the promise and the limitations of relativistic reconnection as an astrophysically-important particle acceleration mechanism. This work is funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  9. GPU acceleration experience with RRTMG long wave radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Erik; Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, HungLung A.; Lee, Tsengdar

    2013-10-01

    An Atmospheric radiative transfer model calculates radiative transfer of electromagnetic radiation through a planetary atmosphere. Both shortwave radiance and longwave radiance parameterizations in an atmospheric model calculate radiation fluxes and heating rates in the earth-atmospheric system. One radiative transfer model is the rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM), which calculates of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. Longwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM. The RRTMG is a validated, correlated k-distribution band model for the calculation of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. The focus of this paper is on the RRTMG long wave (RRTMG_LW) model. In order to improve computational efficiency, RRTMG_LW incorporates several modifications compared to RRTM. In RRTM_LW there are 16 g points in each of the spectral bands for a total of 256 g points. In RRTMG_LW, the number of g points in each spectral band varies from 2 to 16 depending on the absorption in each band. RRTMG_LW employs a computationally efficient correlated-k method for radiative transfer calculations. It contains 16 spectral bands with various number of quadrature points (g points) in each of the bands. In total, there are 140 g points. The radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases are included in RRTMG_LW. Active gas absorbers include H2O, O3, CO2, CH4, N2O, O2 and four types of halocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-22, and CCL4. RRTMG_LW also treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. For cloudysky radiative transfer, a maximum-random cloud overlapping scheme is used. Small scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds can be represented using a statistical technique in RRTMG_LW. Due to its accuracy, RRTMG_LW has been implemented operationally

  10. Simulation of the Focal Spot of the Accelerator Bremsstrahlung Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V.; Bespalov, V.

    2016-06-01

    Testing of thick-walled objects by bremsstrahlung radiation (BR) is primarily performed via high-energy quanta. The testing parameters are specified by the focal spot size of the high-energy bremsstrahlung radiation. In determining the focal spot size, the high- energy BR portion cannot be experimentally separated from the low-energy BR to use high- energy quanta only. The patterns of BR focal spot formation have been investigated via statistical modeling of the radiation transfer in the target material. The distributions of BR quanta emitted by the target for different energies and emission angles under normal distribution of the accelerated electrons bombarding the target have been obtained, and the ratio of the distribution parameters has been determined.

  11. BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Rojo, Patricio; Lust, Nate; Bowman, Oliver; Stemm, Madison; Foster, Andrew; Loredo, Thomas J.; Fortney, Jonathan; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-08-01

    BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

  12. One-way radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, Pedro; Ilan, Boaz; Kim, Arnold D.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the one-way radiative transfer equation (RTE) for modeling the transmission of a light beam incident normally on a slab composed of a uniform forward-peaked scattering medium. Unlike the RTE, which is formulated as a boundary value problem, the one-way RTE is formulated as an initial value problem. Consequently, the one-way RTE is much easier to solve. We discuss the relation of the one-way RTE to the Fokker-Planck, small-angle, and Fermi pencil beam approximations. Then, we validate the one-way RTE through systematic comparisons with RTE simulations for both the Henyey-Greenstein and screened Rutherford scattering phase functions over a broad range of albedo, anisotropy factor, optical thickness, and refractive index values. We find that the one-way RTE gives very good approximations for a broad range of optical property values for thin to moderately thick media that have moderately to sharply forward-peaked scattering. Specifically, we show that the error made by the one-way RTE decreases monotonically as the anisotropic factor increases and as the albedo increases. On the other hand, the error increases monotonically as the optical thickness increases and the refractive index mismatch at the boundary increases.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  14. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  15. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  16. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  17. Radiative transfer of visible radiation in turbid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1974-01-01

    Methods are presented for solving radiative transfer problems; they include the doubling method and the closely related matrix method, iterative method, Chandrasekhar's method of discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo method. To consider radiation transport through turbid atmosphere, an atmospheric model was developed characterizing aerosols by parameters. Intensity and polarization of radiation in turbid atmospheres is discussed, as well as lower atmospheric heating due to solar radiation absorption by aerosols.

  18. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Concepcion, Javier J; Brennaman, M Kyle; Binstead, Robert A; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-01-15

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L(-•))Ru(b)(III)-OH(2) with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near-diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO(4)(2-) and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc(-)) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern-Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc(-) gave a quenching rate constant of k(q) = 4.1 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1) and an estimated pK(a)* value of ~5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L(•-))Ru(b)(III)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH)(3+)] in a H(2)PO(4)(-)/HPO(4)(2-) buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H(2)PO(4)(-) to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] with k(PT,2) = 4.4 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1). From the intercept of a plot of k(obs) vs. [H(2)PO(4)(-)], k = 2.1 × 10(6) s(-1) for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pK(a) values intermediate between pK(a)(H(3)O(+)) = -1.74 and pK(a)(H(2)O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  19. Mass loss from inhomogeneous hot star winds. III. An effective-opacity formalism for line radiative transfer in accelerating, clumped two-component media, and first results on theory and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, J. O.; Puls, J.; Owocki, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We provide a fast and easy-to-use formalism for treating the reduction in effective opacity associated with optically thick clumps in an accelerating two-component medium. Methods: We develop and benchmark effective-opacity laws for continuum and line radiative transfer that bridge the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We then use this formalism to i) design a simple method for modeling and analyzing UV wind resonance lines in hot, massive stars, and ii) derive simple correction factors to the line force driving the outflows of such stars. Results: Using a vorosity-modified Sobolev with exact integration (vmSEI) method, we show that, for a given ionization factor, UV resonance doublets may be used to analytically predict the upward corrections in empirically inferred mass-loss rates associated with porosity in velocity space (a.k.a. velocity-porosity, or vorosity). However, we also show the presence of a solution degeneracy: in a two-component clumped wind with given inter-clump medium density, there are always two different solutions producing the same synthetic doublet profile. We demonstrate this by application to SiIV and PV in B and O supergiants and derive, for an inter-clump density set to 1% of the mean density, upward empirical mass-loss corrections of typically factors of either ~5 or ~50, depending on which of the two solutions is chosen. Overall, our results indicate that this solution dichotomy severely limits the use of UV resonance lines as direct mass-loss indicators in current diagnostic models of clumped hot stellar winds. We next apply the effective line-opacity formalism to the standard CAK theory of line-driven winds. A simple vorosity correction factor to the CAK line force is derived, which for normalized velocity filling factor fvel simply scales as fvelα, where α is the slope of the CAK line-strength distribution function. By analytic and numerical hydrodynamics calculations, we further show that in cases where vorosity is

  20. OPserver: opacities and radiative accelerations on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C.; González, J.; Seaton, M. J.; Buerger, P.; Bellorín, A.; Meléndez, M.; Rodríguez, L. S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.; Palacios, E.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    We report on developments carried out within the Opacity Project (OP) to upgrade atomic database services to comply with e-infrastructure requirements. We give a detailed description of an interactive, online server for astrophysical opacities, referred to as OPserver, to be used in sophisticated stellar modelling where Rosseland mean opacities and radiative accelerations are computed at every depth point and each evolution cycle. This is crucial, for instance, in chemically peculiar stars and in the exploitation of the new asteroseismological data. OPserver, downloadable with the new OPCD_3.0 release from the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg, France, computes mean opacities and radiative data for arbitrary chemical mixtures from the OP monochromatic opacities. It is essentially a client-server network restructuring and optimization of the suite of codes included in the earlier OPCD_2.0 release. The server can be installed locally or, alternatively, accessed remotely from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA. The client is an interactive web page or a subroutine library that can be linked to the user code. The suitability of this scheme in grid computing environments is emphasized, and its extension to other atomic database services for astrophysical purposes is discussed.

  1. Radiation heat transfer shapefactors for combustion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Abrous, A.

    1987-01-01

    The computation of radiation heat transfer through absorbing media is commonly done through the zoning method which relies upon values of the geometric mean transmittance and absorptance. The computation of these values is difficult and expensive, particularly if many spectral bands are used. This paper describes the extension of a scan line algorithm, based upon surface-surface radiation, to the computation of surface-gas and gas-gas radiation transmittances.

  2. Radiative Transfer In Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei

    We propose to develop state-of-the-art numerical tools for radiative transfer calculations in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We will investigate two problems: (1) Production and heating of photons at the early (opaque) stage of the explosion, which controls the brightness and spectral shape of the jet photospheric emission. (2) Transfer of GRB radiation through the external blast wave. Our recent results suggest that this transfer generates the GeV flash observed in GRBs, providing key information on the explosion and its progenitor. We will test our models against observations.

  3. Discrete Space Theory of Radiative Transfer: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. Srinivasa

    2010-06-01

    The method of obtaining the solution of radiative transfer equation using discrete space theory (DST) is described with (1) interaction principle for different geometries (2) star product (3) calculation of radiation field at internal points. Some of the important steps to obtain the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry are also mentioned. Applications of DST are discussed with their results in two cases (a) study of reflection effect in close binary systems and (b) to compute KI 769.9 nm emission line profiles from N-type stars.

  4. Discrete Space Theory of Radiative Transfer: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. Srinivasa

    The method of obtaining the solution of radiative transfer equation using discrete space theory (DST) is described with (1) interaction principle for different geometries (2) star product (3) calculation of radiation field at internal points. Some of the important steps to obtain the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry are also mentioned. Applications of DST are discussed with their results in two cases (a) study of reflection effect in close binary systems and (b) to compute KI 769.9 nm emission line profiles from N-type stars.

  5. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  6. Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These spectrally invariant relationships are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with 1D radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  7. Nonaxisymmetric radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Moder, J.P.; Lee, H.S.; Chai, J.C.; Parthasarathy, G.; Patankar, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    A finite-volume method for radiative transfer in cylindrical enclosures is presented. Angular redistribution terms in the equation of transfer are avoided by defining radiation directions in terms of angular coordinates measured with respect to Cartesian base vectors; this definition of radiation directions can result in control angles which overlap control-volume faces, depending on the type of spatial and angular grids used in the azimuthal direction. A simple treatment for such control-angle overlaps is presented which is also applicable to nonorthogonal curvilinear spatial-coordinates. A comparison of the present procedure with other similar methods is given. Solutions are presented for axisymmetric transfer through a cylinder and nonaxisymmetric transfer through two- and three-dimensional annular sectors. Results show that the procedure produces reasonable solutions for transparent and participating media in axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric cylindrical enclosures.

  8. Radiative transfer model: matrix operator method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Ruprecht, E

    1996-07-20

    A radiative transfer model, the matrix operator method, is discussed here. The matrix operator method is applied to a plane-parallel atmosphere within three spectral ranges: the visible, the infrared, and the microwave. For a homogeneous layer with spherical scattering, the radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically. The vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere can be subdivided into a set of homogeneous layers. The solution of the radiative transfer equation for the vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is obtained recurrently from the analytical solutions for the subdivided layers. As an example for the application of the matrix operator method, the effects of the cirrus and the stratocumulus clouds on the net radiation at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are investigated. The relationship between the polarization in the microwave range and the rain rates is also studied. Copies of the FORTRAN program and the documentation of the FORTRAN program on a diskette are available. PMID:21102832

  9. Transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the formulation of the different methods for determining transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media. A boundary driven radiative problem is considered in a one-dimensional plane-parallel slab. The different methods of solving the transient radiative transfer equation include the P{sub 1}, P{sub 3}, and P{sub 5} approximations, two-flux method, and eight, twelve and sixteen discrete ordinates methods. In addition, the general transient radiative transfer equation is also solved by direct numerical integration without any simplifying assumptions. Different orders of approximation for the phase function are considered as is a parametric analysis of the different parameters such as the scattering albedo and optical depth is performed. The propagation speed obtained and the magnitude of the transmitted and back-scattered fluxes for different models obtained are a function of the approximation used to represent the intensity distribution.

  10. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  11. Radiative transfer in moving media : basic mathematical methods for radiative transfer in spherically symmetrical moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, K. K., Wilson, S. J.

    The advancement of observational techniques over the years has led to the discovery of a large number of stars exhibiting complex spectral structures, thus necessitating the search for new techniques and methods to study radiative transfer in such stars with moving envelopes. This led to the introduction of the concept of "photon escape probability" and the wisdom of expressing the transfer equations in "comoving frames" (CMF). Radiative transfer problems in spherically moving media form a branch of mathematical physics which uses mathematics of a very distinctive kind. Radiative Transfer in Moving Media records the basic mathematical methodologies, both analytical and numerical, developed for solving radiation transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving media, in the consideration of macroscopic velocity fields only. Part I contains the basic notions of radiation-matter interaction in participating media and constructs the relevant transfer equations to be solved in the subsequent chapters. Part II considers the basic mathematical methods for solving the transfer problems in extensive moving atmospheres when it is observed in the lab frame. Part III introduces the analytical and numerical methods for solving radiative transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving atmospheres when expressed in the comoving frame. This book is addressed to graduate students and researchers in Astrophysics, in particular to those studying radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres.

  12. On radiation protection at the LINAC-800 linear electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balalykin, N. I.; Minashkin, V. F.; Nozdrin, M. A.; Shirkov, G. D.; Schegolev, V. Yu.

    2012-07-01

    The Automatic System of Radiation Safety Control (ASRSC) of the LINAC-800 linear electron accelerator is designed to ensure radiation safety for accelerator personnel during regular operations and in emergency cases. The results of calculating the emission power used to develop the ARPS are given. Both hardware and software components of the radiation control system are described. This paper also presents a description of the interlock and signalization system.

  13. Radiation Protection in the NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.; Vylet, Vaclav

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the elements of the design of the NLC Test Accelerator pertaining to ionizing radiation protection and safety. The NLC Test Accelerator is an accelerator physics research facility at SLAC designed to validate 2.6-cm microwave linear accelerator technology for a future high-energy linear collider (the "Next Linear Collider"). The NLC Test Accelerator is designed for average beam power levels up to 1.5 kW, at energies up to 1 GeV (roughly equivalent to 1/500 of an NLC linac). The design for radiation protection incorporates shielding, configuration controls, safety interlock systems for personnel protection and beam containment, and operations procedures. The design was guided by the DOE Accelerator Safety Order, internal Laboratory policy, and the general principle of keeping radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable.

  14. Local Acceleration of Radiation Belt Electrons: Where? When? and How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Morley, S.; Larsen, B.; Friedel, R. H.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2013-12-01

    Two broad classes of processes are capable of accelerating radiation belt electrons to ultra-relativistic energies: radial acceleration by inward diffusion from a high-altitude source population and local acceleration of an in situ source population by wave-particle interactions. Recently the Van Allen Probes mission provided unambiguous observations of local acceleration for one of the first radiation belt enhancement events of the mission on October 8-9, 2012 [Reeves et al., 2013]. Now, with over a year of Van Allen Probes observations, it is possible to conduct a larger survey of radiation belt enhancement events. Level 4 phase space densities recently been made available by the RBSP-ECT science operations center using data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) [Blake et al., 2013] and Van Allen Probes magnetic ephemeris files [Henderson et al., 2013]. In this presentation we survey the radial profiles of phase space density as a function of the magnetic invariants (mu, K, and L*) for characteristic signatures of local acceleration through wave particle interactions. We examine how many radiation belt enhancement events show signatures of local acceleration and determine where the peak acceleration occurred. We compare the observations with the expectations from theories of local acceleration in order to better understand the generation mechanisms and the relative roles of local acceleration and radial diffusion in controlling radiation belt dynamics.

  15. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  17. 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

  18. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  19. Three-dimensional radiative transfer on a massively parallel computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vath, H. M.

    1994-04-01

    We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) in the simple two-level atom approximation on the Mas-Par MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. On such a machine, all processors execute the same command at a given time, but on different data. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and storage of data. To solve the transfer equation, we adopt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the source function. We use the ALI method and test local and non-local operators. Furthermore, we compare the Ng and the orthomin methods of acceleration. We also investigate the use of multi-grid methods to get fast solutions for the NLTE case. In order to test these numerical methods, we apply them to two problems with and without periodic boundary conditions.

  20. Radiative transfer in cylindrical threads with incident radiation. II. 2D azimuth-dependent case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttebroze, P.

    2005-05-01

    A method is proposed for the solution of NLTE radiative transfer equations in long cylinders with an external incident radiation that varies with direction. This method is designed principally for the modelling of elongated structures imbedded in the solar corona (loops, prominence threads). The radiative transfer problem under consideration is a 2D one, since the source functions and absorption coefficients vary with both distance to axis and azimuth. The method is based on the general principles of finite-differences and accelerated Λ-iteration. A Fourier series is used for interpolation in azimuth. The method is applied to a line emitted by a two-level atom with complete frequency redistribution. Convergence properties of the method and influence of the inclination angle on the source function are discussed.

  1. Investigation of advanced propulsion technologies: The RAM accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    The two principal areas of advanced propulsion investigated are the ram accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater. The concept of the ram accelerator is presented as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerothermodynamics research. The ram accelerator is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled in a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Combustion on and behind the projectile generates thrust which accelerates it to very high velocities. The acceleration can be tailored for the 'soft launch' of instrumented models. The distinctive reacting flow phenomena that have been observed in the ram accelerator are relevant to the aerothermodynamic processes in airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems and are useful for validating sophisticated CFD codes. The recently demonstrated scalability of the device and the ability to control the rate of acceleration offer unique opportunities for the use of the ram accelerator as a large-scale hypersonic ground test facility. The flowing gas radiation receiver is a novel concept for using solar energy to heat a working fluid for space power or propulsion. Focused solar radiation is absorbed directly in a working gas, rather than by heat transfer through a solid surface. Previous theoretical analysis had demonstrated that radiation trapping reduces energy loss compared to that of blackbody receivers, and enables higher efficiencies and higher peak temperatures. An experiment was carried out to measure the temperature profile of an infrared-active gas and demonstrate the effect of radiation trapping. The success of this effort validates analytical models of heat transfer in this receiver, and confirms the potential of this approach for achieving high efficiency space power and propulsion.

  2. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  3. CRASH3: cosmological radiative transfer through metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Maselli, A.; Ciardi, B.

    2013-05-01

    Here we introduce CRASH3, the latest release of the 3D radiative transfer code CRASH. In its current implementation, CRASH3 integrates into the reference algorithm the code CLOUDY to evaluate the ionization states of metals, self-consistently with the radiative transfer through H and He. The feedback of the heavy elements on the calculation of the gas temperature is also taken into account, making CRASH3 the first 3D code for cosmological applications which treats self-consistently the radiative transfer through an inhomogeneous distribution of metal-enriched gas with an arbitrary number of point sources and/or a background radiation. The code has been tested in idealized configurations, as well as in a more realistic case of multiple sources embedded in a polluted cosmic web. Through these validation tests, the new method has been proven to be numerically stable and convergent. We have studied the dependence of the results on a number of physical quantities such as the source characteristics (spectral range and shape, intensity), the metal composition, the gas number density and metallicity.

  4. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  5. Radiation from an accelerating neutral body: The case of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarman, Tolga; Arik, Metin; Kholmetskii, Alexander L.

    2013-11-01

    When an object is bound at rest to an attractional field, its rest mass (owing to the law of energy conservation, including the mass and energy equivalence of the Special Theory of Relativity) must decrease. The mass deficiency coming into play indicates a corresponding rest energy discharge. Thus, bringing an object to a rotational motion means that the energy transferred for this purpose serves to extract just as much rest mass (or similarly "rest energy", were the speed of light in empty space taken to be unity) out of it. Here, it is shown that during angular acceleration, photons of fundamental energy are emitted, while the object is kept on being delivered to a more and more intense rotational accelerational field, being the instantaneous angular velocity of the rotating object. This fundamental energy, as seen, does not depend on anything else (such as the mass or charge of the object), and it is in harmony with Bohr's Principle of Correspondence. This means at the same time, that emission will be achieved, as long as the angular velocity keeps on increasing, and will cease right after the object reaches a stationary rotational motion (a constant centrifugal acceleration), but if the object were brought to rotation in vacuum with no friction. By the same token, one can affirm that even the rotation at a macroscopic level is quantized, and can only take on "given angular velocities" (which can only be increased, bit by bit). The rate of emission of photons of concern is, on the other hand, proportional to the angular acceleration of the object, similarly to the derivative of the tangential acceleration with respect to time. It is thus constant for a "constant angular acceleration", although the energy of the emitted photons will increase with increasing , until the rotation reaches a stationary level, after which we expect no emission --let us stress-- if the object is in rotation in vacuum, along with no whatsoever friction (such as the case of a rotating

  6. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  7. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  8. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jets propagating into an unmagnetized plasmas. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and acceleration. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants

  9. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  10. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  11. Radiative transfer in realistic planetary atmospheres. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Some 40 publications that appeared in scientific journals from 1973 to 1981 as well as 45 scientific reports issued during the grant period are listed by title. Topics cover the development of a matrix operator theory of radiative transfer which made possible the exact model calculations of the radiance as a function of height in planetary atmospheres; calculation of the Mie phase matrix for various types of particles as well as for radiance and polarization in planetary atmospheres; analysis of high dispersion spectroscopic observations of Venus; calculation of curves of growth for Venus; the development of a theory for calculating radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres; investigations of zonal winds on Venus; and examination of Rayleigh scattering.

  12. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  13. ASIMUT on line radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; Neary, L.; Robert, S.; Letocart, V.; Giuranna, M.; Kasaba, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The CROSS DRIVE project aims to develop an innovative collaborative workspace infrastructure for space missions that will allow distributed scientific and engineering teams to collectively analyse and interpret scientific data as well as execute operations of planetary spacecraft. ASIMUT will be one of the tools that will be made available to the users. Here we describe this radiative transfer code and how it will be integrated into the virtual environment developed within CROSS DRIVE.

  14. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  15. Pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the enviromental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    1997-05-01

    The project of pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the environmental applications is considered. An accelerator consists of high voltage generator with vacuum insulation and vacuum diode with plasma cathode on the basis discharge on the surface of dielectric of large dimensions. The main parameters of electron accelerators are following: kinetic energy 0.2 - 2.0 MeV, electron beam current 1 - 30 kA and pulse duration 1- 5 microseconds. The main applications of accelerator for decomposition of wastewaters are considered.

  16. Radiation safety training for accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    In November 1992, a working group was formed within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) accelerator facilities to develop a generic safety training program to meet the basic requirements for individuals working in accelerator facilities. This training, by necessity, includes sections for inserting facility-specific information. The resulting course materials were issued by DOE as a handbook under its technical standards in 1996. Because experimenters may be at a facility for only a short time and often at odd times during the day, the working group felt that computer-based training would be useful. To that end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) together have developed a computer-based safety training program for accelerator facilities. This interactive course not only enables trainees to receive facility- specific information, but time the training to their schedule and tailor it to their level of expertise.

  17. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladawi, M. A.; Albarodi, H.; Hammoudeh, A.; Shamma, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  18. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  19. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  20. Principles of Invariance in Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraiah, A.

    1999-09-01

    We have reviewed the principle of invariance, its applications and its usefulness for obtaining the radiation field in semi-infinite and finite atmospheres. Various laws of scattering in dispersive media and the consequent radiation field are studied. The H-functions and X- and Y-functions in semi-infinite and finite media respectively are derived in a few cases. The Discrete Space Theory (DST) which is a general form of the Principle of Invariance is described. The method of addition of layers with general properties, is shown to describe all the properties of multiple scattering. A few examples of the application of DST such as polarization, line formation in expanding stellar atmospheres, etc., and a numerical analysis of DST are presented. Other developments in the theory of radiative transfer are briefly described.

  1. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  2. Accelerated cholesteryl ester transfer in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bagdade, J D; Lane, J T; Subbaiah, P V; Otto, M E; Ritter, M C

    1993-12-01

    Alterations in core lipid composition of lipoproteins in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients have suggested that the heteroexchange of neutral lipids between HDL and the apo B-containing lipoproteins may be enhanced. For this reason, we studied cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) in ten sulfonylurea-treated patients with stable NIDDM. CET measured in all NIDDM subjects with an assay of mass transfer was significantly greater than that of controls at 1 and 2 h (P < 0.001); the transfer of radiolabeled CE also was increased in a subset of four of the NIDDM group (NIDDM k = 0.21 +/- 0.04 vs. control k = 0.10 +/- 0.05; P < 0.05). A weak correlation was demonstrable between the mass of CE transferred at 1 h and diabetic control expressed as plasma fructosamine (r = 0.58, P < 0.09). To characterize this disturbance in CET further, the donor (HDL + VHDL) and acceptor (VLDL + LDL) lipoprotein fractions were isolated by ultracentrifugation at d 1.063 g/ml from NIDDM and control plasma and a series of recombination experiments were performed. Combining NIDDM acceptor with control donor fractions that contained HDL and CETP and not the combination of NIDDM donor and control acceptor lipoproteins resulted in an accelerated CET response identical to that observed in NIDDM whole plasma. This observation indicated that the abnormality in CET in NIDDM was associated with the VLDL + LDL fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8141851

  3. ACCELERATING HIGH-ENERGY PULSAR RADIATION CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; De Jager, O. C.

    2010-12-20

    Curvature radiation (CR) is believed to be a dominant mechanism for creating gamma-ray emission from pulsars and is emitted by relativistic particles that are constrained to move along curved magnetic field lines. Additionally, synchrotron radiation (SR) is expected to be radiated by both relativistic primaries (involving cyclotron resonant absorption of radio photons and re-emission of SR photons), or secondary electron-positron pairs (created by magnetic or photon-photon pair production processes involving CR gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere). When calculating these high-energy spectra, especially in the context of pulsar population studies where several millions of CR and SR spectra have to be generated, it is profitable to consider approximations that would save computational time without sacrificing too much accuracy. This paper focuses on one such approximation technique, and we show that one may gain significantly in computational speed while preserving the accuracy of the spectral results.

  4. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Gordon, Karl D.; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the specific problems that we consider: in simulations with composite path length stretching, high accuracy results are obtained even for simulations with modest numbers of photon packages, while simulations without biasing cannot reach convergence, even with a huge number of photon packages.

  5. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  6. Optimization of THz Radiation Generation from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tilborg, J. van; Albert, O.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Ultrashort terahertz pulses with energies in the {mu}J range can be generated with laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), which are novel, compact accelerators that produce ultrashort electron bunches with energies up to 1 GeV and energy spreads of a few-percent. Laser pulses interacting with a plasma create accelerated electrons which upon exiting the plasma emit terahertz pulses via transition radiation. Because these electron bunches are ultrashort (<50 fs), they can radiate coherently (coherent transition radiation--CTR) in a wide bandwidth ({approx}1-10 THz) yielding high intensity terahertz pulses. In addition to providing a non-invasive bunch-length diagnostic and thus feedback for the LWFA, these high peak power THz pulses are suitable for high field (MV/cm) pump-probe experiments. Here we present energy-based measurements using a Golay cell and an electro-optic technique which were used to characterize these THz pulses.

  7. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  8. Analysis for radiative heat transfer in a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, F.R.; Couturier, M.F.; Poolpol, S.

    1995-12-31

    The radiative heat transfer from the particles within a circulating fluidized bed has been determined for a number of different assumptions. Based on temperature profiles measured in an operating circulating fluidized bed burning coal, a procedure for predicting the radiative transfer from the solid particles to a cold wall is recommended. The radiative transfer from the solid particles to a cold wall makes up approximately 50% of the total heat transfer to the wall in a circulating fluidized bed combustor.

  9. Solar Particle Acceleration Radiation and Kinetics (SPARK). A mission to understand the nature of particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Sarah A.; Williams, David R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kontar, Eduard P.; Smith, David M.; Lagg, Andreas; Krucker, Sam; Hurford, Gordon J.; Vilmer, Nicole; MacKinnon, Alexander L.; Zharkova, Valentina V.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, Iain G.; Browning, Philippa K.; Innes, Davina E.; Trottet, Gerard; Foullon, Clare; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Green, Lucie M.; Lamoureux, Herve; Forsyth, Colin; Walton, David M.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Gandorfer, Achim; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin; Limousin, Olivier; Verwichte, Erwin; Dalla, Silvia; Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henri; Neukirch, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Energetic particles are critical components of plasma populations found throughout the universe. In many cases particles are accelerated to relativistic energies and represent a substantial fraction of the total energy of the system, thus requiring extremely efficient acceleration processes. The production of accelerated particles also appears coupled to magnetic field evolution in astrophysical plasmas through the turbulent magnetic fields produced by diffusive shock acceleration. Particle acceleration is thus a key component in helping to understand the origin and evolution of magnetic structures in, e.g. galaxies. The proximity of the Sun and the range of high-resolution diagnostics available within the solar atmosphere offers unique opportunities to study the processes involved in particle acceleration through the use of a combination of remote sensing observations of the radiative signatures of accelerated particles, and of their plasma and magnetic environment. The SPARK concept targets the broad range of energy, spatial and temporal scales over which particle acceleration occurs in the solar atmosphere, in order to determine how and where energetic particles are accelerated. SPARK combines highly complementary imaging and spectroscopic observations of radiation from energetic electrons, protons and ions set in their plasma and magnetic context. The payload comprises focusing-optics X-ray imaging covering the range from 1 to 60 keV; indirect HXR imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 200 keV, γ-ray spectroscopic imaging with high-resolution LaBr3 scintillators, and photometry and source localisation at far-infrared wavelengths. The plasma environment of the regions of acceleration and interaction will be probed using soft X-ray imaging of the corona and vector magnetography of the photosphere and chromosphere. SPARK is designed for solar research. However, in addition it will be able to provide exciting new insights into the origin of particle acceleration in

  10. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in modeling cometary emission in the 18-cm OH transition with specific application and predictions for Comet Halley. Radiative transfer is also being studied in rough and porous media. The kinematics of the cold, dark interstellar cloud Li34N were examined, and CO monitoring of Venus and Mars continues. Analysis of 3.4 mm maps of the lunar surface shows thermal anomalies associated with such surface features as the Crater Copernicus, Mare Imbrium, Mare Nubium, Mare Serenitatis, and Mare Tranquillatis.

  11. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. Our initial results of a jet-ambient interaction with anti-parallelmagnetic fields show pile-up of magnetic fields at the colliding shock, which may lead to reconnection and associated particle acceleration. We will investigate the radiation in a transient stage as a possible generation mechanism of precursors of prompt emission. In our simulations we calculate the radiation from electrons in the shock region. The detailed properties of this radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  12. Applications of laser-accelerated particle beams for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Fourkal, E.; Li, J. S.; Veltchev, I.; Luo, W.; Fan, J. J.; Lin, T.; Tafo, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beams are more advantageous than high-energy photons and electrons for radiation therapy because of their finite penetrating range and the Bragg peak near the end of their range, which have been utilized to achieve better dose conformity to the treatment target allowing for dose escalation and/or hypofractionation to increase local tumor control, reduce normal tissue complications and/or treatment time/cost. Proton therapy employing conventional particle acceleration techniques is expensive because of the large accelerators and treatment gantries that require excessive space and shielding. Compact proton acceleration systems are being sought to improve the cost-effectiveness for proton therapy. This paper reviews the physics principles of laser-proton acceleration and the development of prototype laserproton therapy systems as a solution for widespread applications of advanced proton therapy. The system design, the major components and the special delivery techniques for energy and intensity modulation are discussed in detail for laser-accelerated proton therapy.

  13. Leakage neutron radiation in a medical electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Lydia; Balcazar, Miguel; Genis, Roberto; Ortiz, Raúl

    2001-10-01

    A simple method was used for the calculation of neutron yield produced by main components of medical electron accelerator head, using a simplified geometric model with spherical-shell for the head shielding made of different materials. The leakage neutron radiation on the patient plane and outside the patient plane at one meter from the x-ray target for a Varian accelerator model Clinac 2100C was evaluated experimentally, using Panasonic UD-802 and UD-809 thermoluminescent dosimeters and CR-39 nuclear track dosimeters. The measured values of leakage neutron radiation were lower than the limits specified in the NCRP-102 and IEC 60601-2-1-Ed.2.0 reports.

  14. Accelerated thermal and radiative ageing of hydrogenated NBR for DRC

    SciTech Connect

    Mares, G.; Notingher, P.

    1996-12-31

    The accelerated thermal and gamma radiation ageing of HNBR carbon black-T80 has been studied by measuring the residual deformation under constant deflection -- DRC, in air, using a relevant equation for the relaxation phenomena. The residual deformation under constant deflection during the process of accelerated ageing is increasing but the structure of polymer answers in the proper manner to the mechanical stress. The degradation equations were obtained, using Alfrey model for the relaxation polymer subject to compression and an Arrhenius dependence for the chemical reaction rate. The inverted relaxation time for the thermal degradation is depending on the chemical reaction rate and the dose rate of gamma radiation.

  15. Diffusion model for lightning radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.; Phanord, Dieudonne D.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    A one-speed Boltzmann transport theory, with diffusion approximations, is applied to study the radiative transfer properties of lightning in optically thick thunderclouds. Near-infrared (lambda = 0.7774 micrometers) photons associated with a prominent oxygen emission triplet in the lightning spectrum are considered. Transient and spatially complex lightning radiation sources are placed inside a rectangular parallelepiped thundercloud geometry and the effects of multiple scattering are studied. The cloud is assumed to be composed of a homogeneous collection of identical spherical water droplets, each droplet a nearly conservative, anisotropic scatterer. Conceptually, we treat the thundercloud like a nuclear reactor, with photons replaced by neutrons, and utilize standard one-speed neutron diffusion techniques common in nuclear reactor analyses. Valid analytic results for the intensity distribution (expanded in spherical harmonics) are obtained for regions sufficiently far from sources. Model estimates of the arrival-time delay and pulse width broadening of lightning signals radiated from within the cloud are determined and the results are in good agreement with both experimental data and previous Monte Carlo estimates. Additional model studies of this kind will be used to study the general information content of cloud top lightning radiation signatures.

  16. Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer on a Massively Parallel Computer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vath, Horst Michael

    1994-01-01

    We perform three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations on the MasPar MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and methods of storage of data that have been used with serial machines. We developed a numerical code which efficiently calculates images and spectra of astrophysical systems as seen from different viewing directions and at different wavelengths. We use this code to examine a number of different astrophysical systems. First we image the HI distribution of model galaxies. Then we investigate the galaxy NGC 5055, which displays a radial asymmetry in its optical appearance. This can be explained by the presence of dust in the outer HI disk far beyond the optical disk. As the formation of dust is connected to the presence of stars, the existence of dust in outer regions of this galaxy could have consequences for star formation at a time when this galaxy was just forming. Next we use the code for polarized radiative transfer. We first discuss the numerical computation of the required cyclotron opacities and use them to calculate spectra of AM Her systems, binaries containing accreting magnetic white dwarfs. Then we obtain spectra of an extended polar cap. Previous calculations did not consider the three -dimensional extension of the shock. We find that this results in a significant underestimate of the radiation emitted in the shock. Next we calculate the spectrum of the intermediate polar RE 0751+14. For this system we obtain a magnetic field of ~10 MG, which has consequences for the evolution of intermediate polars. Finally we perform 3D radiative transfer in NLTE in the two-level atom approximation. To solve the transfer equation in this case, we adapt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the

  17. Radiation from accelerated Alfven solitons in inhomogeneous plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Buti, B.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    1990-01-01

    In a weakly inhomogeneous plasma, the large-amplitude Alfven waves propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field are shown to evolve into accelerated Alfven solitons. Nonlinear interaction of the accelerated Alfven solitons with the Langmuir waves results in the emission of coherent radiations. Analytical expression for the power radiated per unit solid angle from a soliton is derived for two inhomogeneity profiles, namely the linear profile and the parabolic profile. For the case of uniform plasmas, the emission occurs via a decay-type process or resonant modes. In the presence of inhomogeneity, nonresonant modes provide a new channel for the emission of radiation. The power radiated per unit solid angle is computed for the parameters relevant to Comet Halley's plasma environment. For the nonresonant modes it is found to be several orders of magnitude higher than that for the case of resonant modes.

  18. Numerical radiative transfer with state-of-the-art iterative methods made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Julien; Paletou, Frédéric; Josselin, Eric; Glorian, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an on-line tool and its accompanying software resources for the numerical solution of basic radiation transfer out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). State-of-the-art stationary iterative methods such as Accelerated Λ-iteration and Gauss-Seidel schemes, using a short characteristics-based formal solver are used. We also comment on typical numerical experiments associated to the basic non-LTE radiation problem. These resources are intended for the largest use and benefit, in support to more classical radiation transfer lectures usually given at the Master level.

  19. Radiative energy transfer in disordered photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Erementchouk, M V; Deych, L I; Noh, H; Cao, H; Lisyansky, A A

    2009-04-29

    The difficulty of description of the radiative transfer in disordered photonic crystals arises from the necessity to consider on an equal footing the wave scattering by periodic modulations of the dielectric function and by its random inhomogeneities. We resolve this difficulty by approaching this problem from the standpoint of the general multiple scattering theory in media with an arbitrary regular profile of the dielectric function. We use the general asymptotic solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in order to show that for a sufficiently weak disorder the diffusion limit in disordered photonic crystals is presented by incoherent superpositions of the modes of the ideal structure with weights inversely proportional to the respective group velocities. The radiative transfer and the diffusion equations are derived as a relaxation of long scale deviations from this limiting distribution. In particular, it is shown that in general the diffusion is anisotropic unless the crystal has sufficiently rich symmetry, say, the square lattice in 2D or the cubic lattice in 3D. In this case, the diffusion is isotropic and only in this case can the effect of the disorder be characterized by a single mean free path depending on frequency. PMID:21825416

  20. Microwave radiative transfer studies of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Vivekanandan, J.; Turk, F. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Since the deployment of the DMSP SSM/I microwave imagers in 1987, increased utilization of passive microwave radiometry throughout the 10 - 100 GHz spectrum has occurred for measurement of atmospheric constituents and terrestrial surfaces. Our efforts have focused on observations and analysis of the microwave radiative transfer behavior of precipitating clouds. We have focused particular attention on combining both aircraft and SSM/I radiometer imagery with ground-based multiparameter radar observations. As part of this and the past NASA contract, we have developed a multi-stream, polarized radiative transfer model which incorporates scattering. The model has the capability to be initialized with cloud model output or multiparameter radar products. This model provides the necessary 'link' between the passive microwave radiometer and active microwave radar observations. This unique arrangement has allowed the brightness temperatures (TB) to be compared against quantities such as rainfall, liquid/ice water paths, and the vertical structure of the cloud. Quantification of the amounts of ice and water in precipitating clouds is required for understanding of the global energy balance.

  1. Radiative Transfer and Retrievals in EOF Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is a hyperspectral sensor with 8461 spectral channels and a nominal spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(sup -1). It is computationally intensive to perform radiative transfer calculations and inversions using all these channels. We will present a Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) and a retrieval algorithm which perform all the necessary calculations in EOF domain. Since the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, only about 100 principal components are needed to represent the information content of the 8461 channels. The PCRTM provides the EOF coefficients and associated derivatives with respect to atmospheric and surface parameters needed by the inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm is based on a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt method with climatology covariance and a priori information as constraints. The retrieved parameters include atmospheric temperature, moisture and ozone profiles, cloud parameters, surface skin temperature, and surface emissivities. To make the retrieval system even more compact and stable. The atmospheric vertical profiles are compressed into the EOF space as well. The surface emissivities are also compressed into EOF space.

  2. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  3. GPU-accelerated inverse identification of radiative properties of particle suspensions in liquid by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Y.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Zhang, L.; Li, X. C.; Jiang, B. C.

    2016-03-01

    Inverse identification of radiative properties of participating media is usually time consuming. In this paper, a GPU accelerated inverse identification model is presented to obtain the radiative properties of particle suspensions. The sample medium is placed in a cuvette and a narrow light beam is irradiated normally from the side. The forward three-dimensional radiative transfer problem is solved using a massive parallel Monte Carlo method implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU), and particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to inversely identify the radiative properties of particle suspensions based on the measured bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation significantly reduces the solution time of the radiative transfer simulation and hence greatly accelerates the inverse identification process. Hundreds of speedup is achieved as compared to the CPU implementation. It is demonstrated using both simulated BSDF and experimentally measured BSDF of microalgae suspensions that the radiative properties of particle suspensions can be effectively identified based on the GPU-accelerated algorithm with three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  4. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  5. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  6. Radiative acceleration of tritium diffusion in LiF crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Tsetskhladze, T.V.; Emel'yanov, K.A.

    1980-10-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of radiative acceleration of tritium diffusion previously irradiated in LiF crystals in the nuclear radiation field of a reactor are described. It has been discovered that, at a temperature of --100 /sup 0/C and higher, tritium liberation is observed. The rate of this process is not subject to Fick's law and varies nonmonotonically in time. It is suggested from the data of a microcalorimetric investigation of LiF crystals irradiated under various conditions that the combined action of radiative and thermal annealing determines the nature of the dependence of the tritium liberation rate on the temperature of irradiation by fast neutrons.

  7. Radiative Transfer on Mesoscopic Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adam Ronald

    Accurate predictions of light transport produced by illumination of turbid media such as biological tissues, cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, and soft matter is essential in many applications including remote sensing, functional optical imaging, realistic image synthesis, and materials characterization. The inability to model light transport on mesoscopic scales limits the spatial resolution and information content that can be extracted from optical measurements. While effective approaches exist to model light transport in singly- and diffusely-scattering regimes, modeling light propagation over the mesoscopic spatial scales remains an important challenge. Radiative transfer on these scales must account for the complete 5-dimensional spatial and angular distributions of the radiant field. Here, we present novel stochastic and analytic methods to analyze and predict light propagation in turbid media generated by collimated illumination on mesoscopic scales. We also consider coupled transport problems, resulting from illumination and detection, to facilitate measurement design and inverse problems. Specifically, we introduce a coupled Forward-Adjoint Monte Carlo (cFAMC) method that leverages generalized optical reciprocity to enable the computation of spatially-resolved distributions of light interrogation for specific source-detector pairs. cFAMC can aid the design of optical diagnostic measurements by tailoring the light field to interrogate specific sub-volumes of interest. We use cFAMC to examine the effects of angular resolution on the resulting interrogation distributions and analyze a diagnostically-relevant compact fiber probe design for the detection of epithelial precancer. While Monte Carlo simulation is considered a gold standard method to solve the equation of radiative transfer (ERT), it is computationally expensive. Thus, methods to obtain ERT solutions at lower computational cost are valuable. We introduce a general analytical framework to

  8. A stochastic formation of radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.L.; Gabriel, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    The research carried out under this award dealt with issues involving deterministic radiative transfer, remote sensing, Stochastic radiative transfer, and parameterization of cloud optical properties. A number of different forms of radiative transfer models in one, two, and three dimensions were developed in an attempt to build an understanding of the radiative transfer in clouds with realistic spatial structure and to determine the key geometrical parameter that influence this transfer. The research conducted also seeks to assess the relative importance of these geometrical effects in contrast to microphysical effects of clouds. The main conclusion of the work is that geometry has a profound influence on all aspects of radiative transfer and the interpretation of this transfer. We demonstrate how this geometry can influence estimate of particle effective radius to the 30-50% level and also how geometry can significantly bias the remote sensing of cloud optical depth.

  9. Characteristics of betatron radiation from direct-laser-accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. W.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Liu, B.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    Betatron radiation from direct-laser-accelerated electrons is characterized analytically and numerically. It is shown here that the electron dynamics is strongly dependent on a self-similar parameter S (≡n/enca0 ) . Both the electron transverse momentum and energy are proportional to the normalized amplitude of laser field (a0) for a fixed value of S . As a result, the total number of radiated photons scales as a02/√{S } and the energy conversion efficiency of photons from the accelerated electrons scales as a03/S . The particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the analytical scalings. It is suggested that a tunable high-energy and high-flux radiation source can be achieved by exploiting this regime.

  10. Planetary Atmosphere Dynamics and Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, David H.

    1996-01-01

    This research program has dealt with two projects in the field of planetary atmosphere dynamics and radiative energy transfer, one theoretical and one experimental. The first project, in radiative energy transfer, incorporated the capability to isolate and quantify the contribution of individual atmospheric components to the Venus radiative balance and thermal structure to greatly improve the current understanding of the radiative processes occurring within the Venus atmosphere. This is possible by varying the mixing ratios of each gas species, and the location, number density and aerosol size distributions of the clouds. This project was a continuation of the work initiated under a 1992 University Consortium Agreement. Under the just completed grant, work has continued on the use of a convolution-based algorithm that provided the capability to calculate the k coefficients of a gas mixture at different temperatures, pressures and spectral intervals from the separate k-distributions of the individual gas species. The second primary goal of this research dealt with the Doppler wind retrieval for the Successful Galileo Jupiter probe mission in December, 1995. In anticipation of the arrival of Galileo at Jupiter, software development continued to read the radioscience and probe/orbiter trajectory data provided by the Galileo project and required for Jupiter zonal wind measurements. Sample experiment radioscience data records and probe/orbiter trajectory data files provided by the Galileo Radioscience and Navigation teams at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, respectively, were used for the first phase of the software development. The software to read the necessary data records was completed in 1995. The procedure by which the wind retrieval takes place begins with initial consistency checks of the raw data, preliminary data reductions, wind recoveries, iterative reconstruction of the probe descent profile, and refined wind recoveries. At each stage of the wind recovery

  11. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Wiebe, Dmitry; Fateeva, Anna; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    The determination of prestellar core structure is often based on observations of (sub)millimeter dust continuum. However, recently the Spitzer Space Telescope provided us with IR images of many objects not only in emission but also in absorption. We developed a technique to reconstruct the density and temperature distributions of protostellar objects based on radiation transfer (RT) simulations both in mm and IR wavelengths. Best-fit model parameters are obtained with the genetic algorithm. We apply the method to two cores of Infrared Dark Clouds and show that their observations are better reproduced by a model with an embedded heating source despite the lack of 70 μm emission in one of these cores. Thus, the starless nature of massive cores can only be established with the careful case-by-case RT modeling.

  12. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  13. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  14. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  15. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets. PMID:26066270

  17. Radiation measurements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, H.J.; Vacca, J.H.; Veluri, V.R.; White, M.

    1995-07-01

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source is a 2856-MHz, S-band, electron-positron linear accelerator (linac). It produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. Radiation measurements were made during normal electron and positron operation, as well as during several beam loss scenarios. Neutron and gamma measurements made outside the shielding walls during normal operation are within DOE guidelines. Measured radiation fields are compared to predicted levels for different conditions.

  18. Multi-dimensional effects in radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V. K.

    2015-07-31

    A laser carries momentum. On reflection from an ultra-thin overdense plasma foil, it deposits recoil momentum on the foil, i.e. exerts radiation pressure on the foil electrons and pushes them to the rear. The space charge field thus created takes the ions along, accelerating the electron-ion double layer as a single unit. When the foil has surface ripple, of wavelength comparable to laser wavelength, the radiation pressure acts non-uniformly on the foil and the perturbation grows as Reyleigh-Taylor (RT) instability as the foil moves. The finite spot size of the laser causes foil to bend. These effects limit the quasi-mono energy acceleration of ions. Multi-ion foils, e.g., diamond like carbon foil embedded with protons offer the possibility of suppressing RT instability.

  19. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Zhang, B.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We are currently investigating the specific case of a jet colliding with an anti-parallel magnetized ambient medium. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  20. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  1. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  2. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  3. Radiative transfer during the reflooding step of a LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, J.; Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Boulet, P.

    2013-10-01

    Within the evaluation of the heat transfer downstream a quench front during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a nuclear power plant, a numerical study has been conducted on radiative transfer through a vapor-droplet medium. The non-grey behavior of the medium is obvious since it can be optically thin or thick depending on the wavelength. A six wide bands model has been tested, providing a satisfactory accuracy for the description of the radiative properties. Once the radiative properties of the medium computed, they have been introduced in a model solving the radiative heat transfer based on the Improved Differential Approximation. The fluxes and the flux divergence have been computed on a geometry characteristic of the reactor core showing that radiative transfer plays a relevant role, quite as important as convective heat transfer.

  4. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1986-01-01

    Schloerb and Claussen continued their analysis of the very high quality data set obtained on the 18 centimeter OH line from the Comet P/Halley with the NRAO 43 meter antenna. The high spectral resolution (0.22 km/sec) and high signal-to-noise of the OH spectra make them ideal for the study of kinematics in the coma. Synthetic profiles were initiated for comparison with the data. A vectorial model was developed using the Monte Carlo techniques originated by Combi and Delsemme. Analysis of the millimeter wavelength observations of HCN emission from P/Halley obtained throughout much of the recent apparition were continued using the University of Massachusetts 14 millimeter-wavelength (FCRAO) antenna. A detailed analysis of the HCN lineshpaes was performed over the last six months. The excitation of HCN in the coma was studied to obtain a detailed match to the observed spectra. The passive millimeter wave radiometer was used to probe the physical and chemical nature of comets from spacecraft. Work was continued on an improved theory of radiative transfer for rough and porous surfaces, such as the regoliths of satellites, asteroids, and comets.

  5. A Radiative Transfer Simulation of Water Rotational Excitation in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2005-08-01

    In order to interpret comet observations of the 557 GHz water line performed with the Odin satellite (e.g., Lecacheux et al. 2003, A&A, 402, 55), we have developed a numerical model for the simulation of optically thick water rotational emission in cometary coma. For the treatment of radiative transfer, we have elaborated a Monte Carlo code based on the accelerated lambda iteration algorithm presented in Hogerheijde and van der Tak (2000, A&A, 362, 697). The model assumes a spherically symmetric density distribution with constant expansion velocity. It includes the seven lowest rotational levels of ortho-water, which are the primarily populated levels in the rotationally cold gas of the coma. Collisions with water and electrons, and infrared pumping, are taken into account. The model is similar to that presented by Bensch and Bergin (2004, ApJ, 615, 531). We compared the results obtained with this new model with those obtained by the model of Bockelee-Morvan (1987, A&A, 181, 169). Bockelee-Morvan used the escape probability formalism to treat radiation trapping, which is in principle only valid for large velocity gradients. Surprisingly, the results of both models differ only by a few percent, showing that the escape probability formalism can be used with good confidence to treat rotational excitation in cometary atmospheres. This model will allow us to prepare future observations by the ESA Herschel Space Observatory. V.Zakharov acknowledges financial support from CNES.

  6. SHDOM: Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. Franklin

    2015-08-01

    The Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method (SHDOM) radiative transfer model computes polarized monochromatic or spectral band radiative transfer in a one, two, or three-dimensional medium for either collimated solar and/or thermal emission sources of radiation. The model is written in a variant of Fortran 77 and in Fortran90 and requires a Fortran 90 compiler. Also included are programs for generating the optical property files input to SHDOM from physical properties of water cloud particles and aerosols.

  7. Wavelets in the solution of nongray radiative heat transfer equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayazitoglu, Y.; Wang, B.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The wavelet basis functions are introduced into the radiative transfer equation in the frequency domain. The intensity of radiation is expanded in terms of Daubechies` wrapped around wavelet functions. It is shown that the wavelet basis approach to modeling nongrayness can be incorporated into any solution method for the equation of transfer. In this paper the resulting system of equations is solved for the one-dimensional radiative equilibrium problem using the P-N approximation.

  8. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  9. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  10. Requirements for Simulating Space Radiation With Particle Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M-H Y.

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary space radiation consists of fully ionized nuclei of atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in the materials of spacecraft and planetary surface enclosures is a major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. Accurate risk prediction depends on a knowledge of basic radiobiological mechanisms and how they are modified in the living tissues of a whole organism. To a large extent, this knowledge is not currently available. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate the components of space radiation. Different particles, in different energy regions, are required to study different biological effects, including beams of argon and iron nuclei in the energy range 600 to several thousand MeV/nucleon and carbon beams in the energy range of approximately 100 MeV/nucleon to approximately 1000 MeV/nucleon. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjunction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required. International cooperation in the use of these facilities is essential to the development of a safe international space program.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer. PMID:26641312

  12. Study on radiation transfer in human skin for cosmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Jun; Kawamura, Ayumu; Miura, Yoshimasa; Takata, Sadaki; Ogawa, Katsuki

    2005-06-01

    In order to design cosmetics producing the optical properties that are required for a beautiful skin, the radiation transfer in the skin has been numerically investigated by the Monte Carlo method and the effects of skin texture and cosmetics on the radiation transfer have been empirically investigated using an artificial skin. The numerical analysis showed that the total internal reflection suppresses large portion of radiation going out through the skin surface Additionally, the experimental study revealed that skin texture and cosmetics not only diffusely reflect the incoming radiation, but also lead the internally reflected radiation to the outside of the skin.

  13. The use of accelerated radiation testing for avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Heather

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for military and national security applications has been increasing. One possible use of these vehicles is as remote sensing platforms, where the UAV carries several sensors to provide real-time information about biological, chemical or radiological agents that might have been released into the environment. One such UAV, the Global Hawk, has a payload space that can carry nearly one ton of sensing equipment, which makes these platforms significantly larger than many satellites. Given the size of the potential payload and the heightened radiation environment at high altitudes, these systems could be affected by the radiation-induced failure mechanisms from the naturally occurring terrestrial environment. In this paper, we will explore the use of accelerated radiation testing to prepare UAV payloads for deployment.

  14. Accretion Acceleration of Neutron Stars and Effects of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan-yan; Zhang, Yue-zhu; Wei, Yi-huan; Zhang, Cheng-min; Yu, Shao-hua; Pan, Yuan-yue; Guo, Yuan-qi; Wang, De-hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we studied the neutron star's spin acceleration in the accretion process of the neutron star binary system, and the relation how the spin period changes with the accreted mass. We analyzed further the evolutions of both magnetic field and spin period of a neutron star, and compared the modeled results with the observational data of pulsars, to show that they are consistent with each other. Based on above studies, we investigated the effect of gravitational radiation on the spin-up process of a neutron star, and derived the change rate of the neutron star's spin period in the accretion process. We also estimated the critical angular velocity Ωcr, at which the accretion torque is balanced by that of gravitational radiation, and discussed the influence of gravitational radiation on the neutron star's spin evolution.

  15. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  16. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  17. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  18. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  19. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  20. A gas-dynamical approach to radiation pressure acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The study of high intensity ion beams driven by high power pulsed lasers is an active field of research. Of particular interest is the radiation pressure acceleration, for which simulations predict narrow band ion energies up to GeV. We derive a laser-piston model by applying techniques for non-relativistic gas-dynamics. The model reveals a laser intensity limit, below which sufficient laser-piston acceleration is impossible. The relation between target thickness and piston velocity as a function of the laser pulse length yields an approximation for the permissible target thickness. We performed one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations to confirm the predictions of the analytical model. These simulations also reveal the importance of electromagnetic energy transport. We find that this energy transport limits the achievable compression and rarefies the plasma.

  1. Radiation heat transfer in two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Adzerikho, K.S.

    1988-05-01

    The state of the art of approximate and numerical methods of the theory of radiation heat transfer is analyzed. The principles for producing engineering methods of computing the radiation heat-transfer characteristics in power plants are examined. These principles include: the integration of the transport equation, computing the radiation heat transfer in nonisothermal two-phase media bounded by emitting and reflecting surfaces, the thermal efficiency of screens as a function of the optical properties of the boundary surfaces and the furnace medium, the scattering processes, temperature distribution, and a program NOTAK in the FORTRAN-IV language.

  2. The application of a linear electron accelerator in radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiying, Zhou; Binglin, Wang; Wenxiu, Chen; Yongbao, Gu; Yinfen, Zhang; Simin, Qian; Andong, Liu; Peide, Wang

    A 3-5 MeV electron beam generated by a BF-5 type linear electron accelerator has been used in some radiation processing works, such as, (1) The cross-linking technology by radiation for the polyethylene foaming processing --- the correlation between the cross-linkage and the absorbed dose, the relation between the elongation of foaming polyethylene and the dose, the relation between the size of the cavities and the gelatin rate and the optimum range of dosage for foaming have been found. (2) The research work on the fast switch thyristor irradiated by electron beam --- The relation between the absorbed dose and the life-time of minority carriers has been studied and the optimum condition for radiation processing was determined. This process is much better than the conventional gold diffusion in raising the quality and end-product rate of these devices. Besides, we have made some testing works on the hereditary mutation of plant seeds and microorganism mutation induced by electron radiation and radiation sterilization for some medical instruments and foods.

  3. Effects of radiation reaction in relativistic laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hadad, Y.; Labun, L.; Rafelski, J.; Elkina, N.; Klier, C.; Ruhl, H.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold: to explore the response of classical charges to electromagnetic force at the level of unity in natural units and to establish a criterion that determines physical parameters for which the related radiation-reaction effects are detectable. In pursuit of this goal, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is solved analytically for an arbitrary (transverse) electromagnetic pulse. A comparative study of the radiation emission of an electron in a linearly polarized pulse for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and for the Lorentz force equation reveals the radiation-reaction-dominated regime, in which radiation-reaction effects overcome the influence of the external fields. The case of a relativistic electron that is slowed down by a counterpropagating electromagnetic wave is studied in detail. We further show that when the electron experiences acceleration of order unity, the dynamics of the Lorentz force equation, the Landau-Lifshitz equation and the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation all result in different radiation emission that could be distinguished in experiment. Finally, our analytic and numerical results are compared with those appearing in the literature.

  4. Physical analysis of the radiation shielding for the medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. F.; Xing, Q. Z.; Kong, C. C.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation safety standards today require comprehensive shielding protection schemes for all particle accelerators. The original shielding system of BJ-20 (BeiJing-20 MeV), the high-energy medical electron linac, was designed only for the 18 MeV level. And the dose caused by the lost electrons in the 270° bending magnet system was neglected. In this paper, the leakage dose of BJ-20 is carefully analyzed. The radiation leakage dose distribution of the photons coming from the accelerator head is obtained for energy levels of 6, 12, 14, and 18 MeV. The dose of the photoneutrons is especially analyzed for the 18 MeV level. The result gives that even neglecting the dose from the 270° bending magnet system, the shielding system is still not enough for the energy levels lower than 18 MeV. The radiation leakage produced by electrons that are lost in the 270° bending magnet system has been particularly studied. Using beam transport theory and Monte Carlo sampling methods, which have been combined in calculations, we have obtained the distribution of the energy, position, and direction of the lost electrons. These data were then further processed by the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code as input data. The results show that when the electron loss rate in the 270° bending magnet system is 13.5%, the radiation leakage dose of the photons generated by the lost electrons is 0.1% higher than that at the isocenter, and the corresponding relative leakage dose of the photoneutrons reaches 0.045% around an angle of 170° at 18 MeV level. Both of these parameters exceed radioprotection safety standards for medical accelerators. The original shielding design is therefore not suitable and is also incomplete since the radiation produced by the electrons being lost in the 270° bending magnet system was neglected and the leakage dose for the low-energy levels was not considered in the original design. Our calculations provide a very useful tool for further optimization and design

  5. Extended emission wavelength of random dye lasers by exploiting radiative and non-radiative energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Goldys, Ewa M.; Dawes, Judith M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate long-wavelength operation (>700 nm) of random dye lasers (using a methylene blue dye) with the addition of rhodamine 6G and titania, enabled by radiative and non-radiative energy transfer. The pump energy is efficiently absorbed and transferred to the acceptors, to support lasing in random dye lasers in the near infrared. The optimum random laser performance with the highest emission intensity and the lowest lasing threshold was achieved for a concentration of methylene blue as the acceptor equal to 6× the concentration of rhodamine 6G (donor). Excessive levels of methylene blue increased the lasing threshold and broadened the methylene blue emission linewidth due to dye quenching from re-absorption. This is due to competition between the donor emission and energy transfer and between absorption loss and fluorescence quenching. The radiative and non-radiative energy transfer is analyzed as a function of the acceptor concentration and pump energy density, with consideration of the spectral overlap. The dependence of the radiative and non-radiative transfer efficiency on the acceptor concentration is obtained, and the energy transfer parameters, including the radiative and non-radiative energy transfer rate constants ( K R and K NR), are investigated using Stern-Volmer analysis. The analysis indicates that radiative energy transfer is the dominant energy transfer mechanism in this system.

  6. A three-dimensional radiative transfer method for optical remote sensing of vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, R. B.; Asrar, G.; Hall, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the radiative transfer equation in three spatial dimensions is briefly discussed focusing on an efficient acceleration algorithm. The reliability of coding and accuracy of the algorithm are evaluated by benchmarking. Parameterization of the method and results of a simulation are presented to document the utility of the method for remote sensing applications. Attention is also given to a simple model of the hot spot effect and sample calculations.

  7. HADRON ACCELERATORS: Study on CYCIAE-100 radiation field and residual radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuan-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Jue; Jia, Xian-Lu; Zhou, Zheng-He; Wang, Feng; Wei, Su-Min; Zhong, Jun-Qing; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    The accelerators should be properly designed to make the radiation field produced by beam loss satisfy the dose limits. The radiation field for high intensity H- cyclotron includes prompt radiation and residual radiation field. The induced radioactivity in accelerator components is the dominant source of occupational radiation exposure if the accelerator is well shielded. The source of radiation is the beam loss when cyclotron is operating. In this paper, the radiation field for CYCIAE-100 is calculated using Monte Carlo method and the radioactive contamination near stripping foil is studied. A method to reduce the dose equivalent rate of maintenance staff is also given.

  8. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans requires Geokerr (ascl:1011.015), cfitsio (ascl:1010.001), and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  9. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  10. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  11. Effect of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, N.

    1990-03-01

    Experimental data on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of a semitransparent material generally include an error due to the radiation heat transfer. This error varies in accordance with the experimental conditions such as the temperature level of the sample and the measuring method. In this paper, research on the influence of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity are reviewed, and as an example, the method to correct the radiation component in the apparent thermal diffusivity measured by the stepwise heating technique is presented. The transient heat transfer by simultaneous thermal conduction and radiation in a semitransparent material is analyzed when the front surface is subjected to stepwise heating. The apparent thermal diffusivity, which includes the radiation component, is calculated for various parameters.

  12. COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2012-11-10

    We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

  13. PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration

  14. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer: Applications to Black-Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic radiation transfer formulations which include opacity effects due to absorption, emission and scattering explicitly. We consider a moment expansions for the transfer in the presence of scattering. The formulation is applied to calculation emissions from accretion and outflows in black-hole systems. Cases with thin accretion disks and accretion tori are considered. Effects, such as emission anisotropy, non-stationary flows and geometrical self-occultation are investigated. Polarisation transfer in curved space-time is discussed qualitatively.

  15. Thermal radiation heat transfer (3rd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Robert; Howell, John R.

    This book first reviews the overall aspects and background information related to thermal radiation heat transfer and incorporates new general information, advances in analytical and computational techniques, and new reference material. Coverage focuses on radiation from opaque surfaces, radiation interchange between various types of surfaces enclosing a vacuum or transparent medium, and radiation including the effects of partially transmitting media, such as combustion gases, soot, or windows. Boundary conditions and multiple layers are discussed with information on radiation in materials with nonunity refractive indices.

  16. Radiative Transfer Reconsidered as a Quantum Kinetic Theory Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the radiative transfer theory from first principles approach, inspired from quantum kinetic theory. The radiation field is described within the second quantization formalism. A master equation for the radiation density operator is derived and transformed into a balance relation in the phase space, which involves nonlocal terms owing to radiation coherence. In a perturbative framework, we focus on the lowest order term in ℏ-expansion and show that the radiation coherence results in an alteration of the photon group velocity. An application to the formation of hydrogen lines in stellar atmospheres is performed as an illustration.

  17. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  18. Radiation Transfer in the Atmosphere: Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Travis, L.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight illuminating the Earth's atmosphere is scattered by gas molecules and suspended particles, giving rise to blue skies, white clouds, and optical displays such as rainbows and halos. By scattering and absorbing the shortwave solar radiation and the longwave radiation emitted by the underlying surface, cloud and aerosol particles strongly affect the radiation budget of the terrestrial climate system. As a consequence of the dependence of scattering characteristics on particle size, morphology, and composition, scattered light can be remarkably rich in information on particle properties and thus provides a sensitive tool for remote retrievals of macro- and microphysical parameters of clouds and aerosols.

  19. Prediction of radiative heat transfer in rectangular enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.S.; Smith, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Discrete ordinates solutions of the radiative transport equation have been obtained for two- and three-dimensional rectangular enclosures using the S/sub 2/ and S/sub 4/ approximations. Limited evaluations indicate that both S/sub 2/ and S/sub 4/ are suitable for predicting radiative transfer in two-dimensional enclosures. However, for the three-dimensional enclosures the S/sub 2/ approximation is found inadequate. It is inferred that S/sub 4/ or higher order approximations should be used to accurately predict radiative heat transfer in three-dimensional rectangular enclosures.

  20. Radiation exposure and performance of multiple burn LEO-GEO orbit transfer trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorland, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    Many potential strategies exist for the transfer of spacecraft from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. One strategy has generally been utilized, that being a single impulsive burn at perigee and a GEO insertion burn at apogee. Multiple burn strategies were discussed for orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) but the transfer times and radiation exposure, particularly for potentially manned missions, were used as arguments against those options. Quantitative results concerning the trip time and radiation encountered by multiple burn orbit transfer missions in order to establish the feasibility of manned missions, the vulnerability of electronics, and the shielding requirements are presented. The performance of these multiple burn missions is quantified in terms of the payload and propellant variances from the minimum energy mission transfer. The missions analyzed varied from one to eight perigee burns and ranged from a high thrust, 1 g acceleration, cryogenic hydrogen-oxygen chemical prpulsion system to a continuous burn, 0.001 g acceleration, hydrogen fueled resistojet propulsion system with a trip time of 60 days.

  1. Spectrally-Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in clouddominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction. and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with ID radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  2. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  3. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  4. 3D Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony

    Developments in three-dimensional cloud radiation over the past few decades are assessed and distilled into this contributed volume. Chapters are authored by subject-matter experts who address a broad audience of graduate students, researchers, and anyone interested in cloud-radiation processes in the solar and infrared spectral regions. After two introductory chapters and a section on the fundamental physics and computational techniques, the volume extensively treats two main application areas: the impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, which is an essential aspect of climate modeling; and remote observation of clouds, especially with the advanced sensors on current and future satellite missions. http://www.springeronline.com/alert/article?a=3D1_1fva7w_1j826l_41z_6

  5. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  6. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Background Radiation From Electron Acceleration Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; van der Velde, Oscar; Farges, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently proposed that the acceleration of electrons during the growth and branching of streamers above thunderclouds initiated by intense lightning discharges could result in detectable low frequency electromagnetic radiation from several tens of kHz up to several hundreds of kHz (Qin et al., GRL, 2012). The intensity of the predicted radiation scales with the streamer density which is particularly large during spectacular sprite occurrences such as jellyfish sprites and/or dancing sprites. Dancing sprites are up to one second long sequences of consecutive sprites or sprite groups which are typically separated by some hundreds of milliseconds and which tend to follow the spatial development of large scale intracloud lightning discharges. A particularly spectacular series of 10 dancing sprite events over a Mediterranean mesoscale convective system was recorded with a low light video camera in south-eastern France during the early morning hours of August 31, 2012. Each dancing sprite event was composed of ~3-4 consecutive sprites or groups of sprites. All of these sprite occurrences were associated with a sudden enhancement ~2 uV/m/Hz-1/2 of the low frequency electromagnetic background radiation as measured with a radio receiver in south-west England. It is estimated that ~1000 streamers at a height of ~40 km are necessary to epxlain the observed electric field strengths. These sudden enhancements are superimposed on a more continuous low frequency electromagnetic background radiation which accompanies each dancing sprite event. It is speculated that this low frequency 'radio glow' results from filamentary streamers near the cloud top as a result of the large scale electrostatic charging of the thundercloud and that it may be used as an indicator for sprite occurrences in future studies.

  7. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-03-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  9. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  10. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  11. Solution of the self-adjoint radiative transfer equation on hybrid computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasilov, V. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Chetverushkin, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for simulating three-dimensional radiative energy transfer for the use in the software designed for the predictive simulation of plasma with high energy density on parallel computers is proposed. A highly scalable algorithm that takes into account the angular dependence of the radiation intensity and is free of the ray effect is developed based on the solution of a second-order equation with a self-adjoint operator. A distinctive feature of this algorithm is a preliminary transformation of rotation to eliminate mixed derivatives with respect to the spatial variables, simplify the structure of the difference operator, and accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution of the equation. It is shown that the proposed method correctly reproduces the limiting cases—isotropic radiation and the directed radiation with a δ-shaped angular distribution.

  12. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  13. Radiation Heat Transfer Procedures for Space-Related Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last contract year, a numerical procedure for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer using unstructured grids has been developed. As a result of this research, one paper has been published in the Numerical Heat Transfer Journal. One paper has been accepted for presentation at the International Center for Heat and Mass Transfer's International Symposium on Computational Heat Transfer to be held in Australia next year. A journal paper is under review by my NASA's contact. A conference paper for the ASME National Heat Transfer conference is under preparation. In summary, a total of four (4) papers (two journal and two conference) have been published, accepted or are under preparation. There are two (2) to three (3) more papers to be written for the project. In addition to the above publications, one book chapter, one journal paper and six conference papers have been published as a result of this project. Over the last contract year, the research project resulted in one Ph.D. thesis and partially supported another Ph.D. student. My NASA contact and myself have formulated radiation heat transfer procedures for materials with different indices of refraction and for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer. We are trying to find other applications for the procedures developed under this grant.

  14. Transference of 3D accelerations during cross country mountain biking.

    PubMed

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2014-06-01

    Investigations into the work demands of Olympic format cross country mountain biking suggest an incongruent relationship between work done and physiological strain experienced by participants. A likely but unsubstantiated cause is the extra work demand of muscle damping of terrain/surface induced vibrations. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between vibration mechanics and their interaction with terrain, bicycle and rider during a race pace effort on a cross country mountain bike track, on both 26″ and 29″ wheels. Participants completed one lap of a cross country track using 26″ and 29″ wheels, at race pace. Power, cadence, speed, heart rate and geographical position were sampled and logged every second for control purposes. Tri-axial accelerometers located on the bicycle and rider, recorded accelerations (128Hz) and were used to quantify vibrations experienced during the whole lap and over terrain sections (uphill and downhill). While there were no differences in power output (p=0.3062) and heart rate (p=0.8423), time to complete the lap was significantly (p=0.0061) faster on the 29″ wheels despite increased vibrations in the larger wheels (p=0.0020). Overall accelerometer data (RMS) showed location differences (p<0.0001), specifically between the point of interface of bike-body compared to those experienced at the lower back and head. The reduction in accelerations at both the lower back and head are imperative for injury prevention and demonstrates an additional non-propulsive, muscular, challenge to riding. Stress was greatest during downhill sections as acceleration differences between locations were greater when compared to uphill sections, and thus possibly prevent the recovery processes that may occur during non-propulsive load. PMID:24735505

  15. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, Robert T.; Kong, Jin AU; Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. To take into account the clustered structures with the radiative transfer theory, the scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. Subsequently, the resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including the multi-scale structures, namely, trunks, primary and secondary branches, as well as needles, we interpret and simulate the polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles. The preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  16. Partial moment entropy approximation to radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Martin . E-mail: frank@mathematik.uni-kl.de; Dubroca, Bruno . E-mail: Bruno.Dubroca@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Klar, Axel . E-mail: klar@mathematik.uni-kl.de

    2006-10-10

    We extend the half moment entropy closure for the radiative heat transfer equations presented in Dubroca and Klar [B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Half moment closure for radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 180 (2002) 584-596] and Turpault et al. [R. Turpault, M. Frank, B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 363-371] to multi-D. To that end, we consider a partial moment system with general partitions of the unit sphere closed by an entropy minimization principle. We give physical and mathematical reasons for this choice of model and study its properties. Several numerical examples in different physical regimes are presented.

  17. Estimation of radiative heat transfer using a geometric human model.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, N; Yokoyama, S; Nakamura, M; Mabuchi, K

    2001-03-01

    In order to provide a detailed estimate of radiative heat transfer between a human body and its surrounding environment, we have developed a geometric model of a human form and an algorithm. The model closely resembles the actual shape of a human body and is composed of small quadrilateral surfaces. Dealing with an object or a space with an arbitrary shape, the developed algorithm can judge efficiently whether there is an obstruction between a pair of surfaces. As a result, the angle factors between a pair of surfaces that only occur during radiative heat transfer can be defined. The distribution of the radiative heat transfer rates shows the characteristics of body shape and variations in posture. PMID:11327500

  18. Accelerated Hematopoietic Toxicity by High Energy 56Fe Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or x-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. Methods C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of 56Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Results Although onset was more rapid, 56Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)50/30 (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy respectively with relative biologic effectiveness for 56Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. Conclusions 56Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity. PMID:22077279

  19. Numerical approach to Zeeman line radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi

    1991-10-01

    An accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method, a version of the operator perturbation technique, is formulated for applications to Zeeman line formation problems in the presence of magnetic fields. This approach has proven to be quite an effective and flexible numerical device, being applicable to extensive problems (e.g., LTE one-way integration problem, noncoherent scattering etc.). In addition to its general formulation, a specialized practical version is also proposed which is limited to scattering (or multi-level) problems under the assumption of complete frequency redistribution (CRD), but requiring much less computing time. In order to examine the computational efficiency of this ALI method, numerical examples are presented concerning line formation in a magnetic field for several simple cases (LTE Milne-Eddington model, noncoherent CRD scattering, angle-dependent coherent scattering), showing a reasonably rapid convergence with notable numerical stability. Comparisons with other recent numerical techniques confirm the distinguished superiority of the present method.

  20. Many-body radiative heat transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age; Joulain, Karl

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, an N-body theory for the radiative heat exchange in thermally nonequilibrated discrete systems of finite size objects is presented. We report strong exaltation effects of heat flux which can be explained only by taking into account the presence of many-body interactions. Our theory extends the standard Polder and van Hove stochastic formalism used to evaluate heat exchanges between two objects isolated from their environment to a collection of objects in mutual interaction. It gives a natural theoretical framework to investigate the photon heat transport properties of complex systems at the mesoscopic scale. PMID:22026672

  1. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  2. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  3. Combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in concentric cylindrical media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.

    1987-01-01

    The exact radiative transfer expressions for gray and nongray gases which are absorbing, emitting and nonscattering, contained between infinitely long concentric cylinders with black surfaces, are given in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Resulting energy equations due to the combination of conduction and radiation modes of heat transfer, under steady state conditions for gray and nongray media, are solved numerically using the undetermined parameters method. A single 4.3-micron band of CO2 is considered for the nongray problems. The present solutions for gray and nongray gases obtained in the plane-parallel limit (radius ratio approaches to one) are compared with the plane-parallel results reported in the literature.

  4. Computation of Radiation Heat Transfer in Aeroengine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the highlights of the research completed for the NASA are summarized. This research has been completed in the form of two Ph.D. theses by Chai (1994) and Parthasarathy (1996). Readers are referred to these theses for a complete details of the work and lists of references. In the following sections, first objectives of this research are introduced, then the finite-volume method for radiation heat transfer is described, and finally computations of radiative heat transfer in non-gray participating media is presented.

  5. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  6. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor modes in constant-density incompressible fluids accelerated by radiation pressure. [astrophysical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the behavior of linear perturbations in an incompressible fluid undergoing acceleration by radiation pressure, with reference to processes occurring in quasars, supernovae, and planetary nebulae. It is shown that, contrary to prior expectation, fluids accelerated by radiation pressure, are not always unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Some are, in fact, unstable, but the nature of the instability is qualitatively different.

  8. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  9. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  10. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  11. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  12. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 1013 G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  13. ASME Heat Transfer Division: Proceedings. Volume 1: Heat transfer in microgravity systems, radiative heat transfer and radiative heat transfer in low-temperature environments, and thermal contact conductance and inverse problems in heat transfer; HTD-Volume 332

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, A.; Sadhal, S.S.; Jones, P.D.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Woodbury, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the first section on heat transfer in microgravity, the papers cover phase-change phenomena and thermocapillary flows and surface effects. In the second section, several papers cover solution methods for radiative heat transfer while the rest cover heat transfer in low-temperature environments. The last section covers papers containing valuable information for thermal contact conductance of various materials plus papers on inverse problems in heat transfer. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  14. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  15. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  16. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  17. Fractional integration and radiative transfer in a multifractal atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, C.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, Cess et al. (1995) and Ramathan et al. (1995) cited observations which exhibit an anomalous absorption of cloudy skies in comparison with the value predicted by usual models and which thus introduce large uncertainties for climatic change assessments. These observation raise questions concerning the way general circulation models have been tuned for decades, relying on classical methods, of both radiative transfer and dynamical modeling. The observations also tend to demonstrate that homogeneous models are simply not relevant in relating the highly variable properties of clouds and radiation fields. However smoothed, the intensity of cloud`s multi-scattered radiation fields reflect this extreme variability.

  18. Debris disk radiative transfer simulation tool (DDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Hillenbrand, L. A.

    2005-10-01

    A WWW interface for the simulation of spectral energy distributions of optically thin dust configurations with an embedded radiative source is presented. The density distribution, radiative source, and dust parameters can be selected either from an internal database or defined by the user. This tool is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains (a ≫1 μm) are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. The tool is available at http://aida28.mpia-hd.mpg.de/~swolf/dds. Catalogue identifier:ADVV Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:none Computers:PC with Intel(R) XEON(TM) 2.80 GHz processor Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:SUSE Linux 9.1 Programming language used:Fortran 90 (for the main program; furthermore Perl, CGI and HTML) Memory required to execute with typical data:108 words No. of bits in a word:8 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:44 636 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 806 280 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:Simulation of scattered light and thermal reemission in arbitrary optically dust distributions with spherical, homogeneous grains where the dust parameters (optical properties, sublimation temperature, grain size) and SED of the illuminating/heating radiative source can be arbitrarily defined (example application: [S. Wolf, L.A. Hillenbrand, Astrophys. J. 596 (2003) 603]). The program is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains (i.e. with large size parameters) are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. Method of solution:Calculation of the dust temperature distribution and dust reemission and scattering spectrum in the

  19. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  20. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  1. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  2. One-dimensional transient radiative transfer by lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2013-10-21

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing scattering media subjected to a collimated short laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are examined firstly. Afterwards, effects of the medium properties such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo and the anisotropy factor, and the shapes of laser pulse on time-resolved signals of transmittance and reflectance are investigated. Results of the present method are found to compare very well with the data from the literature. For an oblique incidence, the LBM results in this paper are compared with those by Monte Carlo method generated by ourselves. In addition, transient radiative transfer in a two-Layer inhomogeneous media subjected to a short square pulse irradiation is investigated. At last, the LBM is further extended to study the transient radiative transfer in homogeneous medium with a refractive index discontinuity irradiated by the short pulse laser. Several trends on the time-resolved signals different from those for refractive index of 1 (i.e. refractive-index-matched boundary) are observed and analysed. PMID:24150298

  3. RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullemond, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

  4. Field size dependent mapping of medical linear accelerator radiation leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Veres, Attila; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of a graphics library based model for the assessment of linear accelerator radiation leakage. Transmission through the shielding elements was evaluated using the build-up factor corrected exponential attenuation law and the contribution from the electron guide was estimated using the approximation of a linear isotropic radioactive source. Model parameters were estimated by a fitting series of thermoluminescent dosimeter leakage measurements, achieved up to 100 cm from the beam central axis along three directions. The distribution of leakage data at the patient plane reflected the architecture of the shielding elements. Thus, the maximum leakage dose was found under the collimator when only one jaw shielded the primary beam and was about 0.08% of the dose at isocentre. Overall, we observe that the main contributor to leakage dose according to our model was the electron beam guide. Concerning the discrepancies between the measurements used to calibrate the model and the calculations from the model, the average difference was about 7%. Finally, graphics library modelling is a readily and suitable way to estimate leakage dose distribution on a personal computer. Such data could be useful for dosimetric evaluations in late effect studies.

  5. Radiation effects in low-thrust orbit transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, James E.

    1998-01-15

    A low-thrust orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) and its payload must be designed to survive in the near-Earth radiation environment for a much longer duration than a conventional upper stage. This paper examines the effects of natural radiation on OTV's using data that have become available since 1991 from the CRRES and APEX satellites. Dose rates for microelectronics in LEO-to-GEO missions are calculated for spiral orbit raising and for multi-impulse transfers. Semiconductor devices that are shielded by less than 2.5 mm of aluminum (0.69 g/cm{sup 2}) are inappropriate for spiral transfers, because they require hardness levels >100 krad (Si). Shield thicknesses of 6-12 mm reduce this requirement to about 10 krad (Si), which is still an order of magnitude higher than the radiation dose in a 10-year mission at GEO with similar shielding. The dose for a multi-impulse LEO-to-GEO transfer is about 10 times smaller than for a spiral transfer. Estimates of single event upset rates and photovoltaic array degradation are also provided.

  6. Cirrus microphysics and radiative transfer: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    During the Cirrus Intensive Field Operations of FIRE, data collected by the NCAR King Air in the vicinity of Wausau, WI on October 28 were selected to study the influence of cirrus cloud microphysics on radiative transfer and the role of microphysical approximations in radiative transfer models. The instrumentation of the King Air provided, aside from temperature and wind data, up-and downwelling broadband solar and infrared fluxes as well as detailed microphysical data. The aircraft data, supplied every second, are averaged over the 7 legs to represent the properties for that altitude. The resulting vertical profiles, however, suffer from the fact that each leg represents a different cloud column path. Based on the measured microphysical data particle size distributions of equivalent spheres for each cloud level are developed. Accurate radiative transfer calculations are performed, incorporating atmospheric and radiative data from the ground and the stratosphere. Comparing calculated to the measured up- and downwelling fluxes at the seven cloud levels for both the averaged and the three crossover data will help to assess the validity of particle size and shape approximation as they are frequently used to model cirrus clouds. Once agreement is achieved the model results may be applied to determine, in comparison to a cloudfree case, the influence of this particular cirrus on the radiation budget of the earth atmosphere system.

  7. Optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degheidy, A. R.; Sallah, M.; Elgarayhi, A.; Shaaban, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols have been investigated. The aerosol medium is considered as a plane-parallel anisotropic scattering medium with diffusive reflecting boundaries and containing an internal radiation source. The basic components are defined by their complex refractive index, a lognormal size distribution and humidity dependence in hygroscopic particles. The aerosol particles are assumed to be spherical, so the scattering parameters in the form of single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, scattering, absorption, extinction efficiencies and linear anisotropic coefficient are calculated using the Mie theory. The calculations have been performed for individual aerosol particles, internal and external mixing media. Radiation transfer problem through the considered aerosol medium has been solved in terms of the solution of the corresponding source-free problem with simple boundary conditions. For the solution of the source-free problem, the Variational Pomraning-Eddington technique has been employed. The variation of the radiative-transfer properties (partial radiative fluxes at the medium boundaries) have been calculated and represented graphically for the different aerosols with their different mixing states. A comparison of the obtained results versus available published data has been performed and a very good agreement was observed.

  8. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  9. A Thermokinetic Approach to Radiative Heat Transfer at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Lapas, Luciano C.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Radiative heat exchange at the nanoscale presents a challenge for several areas due to its scope and nature. Here, we provide a thermokinetic description of microscale radiative energy transfer including phonon-photon coupling manifested through a non-Debye relaxation behavior. We show that a lognormal-like distribution of modes of relaxation accounts for this non-Debye relaxation behavior leading to the thermal conductance. We also discuss the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The general expression for the thermal conductance we obtain fits existing experimental results with remarkable accuracy. Accordingly, our approach offers an overall explanation of radiative energy transfer through micrometric gaps regardless of geometrical configurations and distances. PMID:23527019

  10. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  11. Realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of observed precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.; Bettenhausen, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of precipitation typically utilize a number of instruments on various platforms. Ground validation campaigns incorporate ground-based and airborne measurements to characterize and study precipitating clouds, while the precipitation measurement constellation envisioned by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission includes measurements from differing space-borne instruments. In addition to disparities such as frequency channel selection and bandwidth, measurement geometry and resolution differences between observing platforms result in inherent inconsistencies between data products. In order to harmonize measurements from multiple passive radiometers, a framework is required that addresses these differences. To accomplish this, we have implemented a flexible three-dimensional radiative transfer model. As its core, the radiative transfer model uses the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2 to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions using Monte Carlo integration. Gaseous absorption is computed with MonoRTM and formatted into look-up tables for rapid processing. Likewise, scattering properties are pre-computed using a number of publicly available codes, such as T-Matrix and DDSCAT. If necessary, a melting layer model can be applied to the input profiles. Gaussian antenna beams estimate the spatial resolutions of the passive measurements, and realistic bandpass characteristics can be included to properly account for the spectral response of the simulated instrument. This work presents three-dimensional simulations of WindSat brightness temperatures for an oceanic rain event sampled by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The 2B-31 combined Precipitation Radar / TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) retrievals provide profiles that are the input to the radiative transfer model. TMI brightness temperatures are also simulated. Comparisons between monochromatic, pencil beam simulations and

  12. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    2015-09-28

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  13. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Scattering of solar radiation and canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional vertical model of radiation transfer in a plant canopy described by Verstraete (1987) is extended to account for the transfer of diffuse radiation. This improved model computes the absorption and scattering of both visible and near-infrared radiation in a multilayer canopy as a function of solar position and leaf orientation distribution. Multiple scattering is allowed, and the spectral reflectance of the vegetation stand is predicted. The results of the model are compared to those of other models and actual observations.

  14. 38 CFR 36.4309 - Transfer of title by borrower or maturity by demand or acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transfer of title by borrower or maturity by demand or acceleration. 36.4309 Section 36.4309 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) LOAN GUARANTY Guaranty or Insurance of Loans to Veterans With Electronic Reporting §...

  15. Cloud Property Retrieval and 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Cloud thickness and photon mean-free-path together determine the scale of "radiative smoothing" of cloud fluxes and radiances. This scale is observed as a change in the spatial spectrum of cloud radiances, and also as the "halo size" seen by off beam lidar such as THOR and WAIL. Such of beam lidar returns are now being used to retrieve cloud layer thickness and vertical scattering extinction profile. We illustrate with recent measurements taken at the Oklahoma ARM site, comparing these to the-dependent 3D simulations. These and other measurements sensitive to 3D transfer in clouds, coupled with Monte Carlo and other 3D transfer methods, are providing a better understanding of the dependence of radiation on cloud inhomogeneity, and to suggest new retrieval algorithms appropriate for inhomogeneous clouds. The international "Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes" or I3RC, program is coordinating and evaluating the variety of 3D radiative transfer methods now available, and to make them more widely available. Information is on the Web at: http://i3rc.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Input consists of selected cloud fields derived from data sources such as radar, microwave and satellite, and from models involved in the GEWEX Cloud Systems Studies. Output is selected radiative quantities that characterize the large-scale properties of the fields of radiative fluxes and heating. Several example cloud fields will be used to illustrate. I3RC is currently implementing an "open source" 3d code capable of solving the baseline cases. Maintenance of this effort is one of the goals of a new 3DRT Working Group under the International Radiation Commission. It is hoped that the 3DRT WG will include active participation by land and ocean modelers as well, such as 3D vegetation modelers participating in RAMI.

  16. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  17. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. M.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2012-02-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  18. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, Dana E

    2009-03-12

    This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

  19. Physical Interpretation of the Schott Energy of An Accelerating Point Charge and the Question of Whether a Uniformly Accelerating Charge Radiates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A core topic in graduate courses in electrodynamics is the description of radiation from an accelerated charge and the associated radiation reaction. However, contemporary papers still express a diversity of views on the question of whether or not a uniformly accelerating charge radiates suggesting that a complete "physical" understanding of the…

  20. SGPGET: AN SBDART Module for Aerosol Radiative Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Ogren, J.A.; Dutton, E.

    2005-03-18

    Quantification of the aerosol direct effect and climate sensitivity requires accurate estimates of optical properties as inputs to a radiative transfer model. Long-term measurements of aerosol properties at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site can be used as an improvement over a best guess or global average for optical properties (e.g., asymmetry factor of 0.7) used in Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) products such as the Broadband Heating Rate Profile VAP. To make this information readily available to the ARM community and others, an add-on module for a commonly used radiative transfer model, SBDART (Ricchiazzi et al. 1998), is being developed. A look up table and algorithm will provide aerosol related model inputs including aerosol optical and atmospheric state properties at high temporal resolution. These inputs can be used in conjunction with any mode of operation and with any other information, for example, cloud properties, in SBDART or any other radiative transfer model. Aerosol properties measured at three visible wavelengths are extrapolated so that flux calculations can be made in any desired wavelength across the shortwave spectrum. Several sources of uncertainty contribute to degraded accuracy of the aerosol property estimation. The effect of these uncertainties is shown through error analysis and comparisons of modeled and observed surface irradiance. A module is also being developed for the North Slope of Alaska site.

  1. Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, J.; Dyakov, S. A.; Yan, M.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale surface corrugation is known to be able to drastically enhance radiative heat transfer between two metal plates. Here we numerically calculate the radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings at dissimilar temperatures based on a scattering approach. It is demonstrated that, compared to unfilled metal gratings, the heat flux for a fixed geometry can be further enhanced, by up to 650% for the geometry separated by a vacuum gap of g =1 μ m and temperature values concerned in our study. The enhancement in radiative heat transfer is found to depend on refractive index of the filling dielectric, the specific grating temperatures, and naturally the gap size between the two gratings. The enhancement can be understood through examining the transmission factor spectra, especially the spectral locations of the spoof surface plasmon polariton modes. Of more practical importance, it's shown that the radiative heat flux can exceed that between two planar SiC plates with same thickness, separation, and temperature settings over a wide temperature range. This reaffirms that one can harness rich electromagnetic modal properties in nanostructured materials for efficient thermal management at nanoscale.

  2. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  3. A new microwave EB accelerator for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cracknell, P. J.

    1995-02-01

    A new high beam power microwave electron linear accelerator, LINTEC 1020, has been built and installed for the AEA, EBIS (Harwell) Limited medical sterilisation irradiation facility. LINTEC microwave electron beam accelerator designs are based upon travelling wave RF structures working at 1300 MHz, with beam powers from 10 to 45 k Watts at 5 to 12 MeV. The accelerator design, installation and operating details are described together with performance characteristics of alternative equipments.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  5. Critical ingredients of Type Ia supernova radiative-transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Blondin, Stéphane; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2014-07-01

    We explore the physics of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves and spectra using the 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. Rather than adjusting ejecta properties to match observations, we select as input one `standard' 1D Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model, and then explore the sensitivity of radiation and gas properties of the ejecta on radiative-transfer modelling assumptions. The correct computation of SN Ia radiation is not exclusively a solution to an `opacity problem', characterized by the treatment of a large number of lines. We demonstrate that the key is to identify and treat important atomic processes consistently. This is not limited to treating line blanketing in non-LTE. We show that including forbidden-line transitions of metals, and in particular Co, is increasingly important for the temperature and ionization of the gas beyond maximum light. Non-thermal ionization and excitation are also critical since they affect the colour evolution and the ΔM15 decline rate of our model. While impacting little the bolometric luminosity, a more complete treatment of decay routes leads to enhanced line blanketing, e.g. associated with 48Ti in the U and B bands. Overall, we find that SN Ia radiation properties are influenced in a complicated way by the atomic data we employ, so that obtaining converged results is a real challenge. Nonetheless, with our fully fledged CMFGEN model, we obtain good agreement with the golden standard Type Ia SN 2005cf in the optical and near-IR, from 5 to 60 d after explosion, suggesting that assuming spherical symmetry is not detrimental to SN Ia radiative-transfer modelling at these times. Multi-D effects no doubt matter, but they are perhaps less important than accurately treating the non-LTE processes that are crucial to obtain reliable temperature and ionization structures.

  6. Radiation survey around a Liac mobile electron linear accelerator for intraoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mario; Pedroli, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Guido, Andrea; Cattani, Federica; Cambria, Raffaella; Veronesi, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a detailed analysis of the air kerma values around a Liac mobile linear accelerator working in a conventional operating room (OR) for IORT. The Liac delivers electron beams at 4, 6, 8 and 10 MeV. A radiation survey to determine photon leakage and scatter consisted of air kerma measurements on a spherical surface of 1.5 m radius, centered on the titanium exit window of the accelerating structure. Measurements were taken using a 30 cm3 calibrated cylindrical ion chamber in three orthogonal planes, at the maximum electron energy. For each point, 10 Gy was delivered. At selected points, the quality of x-ray radiation was determined by using lead sheets, and measurements were performed for all energies to investigate the energy dependence of stray radiation. The photon scatter contribution from the metallic internal patient-shielding in IORT, used to protect normal tissues underlying the target, was also evaluated. At seven locations outside the OR, the air kerma values derived from in-room measurements were compared to measurements directly performed using a survey meter. The results, for a delivered dose of 10 Gy, showed that the air kerma values ranged from approximately 6 microGy (upper and rear sides of the Liac) to 320 microGy (lateral to beam stopper) in the two orthogonal vertical planes, while values lower than 18 microGy were found in the horizontal plane. At 10 MeV, transmission behind 1 cm lead shield was found to be 42%. The use of internal shielding appeared to increase the photon scatter only slightly. Air kerma values outside the OR were generally lower than 1 mGy for an annual workload of 200 patients. Thus, the Liac can safely work in a conventional OR, while the need for additional shielding mainly depends on patient workload. Our data can be useful for centers planning to implement an IORT program using a mobile linear accelerator, permitting radiation safety personnel to estimate in advance the shielding required

  7. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  8. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  9. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  10. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.