Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated unit unloading

  1. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: liquid unloadings.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Pacsi, Adam P; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Lamb, Brian K; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions from liquid unloadings were measured at 107 wells in natural gas production regions throughout the United States. Liquid unloadings clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, employing a variety of liquid lifting mechanisms. In this work, wells with and without plunger lifts were sampled. Most wells without plunger lifts unload less than 10 times per year with emissions averaging 21,000-35,000 scf methane (0.4-0.7 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 10,000-50,000 scf/event). For wells with plunger lifts, emissions averaged 1000-10,000 scf methane (0.02-0.2 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 500-12,000 scf/event). Some wells with plunger lifts are automatically triggered and unload thousands of times per year and these wells account for the majority of the emissions from all wells with liquid unloadings. If the data collected in this work are assumed to be representative of national populations, the data suggest that the central estimate of emissions from unloadings (270 Gg/yr, 95% confidence range of 190-400 Gg) are within a few percent of the emissions estimated in the EPA 2012 Greenhouse Gas National Emission Inventory (released in 2014), with emissions dominated by wells with high frequencies of unloadings. PMID:25488307

  2. Bootstrap unloader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfiffner, H. J.

    1969-01-01

    Circuit can sample a number of transducers in sequence without drawing from them. This bootstrap unloader uses a differential amplifier with one input connected to a circuit which is the equivalent of the circuit to be unloaded, and the other input delivering the proper unloading currents.

  3. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  4. Independent Study Unit on Accelerated Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a list of topics, research areas, references, and laboratory equipment which is prepared to facilitate general-science students' understanding of physics aspects in accelerated reference frames after their study of circular motion and Galilean relativity in mechanics. (CC)

  5. TDRSS momentum unload planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, George R.; Potter, Mitchell A.; Whitehead, J. Douglass; Smith, James T.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge-based system is described which monitors TDRSS telemetry for problems in the momentum unload procedure. The system displays TDRSS telemetry and commands in real time via X-windows. The system constructs a momentum unload plan which agrees with the preferences of the attitude control specialists and the momentum growth characteristics of the individual spacecraft. During the execution of the plan, the system monitors the progress of the procedure and watches for unexpected problems.

  6. Effect of unloading time on interrupted creep in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of unloading time on the interrupted creep behavior of polycrystalline copper specimens was investigated over the temperature range 298--773 K. Up to 553 K, cyclic creep acceleration could be explained in terms of deformation and hardening using a dislocation glide model with recovery during unloading being due to dislocation climb. At higher temperatures, recrystallization effects probably influence behavior.

  7. Status and future prospects for United States accelerators and accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H

    1994-12-01

    The recent performance and future prospects of accelerators in the United States are reviewed. The next decade promises significant improvements and major new facilities. There is uncertainty beyond that because of the SSC cancellation and the new, enhanced importance of international accelerator projects.

  8. LOADING AND UNLOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-08-16

    A device for loading and unloading fuel rods into and from a reactor tank through an access hole includes parallel links carrying a gripper. These links enable the gripper to go through the access hole and then to be moved laterally from the axis of the access hole to the various locations of the fuel rods in the reactor tank.

  9. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  10. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  11. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-10

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  12. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  13. Graphics Processing Unit Acceleration of Gyrokinetic Turbulence Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Benjamin; Parker, Scott

    2012-10-01

    We find a substantial increase in on-node performance using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration in gyrokinetic delta-f particle-in-cell simulation. Optimization is performed on a two-dimensional slab gyrokinetic particle simulation using the Portland Group Fortran compiler with the GPU accelerator compiler directives. We have implemented the GPU acceleration on a Core I7 gaming PC with a NVIDIA GTX 580 GPU. We find comparable, or better, acceleration relative to the NERSC DIRAC cluster with the NVIDIA Tesla C2050 computing processor. The Tesla C 2050 is about 2.6 times more expensive than the GTX 580 gaming GPU. Optimization strategies and comparisons between DIRAC and the gaming PC will be presented. We will also discuss progress on optimizing the comprehensive three dimensional general geometry GEM code.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR UNLOADING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.; Howe, J.P.

    1959-01-20

    An unloading device is described for a heterogeneous reactor of the type wherein the fuel elements are in the form of cylindrical slugs and are disposed in horizontal coolant tubes which traverse the reactor core, coolant fluid being circulated through the tubes. The coolant tubes have at least two inwardly protruding ribs from their lower surfaces to support the slugs in spaced relationship to the inside walls of the tubes. The unloading device consists of a ribbon-like extractor member insertable into the coolant tubes in the space between the ribs and adapted to slide under the fuel slugs thereby raising them off of the ribs and forming a slideway for removing them from the reactor. The fuel slugs are ejected by being forced out of the tubes by incoming new fuel slugs or by a push rod insentable through the inlet end of the fuel tubes.

  15. Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid

    DOEpatents

    Rehberger, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device.

  16. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Accelerating sino-atrium computer simulations with graphic processing units.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Xiao, Zheng; Lin, Shien-fong

    2015-01-01

    Sino-atrial node cells (SANCs) play a significant role in rhythmic firing. To investigate their role in arrhythmia and interactions with the atrium, computer simulations based on cellular dynamic mathematical models are generally used. However, the large-scale computation usually makes research difficult, given the limited computational power of Central Processing Units (CPUs). In this paper, an accelerating approach with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) is proposed in a simulation consisting of the SAN tissue and the adjoining atrium. By using the operator splitting method, the computational task was made parallel. Three parallelization strategies were then put forward. The strategy with the shortest running time was further optimized by considering block size, data transfer and partition. The results showed that for a simulation with 500 SANCs and 30 atrial cells, the execution time taken by the non-optimized program decreased 62% with respect to a serial program running on CPU. The execution time decreased by 80% after the program was optimized. The larger the tissue was, the more significant the acceleration became. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed GPU-accelerating methods and their promising applications in more complicated biological simulations. PMID:26406070

  18. 38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE GEORGE M. CARL.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. 14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE 'GEORGE M. CAR.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-38, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40.) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet. II. Termination of phloem unloading

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.; Geiger, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Phloem unloading in developing leaves of Beta vulgaris L. occurred from successively higher order branches of veins as leaves matured. Phloem unloading was studied in autoradiographs of leaf samples taken at various times during the arrival of a pulse of /sup 14/C-labeled photoassimilate. Extension of mass flow of sieve element contents into leaf vein branches was determined from the high level of radiolabel in veins soon after first arrival of the pulse. Rapid entry, indicative of mass flow through open sieve pores, occurred down to the fourth division of veins in young, importing leaves and to the fifth or terminal branch in importing regions near the zone of transition from sink to source. The rate of unloading decreased with leaf age, as evidenced by the increased time required for the vein-mesophyll demarcation to become obscured. The rate of import per unit leaf area, measures by steady state labeling with /sup 14/CL/sub 2/ also decreased as a leaf matured. The decline in import appeared to result from progressive changes that increased resistance to unloading of sieve elements and eventually terminated phloem unloading.

  1. Graphics Processing Unit Acceleration of Gyrokinetic Turbulence Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Benjamin; Parker, Scott; Chen, Yang

    2013-10-01

    We find a substantial increase in on-node performance using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration in gyrokinetic delta-f particle-in-cell simulation. Optimization is performed on a two-dimensional slab gyrokinetic particle simulation using the Portland Group Fortran compiler with the OpenACC compiler directives and Fortran CUDA. Mixed implementation of both Open-ACC and CUDA is demonstrated. CUDA is required for optimizing the particle deposition algorithm. We have implemented the GPU acceleration on a third generation Core I7 gaming PC with two NVIDIA GTX 680 GPUs. We find comparable, or better, acceleration relative to the NERSC DIRAC cluster with the NVIDIA Tesla C2050 computing processor. The Tesla C 2050 is about 2.6 times more expensive than the GTX 580 gaming GPU. We also see enormous speedups (10 or more) on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge with Kepler K20 GPUs. Results show speed-ups comparable or better than that of OpenMP models utilizing multiple cores. The use of hybrid OpenACC, CUDA Fortran, and MPI models across many nodes will also be discussed. Optimization strategies will be presented. We will discuss progress on optimizing the comprehensive three dimensional general geometry GEM code.

  2. Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid

    DOEpatents

    Rehberger, K.M.

    1994-01-04

    An apparatus is described for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device. 2 figures.

  3. REACTOR UNLOADING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1957-08-20

    A means for remotely unloading irradiated fuel slugs from a neutronic reactor core and conveying them to a remote storage tank is reported. The means shown is specifically adapted for use with a reactor core wherein the fuel slugs are slidably held in end to end abutting relationship in the horizontal coolant flow tubes, the slugs being spaced from tae internal walls of the tubes to permit continuous circulation of coolant water therethrough. A remotely operated plunger at the charging ends of the tubes is used to push the slugs through the tubes and out the discharge ends into a special slug valve which transfers the slug to a conveying tube leading into a storage tank. Water under pressure is forced through the conveying tube to circulate around the slug to cool it and also to force the slug through the conveving tube into the storage tank. The slug valve and conveying tube are shielded to prevent amy harmful effects caused by the radioactive slug in its travel from the reactor to the storage tank. With the disclosed apparatus, all the slugs in the reactor core can be conveyed to the storage tank shortly after shutdown by remotely located operating personnel.

  4. SYSTEM FOR UNLOADING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Rand, A.C. Jr.

    1961-05-01

    An unloading device for individual vertical fuel channels in a nuclear reactor is shown. The channels are arranged in parallel rows and underneath each is a separate supporting block on which the fuel in the channel rests. The blocks are raounted in contiguous rows on an array of parallel pairs of tracks over the bottom of the reactor. Oblong hollows in the blocks form a continuous passageway through the middle of the row of blocks on each pair of tracks. At the end of each passageway is a horizontal grappling rod with a T- or L extension at the end next to the reactor of a length to permit it to pass through the oblong passageway in one position, but when rotated ninety degrees the head will strike one of the longer sides of the oblong hollow of one of the blocks. The grappling rod is actuated by a controllable reciprocating and rotating device which extends it beyond any individual block desired, rotates it and retracts it far enough to permit the fuel in the vertical channel above the block to fall into a handling tank below the reactor.

  5. Accelerated conformational entropy calculations using graphic processing units.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Junmei; Guerrero, Ginés D; Cecilia, José M; García, José M; Li, Youyong; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-08-26

    Conformational entropy calculation, usually computed by normal-mode analysis (NMA) or quasi harmonic analysis (QHA), is extremely time-consuming. Here, instead of NMA or QHA, a solvent accessible surface area (SASA) based model was employed to compute the conformational entropy, and a new fast GPU-based method called MURCIA (Molecular Unburied Rapid Calculation of Individual Areas) was implemented to accelerate the calculation of SASA for each atom. MURCIA employs two different kernels to determine the neighbors of each atom. The first kernel (K1) uses brute force for the calculation of the neighbors of atoms, while the second one (K2) uses an advanced algorithm involving hardware interpolations via GPU texture memory unit for such purpose. These two kernels yield very similar results. Each kernel has its own advantages depending on the protein size. K1 performs better than K2 when the size is small and vice versa. The algorithm was extensively evaluated for four protein data sets and achieves good results for all of them. This GPU-accelerated version is ∼600 times faster than the former sequential algorithm when the number of the atoms in a protein is up to 10⁵. PMID:23862733

  6. Accelerating sparse linear algebra using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2011-06-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of over 1 TFLOPS of peak computational throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU with excellent FLOPS-to-watt ratio. High-level sparse linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring large amounts of parallel operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on a GPU accelerated implementation of sparse linear algebra routines. We present results from both direct and iterative sparse system solvers. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally. For example, the CPU is responsible for graph theory portion of the direct solvers while the GPU simultaneously performs the low level linear algebra routines.

  7. Phloem unloading and cell expansion in pea stems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.; Cosgrove, D.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Phloem unloading into elongating stems of dark-grown pea seedlings was greater in regions with higher relative growth rates. Phloem transport was monitored over 1 h by measuring accumulation of radiolabel from {sup 14}C-sucrose added between the cotyledons. The apical hook and plumule and 8 mm of the growing region of an intact plant were sealed in a pressure chamber and the pressure was raised to stop elongation. Phloem unloading was inhibited in the pressurized zone of elongation and accelerated in the apical hook and plumule, with the result that the magnitude of phloem transport into the stem was unchanged. The results demonstrate a coupling between cell expansion and phloem unloading.

  8. Accelerating Cardiac Bidomain Simulations Using Graphics Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Hoetzl, Elena; Mitchell, Lawrence; Vigmond, Edward J.; Haase, Gundolf

    2013-01-01

    Anatomically realistic and biophysically detailed multiscale computer models of the heart are playing an increasingly important role in advancing our understanding of integrated cardiac function in health and disease. Such detailed simulations, however, are computationally vastly demanding, which is a limiting factor for a wider adoption of in-silico modeling. While current trends in high-performance computing (HPC) hardware promise to alleviate this problem, exploiting the potential of such architectures remains challenging since strongly scalable algorithms are necessitated to reduce execution times. Alternatively, acceleration technologies such as graphics processing units (GPUs) are being considered. While the potential of GPUs has been demonstrated in various applications, benefits in the context of bidomain simulations where large sparse linear systems have to be solved in parallel with advanced numerical techniques are less clear. In this study, the feasibility of multi-GPU bidomain simulations is demonstrated by running strong scalability benchmarks using a state-of-the-art model of rabbit ventricles. The model is spatially discretized using the finite element methods (FEM) on fully unstructured grids. The GPU code is directly derived from a large pre-existing code, the Cardiac Arrhythmia Research Package (CARP), with very minor perturbation of the code base. Overall, bidomain simulations were sped up by a factor of 11.8 to 16.3 in benchmarks running on 6–20 GPUs compared to the same number of CPU cores. To match the fastest GPU simulation which engaged 20GPUs, 476 CPU cores were required on a national supercomputing facility. PMID:22692867

  9. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160406.html Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees? Study puts specially designed footwear to the test ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up ...

  10. Efficient Vent Unloading of Air Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, Alvin J.

    1987-01-01

    Method for unloading one-and two-stage reciprocating air compressors increases energy efficiency and inhibits deterioration of components. In new unloader configuration, compressor vented to atmosphere on downstream side. Method implemented expeditiously as modification of existing systems.

  11. Accelerating molecular docking calculations using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Korb, Oliver; Stützle, Thomas; Exner, Thomas E

    2011-04-25

    The generation of molecular conformations and the evaluation of interaction potentials are common tasks in molecular modeling applications, particularly in protein-ligand or protein-protein docking programs. In this work, we present a GPU-accelerated approach capable of speeding up these tasks considerably. For the evaluation of interaction potentials in the context of rigid protein-protein docking, the GPU-accelerated approach reached speedup factors of up to over 50 compared to an optimized CPU-based implementation. Treating the ligand and donor groups in the protein binding site as flexible, speedup factors of up to 16 can be observed in the evaluation of protein-ligand interaction potentials. Additionally, we introduce a parallel version of our protein-ligand docking algorithm PLANTS that can take advantage of this GPU-accelerated scoring function evaluation. We compared the GPU-accelerated parallel version to the same algorithm running on the CPU and also to the highly optimized sequential CPU-based version. In terms of dependence of the ligand size and the number of rotatable bonds, speedup factors of up to 10 and 7, respectively, can be observed. Finally, a fitness landscape analysis in the context of rigid protein-protein docking was performed. Using a systematic grid-based search methodology, the GPU-accelerated version outperformed the CPU-based version with speedup factors of up to 60. PMID:21434638

  12. A method for assessment of slope unloading zone based on unloading strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Han; Wu, Faquan; Xi, Pengcheng

    2016-04-01

    Slope unloading is a process of energy release. During the evolution of slope, unloading deformation appears and unloading zone is formed in shallow slope with rock mass relaxation and extension. In this paper, a new method is proposed to quantify the extent and damage degree of unloading zone according to unloading strain energy which is released in the process of unloading. By using elastic theory and statistical mechanics of rock masses, we establish a relation between accumulative opening displacement of unloading cracks and unloading strain, which is the principle to assess the extent and damage degree of unloading zone. Based on the unloading strain, the degree of unloading zone can be divided into two sub-zones, i.e., strongly unloading zone and slightly unloading zone, and the extent of the two sub-zones can be determined from the accumulative opening displacement curves of cracks. This method is applied to assess the slope unloading zone at a hydropower station dam site in northwest China. Results show that the accumulative opening displacement curves of cracks along adits vary regularly, and the curves can be divided into three parts. The strongly and slightly unloading zones can be recognized from the slope of each part, and their extent is limited by the two inflexions of each curve.

  13. Acceleration of the GAMESS-UK electronic structure package on graphical processing units.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Karl A; Sherwood, Paul; Guest, Martyn F; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2011-07-30

    The approach used to calculate the two-electron integral by many electronic structure packages including generalized atomic and molecular electronic structure system-UK has been designed for CPU-based compute units. We redesigned the two-electron compute algorithm for acceleration on a graphical processing unit (GPU). We report the acceleration strategy and illustrate it on the (ss|ss) type integrals. This strategy is general for Fortran-based codes and uses the Accelerator compiler from Portland Group International and GPU-based accelerators from Nvidia. The evaluation of (ss|ss) type integrals within calculations using Hartree Fock ab initio methods and density functional theory are accelerated by single and quad GPU hardware systems by factors of 43 and 153, respectively. The overall speedup for a single self consistent field cycle is at least a factor of eight times faster on a single GPU compared with that of a single CPU. PMID:21541963

  14. Design, fabrication and first beam tests of the C-band RF acceleration unit at SINAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Sheng, Xing; Wang, Chaopeng; Tong, Dechun; Chen, Lifang; Zhong, Shaopeng; Tan, Jianhao; Lin, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-07-01

    C-band RF acceleration is a crucial technology for the compact Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A project focusing on C-band RF acceleration technology was launched in 2008, based on high-gradient accelerating structures powered by klystron and pulse compressor units. The target accelerating gradient is 40 MV/m or higher. Recently one prototype of C-band RF unit, consisting of a 1.8 m accelerating structure and a klystron with a TE0115 mode pulse compressor, has been tested with high-power and electron beam. Stable operation at 40 MV/m was demonstrated and, 50 MV/m approached by the end of the test. This paper introduces the C-band R&D program at SINAP and presents the experiment results of high-power and beam tests.

  15. Accelerating Computation of the Unit Commitment Problem (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Barrows, C.; Jones, W.

    2013-10-01

    Production cost models (PCMs) simulate power system operation at hourly (or higher) resolution. While computation times often extend into multiple days, the sequential nature of PCM's makes parallelism difficult. We exploit the persistence of unit commitment decisions to select partition boundaries for simulation horizon decomposition and parallel computation. Partitioned simulations are benchmarked against sequential solutions for optimality and computation time.

  16. Probabilistic estimates of maximum acceleration and velocity in rock in the contiguous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Perkins, D.M.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Bender, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Maximum horizontal accelerations and velocities caused by earthquakes are mapped for exposure times of 10, 50 and 250 years at the 90-percent probability level of nonexceedance for the contiguous United States. In many areas these new maps differ significantly from the 1976 probabilistic acceleration map by Algermlssen and Perkins because of the increase in detail, resulting from greater emphasis on the geologic basis for seismic source zones. This new emphasis is possible because of extensive data recently acquired on Holocene and Quaternary faulting in the western United States and new interpretations of geologic structures controlling the seismicity pattern in the central and eastern United States.

  17. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  18. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  19. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly. PMID:24811627

  20. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  1. Muscle regeneration during hindlimb unloading results in a reduction in muscle size after reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.

    2001-01-01

    The hindlimb-unloading model was used to study the ability of muscle injured in a weightless environment to recover after reloading. Satellite cell mitotic activity and DNA unit size were determined in injured and intact soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded and age-matched weight-bearing rats at the conclusion of 28 days of hindlimb unloading, 2 wk after reloading, and 9 wk after reloading. The body weights of hindlimb-unloaded rats were significantly (P < 0.05) less than those of weight-bearing rats at the conclusion of hindlimb unloading, but they were the same (P > 0.05) as those of weight-bearing rats 2 and 9 wk after reloading. The soleus muscle weight, soleus muscle weight-to-body weight ratio, myofiber diameter, number of nuclei per millimeter, and DNA unit size were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller for the injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats than for the soleus muscles from weight-bearing rats at each recovery time. Satellite cell mitotic activity was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats than from weight-bearing rats 2 wk after reloading, but it was the same (P > 0.05) as in the injured soleus muscles from weight-bearing rats 9 wk after reloading. The injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats failed to achieve weight-bearing muscle size 9 wk after reloading, because incomplete compensation for the decrease in myonuclear accretion and DNA unit size expansion occurred during the unloading period.

  2. Response of semicircular canal dependent units in vestibular nuclei to rotation of a linear acceleration vector without angular acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Benson, A. J.; Guedry, F. E.; Jones, G. Melvill

    1970-01-01

    1. Recent experiments have shown that rotation of a linear acceleration vector round the head can generate involuntary ocular nystagmus in the absence of angular acceleration. The present experiments examine the suggestion that adequate stimulation of the semicircular canals may contribute to this response. 2. Decerebrate cats were located in a stereotaxic device on a platform, slung from four parallel cables, which could be driven smoothly round a circular orbit without inducing significant angular movement of the platform. This Parallel Swing Rotation (PSR) generated a centripetal acceleration of 4·4 m/sec2 which rotated round the head at 0·52 rev/sec. 3. The discharge frequency of specifically lateral canal-dependent neural units in the vestibular nuclei of cats was recorded during PSR to right and left, and in the absence of motion. The dynamic responses to purely angular motion were also examined on a servo-driven turntable. 4. Without exception all proven canal-dependent cells examined (twenty-nine cells in nine cats) were more active during PSR in the direction of endolymph circulation assessed to be excitatory to the unit, than during PSR in the opposite direction. 5. The observed changes in discharge frequency are assessed to have been of a magnitude appropriate for the generation of the involuntary oculomotor response induced by the same stimulus in the intact animal. 6. The findings suggest that a linear acceleration vector which rotates in the plane of the lateral semicircular canals can be an adequate stimulus to ampullary receptors, though an explanation which invokes the modulation of canal cells by a signal dependent upon the sequential activation of macular receptors cannot be positively excluded. PMID:5501270

  3. Accelerating compartmental modeling on a graphical processing unit.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shalom, Roy; Liberman, Gilad; Korngreen, Alon

    2013-01-01

    Compartmental modeling is a widely used tool in neurophysiology but the detail and scope of such models is frequently limited by lack of computational resources. Here we implement compartmental modeling on low cost Graphical Processing Units (GPUs), which significantly increases simulation speed compared to NEURON. Testing two methods for solving the current diffusion equation system revealed which method is more useful for specific neuron morphologies. Regions of applicability were investigated using a range of simulations from a single membrane potential trace simulated in a simple fork morphology to multiple traces on multiple realistic cells. A runtime peak 150-fold faster than the CPU was achieved. This application can be used for statistical analysis and data fitting optimizations of compartmental models and may be used for simultaneously simulating large populations of neurons. Since GPUs are forging ahead and proving to be more cost-effective than CPUs, this may significantly decrease the cost of computation power and open new computational possibilities for laboratories with limited budgets. PMID:23508232

  4. Graphics processing unit acceleration of computational electromagnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inman, Matthew

    The use of Graphical Processing Units (GPU's) for scientific applications has been evolving and expanding for the decade. GPU's provide an alternative to the CPU in the creation and execution of the numerical codes that are often relied upon in to perform simulations in computational electromagnetics. While originally designed purely to display graphics on the users monitor, GPU's today are essentially powerful floating point co-processors that can be programmed not only to render complex graphics, but also perform the complex mathematical calculations often encountered in scientific computing. Currently the GPU's being produced often contain hundreds of separate cores able to access large amounts of high-speed dedicated memory. By utilizing the power offered by such a specialized processor, it is possible to drastically speed up the calculations required in computational electromagnetics. This increase in speed allows for the use of GPU based simulations in a variety of situations that the computational time has heretofore been a limiting factor in, such as in educational courses. Many situations in teaching electromagnetics often rely upon simple examples of problems due to the simulation times needed to analyze more complex problems. The use of GPU based simulations will be shown to allow demonstrations of more advanced problems than previously allowed by adapting the methods for use on the GPU. Modules will be developed for a wide variety of teaching situations utilizing the speed of the GPU to demonstrate various techniques and ideas previously unrealizable.

  5. Accelerating radio astronomy cross-correlation with graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. A.; LaPlante, P. C.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2013-05-01

    We present a highly parallel implementation of the cross-correlation of time-series data using graphics processing units (GPUs), which is scalable to hundreds of independent inputs and suitable for the processing of signals from 'large-Formula' arrays of many radio antennas. The computational part of the algorithm, the X-engine, is implemented efficiently on NVIDIA's Fermi architecture, sustaining up to 79% of the peak single-precision floating-point throughput. We compare performance obtained for hardware- and software-managed caches, observing significantly better performance for the latter. The high performance reported involves use of a multi-level data tiling strategy in memory and use of a pipelined algorithm with simultaneous computation and transfer of data from host to device memory. The speed of code development, flexibility, and low cost of the GPU implementations compared with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementations have the potential to greatly shorten the cycle of correlator development and deployment, for cases where some power-consumption penalty can be tolerated.

  6. Metabolic adaptation of skeletal muscles to gravitational unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Y.; Yasui, W.; Kariya, F.; Wakatsuki, T.; Nakamura, K.; Asakura, T.; Edgerton, V. R.

    Responses of high-energy phosphates and metabolic properties to hindlimb suspension were studied in adult rats. The relative content of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the calf muscles was significantly higher in rats suspended for 10 days than in age-matched cage controls. The Pi/PCr ratio, where Pi is inorganic phosphate, in suspended muscles was less than controls. The absolute weights of soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were approximately 40% less than controls. Although the % fiber distribution in MG was unchanged, the % slow fibers decreased and the % fibers which were classified as both slow and fast was increased in soleus. The activities (per unit weight or protein) of succinate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in soleus were unchanged but those of cytochrome oxidase, β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, and citrate synthase were decreased following unloading. None of these enzyme activities in MG changed. However, the total levels of all enzymes in whole muscles decreased by suspension. It is suggested that shift of slow muscle toward fast type by unloading is associated with a decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis. Further, gravitational unloading affected the levels of muscle proteins differently even in the same mitochondrial enzymes. Unloading-related atrophy is prominent in red muscle or slow-twitch fiber 1, 2. Such atrophy is accompanied by a shift of contractile properties toward fast-twitch type 2-9. Further, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism in these muscles is also reported by some studies 10-14 suggesting a lowered mitochondrial biogenesis, although results from some studies do not necessarily agree 1, 7, 15. However, the precise mechanism responsible for such alterations of muscle properties in response to gravitational unloading is unclear. On the contrary, mitochondrial biogenesis, suggested by mitochondrial enzyme activities and/or mass, is stimulated in muscles with depleted high-energy phosphates by cold exposure 16 and/or by feeding

  7. Accelerating chemical database searching using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Yang, Eric

    2011-08-22

    The utility of chemoinformatics systems depends on the accurate computer representation and efficient manipulation of chemical compounds. In such systems, a small molecule is often digitized as a large fingerprint vector, where each element indicates the presence/absence or the number of occurrences of a particular structural feature. Since in theory the number of unique features can be exceedingly large, these fingerprint vectors are usually folded into much shorter ones using hashing and modulo operations, allowing fast "in-memory" manipulation and comparison of molecules. There is increasing evidence that lossless fingerprints can substantially improve retrieval performance in chemical database searching (substructure or similarity), which have led to the development of several lossless fingerprint compression algorithms. However, any gains in storage and retrieval afforded by compression need to be weighed against the extra computational burden required for decompression before these fingerprints can be compared. Here we demonstrate that graphics processing units (GPU) can greatly alleviate this problem, enabling the practical application of lossless fingerprints on large databases. More specifically, we show that, with the help of a ~$500 ordinary video card, the entire PubChem database of ~32 million compounds can be searched in ~0.2-2 s on average, which is 2 orders of magnitude faster than a conventional CPU. If multiple query patterns are processed in batch, the speedup is even more dramatic (less than 0.02-0.2 s/query for 1000 queries). In the present study, we use the Elias gamma compression algorithm, which results in a compression ratio as high as 0.097. PMID:21696144

  8. Effects of hindlimb unloading on neuromuscular development of neonatal rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckstorf, B. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Bain, J. L.; Reiser, P. M.; Sedlak, F. R.; Wong-Riley, M. T.; Riley, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that hindlimb suspension unloading of 8-day-old neonatal rats would disrupt the normal development of muscle fiber types and the motor innervation of the antigravity (weightbearing) soleus muscles but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Five rats were suspended 4.5 h and returned 1.5 h to the dam for nursing on a 24 h cycle for 9 days. To control for isolation from the dam, the remaining five littermates were removed on the same schedule but not suspended. Another litter of 10 rats housed in the same room provided a vivarium control. Fibers were typed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry and immunostaining for embryonic, slow, fast IIA and fast IIB isomyosins. The percentage of multiple innervation and the complexity of singly-innervated motor terminal endings were assessed in silver/cholinesterase stained sections. Unique to the soleus, unloading accelerated production of fast IIA myosin, delayed expression of slow myosin and retarded increases in standardized muscle weight and fiber size. Loss of multiple innervation was not delayed. However, fewer than normal motor nerve endings achieved complexity. Suspended rats continued unloaded hindlimb movements. These findings suggest that motor neurons resolve multiple innervation through nerve impulse activity, whereas the postsynaptic element (muscle fiber) controls endplate size, which regulates motor terminal arborization. Unexpectedly, in the EDL of unloaded rats, transition from embryonic to fast myosin expression was retarded. Suspension-related foot drop, which stretches and chronically loads EDL, may have prevented fast fiber differentiation. These results demonstrate that neuromuscular development of both weightbearing and non-weightbearing muscles in rats is dependent upon and modulated by hindlimb loading.

  9. Acceleration of Early-Photon Fluorescence Molecular Tomography with Graphics Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Xu; Liu, Fei; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) with early-photons can improve the spatial resolution and fidelity of the reconstructed results. However, its computing scale is always large which limits its applications. In this paper, we introduced an acceleration strategy for the early-photon FMT with graphics processing units (GPUs). According to the procedure, the whole solution of FMT was divided into several modules and the time consumption for each module is studied. In this strategy, two most time consuming modules (Gd and W modules) were accelerated with GPU, respectively, while the other modules remained coded in the Matlab. Several simulation studies with a heterogeneous digital mouse atlas were performed to confirm the performance of the acceleration strategy. The results confirmed the feasibility of the strategy and showed that the processing speed was improved significantly. PMID:23606899

  10. Using a dedicated education unit clinical education model with second-degree accelerated nursing program students.

    PubMed

    Sharpnack, Patricia A; Koppelman, Catherine; Fellows, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    Rising health care costs have underscored the need for new graduates to effectively transition to professional practice. Effective academic-practice partnerships, such as dedicated education units (DEUs), can be useful in facilitating the transfer of knowledge from the classroom to the clinical setting. This randomized experimental study found the DEU clinical model to be valuable in facilitating the transfer of knowledge in second-degree accelerated program students as evaluated by course, simulation, and standardized assessment scores and self-evaluations. Successful transition to clinical practice is reported by practice partners; time allotted for orientation program requirements was reduced and retention on the unit of hire was improved. Additional research is needed to understand the effectiveness of second-degree accelerated nursing programs and how to revise the clinical education element of the program to meet the unique needs of these students. PMID:25406842

  11. Graphics processing unit-accelerated double random phase encoding for fast image encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jieun; Yi, Faliu; Saifullah, Rao; Moon, Inkyu

    2014-11-01

    We propose a fast double random phase encoding (DRPE) algorithm using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based stream-processing model. A performance analysis of the accelerated DRPE implementation that employs the Compute Unified Device Architecture programming environment is presented. We show that the proposed methodology executed on a GPU can dramatically increase encryption speed compared with central processing unit sequential computing. Our experimental results demonstrate that in encryption data of an image with a pixel size of 1000×1000, where one pixel has a 32-bit depth, our GPU version of the DRPE scheme can be approximately two times faster than the advanced encryption standard algorithm implemented on a GPU. In addition, the quality of parallel processing on the presented DRPE acceleration method is evaluated with performance parameters, such as speedup, efficiency, and redundancy.

  12. Dynamics of oxygen unloading from sickle erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Makhijani, V B; Cokelet, G R; Clark, A

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this work is to theoretically model oxygen unloading in sickle red cells. This has been done by combining into a single model diffusive transport mechanisms, which have been well-studied for normal red cells, and the hemoglobin polymerization process, which has been previously been studied for deoxyhemoglobin-S solutions and sickle cells in near-equilibrium situations. The resulting model equations allow us to study the important processes of oxygen delivery and polymerization simultaneously. The equations have been solved numerically by a finite-difference technique. The oxygen unloading curve for sickle erythrocytes is biphasic in nature. The rate of unloading depends in a complicated way on (a) the kinetics of hemoglobin S polymerization, (b) the kinetics of hemoglobin deoxygenation, and (c) the diffusive transport of both free oxygen and oxy-hemoglobin. These processes interact. For example, the hemoglobin S polymer interferes with the transport of both free oxygen and unpolymerized oxy-hemoglobin, and this is accounted for in the model by diffusivities which depend on the polymer and solution hemoglobin concentration. Other parameters which influence the interaction of these processes are the concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and total hemoglobin concentration. By comparing our model predictions for oxygen unloading with simpler predictions based on equilibrium oxygen affinities, we conclude that the relative rate of oxygen unloading of cells with different physical properties cannot be correctly predicted from the equilibrium affinities. To describe the unloading process, a kinetic calculation of the sort we give here is required. PMID:2248988

  13. Dynamics of oxygen unloading from sickle erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, V B; Cokelet, G R; Clark, A

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work is to theoretically model oxygen unloading in sickle red cells. This has been done by combining into a single model diffusive transport mechanisms, which have been well-studied for normal red cells, and the hemoglobin polymerization process, which has been previously been studied for deoxyhemoglobin-S solutions and sickle cells in near-equilibrium situations. The resulting model equations allow us to study the important processes of oxygen delivery and polymerization simultaneously. The equations have been solved numerically by a finite-difference technique. The oxygen unloading curve for sickle erythrocytes is biphasic in nature. The rate of unloading depends in a complicated way on (a) the kinetics of hemoglobin S polymerization, (b) the kinetics of hemoglobin deoxygenation, and (c) the diffusive transport of both free oxygen and oxy-hemoglobin. These processes interact. For example, the hemoglobin S polymer interferes with the transport of both free oxygen and unpolymerized oxy-hemoglobin, and this is accounted for in the model by diffusivities which depend on the polymer and solution hemoglobin concentration. Other parameters which influence the interaction of these processes are the concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and total hemoglobin concentration. By comparing our model predictions for oxygen unloading with simpler predictions based on equilibrium oxygen affinities, we conclude that the relative rate of oxygen unloading of cells with different physical properties cannot be correctly predicted from the equilibrium affinities. To describe the unloading process, a kinetic calculation of the sort we give here is required. PMID:2248988

  14. Interleukin-2 therapy reverses some immunosuppressive effects of skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Jason W.; Balch, Signe; Chapes, Stephen K.

    1994-01-01

    Using antiorthostatic suspension, we characterized hematopoietic changes that may be responsible for the detrimental effect of skeletal unloading on macrophage development. Skeletally unloaded mice had suppressed macrophage development in unloaded and loaded bones, which indicated a systemic effect. Bone marrow cells from unloaded mice secreted less macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-6 than control mice. Additionally, T-lymphocyte proliferation was reduced after skeletal unloading. We show that polyethylene glycol-interleukin-2 therapy reversed the effects of skeletal unloading on macrophage development and cell proliferation.

  15. Probabilistic earthquake acceleration and velocity maps for the United States and Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Algermissen, S.T.; Perkins, D.M.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Bender, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The ground-motion maps presented here (maps A-D) show the expected seismic induced or earthquake caused maximum horizontal acceleration and velocity in rock in the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico.  There is a 90 percent probability that the maximum horizontal acceleration and velocity shown on the maps will not be exceeded in the time periods of 50 and 250 years (average return period for the expected ground motion of 474 and 2,372 years).  Rock is taken here to mean material having a shear-wave velocity of between 0.75 and 0.90 kilometers per second. (Algermissen and Perkins, 1976).  

  16. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  17. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  18. System modeling speeds clamshell unloader delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.W.; Zirkler, A.H.; Duke, G.

    1995-04-01

    This article describes how enhanced dust control concepts and design studies found best method to ensure quick, safe clamshell unloader transport and assembly. A new facility, US Generating Co.`s Logan Generating Station, was built in New Jersey, along the Delaware River and four miles from Chester, Pa. At the outset, concerns arose over possible unusual regulatory issues because the plant`s coal barge unloading system extends into the river where it falls under the jurisdiction of the State of Delaware. However, the project contract with the equipment supplier avoided complications by calling for a turnkey project, including erection, start-up, commissioning and training. The supplier responded by using a modeling technique to ensure environmental compatibility. The contract called for one stationary-clamshell bucket grab unloader, complete with a dust control system, barge haul and barge breasting systems, and auxiliary cranes for handling the barge haul lines. Bucket coal capacity is 10 tons at 50 pounds per cubic foot density. When operating on a 40-second duty cycle, the unloader is rated at 910 tons per hour free digging capacity. Under dry, high dust conditions, the duty cycle is extended to 50 seconds to allow for pause time after the bucket closes and while over the hopper prior to bucket discharge.

  19. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Open-source graphics processing unit-accelerated ray tracer for optical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, Florian; Gronle, Marc; Lyda, Wolfram; Osten, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Ray tracing still is the workhorse in optical design and simulation. Its basic principle, propagating light as a set of mutually independent rays, implies a linear dependency of the computational effort and the number of rays involved in the problem. At the same time, the mutual independence of the light rays bears a huge potential for parallelization of the computational load. This potential has recently been recognized in the visualization community, where graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated ray tracing is used to render photorealistic images. However, precision requirements in optical simulation are substantially higher than in visualization, and therefore performance results known from visualization cannot be expected to transfer to optical simulation one-to-one. In this contribution, we present an open-source implementation of a GPU-accelerated ray tracer, based on nVidias acceleration engine OptiX, that traces in double precision and exploits the massively parallel architecture of modern graphics cards. We compare its performance to a CPU-based tracer that has been developed in parallel.

  1. Accurate design of ICRF antennas for RF plasma thruster acceleration units with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Milanesio, D.; Meneghini, O.

    2007-09-01

    In recent years electromagnetic (RF) plasma generation and acceleration concepts for plasma-based propulsion systems have received growing interest, inasmuch as they can yield continuous thrust as well as highly controllable and wide-ranging exhaust velocities. The acceleration units mostly adopt the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF)—a proven technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers into magnetized plasmas, and also used by the VASIMR propulsion system. In this work we propose and demonstrate the use of TOPICA code to design and optimize the ICRF antenna of a typical acceleration stage. To this end, TOPICA was extended to cope with magnetized cylindricaily-symmetric radially-inhomogeneous warm plasmas, which required coding a new module charged with solving Maxwell's equations within the plasma to obtain the relevant Green's function Ỹ(m,kz) in the Fourier domain, i.e. the relation between the transverse magnetic and electric fields at the air-plasma interface. Then, calculating the antenna input impedance—and hence the loading—relies on an integral-equation formulation and subsequent finite-element weighted-residual solution scheme for the self-consistent evaluation of the current density distribution on the conducting bodies and at the air-plasma interface.

  2. Acoustic emission during unloading of elastically stressed magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A magnesium alloy was quasi-statically cycled elastically between zero load and tension. Both loading and unloading stress delays were found, and the unloading stress delay was further studied. An analytical expression was written for the unloading stress delay which is an elastic constitutive parameter. The potential use of these results for the acoustic emission monitoring of elastic stress states is discussed.

  3. 49 CFR 179.500-11 - Loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Loading and unloading valves. 179.500-11 Section...-113 and 107A) § 179.500-11 Loading and unloading valves. (a) Loading and unloading valve or valves shall be mounted on the cover or threaded into the marked end of tank. These valves shall be of...

  4. 49 CFR 179.500-11 - Loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Loading and unloading valves. 179.500-11 Section... 107A) § 179.500-11 Loading and unloading valves. (a) Loading and unloading valve or valves shall be mounted on the cover or threaded into the marked end of tank. These valves shall be of approved type,...

  5. 49 CFR 179.500-11 - Loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Loading and unloading valves. 179.500-11 Section... 107A) § 179.500-11 Loading and unloading valves. (a) Loading and unloading valve or valves shall be mounted on the cover or threaded into the marked end of tank. These valves shall be of approved type,...

  6. 49 CFR 179.500-11 - Loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Loading and unloading valves. 179.500-11 Section... 107A) § 179.500-11 Loading and unloading valves. (a) Loading and unloading valve or valves shall be mounted on the cover or threaded into the marked end of tank. These valves shall be of approved type,...

  7. 49 CFR 179.500-11 - Loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Loading and unloading valves. 179.500-11 Section... 107A) § 179.500-11 Loading and unloading valves. (a) Loading and unloading valve or valves shall be mounted on the cover or threaded into the marked end of tank. These valves shall be of approved type,...

  8. Accelerated evolution and coevolution drove the evolutionary history of AGPase sub-units during angiosperm radiation

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Jonathan; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Damerval, Catherine; Tenaillon, Maud I.; Manicacci, Domenica

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key enzyme of starch biosynthesis. In the green plant lineage, it is composed of two large (LSU) and two small (SSU) sub-units encoded by paralogous genes, as a consequence of several rounds of duplication. First, our aim was to detect specific patterns of molecular evolution following duplication events and the divergence between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Secondly, we investigated coevolution between amino acids both within and between sub-units. Methods A phylogeny of each AGPase sub-unit was built using all gymnosperm and angiosperm sequences available in databases. Accelerated evolution along specific branches was tested using the ratio of the non-synonymous to the synonymous substitution rate. Coevolution between amino acids was investigated taking into account compensatory changes between co-substitutions. Key Results We showed that SSU paralogues evolved under high functional constraints during angiosperm radiation, with a significant level of coevolution between amino acids that participate in SSU major functions. In contrast, in the LSU paralogues, we identified residues under positive selection (1) following the first LSU duplication that gave rise to two paralogues mainly expressed in angiosperm source and sink tissues, respectively; and (2) following the emergence of grass-specific paralogues expressed in the endosperm. Finally, we found coevolution between residues that belong to the interaction domains of both sub-units. Conclusions Our results support the view that coevolution among amino acid residues, especially those lying in the interaction domain of each sub-unit, played an important role in AGPase evolution. First, within SSU, coevolution allowed compensating mutations in a highly constrained context. Secondly, the LSU paralogues probably acquired tissue-specific expression and regulatory properties via the coevolution between sub-unit interacting domains. Finally, the

  9. Insulin effect on amino acid uptake by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the uptake of alpha-amino-isobutyric acid (AIB) by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles was investigated using soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from intact and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats that were tail-casted for six days. It was found that, at insulin levels above 0.00001 units/ml, the in vitro rate of AIB uptake by muscles from intact animals was stimulated more in the weight bearing muscles than in unloaded ones. In ADX animals, this differential response to insulin was abolished.

  10. Genetic and tissue level muscle-bone interactions during unloading and reambulation.

    PubMed

    Judex, S; Zhang, W; Donahue, L R; Ozcivici, E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about interactions between muscle and bone during the removal and application of mechanical signals. Here, we applied 3wk of hindlimb unloading followed by 3wk of reambulation to a genetically heterogeneous population of 352 adult mice and tested the hypothesis that changes in muscle are associated with changes in bone at the level of the tissue and the genome. During unloading and relative to normally ambulating control mice, most mice lost muscle and cortical bone with large variability across the population. During reambulation, individual mice regained bone and muscle at different rates. Across mice, changes in muscle and trabecular/cortical bone were not correlated to each other during unloading or reambulation. For unloading, we found one significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) for muscle area and five QTLs for cortical bone without overlap between mechano-sensitive muscle and cortical bone QTLs (but some overlap between muscle and trabecular QTLs). The low correlations between morphological changes in muscle and bone, together with the largely distinct genetic regulation of the response indicate that the premise of a muscle-bone unit that co-adjusts its size during (un)loading may need to be reassessed. PMID:27609032

  11. The response of bone to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal unloading leads to decreased bone formation and decreased bone mass. Bone resorption is uncoupled from bone formation, contributing to the bone loss. During spaceflight bone is lost principally from the bones most loaded in the 1-g environment, and some redistribution of bone from the lower extremities to the head appears to take place. Although changes in calcitropic hormones have been demonstrated during skeletal unloading (PTH and 1,25(OH)2D decrease), it remains unclear whether such changes account for or are in response to the changes in bone formation and resorption. Bed rest studies with human volunteers and hindlimb elevation studies with rats have provided useful data to help explain the changes in bone formation during spaceflight. These models of skeletal unloading reproduce a number of the conditions associated with microgravity, and the findings from such studies confirm many of the observations made during spaceflight. Determining the mechanism(s) by which loading of bone is sensed and translated into a signal(s) controlling bone formation remains the holy grail in this field. Such investigations couple biophysics to biochemistry to cell and molecular biology. Although studies with cell cultures have revealed biochemical responses to mechanical loads comparable to that seen in intact bone, it seems likely that matrix-cell interactions underlie much of the mechanocoupling. The role for systemic hormones such as PTH, GH, and 1,25(OH)2D compared to locally produced factors such as IGF-I, PTHrP, BMPs, and TGF-beta in modulating the cellular response to load remains unclear. As the mechanism(s) by which bone responds to mechanical load with increased bone formation are further elucidated, applications of this knowledge to other etiologies of osteoporosis are likely to develop. Skeletal unloading provides a perturbation in bone mineral homeostasis that can be used to understand the mechanisms by which bone mineral homeostasis is maintained, with

  12. Self-unloading, reusable, lunar lander project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arseculeratne, Ruwan; Cavazos, Melissa; Euker, John; Ghavidel, Fred; Hinkel, Todd J.; Hitzfelder, John; Leitner, Jesse; Nevik, James; Paynter, Scott; Zolondek, Allen

    1990-01-01

    In the early 21st century, NASA will return to the Moon and establish a permanent base. To achieve this goal safely and economically, B&T Engineering has designed an unmanned, reusable, self-unloading lunar lander. The lander is designed to deliver 15,000 kg payloads from an orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) in a low lunar polar orbit and an altitude of 200 km to any location on the lunar surface.

  13. The temporal response of bone to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Bikle, D. D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rats were suspended by their tails with the forelimbs bearing the weight load to simulate the weightlessness of space flight. Growth in bone mass ceased by 1 week in the hindlimbs and lumbar vertebrae in growing rats, while growth in the forelimbs and cervical vertebrae remained unaffected. The effects of selective skeletal unloading on bone formation during 2 weeks of suspension was investigated using radio iostope incorporation (with Ca-45 and H-3 proline) and histomorphometry (with tetracycline labeling). The results of these studies were confirmed by histomorphometric measurements of bone formation using triple tetracycline labeling. This model of simulated weightlessness results in an initial inhibition of bone formation in the unloaded bones. This temporary cessation of bone formation is followed in the accretion of bone mass, which then resumes at a normal rate by 14 days, despite continued skeletal unloading. This cycle of inhibition and resumption of bone formation has profound implication for understanding bone dynamics durng space flight, immobilization, or bed rest and offers an opportunity to study the hormonal and mechanical factors that regulate bone formation.

  14. Modified Anderson Method for Accelerating 3D-RISM Calculations Using Graphics Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio

    2012-09-11

    A fast algorithm is proposed to solve the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory on a graphics processing unit (GPU). 3D-RISM theory is a powerful tool for investigating biomolecular processes in solution; however, such calculations are often both memory-intensive and time-consuming. We sought to accelerate these calculations using GPUs, but to work around the problem of limited memory size in GPUs, we modified the less memory-intensive "Anderson method" to give faster convergence to 3D-RISM calculations. Using this method on a Tesla C2070 GPU, we reduced the total computational time by a factor of 8, 1.4 times by the modified Andersen method and 5.7 times by GPU, compared to calculations on an Intel Xeon machine (eight cores, 3.33 GHz) with the conventional method. PMID:26605714

  15. Acceleration of Electron Repulsion Integral Evaluation on Graphics Processing Units via Use of Recurrence Relations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yipu; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-02-12

    Electron repulsion integral (ERI) calculation on graphical processing units (GPUs) can significantly accelerate quantum chemical calculations. Herein, the ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) calculation is implemented on GPUs using recurrence relations, which is one of the fastest ERI evaluation algorithms currently available. A direct-SCF scheme to assemble the Fock matrix efficiently is presented, wherein ERIs are evaluated on-the-fly to avoid CPU-GPU data transfer, a well-known architectural bottleneck in GPU specific computation. Realized speedups on GPUs reach 10-100 times relative to traditional CPU nodes, with accuracies of better than 1 × 10(-7) for systems with more than 4000 basis functions. PMID:26588740

  16. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations with the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field on Graphics Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method has recently been shown to enhance the sampling of biomolecules in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, often by several orders of magnitude. Here, we describe an implementation of the aMD method for the OpenMM application layer that takes full advantage of graphics processing units (GPUs) computing. The aMD method is shown to work in combination with the AMOEBA polarizable force field (AMOEBA-aMD), allowing the simulation of long time-scale events with a polarizable force field. Benchmarks are provided to show that the AMOEBA-aMD method is efficiently implemented and produces accurate results in its standard parametrization. For the BPTI protein, we demonstrate that the protein structure described with AMOEBA remains stable even on the extended time scales accessed at high levels of accelerations. For the DNA repair metalloenzyme endonuclease IV, we show that the use of the AMOEBA force field is a significant improvement over fixed charged models for describing the enzyme active-site. The new AMOEBA-aMD method is publicly available (http://wiki.simtk.org/openmm/VirtualRepository) and promises to be interesting for studying complex systems that can benefit from both the use of a polarizable force field and enhanced sampling. PMID:24634618

  17. Accelerated rescaling of single Monte Carlo simulation runs with the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

    PubMed

    Yang, Owen; Choi, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    To interpret fiber-based and camera-based measurements of remitted light from biological tissues, researchers typically use analytical models, such as the diffusion approximation to light transport theory, or stochastic models, such as Monte Carlo modeling. To achieve rapid (ideally real-time) measurement of tissue optical properties, especially in clinical situations, there is a critical need to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation runs. In this manuscript, we report on our approach using the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to accelerate rescaling of single Monte Carlo runs to calculate rapidly diffuse reflectance values for different sets of tissue optical properties. We selected MATLAB to enable non-specialists in C and CUDA-based programming to use the generated open-source code. We developed a software package with four abstraction layers. To calculate a set of diffuse reflectance values from a simulated tissue with homogeneous optical properties, our rescaling GPU-based approach achieves a reduction in computation time of several orders of magnitude as compared to other GPU-based approaches. Specifically, our GPU-based approach generated a diffuse reflectance value in 0.08ms. The transfer time from CPU to GPU memory currently is a limiting factor with GPU-based calculations. However, for calculation of multiple diffuse reflectance values, our GPU-based approach still can lead to processing that is ~3400 times faster than other GPU-based approaches. PMID:24298424

  18. Accelerating image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography on graphics processing units

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Chao; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Methods: Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical accuracy of the developed algorithms. Results: The GPU implementations improve the computational efficiency by factors of 1000, 125, and 250 for the FBP algorithm and the two pairs of projection/backprojection operators, respectively. Accurate images are reconstructed by use of the FBP and iterative image reconstruction algorithms from both computer-simulated and experimental data. Conclusions: Parallelization strategies for 3D OAT image reconstruction are proposed for the first time. These GPU-based implementations significantly reduce the computational time for 3D image reconstruction, complementing our earlier work on 3D OAT iterative image reconstruction. PMID:23387778

  19. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated particle filter framework for positron emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengchao; Liu, Huafeng; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of the random nature of photon emissions and detections, the data collected by a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system can be shown to be Poisson distributed. Meanwhile, there have been considerable efforts within the tracer kinetic modeling communities aimed at establishing the relationship between the PET data and physiological parameters that affect the uptake and metabolism of the tracer. Both statistical and physiological models are important to PET reconstruction. The majority of previous efforts are based on simplified, nonphysical mathematical expression, such as Poisson modeling of the measured data, which is, on the whole, completed without consideration of the underlying physiology. In this paper, we proposed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated reconstruction strategy that can take both statistical model and physiological model into consideration with the aid of state-space evolution equations. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus making it possible to unify these two constraints into a general framework. In order to accelerate reconstruction, GPU-based parallel computing is introduced. Experiments of Zubal-thorax-phantom data, Monte Carlo simulated phantom data, and real phantom data show the power of the method. Furthermore, thanks to the computing power of the GPU, the reconstruction time is practical for clinical application. PMID:22472843

  20. The design of the electron beam dump unit of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cite, L. H.; Yilmaz, M.

    2016-03-01

    The required simulations of the electron beam interactions for the design of electron beam dump unit for an accelerator which will operate to get two Infra-Red Free Electron Lasers (IR-FEL) covering the range of 3-250 microns is presented in this work. Simulations have been carried out to understand the interactions of a bulk of specially shaped of four different and widely used materials for the dump materials for a 77 pC, 40 MeV, 13 MHz repetition rate e-beam. In the simulation studies dump materials are chosen to absorb the 99% of the beam energy and to restrict the radio-isotope production in the bulk of the dump. A Lead shielding also designed around the dump core to prevent the leakage out of the all the emitted secondary radiations, e.g., neutrons, photons. The necessary dump material requirements, for the overall design considerations and the possible radiation originated effects on the dump unit, are discussed and presented.

  1. Skeletal muscle responses to unloading in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G.; Tesch, P.; Hather, B.; Adams, G.; Buchanan, P.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the effects of unloading on skeletal muscle structure. Method: Eight subjects walked on crutches for six weeks with a 110 cm elevated sole on the right shoe. This removed weight bearing by the left lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of both lower limbs and biopsies of the left m. vastus laterallis (VL) were used to study muscle structure. Results: Unloading decreased (P less than 0.05) muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the knee extensors 16 percent. The knee flexors showed about 1/2 of this response (-7 percent, P less than 0.05). The three vasti muscles each showed decreases (P less than 0.05) of about 15 percent. M. rectus femoris did not change. Mean fiber CSA in VL decreased (P less than 0.05) 14 percent with type 2 and type 1 fibers showing reductions of 15 and 11 percent respectively. The ankle extensors showed a 20 percent decrease (P less than 0.05) in CSA. The reduction for the 'fast' m. gastrocnemius was 27 percent compared to the 18 percent decrease for the 'slow' soleus. Summary: The results suggest that decreases in muscle CSA are determined by the relative change in impact loading history because atrophy was (1) greater in extensor than flexor muscles, (2) at least as great in fast as compared to slow muscles or fibers, and (3) not dependent on single or multi-joint function. They also suggest that the atrophic responses to unloading reported for lower mammals are quantitatively but not qualitatively similar to those of humans.

  2. Development of an Emergency Locking Unit for a Belt-In-Seat (BIS) System Using a MEMS Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Chang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Wan; Kim, Seock Hyun; Paek, Insu

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an emergency locking unit (ELU) for a seat belt retractor which is mounted on the back frame of a vehicle seat. The proposed unit uses a recliner sensor based on a MEMS acceleration sensor and solenoid mechanism. The seat has an upper frame supported to tilt on a lower frame. The retractor in belt in seat (BIS) system is supported by the upper frame. The proposed recliner sensor based on a MEMS acceleration sensor comprises orientation means for maintaining a predetermined orientation of emergency relative to the lower frame independently of the force of gravity when the upper frame tilts on the lower frame. Experimental results show that the developed recliner sensor unit operates effectively with respect to rollover angles. Thus, the developed unit will have a considerable potential to offer a new design concept in BIS system. PMID:22319324

  3. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Acceleration of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Williama

    2011-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System 5 (GEOS-5) is the atmospheric model used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) for a variety of applications, from long-term climate prediction at relatively coarse resolution, to data assimilation and numerical weather prediction, to very high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations. GEOS-5 is being ported to a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS). By utilizing GPU co-processor technology, we expect to increase the throughput of GEOS-5 by at least an order of magnitude, and accelerate the process of scientific exploration across all scales of global modeling, including: The large-scale, high-end application of non-hydrostatic, global, cloud-resolving modeling at 10- to I-kilometer (km) global resolutions Intermediate-resolution seasonal climate and weather prediction at 50- to 25-km on small clusters of GPUs Long-range, coarse-resolution climate modeling, enabled on a small box of GPUs for the individual researcher After being ported to the GPU cluster, the primary physics components and the dynamical core of GEOS-5 have demonstrated a potential speedup of 15-40 times over conventional processor cores. Performance improvements of this magnitude reduce the required scalability of 1-km, global, cloud-resolving models from an unfathomable 6 million cores to an attainable 200,000 GPU-enabled cores.

  4. Graphics processing unit accelerated one-dimensional blood flow computation in the human arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-12-01

    One-dimensional blood flow models have been used extensively for computing pressure and flow waveforms in the human arterial circulation. We propose an improved numerical implementation based on a graphics processing unit (GPU) for the acceleration of the execution time of one-dimensional model. A novel parallel hybrid CPU-GPU algorithm with compact copy operations (PHCGCC) and a parallel GPU only (PGO) algorithm are developed, which are compared against previously introduced PHCG versions, a single-threaded CPU only algorithm and a multi-threaded CPU only algorithm. Different second-order numerical schemes (Lax-Wendroff and Taylor series) are evaluated for the numerical solution of one-dimensional model, and the computational setups include physiologically motivated non-periodic (Windkessel) and periodic boundary conditions (BC) (structured tree) and elastic and viscoelastic wall laws. Both the PHCGCC and the PGO implementations improved the execution time significantly. The speed-up values over the single-threaded CPU only implementation range from 5.26 to 8.10 × , whereas the speed-up values over the multi-threaded CPU only implementation range from 1.84 to 4.02 × . The PHCGCC algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with non-periodic BC and for viscoelastic wall laws, whereas the PGO algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with periodic BC. PMID:24009129

  5. Large scale neural circuit mapping data analysis accelerated with the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yulin; Veidenbaum, Alexander V.; Nicolau, Alex; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern neuroscience research demands computing power. Neural circuit mapping studies such as those using laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) produce large amounts of data and require intensive computation for post-hoc processing and analysis. New Method Here we report on the design and implementation of a cost-effective desktop computer system for accelerated experimental data processing with recent GPU computing technology. A new version of Matlab software with GPU enabled functions is used to develop programs that run on Nvidia GPUs to harness their parallel computing power. Results We evaluated both the central processing unit (CPU) and GPU-enabled computational performance of our system in benchmark testing and practical applications. The experimental results show that the GPU-CPU co-processing of simulated data and actual LSPS experimental data clearly outperformed the multi-core CPU with up to a 22x speedup, depending on computational tasks. Further, we present a comparison of numerical accuracy between GPU and CPU computation to verify the precision of GPU computation. In addition, we show how GPUs can be effectively adapted to improve the performance of commercial image processing software such as Adobe Photoshop. Comparison with Existing Method(s) To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GPU application in neural circuit mapping and electrophysiology-based data processing. Conclusions Together, GPU enabled computation enhances our ability to process large-scale data sets derived from neural circuit mapping studies, allowing for increased processing speeds while retaining data precision. PMID:25277633

  6. Acceleration of High Angular Momentum Electron Repulsion Integrals and Integral Derivatives on Graphics Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yipu; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-04-14

    We present an efficient implementation of ab initio self-consistent field (SCF) energy and gradient calculations that run on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) enabled graphical processing units (GPUs) using recurrence relations. We first discuss the machine-generated code that calculates the electron-repulsion integrals (ERIs) for different ERI types. Next we describe the porting of the SCF gradient calculation to GPUs, which results in an acceleration of the computation of the first-order derivative of the ERIs. However, only s, p, and d ERIs and s and p derivatives could be executed simultaneously on GPUs using the current version of CUDA and generation of NVidia GPUs using a previously described algorithm [Miao and Merz J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 965-976.]. Hence, we developed an algorithm to compute f type ERIs and d type ERI derivatives on GPUs. Our benchmarks shows the performance GPU enable ERI and ERI derivative computation yielded speedups of 10-18 times relative to traditional CPU execution. An accuracy analysis using double-precision calculations demonstrates that the overall accuracy is satisfactory for most applications. PMID:26574356

  7. Using Graphical Processing Units to Accelerate Orthorectification, Atmospheric Correction and Transformations for Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. S.; Justice, B.; Harris, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are high-performance multiple-core processors capable of very high computational speeds and large data throughput. Modern GPUs are inexpensive and widely available commercially. These are general-purpose parallel processors with support for a variety of programming interfaces, including industry standard languages such as C. GPU implementations of algorithms that are well suited for parallel processing can often achieve speedups of several orders of magnitude over optimized CPU codes. Significant improvements in speeds for imagery orthorectification, atmospheric correction, target detection and image transformations like Independent Components Analsyis (ICA) have been achieved using GPU-based implementations. Additional optimizations, when factored in with GPU processing capabilities, can provide 50x - 100x reduction in the time required to process large imagery. Exelis Visual Information Solutions (VIS) has implemented a CUDA based GPU processing frame work for accelerating ENVI and IDL processes that can best take advantage of parallelization. Testing Exelis VIS has performed shows that orthorectification can take as long as two hours with a WorldView1 35,0000 x 35,000 pixel image. With GPU orthorecification, the same orthorectification process takes three minutes. By speeding up image processing, imagery can successfully be used by first responders, scientists making rapid discoveries with near real time data, and provides an operational component to data centers needing to quickly process and disseminate data.

  8. Bone Proteoglycan Changes During Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Uzawa, K.; Pornprasertsuk, S.; Arnaud, S.; Grindeland, R.; Grzesik, W.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal adaptability to mechanical loads is well known since the last century. Disuse osteopenia due to the microgravity environment is one of the major concerns for space travelers. Several studies have indicated that a retardation of the mineralization process and a delay in matrix maturation occur during the space flight. Mineralizing fibrillar type I collagen possesses distinct cross-linking chemistries and their dynamic changes during mineralization correlate well with its function as a mineral organizer. Our previous studies suggested that a certain group of matrix proteoglycans in bone play an inhibitory role in the mineralization process through their interaction with collagen. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the altered mineralization during spaceflight is due in part to changes in matrix components secreted by cells in response to microgravity. In this study, we employed hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) rat model to study the effects of skeletal unloading on matrix proteoglycans in bone.

  9. Hindlimb unloading: rodent analog for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Globus, Ruth K; Morey-Holton, Emily

    2016-05-15

    The rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) model was developed in the 1980s to make it possible to study mechanisms, responses, and treatments for the adverse consequences of spaceflight. Decades before development of the HU model, weightlessness was predicted to yield deficits in the principal tissues responsible for structure and movement on Earth, primarily muscle and bone. Indeed, results from early spaceflight and HU experiments confirmed the expected sensitivity of the musculoskeletal system to gravity loading. Results from human and animal spaceflight and HU experiments show that nearly all organ systems and tissues studied display some measurable changes, albeit sometimes minor and of uncertain relevance to astronaut health. The focus of this review is to examine key HU results for various organ systems including those related to stress; the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems; vision changes; and wound healing. Analysis of the validity of the HU model is important given its potential value for both hypothesis testing and countermeasure development. PMID:26869711

  10. 27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW SKIP TIES UP AT DOCK. THE UNLOADERS OPERATE ALMOST CONTINUOUSLY DURING THE SHIPPING SEASON, WHICH USUALLY RUNS FROM APRIL UNTIL LATE DECEMBER OR EARLY JANUARY. VIEW HERE IS LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT END AND REAR LEGS OF THE HULETT UNLOADERS ARE LAID ON THE DOCK AND REAR WALLS, RESPECTIVELY; BOTH WALLS ARE MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SUPPORTED ON CONCRETE PILES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Grain Unloading of Arsenic Species in Rice

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Norton, Gareth J.; Charnock, John M.; Feldmann, Joerg; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2010-01-11

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for over half the world's population yet may represent a significant dietary source of inorganic arsenic (As), a nonthreshold, class 1 human carcinogen. Rice grain As is dominated by the inorganic species, and the organic species dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). To investigate how As species are unloaded into grain rice, panicles were excised during grain filling and hydroponically pulsed with arsenite, arsenate, glutathione-complexed As, or DMA. Total As concentrations in flag leaf, grain, and husk, were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and As speciation in the fresh grain was determined by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. The roles of phloem and xylem transport were investigated by applying a {+-} stem-girdling treatment to a second set of panicles, limiting phloem transport to the grain in panicles pulsed with arsenite or DMA. The results demonstrate that DMA is translocated to the rice grain with over an order magnitude greater efficiency than inorganic species and is more mobile than arsenite in both the phloem and the xylem. Phloem transport accounted for 90% of arsenite, and 55% of DMA, transport to the grain. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence mapping and fluorescence microtomography revealed marked differences in the pattern of As unloading into the grain between DMA and arsenite-challenged grain. Arsenite was retained in the ovular vascular trace and DMA dispersed throughout the external grain parts and into the endosperm. This study also demonstrates that DMA speciation is altered in planta, potentially through complexation with thiols.

  13. Investigation of Accelerated Partial Breast Patient Alignment and Treatment With Helical Tomotherapy Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja M. Buchholz, Daniel J.; Burch, Doug R. C.; Burkavage, Rob C.; Limaye, Arti U.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Henderson, Doug; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the precision of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)-based alignment of the seroma cavity for patients undergoing partial breast irradiation; and to determine whether accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) plans can be generated for TomoTherapy deliveries that meet the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol guidelines for target coverage and normal tissue dose limitations. Methods and Materials: We obtained 50 MVCT images from 10 patients. An interuser study was designed to assess the alignment precision. Using a standard helical and a fixed beam prototype ('topotherapy') optimizer, two APBI plans for each patient were developed. Results: The precision of the MVCT-based seroma cavity alignment was better than 2 mm if averaged over the patient population. Both treatment techniques could be used to generate acceptable APBI plans for patients that fulfilled the recommended NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 selection criteria. For plans of comparable treatment time, the conformation of the prescription dose to the target was greater for helical deliveries, while the ipsilateral lung dose was significantly reduced for the topotherapy plans. Conclusions: The inherent volumetric imaging capabilities of a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit allow for alignment of patients undergoing partial breast irradiation that is determined from the visibility of the seroma cavity on the MVCT image. The precision of the MVCT-based alignment was better than 2 mm ({+-} standard deviation) when averaged over the patient population. Using the NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 guidelines, acceptable APBI treatment plans can be generated using helical- or topotherapy-based delivery techniques.

  14. Right Ventricular Dysfunction During Intensive Pharmacologic Unloading Persists After Mechanical Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Palardy, Maryse; Nohria, Anju; Rivero, Jose; Lakdawala, Neal; Campbell, Patricia; Kato, Mahoto; Griffin, Leslie M.; Smith, Colleen M.; Couper, Gregory S.; Stevenson, Lynne W.; Givertz, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure (HF). Mechanical unloading should be more effective than pharmacologic therapy to reduce RV afterload and improve RV function. We compared RV size and function after aggressive medical unloading therapy to that achieved in the same patients after 3 months of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. Methods and Results We studied twenty patients who underwent isolated LVAD placement (9 pulsatile and 11 axial flow). Echocardiograms were performed after inpatient optimization with diuretic and inotropic therapy and compared to studies done after 3 months of LVAD support. After medical optimization right atrial pressure was 11±5 mm Hg, mean pulmonary artery pressure 36±11 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure 23±9 mm Hg, and cardiac index 2.0±0.6 L/min/m2. Pre-operatively, RV dysfunction was moderate (2.6 ±0.9 on 0-4 scale), RV diameter at the base was 3.1±0.6 cm, and mid-RV was 3.5±0.6 cm. After median LVAD support of 123 days (92-170), RV size and global RV dysfunction (2.6 ±0.9) failed to improve, despite reduced RV afterload. Conclusions RV dysfunction seen on intensive medical therapy persisted after 3 months of LVAD unloading therapy. Selection of candidates for isolated LV support should anticipate persistence of RV dysfunction observed on inotropic therapy. PMID:20206896

  15. Muscle sarcomere lesions and thrombosis after spaceflight and suspension unloading

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.A.; Ellis, S.; Giometti, C.S.; Hoh, J.F.Y.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.I.; Oganov, V.S.; Slocum, G.R.; Bain, J.L.W.; Sedlak, F.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Extended exposure of humans to spaceflight produces a progressive loss of skeletal muscle strength. This process must be understood to design effective countermeasures. The present investigation examined hindlimb muscles from flight rats killed as close to landing as possible. Spaceflight and tail suspension-hindlimb unloading (unloaded) produced significant decreases in fiber cross-sectional areas of the adductor longus (AL), a slow-twitch antigravity muscle. However, the mean wet weight of the flight AL muscles was near normal, whereas that of the suspension unloaded AL muscles was significantly reduced. Interstitial edema within the flight AL, but not in the unloaded AL, appeared to account for this apparent disagreement.In both conditions, the slow-twitch oxidative fibers atrophied more than the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers. Microcirculation was also compromised by spaceflight, such that there was increased formation of thrombi in the postcapillary venules and capillaries.

  16. Looking southeast at coal conveyor leading from the coal unloading ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southeast at coal conveyor leading from the coal unloading station to the coal elevator. - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  17. CLOSE UP VIEW OF MILL FROM KEKAHA ROAD, WITH UNLOADER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE UP VIEW OF MILL FROM KEKAHA ROAD, WITH UNLOADER AND CRUSHING MILL WING IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FROM THE NORTHEAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  18. VIEW OF UNLOADING STATION THAT WAS ADDED IN 1997. SUGAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF UNLOADING STATION THAT WAS ADDED IN 1997. SUGAR BIN AND MILL IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE NORTHEAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  19. CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERNMOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERN-MOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS IN ASSOCIATION. LOOKING SOUTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Theseus Nose and Pod Cones Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading the nose and pod cones of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  1. Solder joint aging characteristics from the MC2918 firing set of a B61 accelerated aging unit (AAU)

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The B61 accelerated aging unit (AAU) provided a unique opportunity to document the effects of a controlled, long-term thermal cycling environment on the aging of materials used in the device. This experiment was of particular interest to solder technologists because thermal cycling environments are a predominant source of solder joint failures in electronic assemblies. Observations of through hole solder joints in the MC2918 Firing Set from the B61 AAU did not reveal signs of catastrophic failure. Quantitative analyses of the microstructural metrics of intermetallic compound layer thickness and Pb-rich phase particle distributions indicated solder joint aging that was commensurate with the accelerated aging environment. The effects of stress-enhanced coarsening of the Pb-rich phase were also documented.

  2. 49 CFR 173.30 - Loading and unloading of transport vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. 173... § 173.30 Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. A person who is subject to the loading and unloading regulations in this subchapter must load or unload hazardous materials into or from a...

  3. 49 CFR 173.30 - Loading and unloading of transport vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. 173... § 173.30 Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. A person who is subject to the loading and unloading regulations in this subchapter must load or unload hazardous materials into or from a...

  4. 49 CFR 173.30 - Loading and unloading of transport vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. 173... § 173.30 Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. A person who is subject to the loading and unloading regulations in this subchapter must load or unload hazardous materials into or from a...

  5. 49 CFR 173.30 - Loading and unloading of transport vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. 173... § 173.30 Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. A person who is subject to the loading and unloading regulations in this subchapter must load or unload hazardous materials into or from a...

  6. 49 CFR 173.30 - Loading and unloading of transport vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. 173... § 173.30 Loading and unloading of transport vehicles. A person who is subject to the loading and unloading regulations in this subchapter must load or unload hazardous materials into or from a...

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 min. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approx.10 times less and typical durations are approx.1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of sub storms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere. suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby.

  8. MESSENGER observations of extreme loading and unloading of Mercury's magnetic tail.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel M; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetic tail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 minutes. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is lower by a factor of approximately 10 and typical durations are approximately 1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of substorms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines the substorm time scale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby. PMID:20647422

  9. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process.

  10. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process. PMID:26764700

  11. Accelerated Clean-up of the United States Department of Energy, Mound Nuclear Weapons Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Lehew, J.G.; Bradford, J.D.; Cabbil, C.C.

    2006-07-01

    CH2M HILL is executing a performance-based contract with the United States Department of Energy to accelerate the safe closure of the nuclear facilities at the former Mound plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. The contract started in January 2003 with a target completion date of March 31, 2006. Our accelerated baseline targets completion of the project 2 years ahead of the previous baseline schedule, by spring 2006, and for $200 million less than previous estimates. This unique decommissioning and remediation project is located within the City of Miamisburg proper and is designed for transfer of the property to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse. The project is being performed with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and their tenants co-located on the site creating significant logistical, safety and stakeholder challenges. The project is also being performed in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy, United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency under the Mound 2000 regulatory cleanup process. The project is currently over 95% complete. To achieve cleanup and closure of the Mound site, CH2M HILL's scope includes: - Demolition of 64 nuclear, radiological and commercial facilities - Preparation for Transfer of 9 facilities (including a Category 2 nuclear facility) to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse - Removal of all above ground utility structures and components, and preparation for transfer of 9 utility systems to Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation - Investigation, remediation, closure, and documentation of all known Potential Release Sites contaminated with radiological and chemical contamination (73 identified in original contract) - Storage, characterization, processing, packaging and shipment of all waste and excess nuclear materials - Preparation for Transfer of the 306 acre site to the

  12. Concurrent validity of accelerations measured using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cole, Michael H; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W; Smeathers, James E; Kerr, Graham K

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s(-2)). Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: -0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s(-2)), whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: -0.16 to -0.02 vs. -0.07 to 0.07 m.s(-2)). The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments. PMID:24866262

  13. Concurrent Validity of Accelerations Measured Using a Tri-Axial Inertial Measurement Unit while Walking on Firm, Compliant and Uneven Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael H.; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K.; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W.; Smeathers, James E.; Kerr, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s−2). Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: −0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s−2), whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: −0.16 to −0.02 vs. −0.07 to 0.07 m.s−2). The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments. PMID:24866262

  14. Dosimetric characteristics of linear accelerator photon beams with small monitor unit settings.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Hwang, Taejin; Cho, Byung Chul; Kim, Su Ssan; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2008-11-01

    Several studies on the effect of tumor cell killing by dose rate variation have implied that the use of a shorter treatment time is more favorable for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Aiming at step-and-shoot IMRT with higher dose rates, the stabilities of beam output and profiles with small monitor unit (MU) settings were investigated for various dose rates. With the use of a Varian 21EX (Varian Medical Systems Inc., Palo Alto, CA), static and step-and-shoot IMRT beam output along with profiles were measured by use of an ion chamber and a two-dimensional diode array detector as a function of monitor units and dose rates. For a static case, as the MU approached 1, the beam output increased up to 2% for 300 MU/min and 4.5% for 600 MU/min, showing a larger overdose as the dose rate increased. Deterioration of the beam symmetry and flatness were also observed as the MU decreased to 1 monitor unit. For the step-and-shoot IMRT case, a large dosimetric error of more than 10% was also detected with the use of a small MU segment. However, no definite correlation with the dose rate was observed due to the combined beam start-up effects by the grid pulse and finite communication time between the machine console and multileaf collimator (MLC) controller. For step-and-shoot IMRT with higher dose rates, beam output and beam profile stability with small MU needs to be checked, and adequate MU limitation where segments are not allowed need to be reflected in the step-and-shoot IMRT planning. PMID:19070251

  15. The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) for GOES-R: Accelerator Calibrations of Flight Unit 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) instruments for GOES-R will provide high resolution measurement of energetic ions (Solar energetic particles and cosmic rays) from hydrogen (H) through nickel (Ni) for space weather monitoring and scientific research. Measurements are taken in five approximately logarithmically spaced energy intervals from 10-200 MeV/u for hydrogen and helium (He) and comparable penetrations for heavier elements. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS) technique is used to provide single element resolution by determining the angle of incidence with a very simple telescope design using Si solid state detectors. The ADIS system also facilitates on-board event identification of ion species. During high flux conditions, EHIS can identify the elemental composition of ~2000 events per seconds. Elemental charge histograms are compiled on-board and reported via telemetry once per minute providing an unprecedented combination of statistical resolution and high cadence. The first of four flight instruments (FM1) has been completed. FM1 underwent heavy ion accelerator calibration at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF) at Michigan State University in February 2013 and proton calibration at the Massachusetts General Hospital's (MGH) Burr Proton Therapy Center in April 2013. The heavy ion calibration included both Ni primary and secondary fragments runs down to H. Results of these calibration runs will be presented. This work is supported by NASA under the contract NNG06HX01C.

  16. The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) for GOES-R: Accelerator Calibrations of Flight Unit 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS) instruments for GOES-R will provide high resolution measurement of energetic ions (Solar energetic particles and cosmic rays) from hydrogen (H) through nickel (Ni) for space weather monitoring and scientific research. Measurements are taken in five approximately logarithmically spaced energy intervals from 10-200 MeV/u for hydrogen and helium (He) and comparable penetrations for heavier elements. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS) technique is used to provide single element resolution by determining the angle of incidence with a very simple telescope design using Si solid state detectors. The ADIS system also facilitates on-board event identification of ion species. During high flux conditions, EHIS can identify the elemental composition of ~2000 events per seconds. Elemental charge histograms are compiled on-board and reported via telemetry once per minute providing an unprecedented combination of statistical resolution and high cadence. The first of four flight instruments (FM1) has been completed. FM1 underwent heavy ion accelerator calibration at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF) at Michigan State University in February 2013, and proton calibration at the Massachusetts General Hospital's (MGH) Burr Proton Therapy Center in April 2013. The heavy ion calibration included both Ni primary and secondary fragments runs down to H. Results of these calibration runs will be presented.

  17. Monte Carlo-based fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction method accelerated by a cluster of graphic processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Guotao; Gong, Hui; Deng, Yong; Fu, Jianwei; Luo, Qingming

    2011-02-01

    High-speed fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction for 3-D heterogeneous media is still one of the most challenging problems in diffusive optical fluorescence imaging. In this paper, we propose a fast FMT reconstruction method that is based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and accelerated by a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs). Based on the Message Passing Interface standard, we modified the MC code for fast FMT reconstruction, and different Green's functions representing the flux distribution in media are calculated simultaneously by different GPUs in the cluster. A load-balancing method was also developed to increase the computational efficiency. By applying the Fréchet derivative, a Jacobian matrix is formed to reconstruct the distribution of the fluorochromes using the calculated Green's functions. Phantom experiments have shown that only 10 min are required to get reconstruction results with a cluster of 6 GPUs, rather than 6 h with a cluster of multiple dual opteron CPU nodes. Because of the advantages of high accuracy and suitability for 3-D heterogeneity media with refractive-index-unmatched boundaries from the MC simulation, the GPU cluster-accelerated method provides a reliable approach to high-speed reconstruction for FMT imaging.

  18. Segment of Challenger's right wing unloaded at KSC Logistics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    a 9'7' x 16' segment of Challenger's right wing is unloaded at the Logistics Facility after being off-loaded from the rescue and salvage ship USS Opportune. It was located and recovered by Navy divers from the Opportune about 12 nautical miles northeast of Cape Canaveral in 70 feet of water.

  19. 2. PHOSPHATE UNLOADING BUILDING. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PHOSPHATE UNLOADING BUILDING. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH. THIS STRUCTURE WAS RELOCATED TO THE SOUTH OF ITS ORIGINAL SITE IN 1993 FOR USE AS A DECONTAMINATION FACILITY WITHIN THE BUNKER HILL SUPERFUND SITE. - North Idaho Phosphate Company, Silver King Community, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  20. Calf Strength Loss During Mechanical Unloading: Does It Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, K. L.; Mulavara, A.; Bloomberg, J.; Ploutz-Snyder, LL

    2016-01-01

    During the mechanical unloading of spaceflight and its ground-based analogs, muscle mass and muscle strength of the calf are difficult to preserve despite exercise countermeasures that effectively protect these parameters in the thigh. It is unclear what effects these local losses have on balance and whole body function which will be essential for successful performance of demanding tasks during future exploration missions.

  1. Calf Strength Loss During Mechanical Unloading: Does It Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    During the mechanical unloading of spaceflight and its ground-based analogs, muscle mass and muscle strength of the calf are difficult to preserve despite exercise countermeasures that effectively protect these parameters in the thigh. It is unclear what effects these local losses have on balance and whole body function which will be essential for successful performance of demanding tasks during future exploration missions

  2. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF LOG POND AND BOOM FOR UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF LOG POND AND BOOM FOR UNLOADING CEDAR LOGS FROM TRUCKS AT LOG DUMP, ADJACENT TO MILL; TRUCKS FORMERLY USED TRIP STAKES, THOUGH FOR SAFER HANDLING OF LOGS WELDED STAKES ARE NOW REQUIRED; AS A RESULT LOADING IS NOW DONE WITH A CRANE - Lester Shingle Mill, 1602 North Eighteenth Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, OR

  3. 49 CFR 174.67 - Tank car unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration requirements in 29 CFR 1910.119 and 1910.120) in a location where they are immediately available..., the car must be unloaded through the dome. If the obstruction is frozen liquid and no crack has been... fitted with a cap or plug of appropriate material and construction. (3) The piping extends no more...

  4. 49 CFR 174.67 - Tank car unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration requirements in 29 CFR 1910.119 and 1910.120) in a location where they are immediately available..., the car must be unloaded through the dome. If the obstruction is frozen liquid and no crack has been... fitted with a cap or plug of appropriate material and construction. (3) The piping extends no more...

  5. 49 CFR 174.67 - Tank car unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration requirements in 29 CFR 1910.119 and 1910.120) in a location where they are immediately available..., the car must be unloaded through the dome. If the obstruction is frozen liquid and no crack has been... fitted with a cap or plug of appropriate material and construction. (3) The piping extends no more...

  6. 49 CFR 174.67 - Tank car unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration requirements in 29 CFR 1910.119 and 1910.120) in a location where they are immediately available..., the car must be unloaded through the dome. If the obstruction is frozen liquid and no crack has been... fitted with a cap or plug of appropriate material and construction. (3) The piping extends no more...

  7. 49 CFR 174.67 - Tank car unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration requirements in 29 CFR 1910.119 and 1910.120) in a location where they are immediately available..., the car must be unloaded through the dome. If the obstruction is frozen liquid and no crack has been... fitted with a cap or plug of appropriate material and construction. (3) The piping extends no more...

  8. 4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF YAKI TRAIL. APPROXIMATELY TWO-AND-ONE-HALF TONS OF STEEL ON ANIMALS SHOWN. NOTE COIL OF 1-1/2' WIND CABLE IN FOREGROUND. - Kaibab Trail Suspension Bridge, Spanning Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  9. 29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE M. HUMPHREY'S' CARGO OF 25,000. TONS OF ORE. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. 18. THREEQUARTER VIEW OF HULETT UNLOADERS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. IF INCOMING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. THREE-QUARTER VIEW OF HULETT UNLOADERS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. IF INCOMING ORE IS NOT TO BE SHIPPED IMMEDIATELY, THE 'LARRYMAN' MOVES HIS CARLOAD OF ORE ALONG THE CANTILEVER AT THE REAR OF THE HULETT AND DEPOSITS IT INTO THE STORAGE YARD. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ORE BOAT. BY LATE WINTER, THE ORE STORAGE YARD SEEN AT LEFT WILL BE DEPLETED. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. 10. LOOKING DOWN ON TUG AND CAR FLOAT BEING UNLOADED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING DOWN ON TUG AND CAR FLOAT BEING UNLOADED AT BRIDGE NO. 11 SHOWING TRACK, LOCKING MECHANISMS, AND MOORING WINCH IN FOREGROUND. LOOKING EAST. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  13. 40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-39) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. 39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. Skeletal unloading and dietary copper depletion are detrimental to bone quality of mature rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brenda J.; King, Jarrod B.; Lucas, Edralin A.; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Arjmandi, Bahram H.; Stoecker, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the skeletal response to copper depletion and mechanical unloading in mature animals. In a 2 x 2 experimental design, 5.5-mo-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36) consumed either the control (AIN-93M) or Cu-depletion ((-)Cu) diet beginning 21 d before suspension and throughout the remainder of the study. Half of the rats in each dietary treatment group were either tail-suspended (TS) or kept ambulatory (AMB) for 28 d. Lower bone mineral densities (BMD) of 5th lumbar vertebra (L5) (P < 0.05) and femur were observed with (-)Cu and TS, but no differences were noted in the BMD of the humerus. Mechanical strength in the femur and vertebra decreased in response to TS, but were unaffected by copper depletion. Urinary deoxypyridinoline, an index of bone resorption, was significantly greater in TS rats, but unaltered by (-)Cu. No changes in serum or bone alkaline phosphatase activity, an indicator of bone formation, were observed. Our findings suggest that TS and (-)Cu decreased BMD in unloaded femur and vertebra but had no effect on normally loaded humerus. Bone loss with TS appeared to be related to accelerated bone resorption. Alterations in bone metabolism and bone mechanical properties in the mature skeleton resulting from (-)Cu warrant further investigation.

  16. Vulnerability to dysfunction and muscle injury after unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Tesch, P. A.; Hather, B. M.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle injury. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SETTING: General community. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Two women and 5 men (73 +/- 3kg [mean +/- SE]) who were active college students but were not trained in lower body resistance exercise volunteered. INTERVENTION: Five weeks of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), which has been shown to decrease strength and size of the unloaded, left, but not load-bearing, right quadriceps femoris muscle group (QF) by 20% and 14%, respectively; performance of 10 sets of ten eccentric actions with each QF immediately after the ULLS strength tests with a load equivalent to 65% of the post-ULLS eccentric 1-repetition maximum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the left, unloaded and the right, load-bearing QF measured immediately after ULLS and 1,4,7,9, and 11 days later; cross-sectional area and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of each QF as determined by magnetic resonance imaging and measured the last day of ULLS and 3 days later. RESULTS: The mean load used for eccentric exercise was 23 +/- 2 and 30 +/- 3kg for the left, unloaded and right, load-bearing QF, respectively. The concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the unloaded and already weakened left QF was further decreased by 18% (p = .000) and 27% (p = .000), respectively, 1 day after eccentric exercise. Strength did not return to post-ULLS levels until 7 days of recovery. The right, load-bearing QF showed a 4% decrease (p = .002) in the eccentric 1-repetition maximum 1 day after eccentric exercise. The left, unloaded QF showed an increase in T2 (p = .002) in 18% of its cross-sectional area 3 days after the eccentric exercise, thus indicating muscle injury. The right, load-bearing QF showed no elevation in T2 (p = .280). CONCLUSION: Unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle

  17. Analysis of Acceleration, Airspeed, and Gust-Velocity Data From a Four-Engine Transport Airplane Operating Over a Northwestern United States Alaska Route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Jerome N.; Copp, Martin R.

    1959-01-01

    Acceleration, airspeed, and altitude data obtained with an NACA VGH recorder from a four-engine commercial transport airplane operating over a northwestern United States-Alaska route were evaluated to determine the magnitude and frequency of occurrence of gust and maneuver accelerations., operating airspeeds, and gust velocities. The results obtained were then compared with the results previously reported in NACA Technical Note 3475 for two similar airplanes operating over transcontinental routes in the United States. No large variations in the gust experience for the three operations were noted. The results indicate that the gust-load experience of the present operation closely approximated that of the central transcontinental route in the United States with which it is compared and showed differences of about 4 to 1 when compared with that of the southern transcontinental route in the United States. In general, accelerations due to gusts occurred much more frequently than those due to operational maneuvers. At a measured normal-acceleration increment of 0.5g, accelerations due to gusts occurred roughly 35 times more frequently than those due to operational maneuvers.

  18. Grid-based algorithm to search critical points, in the electron density, accelerated by graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Esparza, Raymundo; Mejía-Chica, Sol-Milena; Zapata-Escobar, Andy D; Guevara-García, Alfredo; Martínez-Melchor, Apolinar; Hernández-Pérez, Julio-M; Vargas, Rubicelia; Garza, Jorge

    2014-12-01

    Using a grid-based method to search the critical points in electron density, we show how to accelerate such a method with graphics processing units (GPUs). When the GPU implementation is contrasted with that used on central processing units (CPUs), we found a large difference between the time elapsed by both implementations: the smallest time is observed when GPUs are used. We tested two GPUs, one related with video games and other used for high-performance computing (HPC). By the side of the CPUs, two processors were tested, one used in common personal computers and other used for HPC, both of last generation. Although our parallel algorithm scales quite well on CPUs, the same implementation on GPUs runs around 10× faster than 16 CPUs, with any of the tested GPUs and CPUs. We have found what one GPU dedicated for video games can be used without any problem for our application, delivering a remarkable performance, in fact; this GPU competes against one HPC GPU, in particular when single-precision is used. PMID:25345784

  19. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  20. Graphic processing unit accelerated real-time partially coherent beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xiaolong; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Chunyi; Jiang, Huilin; Fang, Hanhan; Song, Lujun; Zhang, Su

    2016-07-01

    A method of using liquid-crystals (LCs) to generate a partially coherent beam in real-time is described. An expression for generating a partially coherent beam is given and calculated using a graphic processing unit (GPU), i.e., the GeForce GTX 680. A liquid-crystal on silicon (LCOS) with 256 × 256 pixels is used as the partially coherent beam generator (PCBG). An optimizing method with partition convolution is used to improve the generating speed of our LC PCBG. The total time needed to generate a random phase map with a coherence width range from 0.015 mm to 1.5 mm is less than 2.4 ms for calculation and readout with the GPU; adding the time needed for the CPU to read and send to LCOS with the response time of the LC PCBG, the real-time partially coherent beam (PCB) generation frequency of our LC PCBG is up to 312 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first real-time partially coherent beam generator. A series of experiments based on double pinhole interference are performed. The result shows that to generate a laser beam with a coherence width of 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, with a mean error of approximately 1%, the RMS values needed 0.021306 and 0.020883 and the PV values required 0.073576 and 0.072998, respectively.

  1. 48 CFR 52.247-15 - Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading (APR 1984) (a)(1) Unless otherwise specified in this contract to cover store-door or inside delivery, the Contractor shall load and unload shipments at...

  2. 48 CFR 52.247-15 - Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading (APR 1984) (a)(1) Unless otherwise specified in this contract to cover store-door or inside delivery, the Contractor shall load and unload shipments at...

  3. 48 CFR 52.247-15 - Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading (APR 1984) (a)(1) Unless otherwise specified in this contract to cover store-door or inside delivery, the Contractor shall load and unload shipments at...

  4. 48 CFR 52.247-15 - Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading (APR 1984) (a)(1) Unless otherwise specified in this contract to cover store-door or inside delivery, the Contractor shall load and unload shipments at...

  5. 48 CFR 52.247-15 - Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Contractor Responsibility for Loading and Unloading (APR 1984) (a)(1) Unless otherwise specified in this contract to cover store-door or inside delivery, the Contractor shall load and unload shipments at...

  6. Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Analysis of Loading-Unloading Behaviour in Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloy sheets exhibit strong inelastic response during unloading. In this study crystal plasticity finite element analysis of loading-unloading behaviour during uniaxial tension in a rolled magnesium alloy sheet was carried out, and the mechanism of this inelastic response was examined in detail in terms of macroscopic and mesoscopic deformations. The unloading behaviour obtained by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment in terms of variation with stress of instantaneous tangent modulus during unloading. Variations of activities of each family of slip systems during the deformation showed that the activation of basal slip systems is the largest during unloading, and the slip direction during unloading is opposite from during loading. These results indicated that one of the factors of the inelastic behaviour during unloading is the fact that the basal slip systems are easily activated during unloading because of their low strengths.

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, a series of 2-3 minute long enhancements of the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail were observed. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approximately 10 times less and the durations are 1 hr. These observations of extreme loading imply that the relative intensity of substorms at Mercury must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail enhancements and the calculated approximately 2 min Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles. Such signatures are puzzlingly absent from the MESSENGER flyby measurements.

  8. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  9. Rat limb unloading - Soleus histochemistry, ultrastructure, and electromyography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Slocum, G. R.; Bain, J. L. W.; Sedlak, F. R.; Sowa, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hindlimb unloading on rat-soleus histochemisty, ultrastructure, and electromyogram (EMG) activity were investigated. It was found that, after 14 days of tail suspension, the area of type I and type IIa muscle fibers decreased by 63 and 47 percent, respectively, mainly due to the degradation of subsarcolemmal mitochondria and myofibrils. After 10 days, 3 percent of type IIa fibers exhibited segmental necrosis. After four days, video monitoring revealed abnormal plantar flexion of the hindfeet, which shortened the soleus working range. The EMG activity shifted from tonic to phasic, and aggregate activity decreased drastically after only seven days. The results indictate that the pathological changes in the soleus resulted from unloaded contractions, reduced use, compromised blood flow, and shortened working length.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  11. No-dependent signaling pathways in unloaded skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana L.; Lomonosova, Yulia N.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of the current review is the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signaling mechanism in unloaded skeletal. Review of the published data describing muscles during physical activity and inactivity demonstrates that NO is an essential trigger of signaling processes, which leads to structural and metabolic changes of the muscle fibers. The experiments with modulation of NO-synthase (NOS) activity during muscle unloading demonstrate the ability of an activated enzyme to stabilize degradation processes and prevent development of muscle atrophy. Various forms of muscle mechanical activity, i.e., plantar afferent stimulation, resistive exercise and passive chronic stretch increase the content of neural NOS (nNOS) and thus may facilitate an increase in NO production. Recent studies demonstrate that NO-synthase participates in the regulation of protein and energy metabolism in skeletal muscle by fine-tuning and stabilizing complex signaling systems which regulate protein synthesis and degradation in the fibers of inactive muscle. PMID:26582991

  12. Mass transport perspective on an accelerated exclusion process: Analysis of augmented current and unit-velocity phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Klumpp, Stefan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-02-01

    In an accelerated exclusion process (AEP), each particle can “hop” to its adjacent site if empty as well as “kick” the frontmost particle when joining a cluster of size ℓ⩽ℓmax. With various choices of the interaction range, ℓmax, we find that the steady state of AEP can be found in a homogeneous phase with augmented currents (AC) or a segregated phase with holes moving at unit velocity (UV). Here we present a detailed study on the emergence of the novel phases, from two perspectives: the AEP and a mass transport process (MTP). In the latter picture, the system in the UV phase is composed of a condensate in coexistence with a fluid, while the transition from AC to UV can be regarded as condensation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, exact results for special cases, and analytic methods in a mean field approach (within the MTP), we focus on steady state currents and cluster sizes. Excellent agreement between data and theory is found, providing an insightful picture for understanding this model system.

  13. Self-unloading, unmanned, reusable lunar lander project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, Kevin; Lewis, Ron; Mislinski, Philip; Rivers, Donna; Smith, Solar; Vasicek, Clifford; Verona, Matt

    1991-01-01

    A payload delivery system will be required to support the buildup and operation of a manned lunar base. In response, a self-unloading, unmanned, reusable lunar lander was conceptually designed. The lander will deliver a 7000 kg payload, with the same dimensions as a space station logistics module, from low lunar orbit to any location on the surface of the moon. The technical aspects of the design is introduced as well as the management structure and project cost.

  14. Unloaded Treadmill Training Therapy for Lumbar Disc Herniation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Steve; Bettis, Brad; Herbertson, James

    1996-01-01

    The low back region is an area that is very susceptible to injury in athletes. Running is an activity that can be significantly affected by chronic overuse stress. The athlete presented in this case report suffered a herniation of the disc between L-4 and L-5 while training for and racing in a national championship marathon. The athlete was placed on a treatment program of heat, electrical muscle stimulation, and strength and flexibility exercises. The athlete also continued to train by unloaded treadmill training therapy. Unloaded treadmill training therapy produced an effect that reduced stress on injured joints and tissue. This enabled the athlete to maintain fitness while running pain-free on this specialized equipment. The athlete trained twice a week for 16 weeks and training runs ranged from 3 miles to a half-marathon (13.1 miles). Unloaded amounts decreased from 20 to 3 pounds. Training times improved at all distances and were maintained following resumption of normal training. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558374

  15. Biochemical response to chronic shortening in unloaded soleus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    One leg of tail-casted suspended rats was immobilized in a plantar-flexed position to test whether chronic shortening of posterior leg muscles affected the metabolic response to unloading. The immobilized plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles of these animals showed approximately 20 percent loss of muscle mass in contrast to simply a slower growth rate with unloading. Loss of mass of the soleus muscle during suspension was not accentuated by chronic shortening. Although protein degradation in the isolated soleus muscle of the plantar-flexed limb was slightly faster than in the contralateral free limb, this difference was offset by faster synthesis of the myofibrillar protein fraction of the chronically shortened muscle. Total adenine nucleotides were 17 percent lower (P less than 0.005) in the chronically shortened soleus muscle following incubation. Glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism showed little response to chronic shortening. These results suggest that, in the soleus muscle, chronic shortening did not alter significantly the metabolic responses to unloading and reduced activity.

  16. Photoplethysmography system for blood pulsation detection in unloaded artery conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskis, A.; Marcinkevics, Z.; Rubenis, O.; Rubins, U.; Lusa, V.

    2012-06-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is an optical method of blood pulsation recording and has been extensively studied for decades. Recently PPG is widely used in the medical equipment for patient monitoring and in laboratories for research and physiological studies. In spite of the technological progress in the field of medical equipment, there are no generally accepted standards for clinical PPG measurements up to date. One of the most important factors affecting PPG waveform is the contact pressure between tissue and PPG probe. The aim of the current study was to develop and evaluate a system for software-assisted PPG signal acquisition from the unloaded artery. Novel PPG waveform derived Optimal Pressure Parameter (OPP) has been proposed as the reliable indicator of unloaded artery condition. We affirm that PPG measurements provided in balanced transmural arterial pressure conditions might serve as a reference for the unification of contact manner optical plethysmography methods. It is a step forward towards the standardization of the PPG methodology, and showed that the maximal value of the OPP, obtained in the particular experimental trial, indicates the optimal PPG probe contact pressure at that moment. Our developed system has been validated in the experimental series and showed the possibility of determining the correct PPG contact pressure value with high repeatability. It is concluded that this system can provide the necessary feedback to perform reliable PPG signal acquisition from the unloaded conduit artery.

  17. Experimental evidence of the tonic vibration reflex during whole-body vibration of the loaded and unloaded leg.

    PubMed

    Zaidell, Lisa N; Mileva, Katya N; Sumners, David P; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Increased muscle activation during whole-body vibration (WBV) is mainly ascribed to a complex spinal and supraspinal neurophysiological mechanism termed the tonic vibration reflex (TVR). However, TVR has not been experimentally demonstrated during low-frequency WBV, therefore this investigation aimed to determine the expression of TVR during WBV. Whilst seated, eight healthy males were exposed to either vertical WBV applied to the leg via the plantar-surface of the foot, or Achilles tendon vibration (ATV) at 25 Hz and 50 Hz for 70s. Ankle plantar-flexion force, tri-axial accelerations at the shank and vibration source, and surface EMG activity of m. soleus (SOL) and m. tibialis anterior (TA) were recorded from the unloaded and passively loaded leg to simulate body mass supported during standing. Plantar flexion force was similarly augmented by WBV and ATV and increased over time in a load- and frequency dependent fashion. SOL and TA EMG amplitudes increased over time in all conditions independently of vibration mode. 50 Hz WBV and ATV resulted in greater muscle activation than 25 Hz in SOL when the shank was loaded and in TA when the shank was unloaded despite the greater transmission of vertical acceleration from source to shank with 25 Hz and WBV, especially during loading. Low-amplitude WBV of the unloaded and passively loaded leg produced slow tonic muscle contraction and plantar-flexion force increase of similar magnitudes to those induced by Achilles tendon vibration at the same frequencies. This study provides the first experimental evidence supporting the TVR as a plausible mechanism underlying the neuromuscular response to whole-body vibration. PMID:24386466

  18. The impact of skeletal unloading on bone formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Sakata, Takeshi; Halloran, Bernard P.

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal unloading leads to decreased bone formation and decreased bone mass. Bone resorption is uncoupled from bone formation, contributing to the bone loss. During space flight bone is lost principally from the bones most loaded in the 1 g environment. Determining the mechanism(s) by which loading of bone is sensed and translated into a signal(s) controlling bone formation remains the holy grail in this field. It seems likely that matrix/cell interactions will underlie much of the mechanocoupling. Integrins are a prime mediator of such interactions. The role for systemic hormones such as PTH, GH and 1,25(OH)2D compared to locally produced factors such as IGF-I, PTHrP, BMPs and TGF beta in modulating the cellular response to load remains unclear. Our studies demonstrate that skeletal unloading leads to resistance to the anabolic actions of IGF-I on bone as a result of failure of IGF-I to activate its own signaling pathways. This is associated with a reduction in integrin expression, suggesting crosstalk between these two pathways. As the mechanism(s) by which bone responds to changes in mechanical load with changes in bone formation is further elucidated, applications of this knowledge to other etiologies of osteoporosis are likely to develop. Skeletal unloading provides a perturbation in bone mineral homeostasis that can be used to understand the mechanisms by which bone mineral homeostasis is maintained, and that such understanding will lead to effective treatment for disuse osteoporosis in addition to preventive measures for the bone loss that accompanies space travel.

  19. Skeletal muscle responses to unloading with special reference to man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. A.; Hather, B. M.; Buchanan, P.

    1992-01-01

    The limited space flight data suggest that exposure to microgravity decreases muscle strength in humans and muscle mass in lower mammals. Several earth-based models have been used to address the effect of unloading on the human neuromuscular system due to the limited access of biological research to long-term space flight. Bedrest eliminates body weight bearing of both lower limbs. Unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), where all ambulatory activity is performed on crutches with an elevated sole on the shoe of one foot, has recently been used to unload one lower limb. The results from studies using these two models support their efficacy. The decrease in strength of m. quadriceps femoris, for example, after four to six weeks of bedrest, ULLS or space flight is 20 to 25 percent. The results from the earth-based studies show that this response can be attributed in part to a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the KE which reflects muscle fiber atrophy. The results from the ground based studies also support the limited flight data and show that reductions in strength are larger in lower than upper limbs and in extensor than flexor muscle groups. They also raise issue with the generally held concept that postural muscle is most affected by unweighting. Slow-twitch fibers in lower limb muscles of mixed fiber type composition and muscle composed mainly of slow-twitch fibers do not preferentially atrophy after bedrest or ULLS. Taken together, the data suggest that unloading causes remarkable adaptations in the neuromuscular system of humans. It should be appreciated, however, that this area of research is in its infancy.

  20. Hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle subjected to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Trieschmann, J T; Ekberg, A

    2004-04-01

    In an effort to simulate the compromised function and atrophy of lower limb muscles experienced by astronauts after spaceflight, 21 men and women age 30-56 yr were subjected to unilateral lower limb unloading for 5 wk. Whereas 10 of these subjects performed unilateral knee extensor resistance exercise (ULRE) two or three times weekly, 11 subjects (UL) refrained from training. The exercise regimen consisted of four sets of seven maximal actions, using an apparatus that offers concentric and eccentric resistance by utilizing the inertia of rotating flywheel(s). Knee extensor muscle strength was measured before and after UL and ULRE, and knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscle volumes were determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Surface electromyographic activity measured after UL inferred increased muscle use to perform a given motor task. UL induced an 8.8% decrease (P < 0.05) in knee extensor muscle volume. After ULRE and as a result of only approximately 16 min of maximal contractile activity over the 5-wk course, muscle volume increased 7.7% (P < 0.05). Muscle strength decreased 24-32% (P < 0.05) in response to UL. Group ULRE showed maintained (P > 0.05) strength. Ankle plantar flexor muscle volume of the unloaded limb decreased (P < 0.05) in both groups (UL 10.5%; ULRE 11.1%). In neither group did the right weight-bearing limb show any change (P > 0.05) in muscle volume or strength. The results of this study provide evidence that resistance exercise not only may offset muscle atrophy but is in fact capable of promoting marked hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle. PMID:14660503

  1. A reproducible radiation delivery method for unanesthetized rodents during periods of hind limb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walb, M. C.; Black, P. J.; Payne, V. S.; Munley, M. T.; Willey, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to the spaceflight environment has long been known to be a health challenge concerning many body systems. Both microgravity and/or ionizing radiation can cause acute and chronic effects in multiple body systems. The hind limb unloaded (HLU) rodent model is a ground-based analogue for microgravity that can be used to simulate and study the combined biologic effects of reduced loading with spaceflight radiation exposure. However, studies delivering radiation to rodents during periods of HLU are rare. Herein we report the development of an irradiation protocol using a clinical linear accelerator that can be used with hind limb unloaded, unanesthetized rodents that is capable of being performed at most academic medical centers. A 30.5 cm × 30.5 cm × 40.6 cm rectangular chamber was constructed out of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheets (0.64 cm thickness). Five centimeters of water-equivalent material were placed outside of two PMMA inserts on either side of the rodent that permitted the desired radiation dose buildup (electronic equilibrium) and helped to achieve a flatter dose profile. Perforated aluminum strips permitted the suspension dowel to be placed at varying heights depending on the rodent size. Radiation was delivered using a medical linear accelerator at an accelerating potential of 10 MV. A calibrated PTW Farmer ionization chamber, wrapped in appropriately thick tissue-equivalent bolus material to simulate the volume of the rodent, was used to verify a uniform dose distribution at various regions of the chamber. The dosimetry measurements confirmed variances typically within 3%, with maximum variance <10% indicated through optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD) measurements, thus delivering reliable spaceflight-relevant total body doses and ensuring a uniform dose regardless of its location within the chamber. Due to the relative abundance of LINACs at academic medical centers and the reliability of their dosimetry properties, this

  2. A Reproducible Radiation Delivery Method for Unanesthetized Rodents during Periods of Hind Limb Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Walb, M.C.; Black, P.J.; Payne, V.S.; Munley, M.T.; Willey, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the spaceflight environment has long been known to be a health challenge concerning many body systems. Both microgravity and/or ionizing radiation can cause acute and chronic effects in multiple body systems. The hind limb unloaded (HLU) rodent model is a ground-based analogue for microgravity that can be used to simulate and study the combined biologic effects of reduced loading with spaceflight radiation exposure. However, studies delivering radiation to rodents during periods of HLU are rare. Herein we report the development of an irradiation protocol using a clinical linear accelerator that can be used with hind limb unloaded, unanesthetized rodents that is capable of being performed at most academic medical centers. A 30.5 cm × 30.5 cm × 40.6 cm rectangular chamber was constructed out of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheets (0.64 cm thickness). Five cm of water-equivalent material were placed outside of two PMMA inserts on either side of the rodent that permitted the desired radiation dose buildup (electronic equilibrium) and helped to achieve a flatter dose profile. Perforated aluminum strips permitted the suspension dowel to be placed at varying heights depending on the rodent size. Radiation was delivered using a medical linear accelerator at an accelerating potential of 10 MV. A calibrated PTW Farmer ionization chamber, wrapped in appropriately thick tissue-equivalent bolus material to simulate the volume of the rodent, was used to verify a uniform dose distribution at various regions of the chamber. The dosimetry measurements confirmed variances typically within 3%, with maximum variance <10% indicated through optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD) measurements, thus delivering reliable spaceflight-relevant total body doses and ensuring a uniform dose regardless of its location within the chamber. Due to the relative abundance of LINAC’s at academic medical centers and the reliability of their dosimetry properties, this method

  3. Deoxypyridinoline in the Urine of Rats with Unloaded Hindlimbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, M.; Wren, J.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (U-Dpd), a nonreducible collagen crosslink in bone released by osteoclastic activity, is thought to be an accurate marker of bone resorption. The role of increased resorption in the osteopenia of a space flight model which unloads the hindlimbs by suspending the tail is controversial. To assess skeletal resorption in the model we measured U-Dpd (Pyrilinks-D, Metro Biosystems, Inc.) in serial 24 hour urine specimens collected from 250 a (Y) and 450 a (M) male rats with unloaded hindlimbs for four weeks. Both groups of rats were fed AIN76 diets with calcium restricted to 0.2% in Y and to 0.1 % in M. Blood was obtained after 28 days for parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-D) and alkaline phosphatase (Alkptase). Basal U-Dpd was higher and more variable in Y than M (475+/-200 vs 67+/-9, nM/mM creatinine, p<.001). Repeated measures ANOVA in Y revealed decreases in U-Dpd, 36% in control (C) and 24% in unloaded (S) rats (p<.005). There was a nadir in YS on the 14th day not observed in YC (p<.05). U-Dpd in MC showed no change, but increased in MS by the 14th day and remained elevated. At the end of the experiment, body weights in both Y and M were less in S than C (337+/-16 vs 306+/-12g and 485+/-10 vs 461+/-6g, p=.002). Bill was inversely related to U-Dpd only in M (r=0.699, p=.024). PTH, similar in C and S in Y (52+/-15 vs 42+/-7pg/ml, NS) and M (68+/-13 vs 61+/-12, NS), was unrelated to U-Dpd. 1,25-D tended toward higher values in YC than YS (197+/-103 vs 119+/-30, NS) and correlated with U-Dpd (0.773, p=.015). Alkptase, 1.3 times higher in Y than M, was similar in C and S at the end of unloading. These findings indicate that bone resorption, as reflected by U-Dpd, is suppressed in young and stimulated in mature rats exposed to a space flight model. U-Dpd reflects reduced growth from the diet change in young control and experimental rats and loss of Bill in mature animals exposed to the space flight model, 2

  4. Effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow magmatic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    One of the effects of global warming is the increase of volcanic activity. Glacial melting has been shown to cause visco-elastic relaxation of the upper mantle, which in turn promotes upwelling of magmas through the crust. To date, the effects of ice-cap melting on shallow (i.e., less than 10 km depth) plumbing systems of volcanoes are still not clear. We investigate the pressure changes due to glacial unloading around a magmatic reservoir by combining laboratory and numerical methods. As a case study we focus on Snæfellsjökull, a volcano in Western Iceland whose ice cap is currently melting 1.25 meters (thickness) per year. Our approach is as follows: we obtain representative rock samples from the field, preform tri-axial deformation tests at relevant pressure and temperature (PT) conditions and feed the results into a numerical model in which the stress fields before and after ice cap removal are compared. A suite of deformation experiments were conducted using a Paterson-type tri-axial deformation apparatus. All experiments were performed at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1, while varying the PT conditions. We applied confining pressures between 50 and 150 MPa and temperatures between 200 and 1000 ° C. Between 200 and 800 ° C we observe a localized deformation and a slight decrease of the Young's modulus from 41 to 38 GPa. Experiments at 900 and 1000 ° C exhibit macroscopically ductile behavior and a marked reduction of the Young's modulus down to 4 GPa at 1000 ° C. These results are used to construct a numerical finite-element model in which we approximate the volcanic edifice and basement by a 2D axisymmetric half-space. We first calculate the steady-state temperature field in the volcanic system and assign the laboratory-derived temperature-dependent Young's modulus to every element of the model. Then the pressure in the edifice is calculated for two scenarios: with and without ice cap. The comparison between the two scenarios allows us estimate the

  5. Indentation-derived elastic modulus of multilayer thin films: Effect of unloading induced plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, Ryan Dale; Shen, Yu -Lin

    2015-08-13

    Nanoindentation is useful for evaluating the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of multilayer thin film materials. A fundamental assumption in the derivation of the elastic modulus from nanoindentation is that the unloading process is purely elastic. In this work, the validity of elastic assumption as it applies to multilayer thin films is studied using the finite element method. The elastic modulus and hardness from the model system are compared to experimental results to show validity of the model. Plastic strain is shown to increase in the multilayer system during the unloading process. Additionally, the indentation-derived modulus of a monolayer material shows no dependence on unloading plasticity while the modulus of the multilayer system is dependent on unloading-induced plasticity. Lastly, the cyclic behavior of the multilayer thin film is studied in relation to the influence of unloading-induced plasticity. Furthermore, it is found that several cycles are required to minimize unloading-induced plasticity.

  6. Caldera collapse unloading volcanoes: the textbook case of Fernandina, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Acocella, V.

    2014-12-01

    Calderas are topographical depressions resulting from the yielding of magma chambers roof after large eruptions or intrusive events. On the outer slope, most calderas display radial fissures and, in limited cases, also circumferential fissures. Despite many hypotheses, the conditions controlling the formation of radial and/or circumferential fissures, and thus the shallow magma transfer within the volcano slopes, are still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate with numerical and analog models that the mass redistribution associated with caldera formation promotes shallow sill-shaped magma chambers and controls the orientation of eruptive fissures. We find that depending on the initial injection depth, dikes will bend or twist about an axis parallel to propagation resulting in circumferential and radial eruptive fissures, respectively. This mechanism is governed by the competition between gravitational unloading pressure and dike overpressure. We apply our results to Fernandina (Galapagos, Ecuador), the best case of caldera with radial and circumferential fissures, showing that the predicted stress field caused by the caldera unloading is consistent with the pattern of eruptive fissures and the dynamics of magma propagation.

  7. Phloem Unloading in Developing Leaves of Sugar Beet 1

    PubMed Central

    Schmalstig, J. Gougler; Geiger, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and transport data are presented in support of a symplastic pathway of phloem unloading in importing leaves of Beta vulgaris L. (`Klein E multigerm'). The sulfhydryl reagent p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) at concentration of 10 millimolar inhibited uptake of exogenous [14C]sucrose by sink leaf tissue over sucrose concentrations of 0.1 to 5.0 millimolar. Inhibited uptake was 24% of controls. The same PCMBS treatment did not affect import of 14C-label into sink leaves during steady state labeling of a source leaf with 14CO2. Lack of inhibition of import implies that sucrose did not pass through the free space during unloading. A passively transported xenobiotic sugar, l-[14C]glucose, imported by a sink leaf through the phloem, was evenly distributed throughout the leaf as seen by whole-leaf autoradiography. In contrast, l-[14C]glucose supplied to the apoplast through the cut petiole or into a vein of a sink leaf collected mainly in the vicinity of the major veins with little entering the mesophyll. These patterns are best explained by transport through the symplast from phloem to mesophyll. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 PMID:16664377

  8. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  9. Hindlimb unloading increases oxidative stress and disrupts antioxidant capacity in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, John M.; Song, Wook; Demaree, Scott R.; Bloomfield, S. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle disuse with space-flight and ground-based models (e.g., hindlimb unloading) results in dramatic skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness. Pathological conditions that cause muscle wasting (i.e., heart failure, muscular dystrophy, sepsis, COPD, cancer) are characterized by elevated "oxidative stress," where antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed by oxidant production. However, the existence, cellular mechanisms, and ramifications of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle subjected to hindlimb unloading are poorly understood. Thus we examined the effects of hindlimb unloading on hindlimb muscle antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase), nonenzymatic antioxidant scavenging capacity (ASC), total hydroperoxides, and dichlorohydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) oxidation, a direct indicator of oxidative stress. Twelve 6 month old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two groups: 28 d of hindlimb unloading (n = 6) and controls (n = 6). Hindlimb unloading resulted in a small decrease in Mn-superoxide dismutase activity (10.1%) in the soleus muscle, while Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase increased 71.2%. In contrast, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, antioxidant enzymes that remove hydroperoxides, were significantly reduced in the soleus with hindlimb unloading by 54.5 and 16.1%, respectively. Hindlimb unloading also significantly reduced ASC. Hindlimb unloading increased soleus lipid hydroperoxide levels by 21.6% and hindlimb muscle DCFH-DA oxidation by 162.1%. These results indicate that hindlimb unloading results in a disruption of antioxidant status, elevation of hydroperoxides, and an increase in oxidative stress.

  10. Passive stretch reduces calpain activity through nitric oxide pathway in unloaded soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Li, Quan; Sheng, Juan-Juan; Chang, Hui; Song, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Unloading in spaceflight or long-term bed rest induces to pronounced atrophy of anti-gravity skeletal muscles. Passive stretch partially resists unloading-induced atrophy of skeletal muscle, but the mechanism remains elusive. The aims of this study were to investigate the hypotheses that stretch tension might increase protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in unloaded skeletal muscle, and then nNOS-derived NO alleviated atrophy of skeletal muscle by inhibiting calpain activity. The tail-suspended rats were used to unload rat hindlimbs for 2 weeks, at the same time, left soleus muscle was stretched by applying a plaster cast to fix the ankle at 35° dorsiflexion. Stretch partially resisted atrophy and inhibited the decreased protein level and activity of nNOS in unloaded soleus muscles. Unloading increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. Stretch reduced frequency of calcium sparks and restored intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration to control levels in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. The increased protein level and activity of calpain as well as the higher degradation of desmin induced by unloading were inhibited by stretch in soleus muscles. In conclusion, these results suggest that stretch can preserve the stability of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channels which prevents the elevated [Ca(2+)]i by means of keeping nNOS activity, and then the enhanced protein level and activity of calpain return to control levels in unloaded soleus muscles. Therefore, stretch can resist in part atrophy of unloaded soleus muscles. PMID:22547201

  11. Calcium balance in mature male rats with unloaded hindlimbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Evans, Juliann; Wolinsky, Ira; Arnaud, Sara B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium balances, regulated by the calcium endocrine system, are negative during spaceflight but have not been reported in flight simulation models using fully mature small animals. METHODS: We conducted two calcium (Ca) balance studies in 6-mo-old male rats exposed to a model that unloads the hindlimbs (HU) for 4 wk. Control (C) and HU rats were fed diets with 0.5% Ca in the first and 0.1% Ca in the second study. Housing in metabolic cages enabled daily food and water intake measurements as well as collections of urine and fecal specimens. At necropsy, blood was obtained for measures of Ca-regulating hormones. RESULTS: Both C and HU rats adjusted to housing and diets with decreases in body weight and negative Ca balances during the first week of each experiment. Thereafter, averages of Ca balances were more negative in the unloaded rats than controls: -8.1 vs. -1.6 mg x d(-1) in rats fed 0.5% (p < 0.05). This difference was not due to urinary Ca excretion since it was lower in HU than C rats (1.27 +/- 0.51 mg x d(-1) vs. 2.35 +/- 0.82 mg x d(-1), p < 0.05). Fecal Ca in HU rats exceeded dietary Ca by 4-7%, Restricting dietary Ca to 0.1% was followed by an increase in serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-D) and greater intestinal Ca absorption than in rats fed 0.5% Ca. Ca balances in rats fed 0.1% Ca were also more negative in HU than C rats (-2.4 vs. -0.03 mg x d(-1), p < 0.05). Parathyroid hormone (PTH) was suppressed and 1,25-D increased in HU rats fed 0.5% Ca. C rats fed 0.1% Ca had increased PTH and 1,25-D was the same as in the HU group. CONCLUSION: After adaptation, Ca balances were more negative in mature male rats with unloaded hindlimbs than controls, an effect from increased secretion and loss of endogenous fecal Ca associated with increased 1,25-D in Ca-replete and Ca-restricted rats.

  12. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  13. Comparing two devices of suspended treadmill walking by varying body unloading and Froude number.

    PubMed

    Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Kho, Jenniefer; Weed, Matthew; Wilkinson, Miles W; Hargens, Alan R

    2009-11-01

    In rehabilitation, treadmill walking with body weight support is commonly used to reduce loads on lower extremities. (1) However, gait pattern alterations during unloading at constant Froude number are infrequently reported. (2) Furthermore, differences between two common devices for unloading are not well known. Therefore, we investigated two devices; a waist-high chamber with increased pressure called Lower Body Positive Pressure (LBPP), and a harness system (LiteGait), considered a standard system for unloading the lower body. Four gait parameters (cadence, normalized stride length, duty factor, and leg angle at touch down), heart rate, and comfort level were monitored in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects walked at three body weight (BW) conditions (100%, 66%, and 33% BW) and three Froude numbers (Fr), which refer to a dimensionless speed reflecting slow walking (Fr=0.09), comfortable walking (Fr=0.25), and walk-run transition (Fr=0.5). Absolute treadmill speed was determined using Froude numbers reflecting dynamically similar motions during unloading. We found that (1) the normal gait pattern is altered during unloading at a constant Froude number. In rehabilitation, physical therapists should be aware that normal gait pattern may not need to be maintained during unloaded treadmill walking. (2) Gait parameters were not different when comparing LBPP to harness supported walking. However, heart rate was lower and comfort higher during unloaded LBPP ambulation compared to suspended harness walking. Therefore, suspended LBPP walking may be more appropriate for patients with cardiovascular disease and for conditions at high unloading. PMID:19674901

  14. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  15. Alendronate increases skeletal mass of growing rats during unloading by inhibiting resorption of calcified cartilage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Doty, S. B.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S. J.; Halloran, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    Loss of bone mass during periods of skeletal unloading remains an important clinical problem. To determine the extent to which resorption contributes to the relative loss of bone during skeletal unloading of the growing rat and to explore potential means of preventing such bone loss, 0.1 mg P/kg alendronate was administered to rats before unloading of the hindquarters. Skeletal unloading markedly reduced the normal increase in tibial mass and calcium content during the 9 day period of observation, primarily by decreasing bone formation, although bone resorption was also modestly stimulated. Alendronate not only prevented the relative loss of skeletal mass during unloading but led to a dramatic increase in calcified tissue in the proximal tibia compared with the vehicle-treated unloaded or normally loaded controls. Bone formation, however, assessed both by tetracycline labeling and by [3H]proline and 45Ca incorporation, was suppressed by alendronate treatment and further decreased by skeletal unloading. Total osteoclast number increased in alendronate-treated animals, but values were similar to those in controls when corrected for the increased bone area. However, the osteoclasts had poorly developed brush borders and appeared not to engage the bone surface when examined at the ultrastructural level. We conclude that alendronate prevents the relative loss of mineralized tissue in growing rats subjected to skeletal unloading, but it does so primarily by inhibiting the resorption of the primary and secondary spongiosa, leading to altered bone modeling in the metaphysis.

  16. 49 CFR 179.300-13 - Venting, loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Venting, loading and unloading valves. 179.300-13..., loading and unloading valves. (a) Valves shall be of approved type, made of metal not subject to rapid deterioration by lading, and shall withstand tank test pressure without leakage. The valves shall be...

  17. 49 CFR 179.300-13 - Venting, loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Venting, loading and unloading valves. 179.300-13..., loading and unloading valves. (a) Valves shall be of approved type, made of metal not subject to rapid deterioration by lading, and shall withstand tank test pressure without leakage. The valves shall be...

  18. 49 CFR 179.300-13 - Venting, loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting, loading and unloading valves. 179.300-13..., loading and unloading valves. (a) Valves shall be of approved type, made of metal not subject to rapid deterioration by lading, and shall withstand tank test pressure without leakage. The valves shall be...

  19. Grain Unloading of Arsenic Species in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Norton, Gareth J.; Charnock, John M.; Feldmann, Joerg; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for over half the world's population yet may represent a significant dietary source of inorganic arsenic (As), a nonthreshold, class 1 human carcinogen. Rice grain As is dominated by the inorganic species, and the organic species dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). To investigate how As species are unloaded into grain rice, panicles were excised during grain filling and hydroponically pulsed with arsenite, arsenate, glutathione-complexed As, or DMA. Total As concentrations in flag leaf, grain, and husk, were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and As speciation in the fresh grain was determined by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. The roles of phloem and xylem transport were investigated by applying a ± stem-girdling treatment to a second set of panicles, limiting phloem transport to the grain in panicles pulsed with arsenite or DMA. The results demonstrate that DMA is translocated to the rice grain with over an order magnitude greater efficiency than inorganic species and is more mobile than arsenite in both the phloem and the xylem. Phloem transport accounted for 90% of arsenite, and 55% of DMA, transport to the grain. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence mapping and fluorescence microtomography revealed marked differences in the pattern of As unloading into the grain between DMA and arsenite-challenged grain. Arsenite was retained in the ovular vascular trace and DMA dispersed throughout the external grain parts and into the endosperm. This study also demonstrates that DMA speciation is altered in planta, potentially through complexation with thiols. PMID:19880610

  20. Accuracy of unloading with the anti-gravity treadmill.

    PubMed

    McNeill, David K P; de Heer, Hendrik D; Bounds, Roger G; Coast, J Richard

    2015-03-01

    Body weight (BW)-supported treadmill training has become increasingly popular in professional sports and rehabilitation. To date, little is known about the accuracy of the lower-body positive pressure treadmill. This study evaluated the accuracy of the BW support reported on the AlterG "Anti-Gravity" Treadmill across the spectrum of unloading, from full BW (100%) to 20% BW. Thirty-one adults (15 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 29.3 years (SD = 10.9), and a mean weight of 66.55 kg (SD = 12.68) were recruited. Participants were weighed outside the machine and then inside at 100-20% BW in 10% increments. Predicted BW, as presented by the AlterG equipment, was compared with measured BW. Significant differences between predicted and measured BW were found at all but 90% through 70% of BW. Differences were small (<5%), except at the extreme ends of the unloading spectrum. At 100% BW, the measured weight was lower than predicted (mean = 93.15%, SD = 1.21, p < 0.001 vs. predicted). At 30 and 20% BW, the measured weight was higher than predicted at 35.75% (SD = 2.89, p < 0.001), and 27.67% (SD = 3.76, p < 0.001), respectively. These findings suggest that there are significant differences between reported and measured BW support on the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill®, with the largest differences (>5%) found at 100% BW and the greatest BW support (30 and 20% BW). These differences may be associated with changes in metabolic demand and maximum speed during walking or running and should be taken into consideration when using these devices for training and research purposes. PMID:25226319

  1. 78 FR 43055 - Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 15, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013-17478 Filed 7-17-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative By...

  2. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated

  3. Low-level vibrations maintain the intervertebral disc during unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holguin, Nilsson

    Changes in intervertebral disc (IVD) biochemistry, morphology and mechanics have been characterized only incompletely in the rat hindlimb unloading (HU) model. Although exposure to chronic vibrations can be damaging, low-magnitude vibrations can attenuate the geometric changes of the IVD due to altered spinal loading. Here, we tested the hypothesis that low-magnitude, high-frequency vibrations will mitigate the hypotrophy, biochemical degradation and deconditioning of the IVD during HU. When applied as whole-body vibrations through all four paws, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to HU and exposed to daily periods (15min/d) of either ambulatory activities (HU+AMB) or whole body vibrations superimposed upon ambulation (HU+WBV; WBV at 45Hz, 0.3g). After 4wks and, compared to age-matched control rats (AC), the lumbar IVD of HU+AMB had a 22% smaller glycosaminoglycans/collagen ratio, 12% smaller posterior IVD height, and 13% smaller cross-sectional area. Compared to HU+AMB rats, the addition of low-level vibratory loading did not significantly alter IVD biochemistry, posterior height, area, or volume, but directionally altered IVD geometry. When subjected to upright vibrations through the hindpaws, rats were HU for 4wks. A subset of HU rats stood in an upright posture on a vertically oscillating plate (0.2g) at 45- or 90-Hz (HU+45 or HU+90). After 4wks, regardless of sham (HU+SC) loading (HU+/-SC) and, compared to AC, IVD of HU+/-SC had 10% less height, 39% smaller nucleus pulposus area, less glycosaminoglycans in the nucleus pulposus (21%), anterior annulus fibrosus (16%) and posterior annulus fibrosus (19%), 76% less tension-compression neutral zone (NZ) modulus, 26% greater compressive modulus, 25% greater initial elastic damping modulus, 26% less torsional NZ stiffness, no difference in collagen content and a weaker relationship between tension-compression NZ modulus and posterior height change. Exogenously introduced oscillations maintained the morphology

  4. The hindlimb unloading rat model: literature overview, technique update and comparison with space flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily; Globus, Ruth K.; Kaplansky, Alexander; Durnova, Galina

    2005-01-01

    The hindlimb unloading rodent model is used extensively to study the response of many physiological systems to certain aspects of space flight, as well as to disuse and recovery from disuse for Earth benefits. This chapter describes the evolution of hindlimb unloading, and is divided into three sections. The first section examines the characteristics of 1064 articles using or reviewing the hindlimb unloading model, published between 1976 and April 1, 2004. The characteristics include number of publications, journals, countries, major physiological systems, method modifications, species, gender, genetic strains and ages of rodents, experiment duration, and countermeasures. The second section provides a comparison of results between space flown and hindlimb unloading animals from the 14-day Cosmos 2044 mission. The final section describes modifications to hindlimb unloading required by different experimental paradigms and a method to protect the tail harness for long duration studies. Hindlimb unloading in rodents has enabled improved understanding of the responses of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, renal, neural, metabolic, and reproductive systems to unloading and/or to reloading on Earth with implications for both long-duration human space flight and disuse on Earth.

  5. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  6. Contractile reserve and calcium regulation are depressed in myocytes from chronically unloaded hearts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kenta; Nakayama, Masaharu; Hasan, Faisal; Yan, Xinhua; Schneider, Michael D.; Lorell, Beverly H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cardiac unloading of the normal heart results in the reduction of left ventricular (LV) mass, but effects on myocyte contractile function are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac unloading and reduction in LV mass were induced by heterotopic heart transplantation to the abdominal aorta in isogenic rats. Contractility and [Ca(2+)](i) regulation in LV myocytes were studied at both 2 and 5 weeks after transplantation. Native in situ hearts from recipient animals were used as the controls for all experiments. Contractile function indices in myocytes from 2-week unloaded and native (control) hearts were similar under baseline conditions (0.5 Hz, 1.2 mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o), and 36 degrees C) and in response to stimulation with high [Ca(2+)](o) (range 2.5 to 4.0 mmol/L). In myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts, there were no differences in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) at baseline; however, time to 50% relengthening and time to 50% decline in [Ca(2+)](i) were prolonged compared with controls. Severe defects in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) were elicited in myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts in response to high [Ca(2+)](o). However, there were no differences in the contractile response to isoproterenol between myocytes from unloaded and native hearts. In 5-week unloaded hearts, but not in 2-week unloaded hearts, LV protein levels of phospholamban were increased (345% of native heart values). Protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger were not changed. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic unloading of the normal heart caused a time-dependent depression of myocyte contractile function, suggesting the potential for impaired performance in states associated with prolonged cardiac atrophy.

  7. Project UM-HAUL (UnManned Heavy pAyload Unloader and Lander): The design of a reusable lunar lander with an independent cargo unloader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Project UM-Haul is the preliminary design of a reusable lunar transportation vehicle that travels between a lunar parking orbit and the lunar surface. This vehicle is an indispensible link in the overall task of establishing a lunar base as defined by the NASA Space Exploration Initiative. The response to this need consists of two independent vehicles: a lander and an unloader. The system can navigate and unload itself with a minimum amount of human intervention. The design addresses structural analysis, propulsion, power, controls, communications, payload handling and orbital operations. The Lander has the capacity to decend from low lunar orbit (LLO) to the lunar surface carrying a 7000 kg payload, plus the unloader, plus propellant for ascent to LLO. The Lander employs the Unloader by way of a motorized ramp. The Unloader is a terrain vehicle capable of carrying cargoes of 8,500 kg mass and employs a lift system to lower payloads to the ground. The system can perform ten missions before requiring major servicing.

  8. Anodisation Increases Integration of Unloaded Titanium Implants in Sheep Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Warwick J.; Lee, Min-Ho; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Jeong; Gay, Jennifer; Loch, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Spark discharge anodic oxidation forms porous TiO2 films on titanium implant surfaces. This increases surface roughness and concentration of calcium and phosphate ions and may enhance early osseointegration. To test this, forty 3.75 mm × 13 mm titanium implants (Megagen, Korea) were placed into healed mandibular postextraction ridges of 10 sheep. There were 10 implants per group: RBM surface (control), RBM + anodised, RBM + anodised + fluoride, and titanium alloy + anodised surface. Resonant frequency analysis (RFA) was measured in implant stability quotient (ISQ) at surgery and at sacrifice after 1-month unloaded healing. Mean bone-implant contact (% BIC) was measured in undemineralised ground sections for the best three consecutive threads. One of 40 implants showed evidence of failure. RFA differed between groups at surgery but not after 1 month. RFA values increased nonsignificantly for all implants after 1 month, except for controls. There was a marked difference in BIC after 1-month healing, with higher values for alloy implants, followed by anodised + fluoride and anodised implants. Anodisation increased early osseointegration of rough-surfaced implants by 50–80%. RFA testing lacked sufficient resolution to detect this improvement. Whether this gain in early bone-implant contact is clinically significant is the subject of future experiments. PMID:26436099

  9. Phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and transport data support a symplastic pathway for phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Klein E, multigerm). The sulfhydryl inhibitor parachloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) inhibited uptake of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose added to the free space of developing leaves, but did not affect import of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose during steady-state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling of a source leaf. The passively-transported xenobiotic sugar, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose did not readily enter mesophyll cells when supplied through the cut end of the petiole of a sink leaf as determined by whole leaf autoradiography. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose translocated through the phloem from a mature leaf, rapidly entered mesophyll cells, and was evenly distributed between mesophyll and veins. Autoradiographs of developing leaves following a pulse of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to a source leaf revealed rapid passage of phloem translocated into progressively higher order veins as the leaf developed. Entry into V order veins occurred during the last stage of import through the phloem. Import into developing leaves was inhibited by glyphosate (N-phosphomethylglycine), a herbicide which inhibits the aromatic amino acid pathway and hence protein synthesis. Glyphosate also stopped net starch accumulation in sprayed mature leaves, but did not affect export of carbon from treated leaves during the time period that import into developed leaves was inhibited.

  10. 77. Neg. No. F65A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Neg. No. F-65A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, UNLOADING THE ENAMEL OVEN - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Yield Response of Tantalum for Quasi-Isentropic Loading and Unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay, James R.; Ao, Tommy; Vogler, Tracy J.; Gray, George T., III

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic loading was used to study initial yield strength of pure annealed and cold-worked polycrystalline and single crystal Ta samples for ramp loading at strain rates of ˜10^6/s and the flow strength after peak compression to ˜17 GPa at about 5x10^4/s. For sample thicknesses of 0.5--6 mm, it was found that for annealed pure polycrystalline Ta, the quasi-isentrope elastic limit (IEL) was essentially constant at ˜3.2 GPa with propagation distance. There was no apparent effect of sample purity on precursor amplitude to within experimental uncertainty, although cold-working resulted in loss of the elastic peak and a reduced IEL of ˜1.7 GPa. The flow strength at peak loading stress was estimated from the quasi-elastic unloading and found to increase with peak stress. These results will be discussed in terms of constitutive models for Ta. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. A proportional assist ventilator to unload respiratory muscles experimentally during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Can a modern proportional assist ventilator (PAV) function sufficiently well to unload the respiratory muscles during exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? A PAV can be constructed with contemporary hardware and software and be used at all exercise intensities to unload the respiratory muscles by up to 70%. Previously, PAVs have allowed researchers to address many fundamental physiological problems in clinical and healthy populations, but those versions are no longer functional or available. We describe the creation of a PAV that permits researchers to use it as an experimental tool. Manipulation of the normally occurring work of breathing (WOB) during exercise can provide insights into whole-body regulatory mechanisms in clinical patients and healthy subjects. One method to reduce the WOB uses a proportional assist ventilator (PAV). Suitable commercially available units are not capable of being used during heavy exercise. This investigation was undertaken in order to create a PAV and assess the degree to which the WOB could be reduced during exercise. A PAV works by creating a positive mouth pressure (Pm ) during inspiration, which consequently reduces the WOB. Spontaneous breathing patterns can be maintained, and the amplitude of Pm is calculated using the equation of motion and predetermined proportionality constants. We generated positive Pm using a breathing apparatus consisting of rigid tubing, solenoid valves to control the airflow direction and a proportional valve connected to compressed gas. Healthy male and female subjects were able to use the PAV successfully while performing cycling exercise over a range of intensities (50-100% of maximal workload) for different durations (from 30 s to 20 min) and different protocols (constant versus progressive workload). Inspiratory WOB was reduced up to 90%, while total WOB was reduced by 70%. The greatest reduction in WOB (50-75%) occurred during

  13. High-energy proton irradiation of C57Bl6 mice under hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, Marc; Todd, Paul; Orschell, Christie; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Farr, Jonathan; Klein, Susan; Sokol, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) pose substantial risk for crewmembers on deep space missions. It has been shown that low gravity and ionizing radiation both produce transient anemia and immunodeficiencies. We utilized the C57Bl/6 based hindlimb suspension model to investigate the consequences of hindlimb-unloading induced immune suppression on the sensitivity to whole body irradiation with modulated 208 MeV protons. Eight-week old C57Bl/6 female mice were conditioned by hindlimb-unloading. Serial CBC and hematocrit assays by HEMAVET were accumulated for the hindlimb-unloaded mice and parallel control animals subjected to identical conditions without unloading. One week of hindlimb-unloading resulted in a persistent, statistically significant 10% reduction in RBC count and a persistent, statistically significant 35% drop in lymphocyte count. This inhibition is consistent with published observations of low Earth orbit flown mice and with crewmember blood analyses. In our experiments the cell count suppression was sustained for the entire six-week period of observation and persisted for at least 7 days beyond the period of active hindlimb-unloading. C57Bl/6 mice were also irradiated with 208 MeV Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) protons at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. We found that at 8.5 Gy hindlimb-unloaded mice were significantly more radiation sensitive with 35 lethalities out of 51 mice versus 15 out of 45 control (non-suspended) mice within 30 days of receiving 8.5 Gy of SOBP protons (p =0.001). Both control and hindlimb-unloaded stocktickerCBC analyses of 8.5 Gy proton irradiated and control mice by HEMAVET demonstrated severe reductions in WBC counts (Lymphocytes and PMNs) by day 2 post-irradiation, followed a week to ten days later by reductions in platelets, and then reductions in RBCs about 2 weeks post-irradiation. Recovery of all blood components commenced by three weeks post-irradiation. CBC analyses of 8

  14. Hindlimb unloading of growing rats: a model for predicting skeletal changes during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Globus, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    A model that uses hindlimb unloading of rats was developed to study the consequences of skeletal unloading and reloading as occurs during and following space flight. Studies using the model were initiated two decades ago and further developed at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Ames Research Center. The model mimics some aspects of exposure to microgravity by removing weightbearing loads from the hindquarters and producing a cephalic fluid shift. Unlike space flight, the forelimbs remain loaded in the model, providing a useful internal control to distinguish between the local and systemic effects of hindlimb unloading. Rats that are hindlimb unloaded by tail traction gain weight at the same rate as pairfed controls, and glucocorticoid levels are not different from controls, suggesting that systemic stress is minimal. Unloaded bones display reductions in cancellous osteoblast number, cancellous mineral apposition rate, trabecular bone volume, cortical periosteal mineralization rate, total bone mass, calcium content, and maturation of bone mineral relative to controls. Subsequent studies reveal that these changes also occur in rats exposed to space flight. In hindlimb unloaded rats, bone formation rates and masses of unloaded bones decline relative to controls, while loaded bones do not change despite a transient reduction in serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) concentrations. Studies using the model to evaluate potential countermeasures show that 1,25D, growth hormone, dietary calcium, alendronate, and muscle stimulation modify, but do not completely correct, the suppression of bone growth caused by unloading, whereas continuous infusion of transforming growth factor-beta2 or insulin-like growth factor-1 appears to protect against some of the bone changes caused by unloading. These results emphasize the importance of local as opposed to systemic factors in the skeletal response to unloading, and reveal the pivotal role that osteoblasts play in

  15. Effects of support unloading on inhibitory processes in motoneurons pools of postural muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigueva, Tatiana; Zakirova, Albina; Tomilovskaya, Elena

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of support unloading on characteristics of shin extensor muscles (m.soleus and m.gastrocnemius lat.) motor units` (MU) activity evoked by electrical stimulation and intensity of spinal inhibitory processes. Conditions of support unloading were reproduced by "dry" immersion (DI), that it seen to be is the most adequate ground simulation model of weightlessness [Shulzhenko E.B. et al, 1976]. The experiments were performed with participation of 10 healthy men of 20-27 years old. The subjects were divided into 2 groups. In the first one (control group) the subjects stayed in DI for 3 days without any other influences; in the second one (experimental group) in the course of DI the mechanical stimulation of soles’ support zones in the regimen of locomotion was applied daily for 20 min at the beginning of each hour for 6 hours per day [Kozlovskaya I.B., 2007]. MUs’ activity of shin muscles (mm. gastrocnemius lat. and soleus) was recorded with needle concentric electrodes during execution of the task of maintaining a small plantar flexion effort (not stronger than 7% of maximal voluntary contraction force). Single electrical pulses 0,1 ms duration were applied to n.tibialis during spontaneous MU activity. The duration of silent period (SP) following H-reflex response and presence of rebound phenomenon - an increase of MU activity at the end of SP, that is usually observed under normal conditions and reflects trace of inhibitory and excitatory processes in motoneurons pools, were analyzed [Person R.S., 1985]. Experiments were performed before, on the 2nd and 3d day of DI and on the 2nd day after its accomplishment. The Wilcoxon nonparametric criteria were used for statistical data analysis. Exposure to the conditions of support unloading was followed by significant decline of SP duration. The mean of SP duration in shin muscles before DI was 227±31,4 ms. On the 2nd and 3rd days of DI in the control group it

  16. Decreased Estrogen May Contribute to Osteopenia in Unloaded Bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet; Arnaud, Sara; Grindeland, Richard; Wade, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Progressive loss of weight-bearing bone in astronauts is one of the most serious impediments to long-duration spaceflight. Estrogen deficiency in women is an established factor in bone loss. Reduced sex hormone levels have been reported in male astronauts, but no data is available regarding spaceflight effects on female sex hormones. The objective of our study was to determine the role of estrogen in disuse osteopenia. The NASA developed hindlimb suspension (HLS) model was used to simulate the unloading disuse of weight-bearing bones experienced in space. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (age 77d; n = 20/group) were HLS or kept ambulatory (AMB) for 38 d and endocrine and bone indices determined. HLS of rats resulted in lower (p less than 0.01) bone mass (9%0), bone mineral content (BMC 13%) and mechanical strength (28%) compared to AMB animals. Plasma estradiol (E2) was lower (p = 0.03) in HLS (10.1 +/- 1.4 pg/ml) compared to AMB rats (16.7 +/- 2.6 pg/ml). E2 was positively correlated to BMC r(sup 2) = 0.67 and mechanical strength r(sup 2) = 0.61. These results suggest that reduced E2 plays a role in disuse osteopenia induced by HLS. Plasma or pituitary lutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were not different in HLS versus AMB rats. However, pituitary LH was correlated to E2 (r(sup 2) = 0.57), suggesting changes in E2 were exerted at the level of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Understanding the role of estrogen in disuse osteopenia is necessary to the development of efficacious therapies for female astronauts, bed rest patients and the increasing number of individuals in our sedentary population suffering bone loss.

  17. Gravitational unloading effects on muscle fiber size, phenotype and myonuclear number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nomura, T.; Kawano, F.; Ishihara, A.; Nonaka, I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of gravitational unloading with or without intact neural activity and/or tension development on myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), number of myonuclei, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus ratio) in single fibers of both slow and fast muscles of rat hindlimbs are reviewed briefly. The atrophic response to unloading is generally graded as follows: slow extensors > fast extensors > fast flexors. Reduction of CSA is usually greater in the most predominant fiber type of that muscle. The percentage of fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms increases in unloaded slow but not fast muscles. Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length and myonuclear domain is decreased in the fibers of the unloaded predominantly slow soleus muscle, but not in the predominantly fast plantaris. Decreases in myonuclear number and domain, however, are observed in plantaris fibers when tenotomy, denervation, or both are combined with hindlimb unloading. All of these results are consistent with the view that a major factor for fiber atrophy is an inhibition or reduction of loading of the hindlimbs. These data also indicate that predominantly slow muscles are more responsive to unloading than predominantly fast muscles. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased response to insulin of glucose metabolism in the 6-day unloaded rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Tischler, Marc E.; Johnson, David G.

    1986-01-01

    Hind leg muscles of female rats were unloaded by tail cast suspension for 6 days. In the fresh-frozen unloaded soleus, the significantly greater concentration of glycogen correlated with a lower activity ratio of glycogen phosphorylase (p less than 0.02). The activity ratio of glycogen synthase also was lower (p less than 0.001), possibly due to the higher concentration of glycogen. In isolated unloaded soleus, insulin (0.1 milliunit/ml) increased the oxidation of D(U-C-14) glucose, release of lactate and pyruvate, incorporation of D-(U-C-14) glucose into glycogen, and the concentration of glucose 6-phosphate more (p less than 0.05) than in the weight-bearing soleus. At physiological doses of insulin, the percent of maximal uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(1,2-H-3) glucose/muscle also was greater in the unloaded soleus. Unloading of the soleus increased, by 50 percent the concentration of insuling receptors, due to no decrease in total receptor number during muscle atrophy. This increase may account for the greater response of glucose metabolism to insulin in this muscle. The extensor digitorum longus, which generally shows little response to unloading, displayed no differential response of glucose metabolism to insulin.

  19. Regional responsiveness of the tibia to intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone as affected by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Tanner, S.; Curren, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether the acute inhibition of bone formation and deficit in bone mineral induced by skeletal unloading can be prevented, we studied the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration (8 micrograms/100 g/day) on growing rats submitted to 8 days of skeletal unloading. Loss of weight bearing decreased periosteal bone formation by 34 and 51% at the tibiofibular junction and tibial midshaft, respectively, and reduced the normal gain in tibial mass by 35%. Treatment with PTH of normally loaded and unloaded animals increased mRNA for osteocalcin (+58 and +148%, respectively), cancellous bone volume in the proximal tibia (+41 and +42%, respectively), and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction (+27 and +27%, respectively). Formation was also stimulated at the midshaft in unloaded (+47%, p < 0.05), but not loaded animals (-3%, NS). Although cancellous bone volume was preserved in PTH-treated, unloaded animals, PTH did not restore periosteal bone formation to normal nor prevent the deficit in overall tibial mass induced by unloading. We conclude that the effects of PTH on bone formation are region specific and load dependent. PTH can prevent the decrease in cancellous bone volume and reduce the decrement in cortical bone formation induced by loss of weight bearing.

  20. Indentation-derived elastic modulus of multilayer thin films: Effect of unloading induced plasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jamison, Ryan Dale; Shen, Yu -Lin

    2015-08-13

    Nanoindentation is useful for evaluating the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of multilayer thin film materials. A fundamental assumption in the derivation of the elastic modulus from nanoindentation is that the unloading process is purely elastic. In this work, the validity of elastic assumption as it applies to multilayer thin films is studied using the finite element method. The elastic modulus and hardness from the model system are compared to experimental results to show validity of the model. Plastic strain is shown to increase in the multilayer system during the unloading process. Additionally, the indentation-derived modulus of a monolayermore » material shows no dependence on unloading plasticity while the modulus of the multilayer system is dependent on unloading-induced plasticity. Lastly, the cyclic behavior of the multilayer thin film is studied in relation to the influence of unloading-induced plasticity. Furthermore, it is found that several cycles are required to minimize unloading-induced plasticity.« less

  1. Increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection under hindlimb-unloading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Fountain, Kimberly; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that spaceflight conditions alter the immune system and resistance to infection [Belay T, Aviles H, Vance M, Fountain K, and Sonnenfeld G. J Allergy Clin Immunol 170: 262-268, 2002; Hankins WR and Ziegelschmid JF. In: Biomedical Results of Apollo. Washington, DC: NASA, 1975, p. 43-81. (NASA Spec. Rep. SP-368)]. Ground-based models, including the hindlimb-unloading model, have become important tools for increasing understanding of how spaceflight conditions can influence physiology. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of hindlimb unloading on the susceptibility of mice to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Hindlimb-unloaded and control mice were subcutaneously infected with 1 LD50 of P. aeruginosa. Survival, bacterial organ load, and antibody and corticosterone levels were compared among the groups. Hindlimb unloading had detrimental effects for infected mice. Animals in the hindlimb-unloaded group, compared with controls, 1). showed significantly increased mortality and reduced time to death, 2). had increased levels of corticosterone, and 3). were much less able to clear bacteria from the organs. These results suggest that hindlimb unloading may induce the production of corticosterone, which may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system leading to increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. Loading and Unloading Finishing Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J

    2014-01-01

    The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of finishing pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps with a slope below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs. However, the total time it takes to load and unload animals and slips, falls, and vocalizations are a welfare concern. Three ramp angles (0, 10 or 20 degrees), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding, >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 2400 pig observations) and analyzed with a scoring system. The use of bedding during summer or winter played a role in the total time it took to load and unload the ramp (p < 0.05). Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and slope significantly interacted to impact the total time to load and unload finishing pigs (p < 0.05). Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload the ramp increased as the slope of the ramp increased (p < 0.05). Heart rates were higher during the summer than winter, and summer heart rates increased as the slope increased (p < 0.05). The current study suggests that several factors should be considered in combination to identify the appropriate bedding for the specific occasion. PMID:26479134

  3. An ergonomics evaluation of cashier work activities at checker-unload workstations.

    PubMed

    Grant, K A; Habes, D J; Baron, S L

    1994-10-01

    The ergonomic suitability of the 'over-the-counter' (OTC) or 'checker unload' workstation for grocery-scanning operations has been questioned by a number of ergonomists, safety and health professionals, and retail food industry executives in the USA. There is concern that requiring cashiers to remove grocery items directly from the customer's cart for scanning exacerbates the risk of musculoskeletal disorders associated with this job. For this reason, a study was conducted to determine whether supermarket cashiers are exposed to increased biomechanical stress due to the use of checker-unload workstations for standing work. The work activities of 12 grocery cashiers from three supermarkets were recorded on videotape. Postures and movements associated with the scanning task were visually evaluated and compared with those of 10 grocery cashiers using a front-facing, customer-unload workstation examined in a previous study. The results indicate that use of the checker-unload workstation places additional stresses on the cashier beyond those imposed by customer-unload checkstands. Specifically, the task of removing groceries directly from the cart for scanning increases the frequency of long reaches, awkward shoulder postures, and lifts. These stresses can be mitigated by eliminating checker-unload operations and providing checkstands with conveyor belts for delivering groceries to the cashier. Implementing additional workstation modifications and encouraging cashiers to adopt alternative work practices also may reduce the frequencies of awkward postures and stressful motions associated with this checkstand design. PMID:15676983

  4. Using compute unified device architecture-enabled graphic processing unit to accelerate fast Fourier transform-based regression Kriging interpolation on a MODIS land surface temperature image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongda; Shu, Hong; Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Jianhui

    2016-04-01

    Kriging interpolation provides the best linear unbiased estimation for unobserved locations, but its heavy computation limits the manageable problem size in practice. To address this issue, an efficient interpolation procedure incorporating the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was developed. Extending this efficient approach, we propose an FFT-based parallel algorithm to accelerate regression Kriging interpolation on an NVIDIA® compute unified device architecture (CUDA)-enabled graphic processing unit (GPU). A high-performance cuFFT library in the CUDA toolkit was introduced to execute computation-intensive FFTs on the GPU, and three time-consuming processes were redesigned as kernel functions and executed on the CUDA cores. A MODIS land surface temperature 8-day image tile at a resolution of 1 km was resampled to create experimental datasets at eight different output resolutions. These datasets were used as the interpolation grids with different sizes in a comparative experiment. Experimental results show that speedup of the FFT-based regression Kriging interpolation accelerated by GPU can exceed 1000 when processing datasets with large grid sizes, as compared to the traditional Kriging interpolation running on the CPU. These results demonstrate that the combination of FFT methods and GPU-based parallel computing techniques greatly improves the computational performance without loss of precision.

  5. Real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain OCT system using graphics processing unit accelerated 4D signal processing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We realized a real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system using graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated 4D (3D+time) signal processing and visualization. For both standard and complex FD-OCT modes, the signal processing tasks were implemented on a dual-GPUs architecture that included λ-to-k spectral re-sampling, fast Fourier transform (FFT), modified Hilbert transform, logarithmic-scaling, and volume rendering. The maximum A-scan processing speeds achieved are >3,000,000 line/s for the standard 1024-pixel-FD-OCT, and >500,000 line/s for the complex 1024-pixel-FD-OCT. Multiple volumerendering of the same 3D data set were preformed and displayed with different view angles. The GPU-acceleration technique is highly cost-effective and can be easily integrated into most ultrahigh speed FD-OCT systems to overcome the 3D data processing and visualization bottlenecks.

  6. Paradoxical Sost gene expression response to mechanical unloading in metaphyseal bone.

    PubMed

    Macias, Brandon R; Aspenberg, Per; Agholme, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    The Sost gene encodes Sclerostin, an inhibitor of Wnt-signaling, generally considered a main response gene to mechanical loading in bone. Several papers describe that unloading leads to upregulation of Sost, which in turn may lead to loss of bone. These studies were based on whole bone homogenates or cortical bone. By serendipity, we noted an opposite response to unloading in the proximal rat tibia. Therefore, we hypothesized that Sost-expression in response to changes in mechanical load is bone site specific. One hind limb of male, 3 month old rats was unloaded by paralyzing the extensors with Botulinium toxin A (Botox) injections. A series of experiments compared the expression of Sost mRNA in the unloaded and contralateral, loaded limbs, after 3 or 10 days, in metaphyseal cancellous bone, metaphyseal cortical bone, and diaphyseal cortical bone. We also conducted μCT to confirm changes in bone volume density related to unloading. Sost mRNA expression in the cancellous metaphyseal bone was downregulated almost 2-fold, both 3 days and 10 days after unloading (P<0.05). A similar tendency was seen in the metaphyseal cortical bone, in which Sost was 1.5-fold downregulated (P<0.05) after 10days, but not significantly changed after 3days. In contrast, diaphyseal cortical Sost expression was instead upregulated 1.4-fold (P<0.05) following 3-day unloading, while there was no significant change after 10days. Cancellous bone volume density was 58% lower (P<0.001, compared to cage controls) in the unloaded limb but not significantly affected in the loaded limb. The results suggest that Sost mRNA expression in metaphyseal bone responds to mechanical unloading in an opposite direction to that observed in diaphyseal cortical bone. This proposes a more complex expression pattern for Sost in response to unloading. Therapeutics that target Sclerostin during altered loading conditions may result in local bone mass changes that are difficult to predict. PMID:23337040

  7. Stimulating angiogenesis mitigates the unloading-induced reduction in osteogenesis in early-stage bone repair in rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sato, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating fracture healing during bed rest allows early mobilization and avoids prolonged fracture healing times. We tested the hypothesis that stimulating angiogenesis with deferoxamine (DFO) mitigates the unloading-induced reduction in early-stage bone repair. Rats aged 12 weeks were subjected to cortical drilling on their tibial diaphysis under anesthesia and treated with hindlimb unloading (HU), HU and DFO administration (DFOHU), or weight bearing (WB) for 5 or 10 days (HU5/10, DFOHU5/10, WB5/10; n = 8 per groups) until sacrifice for vascular casting with a zirconium dioxide-based contrast agent. Taking advantage of its absorption discontinuity at the K-absorption edge, vascular and bone images in the drill-hole defects were acquired by synchrotron radiation subtraction CT. Bone repair was reduced in HU rats. The bone volume fraction (B.Vf) was 88% smaller in HU5 and 42% smaller in HU10 than in WB5/10. The bone segment densities (B.Seg) were 97% smaller in HU5 and 141% larger in HU10 than in WB5/10, and bone thickness (B.Th) was 38% smaller in HU10 than in WB10. The vascular volume fraction (V.Vf) was 35% and the mean vessel diameter (V.D) was 13% smaller in HU10 than in WB10. When compared according to categorized vessel sizes, V.Vf in the diameter ranges 20–30, 30–40, and >40 μm were smaller in HU10 than in WB10, and V.Seg in the diameter range >40 μm was smaller in HU10 than in WB10. In contrast, there was no difference in B.Vf between DFOHU5/10 and WB5/10 and in V.Vf between DFOHU10 and WB10, though B.Seg remained 86% smaller in DFOHU5 and 94% larger in DFOHU10 than in WB5/10, and B.Th and V.D were 23% and 14% lower in DFOHU10 than in WB10. Vessel size-specific V.Vf in the diameter ranges 10–20 and 20–30 μm was larger in DFOHU5 than in HU5. In conclusion, the enhanced angiogenic ingrowth mitigates the reduction in bone repair during mechanical unloading. PMID:25780087

  8. Accelerating the performance of a novel meshless method based on collocation with radial basis functions by employing a graphical processing unit as a parallel coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu-Banson, Derek

    In recent times, a variety of industries, applications and numerical methods including the meshless method have enjoyed a great deal of success by utilizing the graphical processing unit (GPU) as a parallel coprocessor. These benefits often include performance improvement over the previous implementations. Furthermore, applications running on graphics processors enjoy superior performance per dollar and performance per watt than implementations built exclusively on traditional central processing technologies. The GPU was originally designed for graphics acceleration but the modern GPU, known as the General Purpose Graphical Processing Unit (GPGPU) can be used for scientific and engineering calculations. The GPGPU consists of massively parallel array of integer and floating point processors. There are typically hundreds of processors per graphics card with dedicated high-speed memory. This work describes an application written by the author, titled GaussianRBF to show the implementation and results of a novel meshless method that in-cooperates the collocation of the Gaussian radial basis function by utilizing the GPU as a parallel co-processor. Key phases of the proposed meshless method have been executed on the GPU using the NVIDIA CUDA software development kit. Especially, the matrix fill and solution phases have been carried out on the GPU, along with some post processing. This approach resulted in a decreased processing time compared to similar algorithm implemented on the CPU while maintaining the same accuracy.

  9. Graphics processing unit accelerated three-dimensional model for the simulation of pulsed low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro, Andrew Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas

    2014-12-15

    A 3-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation that is fully implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is described and used to determine low-temperature plasma characteristics at high reduced electric field, E/n, in nitrogen gas. Details of implementation on the GPU using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture framework are discussed with respect to efficient code execution. The software is capable of tracking around 10 × 10{sup 6} particles with dynamic weighting and a total mesh size larger than 10{sup 8} cells. Verification of the simulation is performed by comparing the electron energy distribution function and plasma transport parameters to known Boltzmann Equation (BE) solvers. Under the assumption of a uniform electric field and neglecting the build-up of positive ion space charge, the simulation agrees well with the BE solvers. The model is utilized to calculate plasma characteristics of a pulsed, parallel plate discharge. A photoionization model provides the simulation with additional electrons after the initial seeded electron density has drifted towards the anode. Comparison of the performance benefits between the GPU-implementation versus a CPU-implementation is considered, and a speed-up factor of 13 for a 3D relaxation Poisson solver is obtained. Furthermore, a factor 60 speed-up is realized for parallelization of the electron processes.

  10. Phloem unloading in aerial roots of Monstera deliciosa.

    PubMed

    Eschrich, W

    1983-05-01

    Plants of Monstera deliciosa Liebm. pruned to exemplars with one leaf and one aerial root were labeled with 7.4 MBq (14)CO2 over the leaf blade. Microautoradiographs of soluble and insoluble radioactivity were prepared from three different regions of the aerial root. In addition, histochemical localization of ATPase was carried out on similar aerial roots. Vigorously growing aerial roots grew as fast as 26 mm d(-1), and zones of differentiation extended more than 10 cm from the root tip. In the region 2-3 cm from the root tip, in which only protoelements of the vascular tissue were differentiated, (14)C-label was restricted to the protophloem. The activity of ATPase was recognized in many different cellular organelles of the meristematic phloem parenchyma. In the region 5-6 cm from the root tip, in which the first metaelements differentiated, all parenchyma cells of the central cylinder and many cortical cells showed (14)C-label, in addition to the densely labeled protophloem. Differentiating vessels were heavily labeled at sites where secondary walls were formed. In this region of the root, ATPase activity was concentrated on the plasmalemma and cortical cytoplasma of the sieve tubes, and on the tonoplast of the phloem parenchyma cells. In contrast, the strands of internal metaphloem with giant sieve tubes, which are scattered among the metaxylem, were neither labeled nor did they show ATPase activity. In the zone 19-20 cm from the root tip, regions of cell differentiation in the sclerenchymatic mantle of the inner cortex, the late-formed metaxylem vessels and some strands of the internal metaphloem could be identified by dense (14)C-label. Low ATPase activity was found in the plasmalemma of practically all living cells. In this nearly mature region, a strong peroxidase activity was observed in the radial walls of the endodermis. The results indicate that phloem unloading was strongest at sites of root differentiation, where ATPase activity was concentrated in the

  11. The use of satellites in non-goestationary orbits for unloading geostationary communication satellite traffic peaks. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K.; Turner, A.; Nguyen, T.; Doong, W.; Weyandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    The part of the geostationary (GEO) orbital arc used for United States domestic fixed, communications service is rapidly becoming filled with satellites. One of the factors currently limiting its utilization is that communications satellites must be designed to have sufficient capacity to handle peak traffic leads, and thus are under utilized most of the time. A solution is to use satellites in suitable non-geostationary orbits to unload the traffic peaks. Three different designs for a non-geostationary orbit communications satellite system are presented for the 1995 time frame. The economic performance is analyzed and compared with geostationary satellites for two classes of service, trunking and customer premise service. The result is that the larger payload of the non-geostationary satellite offsets the burdens of increased complexity and worse radiation environment to give improved economic performance. Depending on ground terminal configuration, the improved economic performance of the space segment may be offset by increased ground terminal expenses.

  12. Structural, dynamic, and electrostatic properties of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations accelerated with graphical processing units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Narayan; Bauer, Brad A; Lucas, Timothy R; Patel, Sandeep; Taufer, Michela

    2011-11-15

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers performed on graphics processing units (GPUs) using current state-of-the-art non-polarizable force fields and a local GPU-enabled molecular dynamics code named FEN ZI. We treat the conditionally convergent electrostatic interaction energy exactly using the particle mesh Ewald method (PME) for solution of Poisson's Equation for the electrostatic potential under periodic boundary conditions. We discuss elements of our implementation of the PME algorithm on GPUs as well as pertinent performance issues. We proceed to show results of simulations of extended lipid bilayer systems using our program, FEN ZI. We performed simulations of DMPC bilayer systems consisting of 17,004, 68,484, and 273,936 atoms in explicit solvent. We present bilayer structural properties (atomic number densities, electron density profiles), deuterium order parameters (S(CD)), electrostatic properties (dipole potential, water dipole moments), and orientational properties of water. Predicted properties demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment and previous all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We observe no statistically significant differences in calculated structural or electrostatic properties for different system sizes, suggesting the small bilayer simulations (less than 100 lipid molecules) provide equivalent representation of structural and electrostatic properties associated with significantly larger systems (over 1000 lipid molecules). We stress that the three system size representations will have differences in other properties such as surface capillary wave dynamics or surface tension related effects that are not probed in the current study. The latter properties are inherently dependent on system size. This contribution suggests the suitability of applying emerging GPU technologies to studies of an important class of biological environments, that of lipid bilayers and their associated integral

  13. Loading and Unloading Finishing Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Current guidelines suggest the use of ramps below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs; however, they do not suggest the use of any specific bedding. Bedding types (nothing, feed, sand, wood shavings, and hay) were tested with finishing pigs (70–120 kg) to determine which was most effective in reducing slips, falls, and vocalizations at three ramp angles, two moisture levels, over two seasons. Slips, falls, and vocalizations were summed to establish a scoring system for the types of beddings. Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload pigs, increased as the slope increased. Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and ramp slope interacted to impact the total time it took for finishing pigs to load and unload the ramp. Selection of the best bedding depends on ramp slope, season, and wetness of bedding. Abstract The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of finishing pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps with a slope below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs. However, the total time it takes to load and unload animals and slips, falls, and vocalizations are a welfare concern. Three ramp angles (0, 10 or 20 degrees), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding, >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 2400 pig observations) and analyzed with a scoring system. The use of bedding during summer or winter played a role in the total time it took to load and unload the ramp (p < 0.05). Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and slope significantly interacted to impact the total time to load and unload finishing pigs (p < 0.05). Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload the ramp increased as the slope of the ramp increased (p < 0.05). Heart rates were higher during the

  14. Glucose uptake in rat soleus - Effect of acute unloading and subsequent reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Eric J.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acutely reduced weight bearing (unloading) on the in vitro uptake of 2-1,2-H-3-deoxy-D-glucose was studied in the soleus muscle by tail casting and suspending rats. After just 4 h, the uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose fell (-19 percent) and declined further after an additional 20 h of unloading. This diminution at 24 h was associated with slower oxidation of C-14-glucose and incorporation of C-14-glucose into glycogen. At 3 days of unloading, basal uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not differ from control. Reloading of the soleus after 1 or 3 days of unloading increased uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose above control and returned it to normal within 6 h and 4 days, respectively. These effects of unloading and recovery were caused by local changes in the soleus, because the extensor digitorum longus from the same hindlimbs did not display any alterations in uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose or metabolism of glucose.

  15. Skeletal unloading induces resistance to insulin-like growth factor I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    In previous studies with a hindlimb elevation model, we demonstrated that skeletal unloading transiently inhibits bone formation. This effect is limited to the unloaded bones (the normally loaded humerus does not cease growing), suggesting that local factors are of prime importance. IGF-I is one such factor; it is produced in bone and stimulates bone formation. To determine the impact of skeletal unloading on IGF-I production and function, we assessed the mRNA levels of IGF-I and its receptor (IGF-IR) in the proximal tibia and distal femur of growing rats during 2 weeks of hindlimb elevation. The mRNA levels for IGF-I and IGF-IR rose during hindlimb elevation, returning toward control values during recovery. This was accompanied by a 77% increase in IGF-I levels in the bone, peaking at day 10 of unloading. Changes in IGF binding protein levels were not observed. Infusion of IGF-I (200 micrograms/day) during 1 week of hindlimb elevation doubled the increase in bone mass of the control animals but failed to reverse the cessation of bone growth in the hindlimb-elevated animals. We conclude that skeletal unloading induces resistance to IGF-I, which may result secondarily in increased local production of IGF-I.

  16. Loading-unloading response of circular GLARE fiber-metal laminates under lateral indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamasphyros, George J.; Bikakis, George S.

    2015-01-01

    GLARE is a Fiber-Metal laminated material used in aerospace structures which are frequently subjected to various impact damages. Hence, the response of GLARE plates subjected to lateral indentation is very important. In this paper, analytical expressions are derived and a non-linear finite element modeling procedure is proposed in order to predict the static load-indentation curves of circular GLARE plates during loading and unloading by a hemispherical indentor. We have recently published analytical formulas and a finite element procedure for the static indentation of circular GLARE plates which are now used during the loading stage. Here, considering that aluminum layers are in a state of membrane yield and employing energy balance during unloading, the unloading path is determined. Using this unloading path, an algebraic equation is derived for calculating the permanent dent depth of the GLARE plate after the indentor's withdrawal. Furthermore, our finite element procedure is modified in order to simulate the unloading stage as well. The derived formulas and the proposed finite element modeling procedure are applied successfully to GLARE 2-2/1-0.3 and to GLARE 3-3/2-0.4 circular plates. The analytical results are compared with corresponding FEM results and a good agreement is found. The analytically calculated permanent dent depth is within 6 % for the GLARE 2 plate, and within 7 % for the GLARE 3 plate, of the corresponding numerically calculated result. No other solution of this problem is known to the authors.

  17. Effects of Microstructure on the Variation of the Unloading Behavior of DP780 Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Lin, Chengjiang; Mendiguren, Joseba; Rolfe, Bernard F.; Weiss, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear unloading behavior of three different commercial dual-phase steels (DP780 grade equivalent) was examined. These steels exhibited small variations in chemical composition (0.07 to 0.10 mass percent carbon) and martensite volume fraction (0.23 to 0.28), and they demonstrated similar hardening behavior. Uniaxial loading-unloading-loading tests were conducted at room temperature and quasi-static strain rates between engineering strains of 0.5 and 8%. Steel microstructures were examined using electron backscatter diffraction and nanoindentation techniques. The microplastic component of the unloading strain exhibited no dependence on the martensite volume fraction or the ferrite grain size within the small range encountered in this investigations. Instead, the magnitude of the microplastic component of the unloading strain increased as the strength ratio between the martensite and ferrite phases increased. Correspondingly, the apparent unloading modulus, or chord modulus, exhibited a greater reduction for equivalent increments of strain hardening as the strength ratio increased. These results suggest that springback can be reduced in structures containing two ductile phases if the strength ratio between the harder and softer phases is reduced.

  18. Time course of the response of carbohydrate metabolism to unloading of the soleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The time course of the response of carbohydrate metabolism to unloading was studied in the soleus muscle of rats subjected to tail-cast suspension. In the fresh soleus, 12 hours of unloading led to higher concentrations of glycogen and lower activity ratios of both glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase. These changes were still evident on day three. Thereafter, the increased glycogen concentration apparently diminished the activity ratio of glycogen synthase, leading to a subsequent fall in the total glycogen content after day one. After 24 hours of unloading, when no significant atrophy was detectable, there was no differential response to insulin for in vitro glucose metabolism. On day three, the soleus atrophied significantly and displayed a greater sensitivity to insulin for most of these parameters compared to the weight-bearing control muscle. However, insulin sensitivity for glycogen synthesis was unchanged. These results showed that the increased sensitivity to insulin of the unloaded soleus is associated with the degree of muscle atrophy, likely due to an increased insulin binding capacity relative to muscle mass. This study also showed that insulin regulation of glucose uptake and of glycogen synthesis is affected differentially in the unloaded soleus muscle.

  19. Effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the unloaded animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Min-Chul; Sung, Nak-Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Jong Lee, Yun; Lee, Ki-Soo; Choi, In-Ho; Nam, Gung Uk; Lee, Ju-Woon

    During the space flight, human beings encountered the extreme conditions such as the cosmic ray irradiation and microgravity. There have been developed the animal models to simulate the microgravity condition in laboratory, but no study was carried out to investigate the combined effect of microgravity and exposure to irradiation. In this study, it was examined the effect of gamma irradiation on the suspension model. Rats were divided into four groups, Group I was loaded and not exposed to gamma irradiation, Group 2 was unloaded and not exposed, Group 3 was loaded and exposed to gamma irradiation at the dose of 50 mSV, and Group 4 was unloaded and exposed to gamma irradiation at the same dose. It was measured body, muscles and tissues weights and the biological analysis and the hematological response in blood samples were conducted. Anti-gravity tissue weight was only changed between loading and un-loading condition. However, there was no difference between irradiation exposed and not exposed unloaded groups. To know the difference of protein expression in anti-gravity tissues, 2 dimensional electrophoresis was performed. It has been found that the expression levels of several proteins were different by unloading condition and by irradiation exposed condition, respectively. These results provided the information on the combined effect of irradiation and microgravity to simulate space flight, and could be useful to search the candidate material for the countermeasure against space environment.

  20. Modeling Loading/Unloading Hysteresis Behavior of Unidirectional C/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li; Yingdong, Song; Youchao, Sun

    2013-08-01

    The loading/unloading tensile behavior of unidirectional C/SiC ceramic matrix composites at room temperature has been investigated. The loading/unloading stress-strain curve exhibits obvious hysteresis behavior. An approach to model the hysteresis loops of ceramic matrix composites including the effect of fiber failure during tensile loading has been developed. By adopting a shear-lag model which includes the matrix shear deformation in the bonded region and friction in the debonded region, the matrix cracking space and interface debonded length are obtained by matrix statistical cracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonded criterion. The two-parameter Weibull model is used to describe the fiber strength distribution. The stress carried by the intact and fracture fibers on the matrix crack plane during unloading and subsequent reloading is determined by the Global Load Sharing criterion. Based on the damage mechanisms of fiber sliding relative to matrix during unloading and subsequent reloading, the unloading interface reverse slip length and reloading interface new slip length are obtained by the fracture mechanics approach. The hysteresis loops of unidirectional C/SiC ceramic matrix composites corresponding to different stress have been predicted.

  1. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. 9 CFR 325.17 - Loading or unloading products in sealed railroad cars, trucks, etc., en route prohibited; exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND...; exception. Unloading any product from an officially sealed railroad car, truck, or other means of...

  4. 9 CFR 325.17 - Loading or unloading products in sealed railroad cars, trucks, etc., en route prohibited; exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND...; exception. Unloading any product from an officially sealed railroad car, truck, or other means of...

  5. 9 CFR 325.17 - Loading or unloading products in sealed railroad cars, trucks, etc., en route prohibited; exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND...; exception. Unloading any product from an officially sealed railroad car, truck, or other means of...

  6. 9 CFR 325.17 - Loading or unloading products in sealed railroad cars, trucks, etc., en route prohibited; exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND...; exception. Unloading any product from an officially sealed railroad car, truck, or other means of...

  7. 9 CFR 325.17 - Loading or unloading products in sealed railroad cars, trucks, etc., en route prohibited; exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND...; exception. Unloading any product from an officially sealed railroad car, truck, or other means of...

  8. Deglaciation and glacial erosion: A joint control on magma productivity by continental unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Caricchi, Luca; Castelltort, Sébastien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles affect the processes through which water and rocks are redistributed across the Earth's surface, thereby linking the solid Earth and climate dynamics. Regional and global scale studies suggest that continental lithospheric unloading due to ice melting during the transition to interglacials leads to increased continental magmatic, volcanic, and degassing activity. Such a climatic forcing on the melting of the Earth's interior, however, has always been evaluated regardless of continental unloading by glacial erosion, albeit the density of rock exceeds that of ice by approximately 3 times. Here we present and discuss numerical results involving synthetic but realistic topographies, ice caps, and glacial erosion rates suggesting that erosion may be as important as deglaciation in affecting continental unloading. Our study represents an additional step toward a more general understanding of the links between a changing climate, glacial processes, and the melting of the solid Earth.

  9. Low oxygen [correction of oxygene] tension may defence the bone tissue from unloading simulated osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Berezovskii, V A; Litovka, I G; Kostyuchenko, A S

    2004-07-01

    The main task of the present study is to investigate the influences of normobaric gas mixture with lowered PO2 (90-110 mm Hg) on the bones metabolism in rats after hind limb unloaded (HLU). We observed increased the glycosaminoglicans (GAG) concentration in blood serum rats with hind limb unloaded in atmospheric air (AA). An increased activity of acid phosphatase (AcP) and tartratresistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) in blood serum of rats after HLU was observed. The activities of the alkaline phosphatase (AIP) in blood serum did not change. An increased osteocalcin (OST) and C-terminal Propeptide of type I Collagen (CICP) concentration in blood serum, but parathyroid hormone (PTH) decrease comparatively with the control. The above mentioned biochemistry markers in animals after 28 days unloading in normobaric gas mixture (NGM) were more stable and in spite of the same procedure in AA, all dates were near to the controls. PMID:16237821

  10. Muscle protein and glycogen responses to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory using the tail-bast hindlimb suspension model have shown that there are specific changes in protein and carbohydrate metabolism in the soleus muscle due to unloading. For example, 6 days of unloading caused a 27% decrease in mass and a 60% increase in glycogen content in the soleus muscle, while the extensor digitorum longus muscle was unaffected. Also, fresh tissue tyrosine and its in vitro release from the muscle are increased in the unloaded soleus, indicating that this condition causes a more negative protein balance. With these results in mind, studies to investigate the effect of hypogravity on protein and carbohydrate metabolism in a number of rat hindlimb muscles were carried out.

  11. Muscle protein and glycogen responses to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory using the tail-bast hindlimb suspension model have shown that there are specific changes in protein and carbohydrate metabolism in the soleus muscle due to unloading. For example, 6 days of unloading caused a 27 percent decrease in mass and a 60 percent increse in glycogen content in the soleus muscle, while the extensor digitorum longus muscle was unaffected. Also, fresh tissue tyrosine and its in vitro release from the muscle are increased in the unloaded soleus, indicating that this condition causes a more negative protein balance. With these results in mind, studies to investigate the effect of hypogravity on protein and carbohydrate metabolism in a number of rat hindlimb muscles were carried out.

  12. Loading-unloading of an elastic-plastic adhesive spherical microcontact.

    PubMed

    Kadin, Y; Kligerman, Y; Etsion, I

    2008-05-01

    A numerical solution is presented for a single load-unload cycle of an adhesive contact between an elastic-plastic sphere and a rigid flat. The interacting forces between the sphere and the flat are obtained through connecting nonlinear spring elements having force-displacement behavior that obeys the Lennard-Jones potential. Kinematic, rather than isotropic, hardening is assumed for the sphere material to account for possible secondary plastification during the unloading. The well-known Tabor parameter and a plasticity parameter are shown to be the two main dimensionless parameters governing the problem. The effects of these two parameters on the load-approach curves, on the plastically deformed sphere profiles, and on the plastic strain fields inside the sphere are presented, showing different modes of separation during the unloading. PMID:18275967

  13. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  14. Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates unloaded-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dupré-Aucouturier, Sylvie; Castells, Josiane; Freyssenet, Damien; Desplanches, Dominique

    2015-08-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is commonly associated with immobilization, ageing, and catabolic diseases such as diabetes and cancer cachexia. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression resulting from chromatin remodeling through histone acetylation has been implicated in muscle disuse. The present work was designed to test the hypothesis that treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, would partly counteract unloading-induced muscle atrophy. Soleus muscle atrophy (-38%) induced by 14 days of rat hindlimb suspension was reduced to only 25% under TSA treatment. TSA partly prevented the loss of type I and IIa fiber size and reversed the transitions of slow-twitch to fast-twitch fibers in soleus muscle. Unloading or TSA treatment did not affect myostatin gene expression and follistatin protein. Soleus protein carbonyl content remained unchanged, whereas the decrease in glutathione vs. glutathione disulfide ratio and the increase in catalase activity (biomarkers of oxidative stress) observed after unloading were abolished by TSA treatment. The autophagy-lysosome pathway (Bnip3 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 proteins, Atg5, Gabarapl1, Ulk1, and cathepsin B and L mRNA) was not activated by unloading or TSA treatment. However, TSA suppressed the rise in muscle-specific RING finger protein 1 (MuRF1) caused by unloading without affecting the forkhead box (Foxo3) transcription factor. Prevention of muscle atrophy by TSA might be due to the regulation of the skeletal muscle atrophy-related MuRF1 gene. Our findings suggest that TSA may provide a novel avenue to treat unloaded-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:26112243

  15. Vitamin E provides protection for bone in mature hindlimb unloaded male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. J.; Lucas, E. A.; Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Lerner, M. R.; Brackett, D. J.; Stoecker, B. J.; Arjmandi, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    The deleterious effects of skeletal unloading on bone mass and strength may, in part, result from increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), a free-radical scavenger with antiinflammatory properties, to protect against bone loss caused by skeletal unloading in mature male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 2 x 3 factorial design was used with either hindlimb unloading (HU) or normal loading (ambulatory; AMB), and low-dose (LD; 15 IU/kg diet), adequate-dose (AD; 75 IU/kg diet), or high-dose (HD; 500 IU/kg diet) vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate). To optimize the effects of vitamin E on bone, dietary treatments were initiated 9 weeks prior to unloading and continued during the 4-week unloading period, at which time animals were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum vitamin E was dose-dependently increased, confirming the vitamin E status of animals. The HD treatment improved oxidation parameters, as indicated by elevated serum ferric-reducing ability and a trend toward reducing tissue lipid peroxidation. Histomorphometric analysis of the distal femur revealed significant reductions in trabecular thickness (TbTh), double-labeled surface (dLS/BS), and rate of bone formation to bone volume (BFR/BV) due by HU. AMB animals on the HD diet and HU animals on the LD diet had reduced bone surface normalized to tissue volume (BS/TV) and trabecular number (TbN); however, the HD vitamin E protected against these changes in the HU animals. Our findings suggest that vitamin E supplementation provides modest bone protective effects during skeletal unloading.

  16. Intracellular Ca2+ transients in mouse soleus muscle after hindlimb unloading and reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, C. P.; Warren, G. L.; Armstrong, R. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether altered intracellular Ca(2+) handling contributes to the specific force loss in the soleus muscle after unloading and/or subsequent reloading of mouse hindlimbs. Three groups of female ICR mice were studied: 1) unloaded mice (n = 11) that were hindlimb suspended for 14 days, 2) reloaded mice (n = 10) that were returned to their cages for 1 day after 14 days of hindlimb suspension, and 3) control mice (n = 10) that had normal cage activity. Maximum isometric tetanic force (P(o)) was determined in the soleus muscle from the left hindlimb, and resting free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), and 4-chloro-m-cresol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in the contralateral soleus muscle by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unloading and reloading increased resting [Ca(2+)](i) above control by 36% and 24%, respectively. Although unloading reduced P(o) and specific force by 58% and 24%, respectively, compared with control mice, there was no difference in tetanic [Ca(2+)](i). P(o), specific force, and tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) were reduced by 58%, 23%, and 23%, respectively, in the reloaded animals compared with control mice; however, tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) was not different between unloaded and reloaded mice. These data indicate that although hindlimb suspension results in disturbed intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, changes in tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) do not contribute to force deficits. Compared with unloading, 24 h of physiological reloading in the mouse do not result in further changes in maximal strength or tetanic [Ca(2+)](i).

  17. Disruption of NF-κB1 prevents bone loss caused by mechanical unloading.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Wataru; Alles, Neil; Nagano, Kenichi; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Osawa, Kenji; Yasuda, Hisataka; Nakamura, Ichiro; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Ohya, Keiichi; Maki, Kenshi; Jimi, Eijiro

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical unloading, such as in a microgravity environment in space or during bed rest (for patients who require prolonged bed rest), leads to a decrease in bone mass because of the suppression of bone formation and the stimulation of bone resorption. To address the challenges presented by a prolonged stay in space and the forthcoming era of a super-aged society, it will be important to prevent the bone loss caused by prolonged mechanical unloading. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcription factors are activated by mechanical loading and inflammatory cytokines. Our objective was to elucidate the role of NF-κB pathways in bone loss that are caused by mechanical unloading. Eight-week-old wild-type (WT) and NF-κB1-deficient mice were randomly assigned to a control or mechanically unloaded with tail suspension group. After 2 weeks, a radiographic analysis indicated a decrease in bone mass in the tibias and femurs of the unloaded WT mice but not in the NF-κB1-deficient mice. An NF-κB1 deficiency suppressed the unloading-induced reduction in bone formation by maintaining the proportion and/or potential of osteoprogenitors or immature osteoblasts, and by suppression of bone resorption through the inhibition of intracellular signaling through the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteoclast precursors. Thus, NF-κB1 is involved in two aspects of rapid reduction in bone mass that are induced by disuse osteoporosis in space or bed rest. PMID:23322687

  18. Involvement of AMPK in regulating slow-twitch muscle atrophy during hindlimb unloading in mice.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Tatsuro; Goto, Ayumi; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Shingo; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Goto, Katsumasa

    2015-10-01

    AMPK is considered to have a role in regulating skeletal muscle mass. However, there are no studies investigating the function of AMPK in modulating skeletal muscle mass during atrophic conditions. In the present study, we investigated the difference in unloading-associated muscle atrophy and molecular functions in response to 2-wk hindlimb suspension between transgenic mice overexpressing the dominant-negative mutant of AMPK (AMPK-DN) and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Male WT (n = 24) and AMPK-DN (n = 24) mice were randomly divided into two groups: an untreated preexperimental control group (n = 12 in each group) and an unloading (n = 12 in each group) group. The relative soleus muscle weight and fiber cross-sectional area to body weight were decreased by ∼30% in WT mice by hindlimb unloading and by ∼20% in AMPK-DN mice. There were no changes in puromycin-labeled protein or Akt/70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase signaling, the indicators of protein synthesis. The expressions of ubiquitinated proteins and muscle RING finger 1 mRNA and protein, markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, were increased by hindlimb unloading in WT mice but not in AMPK-DN mice. The expressions of molecules related to the protein degradation system, phosphorylated forkhead box class O3a, inhibitor of κBα, microRNA (miR)-1, and miR-23a, were decreased only in WT mice in response to hindlimb unloading, and 72-kDa heat shock protein expression was higher in AMPK-DN mice than in WT mice. These results imply that AMPK partially regulates unloading-induced atrophy of slow-twitch muscle possibly through modulation of the protein degradation system, especially the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26244519

  19. Accelerating electrostatic interaction calculations with graphical processing units based on new developments of Ewald method using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Chun; Wang, Yong-Lei; Jiao, Gui-Sheng; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-01-30

    We present new algorithms to improve the performance of ENUF method (F. Hedman, A. Laaksonen, Chem. Phys. Lett. 425, 2006, 142) which is essentially Ewald summation using Non-Uniform FFT (NFFT) technique. A NearDistance algorithm is developed to extensively reduce the neighbor list size in real-space computation. In reciprocal-space computation, a new algorithm is developed for NFFT for the evaluations of electrostatic interaction energies and forces. Both real-space and reciprocal-space computations are further accelerated by using graphical processing units (GPU) with CUDA technology. Especially, the use of CUNFFT (NFFT based on CUDA) very much reduces the reciprocal-space computation. In order to reach the best performance of this method, we propose a procedure for the selection of optimal parameters with controlled accuracies. With the choice of suitable parameters, we show that our method is a good alternative to the standard Ewald method with the same computational precision but a dramatically higher computational efficiency. PMID:26584145

  20. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  1. Predicting Bone Mechanical State During Recovery After Long-Duration Skeletal Unloading Using QCT and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Katarina L.; Pennline, James A.

    2013-01-01

    During long-duration missions at the International Space Station, astronauts experience weightlessness leading to skeletal unloading. Unloading causes a lack of a mechanical stimulus that triggers bone cellular units to remove mass from the skeleton. A mathematical system of the cellular dynamics predicts theoretical changes to volume fractions and ash fraction in response to temporal variations in skeletal loading. No current model uses image technology to gather information about a skeletal site s initial properties to calculate bone remodeling changes and then to compare predicted bone strengths with the initial strength. The goal of this study is to use quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in conjunction with a computational model of the bone remodeling process to establish initial bone properties to predict changes in bone mechanics during bone loss and recovery with finite element (FE) modeling. Input parameters for the remodeling model include bone volume fraction and ash fraction, which are both computed from the QCT images. A non-destructive approach to measure ash fraction is also derived. Voxel-based finite element models (FEM) created from QCTs provide initial evaluation of bone strength. Bone volume fraction and ash fraction outputs from the computational model predict changes to the elastic modulus of bone via a two-parameter equation. The modulus captures the effect of bone remodeling and functions as the key to evaluate of changes in strength. Application of this time-dependent modulus to FEMs and composite beam theory enables an assessment of bone mechanics during recovery. Prediction of bone strength is not only important for astronauts, but is also pertinent to millions of patients with osteoporosis and low bone density.

  2. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  4. 9 CFR 72.17 - Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unloading noninfected cattle for rest... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.17 Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for such...

  5. 9 CFR 72.17 - Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unloading noninfected cattle for rest... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.17 Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for such...

  6. 9 CFR 72.17 - Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unloading noninfected cattle for rest... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.17 Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for such...

  7. 78 FR 41853 - Safety Advisory Guidance: Heating Rail Tank Cars To Prepare Hazardous Material for Unloading or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ...This guidance provides safety precautions and recommended guidance for persons responsible for unloading or transloading \\1\\ hazardous materials from rail tank cars, specifically those persons heating a rail tank car to prepare its hazardous material contents for unloading or transloading. Further, this guidance reminds such persons of current regulatory requirements addressing this type of......

  8. 49 CFR 179.200-16 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices... and 115AW) § 179.200-16 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet...). In no case shall the wall thickness be less than that specified in § 179.201-1. (f) When top...

  9. 49 CFR 179.220-17 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices. 179.220-17 Section 179.220-17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and 115AW) § 179.220-17 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air...

  10. 49 CFR 179.220-17 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices. 179.220-17 Section 179.220-17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and 115AW) § 179.220-17 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air...

  11. 49 CFR 179.220-17 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices. 179.220-17 Section 179.220-17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-17 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and...

  12. 49 CFR 179.200-16 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices... and 115AW) § 179.200-16 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet...). In no case shall the wall thickness be less than that specified in § 179.201-1. (f) When top...

  13. 49 CFR 179.220-17 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices. 179.220-17 Section 179.220-17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and 115AW) § 179.220-17 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air...

  14. 49 CFR 179.220-17 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices. 179.220-17 Section 179.220-17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and 115AW) § 179.220-17 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air...

  15. 49 CFR 179.200-16 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices... and 115AW) § 179.200-16 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet...). In no case shall the wall thickness be less than that specified in § 179.201-1. (f) When top...

  16. 49 CFR 179.200-16 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices... and 115AW) § 179.200-16 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet...). In no case shall the wall thickness be less than that specified in § 179.201-1. (f) When top...

  17. 49 CFR 179.200-16 - Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air inlet devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices... DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-16 Gauging devices, top loading and unloading devices, venting and air...). In no case shall the wall thickness be less than that specified in § 179.201-1. (f) When top...

  18. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  19. Replication-Coupled PCNA Unloading by the Elg1 Complex Occurs Genome-wide and Requires Okazaki Fragment Ligation.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takashi; Katou, Yuki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Donaldson, Anne D

    2015-08-01

    The sliding clamp PCNA is a crucial component of the DNA replication machinery. Timely PCNA loading and unloading are central for genome integrity and must be strictly coordinated with other DNA processing steps during replication. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Elg1 replication factor C-like complex (Elg1-RLC) unloads PCNA genome-wide following Okazaki fragment ligation. In the absence of Elg1, PCNA is retained on chromosomes in the wake of replication forks, rather than at specific sites. Degradation of the Okazaki fragment ligase Cdc9 leads to PCNA accumulation on chromatin, similar to the accumulation caused by lack of Elg1. We demonstrate that Okazaki fragment ligation is the critical prerequisite for PCNA unloading, since Chlorella virus DNA ligase can substitute for Cdc9 in yeast and simultaneously promotes PCNA unloading. Our results suggest that Elg1-RLC acts as a general PCNA unloader and is dependent upon DNA ligation during chromosome replication. PMID:26212319

  20. Skeletal unloading inhibits the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of rat osteoprogenitor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostenuik, P. J.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bikle, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of weight bearing in the growing rat decreases bone formation, osteoblast numbers, and bone maturation in unloaded bones. These responses suggest an impairment of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. To test this assumption, we assessed the effects of skeletal unloading using an in vitro model of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation. Rats were hindlimb elevated for 0 (control), 2, or 5 days, after which their tibial bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested and cultured. Five days of hindlimb elevation led to significant decreases in proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (AP) enzyme activity, and mineralization of BMSC cultures. Differentiation of BMSCs was analyzed by quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction of cDNA after 10, 15, 20, and 28 days of culture. cDNA pools were analyzed for the expression of c-fos (an index of proliferation), AP (an index of early osteoblast differentiation), and osteocalcin (a marker of late differentiation). BMSCs from 5-day unloaded rats expressed 50% less c-fos, 61% more AP, and 35% less osteocalcin mRNA compared with controls. These data demonstrate that cultured osteoprogenitor cells retain a memory of their in vivo loading history and indicate that skeletal unloading inhibits proliferation and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells in vitro.

  1. 48 CFR 52.247-19 - Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stopping in Transit for... Clauses 52.247-19 Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading. As prescribed in 47.207-6(c)(5)(ii), insert... origin to two or more consignees along the route between origin and last destination: Stopping in...

  2. 48 CFR 52.247-19 - Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stopping in Transit for... Clauses 52.247-19 Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading. As prescribed in 47.207-6(c)(5)(ii), insert... origin to two or more consignees along the route between origin and last destination: Stopping in...

  3. 48 CFR 52.247-19 - Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stopping in Transit for... Clauses 52.247-19 Stopping in Transit for Partial Unloading. As prescribed in 47.207-6(c)(5)(ii), insert... origin to two or more consignees along the route between origin and last destination: Stopping in...

  4. 49 CFR 179.300-13 - Venting, loading and unloading valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting, loading and unloading valves. 179.300-13 Section 179.300-13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications...

  5. 76 FR 13313 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477..., PHMSA published a notice (73 FR 916) to solicit comments and information on a set of recommended... the greatest single primary cause of incidents during loading and unloading operations, accounting...

  6. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  7. 15 CFR 758.5 - Conformity of documents and unloading of items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conformity of documents and unloading of items. 758.5 Section 758.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT...

  8. 9 CFR 95.25 - Transportation of restricted import products; placarding cars and marking billing; unloading...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: Nature of emergency; place where product or material was unloaded; original points of shipment and... product.” These placards shall also bear the words “Clean and disinfect this car or truck.” Each of the... words “Restricted import product, clean and disinfect car or truck,” plainly written or stamped upon...

  9. Dynamic Foot Stimulation Attenuates Soleus Muscle Atrophy Induced by Hindlimb Unloading in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Feeback, Daniel L.; Layne, Charles S.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    Unloading-induced myofiber atrophy is a phenomenon that occurs in the aging population, bed-ridden patients and astronauts. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not dynamic foot stimulation (DFS) applied to the plantar surface of the rat foot can serve as a countermeasure to the soleus muscle atrophy normally observed in hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty mature adult (6-month-old) male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into ambulatory control (AMB), hindlimb unloaded alone (HU), or hindlimb unloaded with the application of DFS (HU+DFS) groups. A dynamic pattern of pressure was applied to the right foot of each HU animal using a specially fabricated boot containing an inflatable air bladder connected to a solenoid air pump controlled by a laptop computer. The anti-atrophic effects of DFS were quantified morphometrically in frozen cross-sections of soleus muscle stained using the metachromatic-ATPase fiber typing technique. Application of DFS during HU significantly counteracted the atrophic response observed in the soleus by preventing approximately 85% of the reduction in Type I myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA) observed during HU. However, DFS did not protect type II fibers of the soleus from HU-induced atrophy or any fiber type in the soleus muscle of the contralateral control leg of the DFS-treated HU animals. These results illustrate that the application of DFS to the rat foot is an effective countermeasure to soleus muscle atrophy induced by HU.

  10. Modulation of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump (SERCA) Function by Membrane Cholesterol during Unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. S. F.; Hammond, D. K.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated by in situ immuno-localization that cholesterol is predominantly located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), rather than in the sarcolemmal/T-tubule (SL-TT) membranes of both human and rat skeletal muscle (Clarke et al., 2000, JAP). In addition, we have demonstrated that mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle in a rat hindlimb suspension model significantly increases membrane cholesterol content and that this increase is also localized to SR rather than SL-TT membranes in such atrophied muscle. Utilizing a novel fluorescent calcium staining technique in perfusion fixed soleus muscle we observed a significant positive correlation between membrane cholesterol content and free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading. To determine if a correlation between increased SR membrane cholesterol content and increased free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading is due to a membrane cholesterol-mediated alteration in SR calcium pump function, we also describe the effects of modulating the cholesterol content of purified SR membrane preparations on SR-Ca2+ ATPase activity and ryanodine channel activity. As an increase in free intra-cellular calcium levels have previously demonstrated to induce catabolism in a wide range of biological systems, we suggest that altered SR calcium pump function may be the underlying basis for the initiation of unloading induced muscle atrophy.

  11. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J

    2014-01-01

    The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations). "Score" was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01). Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05) scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01). Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was affected by bedding type, ramp angle, and season (P < 0.05). Minimizing slips, falls, and vocalizations when loading and unloading pigs improved animal welfare. PMID:26479010

  12. The Effect of Skeletal Unloading on Bone Formation: Role of IGF-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Kostenuik, P.; Holton, E. M.; Halloran, B. P.

    1999-01-01

    The best documented change in bone during space flight is the near cessation of bone formation. Space flight leads to a decrease in osteoblast number and activity, likely the result of altered differentiation of osteoblast precursors. The net result of these space flight induced changes is weaker bone. To understand the mechanism for these changes poses a challenge. Space flight studies must overcome enormous technical problems, and are necessarily limited in size and frequency. Therefore, ground based models have been developed to evaluate the effects of skeletal unloading. The hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) model simulates space flight better than other models because it reproduces the fluid shifts seen in space travel, is reversible, and is well tolerated by the animals with minimal evidence of stress as indicated by continued weight gain and normal levels and circadian rhythms of corticosterone. This is the model we have used for our experiments. Skeletal unloading by the hindlimb elevation method simulates a number of features of space flight in that bone formation, mineralization, and maturation are inhibited, osteoblast number is decreased, serum and skeletal osteocalcin levels fall, the ash content of bone decreases, and bone strength diminishes. We and others have shown that when osteoblasts or osteoprogenitor cells from the bones of the unloaded limbs are cultured in vitro they proliferate and differentiate more slowly, suggesting that skeletal unloading causes a persistent change in cell function which can be assessed in vitro. In contrast to the unweighted bones of the hindlimbs, no significant change in bone mass or bone formation is observed in the humeri, mandible, and cervical vertebrae during hindlimb elevation. The lack of effect of hindlimb elevation on bones like the humeri, mandible, and cervical vertebrae which are not unloaded by this procedure suggests that local factors rather than systemic effects dominate the response of bone to

  13. Paradoxical Response to Mechanical Unloading in Bone Loss, Microarchitecture, and Bone Turnover Markers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaodi; Yang, Kaiyun; Wang, Chune; Cao, Sensen; Merritt, Mackenzie; Hu, Yingwei; Xu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sclerostin, encoded by the SOST gene, has been implicated in the response to mechanical loading in bone. Some studies demonstrated that unloading leads to up-regulated SOST expression, which may induce bone loss. Purpose: Most reported studies regarding the changes caused by mechanical unloading were only based on a single site. Considering that the longitudinal bone growth leads to cells of different age with different sensitivity to unloading, we hypothesized that bone turnover in response to unloading is site specific. Methods: We established a disuse rat model by sciatic neurectomy in tibia. In various regions at two time-points, we evaluated the bone mass and microarchitecture in surgically-operated rats and control rats by micro-Computed Tomography (micro-CT) and histology, sclerostin/SOST by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b) by ELISA and TRAP staining, and other bone markers by ELISA. Results: Micro-CT and histological analysis confirmed bone volume in the disuse rats was significantly decreased compared with those in the time-matched control rats, and microarchitecture also changed 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Compared with the control groups, SOST mRNA expression in the diaphysis was down-regulated at both week 2 and 8. On the contrary, the percentage of sclerostin-positive osteocytes showed an up-regulated response in the 5 - 6 mm region away from the growth plate, while in the 2.5 - 3.5 mm region, the percentage was no significant difference. Nevertheless, in 0.5 - 1.5 mm region, the percentage of sclerostin-positive osteocytes decreased after 8 weeks, consistent with serum SOST level. Besides, the results of TRAP also suggested that the expression in response to unloading may be opposite in different sites or system. Conclusion: Our data indicated that unloading-induced changes in bone

  14. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  15. Micro-macro correlations and anisotropy in granular assemblies under uniaxial loading and unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imole, Olukayode I.; Wojtkowski, Mateusz; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Luding, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The influence of contact friction on the behavior of dense, polydisperse granular assemblies under uniaxial (oedometric) loading and unloading deformation is studied using discrete element simulations. Even though the uniaxial deformation protocol is one of the "simplest" element tests possible, the evolution of the structural anisotropy necessitates its careful analysis and understanding, since it is the source of interesting and unexpected observations. On the macroscopic, homogenized, continuum scale, the deviatoric stress ratio and the deviatoric fabric, i.e., the microstructure behave in a different fashion during uniaxial loading and unloading. The maximal stress ratio and strain increase with increasing contact friction. In contrast, the deviatoric fabric reaches its maximum at a unique strain level independent of friction, with the maximal value decreasing with friction. For unloading, both stress and fabric respond to unloading strain with a friction-dependent delay but at different strains. On the micro-level, a friction-dependent non-symmetry of the proportion of weak (strong) and sliding (sticking) contacts with respect to the total contacts during loading and unloading is observed. Coupled to this, from the directional probability distribution, the "memory" and history-dependent behavior of granular systems is confirmed. Surprisingly, while a rank-2 tensor is sufficient to describe the evolution of the normal force directions, a sixth order harmonic approximation is necessary to describe the probability distribution of contacts, tangential force, and mobilized friction. We conclude that the simple uniaxial deformation activates microscopic phenomena not only in the active Cartesian directions, but also at intermediate orientations, with the tilt angle being dependent on friction, so that this microstructural features cause the interesting, nontrivial macroscopic behavior.

  16. The Wnt Inhibitor Sclerostin Is Up-regulated by Mechanical Unloading in Osteocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Spatz, Jordan M; Wein, Marc N; Gooi, Jonathan H; Qu, Yili; Garr, Jenna L; Liu, Shawn; Barry, Kevin J; Uda, Yuhei; Lai, Forest; Dedic, Christopher; Balcells-Camps, Mercedes; Kronenberg, Henry M; Babij, Philip; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2015-07-01

    Although bone responds to its mechanical environment, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the skeleton to mechanical unloading are not completely understood. Osteocytes are the most abundant but least understood cells in bones and are thought to be responsible for sensing stresses and strains in bone. Sclerostin, a product of the SOST gene, is produced postnatally primarily by osteocytes and is a negative regulator of bone formation. Recent studies show that SOST is mechanically regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. During prolonged bed rest and immobilization, circulating sclerostin increases both in humans and in animal models, and its increase is associated with a decrease in parathyroid hormone. To investigate whether SOST/sclerostin up-regulation in mechanical unloading is a cell-autonomous response or a hormonal response to decreased parathyroid hormone levels, we subjected osteocytes to an in vitro unloading environment achieved by the NASA rotating wall vessel system. To perform these studies, we generated a novel osteocytic cell line (Ocy454) that produces high levels of SOST/sclerostin at early time points and in the absence of differentiation factors. Importantly, these osteocytes recapitulated the in vivo response to mechanical unloading with increased expression of SOST (3.4 ± 1.9-fold, p < 0.001), sclerostin (4.7 ± 0.1-fold, p < 0.001), and the receptor activator of nuclear factor κΒ ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) (2.5 ± 0.7-fold, p < 0.001) ratio. These data demonstrate for the first time a cell-autonomous increase in SOST/sclerostin and RANKL/OPG ratio in the setting of unloading. Thus, targeted osteocyte therapies could hold promise as novel osteoporosis and disuse-induced bone loss treatments by directly modulating the mechanosensing cells in bone. PMID:25953900

  17. The influence of antiorthostatic unloading and long gamma-irradiation on rat bone marrow (MSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Maria; Bobyleva, Polina; Shtemberg, Andrey; Buravkova, Ludmila

    With the prospect of long interplanetary spaceflight becoming a real possibility there are some important questions that need to be answered regarding the combined effects of microgravity and long gamma-irradiation.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of synchronous antiorthostatic unloading and fractional gamma-irradiation on the functional characteristics of rat bone marrow multipotent stromal cells (MSCs).This experiment was carried out following all rules laid out by the Commission on Bioethics at the SSC RF - IBMP RAS. In this experiment the Wistar rats were kept in an unloaded position for a duration of 30 days. They were also subjected to 6 doses of gamma-radiation on the “GOBO-60” with a source of (137) Cs. The dose rate set to 1 meter 50 sGr / H (Total dose of 3 Gr).The study revealed a significant reduction in the number of colonies (CFU-F) in all cultures from the experimental groups when compared to the control groups. The most significant reduction was observed in the group, which had been subject to combined unloading, and radiation. This result was confirmed by examination of cell cultures during 10 days of growth.We found that the CD45 expression was increased in the groups exposed to radiation. At the same time a reduction in the expression of CD90 was observed during combination of radiation and unloading we found.The experimental groups also differed from the control group showing smaller lipid inclusions and decreased expression of alkaline phosphates in the MSCs. This experiment concluded that the bone marrow MSCs after a combination of unloading and multiple radiation sessions, showed a decrease in proliferation and differentiation potential which could reduce the adaption and reparative capacity of the organism.

  18. True Triaxial Strength and Failure Modes of Cubic Rock Specimens with Unloading the Minor Principal Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Du, Kun; Li, Diyuan

    2015-11-01

    True triaxial tests have been carried out on granite, sandstone and cement mortar using cubic specimens with the process of unloading the minor principal stress. The strengths and failure modes of the three rock materials are studied in the processes of unloading σ 3 and loading σ 1 by the newly developed true triaxial test system under different σ 2, aiming to study the mechanical responses of the rock in underground excavation at depth. It shows that the rock strength increases with the raising of the intermediate principal stress σ 2 when σ 3 is unloaded to zero. The true triaxial strength criterion by the power-law relationship can be used to fit the testing data. The "best-fitting" material parameters A and n ( A > 1.4 and n < 1.0) are almost located in the same range as expected by Al-Ajmi and Zimmerman (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 563 42(3):431-439, 2005). It indicates that the end effect caused by the height-to-width ratio of the cubic specimens will not significantly affect the testing results under true triaxial tests. Both the strength and failure modes of cubic rock specimens under true triaxial unloading condition are affected by the intermediate principal stress. When σ 2 increases to a critical value for the strong and hard rocks (R4, R5 and R6), the rock failure mode may change from shear to slabbing. However, for medium strong and weak rocks (R3 and R2), even with a relatively high intermediate principal stress, they tend to fail in shear after a large amount of plastic deformation. The maximum extension strain criterion Stacey (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 651 18(6):469-474, 1981) can be used to explain the change of failure mode from shear to slabbing for strong and hard rocks under true triaxial unloading test condition.

  19. The Wnt Inhibitor Sclerostin Is Up-regulated by Mechanical Unloading in Osteocytes in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Spatz, Jordan M.; Wein, Marc N.; Gooi, Jonathan H.; Qu, Yili; Garr, Jenna L.; Liu, Shawn; Barry, Kevin J.; Uda, Yuhei; Lai, Forest; Dedic, Christopher; Balcells-Camps, Mercedes; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Babij, Philip; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2015-01-01

    Although bone responds to its mechanical environment, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the skeleton to mechanical unloading are not completely understood. Osteocytes are the most abundant but least understood cells in bones and are thought to be responsible for sensing stresses and strains in bone. Sclerostin, a product of the SOST gene, is produced postnatally primarily by osteocytes and is a negative regulator of bone formation. Recent studies show that SOST is mechanically regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. During prolonged bed rest and immobilization, circulating sclerostin increases both in humans and in animal models, and its increase is associated with a decrease in parathyroid hormone. To investigate whether SOST/sclerostin up-regulation in mechanical unloading is a cell-autonomous response or a hormonal response to decreased parathyroid hormone levels, we subjected osteocytes to an in vitro unloading environment achieved by the NASA rotating wall vessel system. To perform these studies, we generated a novel osteocytic cell line (Ocy454) that produces high levels of SOST/sclerostin at early time points and in the absence of differentiation factors. Importantly, these osteocytes recapitulated the in vivo response to mechanical unloading with increased expression of SOST (3.4 ± 1.9-fold, p < 0.001), sclerostin (4.7 ± 0.1-fold, p < 0.001), and the receptor activator of nuclear factor κΒ ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) (2.5 ± 0.7-fold, p < 0.001) ratio. These data demonstrate for the first time a cell-autonomous increase in SOST/sclerostin and RANKL/OPG ratio in the setting of unloading. Thus, targeted osteocyte therapies could hold promise as novel osteoporosis and disuse-induced bone loss treatments by directly modulating the mechanosensing cells in bone. PMID:25953900

  20. The role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Wronski, T. J.; GLOBUS. R.; Levens, M. J.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1983-01-01

    Skeletal unloading results in osteopenia. To examine the involvement of vitamin D in this process, the rear limbs of growing rats were unloaded and alterations in bone calcium and bone histology were related to changes in serum calcium (Ca), inorganic phosphorus (P sub i), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH)2D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D. Acute skeletal unloading induced a transitory inhibition of Ca accumulation in unloaded bones. This was accompanied by a transitory rise in serum Ca, a 21% decrease in longitudinal bone growth (P 0.01), a 32% decrease in bone surface lined with osteoblasts (P .05), no change in bone surface lined with osteoclasts and a decrease in circulating (1,25(OH)2D. No significant changes in the serum concentrations of P sub i, 25-OH-D or 24,25(OH)2D were observed. After 2 weeks of unloading, bone Ca stabilized at approximately 70% of control and serum Ca and 1,25(OH)2D returned to control values. Maintenance of a constant serum 1,25(OH)2D concentration by chronic infusion of 1,25(OH)2D (Alza osmotic minipump) throughout the study period did not prevent the bone changes induced by acute unloading. These results suggest that acute skeletal unloading in the growing rat produces a transitory inhibition of bone formation which in turn produces a transitory hypercalcemia.

  1. Combined effects of soy isoflavones and milk basic protein on bone mineral density in hind-limb unloaded mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yu; Tousen, Yuko; Nishide, Yoriko; Tadaishi, Miki; Kato, Ken; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether the combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein both are reported to be effective for bone metabolism, prevents bone loss induced by skeletal hind-limb unloading in mice. Female ddY strain mice, aged 8 weeks, were divided into six groups (n = 6–8 each): (1) normally housed group, (2) loading group, (3) hind-limb unloading group fed a control diet, (4) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates diet, (5) hind-limb unloading group fed a 1.0% milk basic protein diet, and (6) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates and 1.0% milk basic protein diet. After 3 weeks, femoral bone mineral density was markedly reduced in unloading mice. The combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein showed cooperative effects in preventing bone loss and milk basic protein inhibited the increased expression of osteogenic genes in bone marrow cells in unloading mice. These results suggest that the combination of soy isoflavone and milk basic protein may be useful for bone health in subjects with disabling conditions as well as astronauts. PMID:27013781

  2. Combined effects of soy isoflavones and milk basic protein on bone mineral density in hind-limb unloaded mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yu; Tousen, Yuko; Nishide, Yoriko; Tadaishi, Miki; Kato, Ken; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2016-03-01

    We examined whether the combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein both are reported to be effective for bone metabolism, prevents bone loss induced by skeletal hind-limb unloading in mice. Female ddY strain mice, aged 8 weeks, were divided into six groups (n = 6-8 each): (1) normally housed group, (2) loading group, (3) hind-limb unloading group fed a control diet, (4) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates diet, (5) hind-limb unloading group fed a 1.0% milk basic protein diet, and (6) hind-limb unloading group fed a 0.2% isoflavone conjugates and 1.0% milk basic protein diet. After 3 weeks, femoral bone mineral density was markedly reduced in unloading mice. The combination of isoflavone and milk basic protein showed cooperative effects in preventing bone loss and milk basic protein inhibited the increased expression of osteogenic genes in bone marrow cells in unloading mice. These results suggest that the combination of soy isoflavone and milk basic protein may be useful for bone health in subjects with disabling conditions as well as astronauts. PMID:27013781

  3. Effects of the hindlimb-unloading model of spaceflight conditions on resistance of mice to infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been well documented in several studies that many immunologic parameters are altered in experimental animals and human subjects who have flown in space. However, it is not fully known whether these immunologic changes could result in increased susceptibility to infection. Hindlimb (antiorthostatic) unloading of rodents has been used successfully to simulate some of the effects of spaceflight on physiologic systems. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hindlimb unloading on the outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in mice. METHODS: Hindlimb-unloaded, hindlimb-restrained, and control mice were intraperitoneally infected with one 50% lethal dose of K pneumoniae 2 days after suspension. Mortality and bacterial load in several organs were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Unloaded mice showed significantly increased mortality and reduced mean time to death compared with that seen in the control groups. Kinetics of bacterial growth with smaller infective doses revealed that control mice were able to clear bacteria from the organs after 30 hours. In contrast, unloaded mice had continued bacterial growth at the same time point. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that hindlimb unloading might enhance the dissemination of K pneumoniae, leading to increased mortality. The complex physiologic changes observed during hindlimb unloading, including stress, have a key role in the pathophysiology of this infection.

  4. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Current guidelines suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs; they do not suggest the use of any specific bedding. Bedding types (nothing, feed, sand, wood shavings, and hay) were tested with four week old weaned pigs to determine which was most effective in reducing slips, falls, and vocalizations at three ramp angles, two moistures, over two seasons. Slips, falls, and vocalizations were summed to establish a scoring system to evaluate treatments. Scores increased in a linear fashion as ramp slope increased. The amount of time it took to load and unload pigs was affected by bedding type and ramp angle. Overall, the use of selected bedding types minimized slips, falls, and vocalizations and improved animal welfare. Abstract The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations). “Score” was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01). Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05) scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01). Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was affected by bedding type, ramp angle, and season (P < 0.05). Minimizing slips, falls, and vocalizations when loading and unloading pigs improved animal

  5. An in vivo Experimental System to Study Sugar Phloem Unloading in Ripening Grape Berries During Water Deficiency Stress

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHEN‐PING; DELOIRE, ALAIN; CARBONNEAU, ALAIN; FEDERSPIEL, BRIGITTE; LOPEZ, FRANÇOIS

    2003-01-01

    An in vivo experimental system—called the ‘berry‐cup’ technique—was developed to study sugar phloem unloading and the accumulation of sugar in ripening grape berries. The berry‐cup system consists of a single peeled grape berry immersed in a buffer solution in a cup prepared from a polypropylene syringe. A small cross‐incision (2 mm in length) is made on the stylar remnant of a berry during its ripening phase, the skin of the berry then being easily peeled off, exposing the dorsal vascular bundles without damaging either these or the pulp tissue of the berry. The sites of sugar phloem unloading are thus made directly accessible and may be regulated by the buffer solution. In addition, the unloaded photoassimilates are easily transported into the buffer solution in the berry‐cup. With the berry‐cup technique, it takes 60 min to purge the sugar already present in the apoplast, after which the amount of sugar in the buffer solution is a direct measure of the sugar unloading from the grape berry phloem. The optimum times for sampling were 20 or 30 min, depending on the type of experiment. Sugar phloem unloading was significantly inhibited by the inclusion of either 7·5 mm NaF or 2·5 mm PCMB in the buffer solution. This study indicates that sugar phloem unloading in ripening grape berries is via the apoplastic network and that the process requires the input of energy. The system was shown to be an appropriate experimental system with which to study sugar phloem unloading in ripening grape berries, and was applied successfully to the study of berry sugar unloaded from grapevines subjected to water stress. The results showed that water deficiency inhibits sugar unloading in grape berries. PMID:12907466

  6. Contribution of Social Isolation, Restraint, and Hindlimb Unloading to Changes in Hemodynamic Parameters and Motion Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsvirkun, Darya; Bourreau, Jennifer; Mieuset, Aurélie; Garo, Florian; Vinogradova, Olga; Larina, Irina; Navasiolava, Nastassia; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Gharib, Claude; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The most accepted animal model for simulation of the physiological and morphological consequences of microgravity on the cardiovascular system is one of head-down hindlimb unloading. Experimental conditions surrounding this model include not only head-down tilting of rats, but also social and restraint stresses that have their own influences on cardiovascular system function. Here, we studied levels of spontaneous locomotor activity, blood pressure, and heart rate during 14 days under the following experimental conditions: cage control, social isolation in standard rat housing, social isolation in special cages for hindlimb unloading, horizontal attachment (restraint), and head-down hindlimb unloading. General activity and hemodynamic parameters were continuously monitored in conscious rats by telemetry. Heart rate and blood pressure were both evaluated during treadmill running to reveal cardiovascular deconditioning development as a result of unloading. The main findings of our work are that: social isolation and restraint induced persistent physical inactivity, while unloading in rats resulted in initial inactivity followed by normalization and increased locomotion after one week. Moreover, 14 days of hindlimb unloading showed significant elevation of blood pressure and slight elevation of heart rate. Hemodynamic changes in isolated and restrained rats largely reproduced the trends observed during unloading. Finally, we detected no augmentation of tachycardia during moderate exercise in rats after 14 days of unloading. Thus, we concluded that both social isolation and restraint, as an integral part of the model conditions, contribute essentially to cardiovascular reactions during head-down hindlimb unloading, compared to the little changes in the hydrostatic gradient. PMID:22768322

  7. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  8. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives. PMID:25244526

  9. A Load-Based Multiple-Partial Unloading Micro-Indentation Technique for Mechanical Property Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    C. Feng; J.M. Tannenbaum; B.S. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2009-07-23

    A load-based multiple-partial unloading microindentation technique has been developed for evaluating mechanical properties of materials. Comparing to the current prevailing nano/micro-indentation methods, which require precise measurements of the indentation depth and load, the proposed technique only measures indentation load and the overall indentation displacement (i.e. including displacement of the loading apparatus). Coupled with a multiple-partial unloading procedure during the indentation process, this technique results in a load-depth sensing indentation system capable of determining Young’s modulus of metallic alloys with flat, tubular, or curved architectures. Test results show consistent and correct elastic modulus values when performing indentation tests on standard alloys such as steel, aluminum, bronze, and single crystal superalloys. The proposed micro-indentation technique has led to the development of a portable loaddepth sensing indentation system capable of on-site, in-situ material property measurement.

  10. Orbit-averaged behavior of magnetic control laws for momentum unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camillo, P. J.; Markley, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical formulas are derived for orbit-averaged behavior of magnetic control laws for unloading the excess angular momentum of a spacecraft reaction wheel control system in the presence of secular environmental torques. The specific example of an axially symmetric spacecraft with an inertially fixed attitude for which the dominant environmental torque is the gravity-gradient torque is treated in detail, but extensions of the general approach to other inertially fixed and earth-pointing spacecraft are discussed. The analytical formulas are compared to detailed simulations performed for the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft, and agreement to within 10% is found. The analytical formulas can be used in place of detailed simulations for preliminary studies, and can be used to find selected cases giving the most stringent tests of momentum unloading capability for which detailed simulations may be performed.

  11. Effects of Gravitational Mechanical Unloading in Endothelial Cells: Association between Caveolins, Inflammation and Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Jeanne, Marion; Aguado-Zuniga, Jesus; Conte, Michael S.; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces including gravity affect endothelial cell (ECs) function, and have been implicated in vascular disease as well as physiologic changes associated with low gravity environments. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of gravitational mechanical unloading on ECs phenotype as determined by patterns of gene expression. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1-gravity environment or mechanical unloading (MU) for 24 hours, with or without periods of mechanical loading (ML). MU led to a significant decrease in gene expression of several adhesion molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the contrary, eNOS, Caveolin-1 and -2 expression were significantly increased with MU. There was a decrease in the length and width of the cells with MU. Addition of ML during the MU period was sufficient to reverse the changes triggered by MU. Our results suggest that gravitational loading could dramatically affect vascular endothelial cell function. PMID:23511048

  12. Work capacity and metabolic and morphologic characteristics of the human quadriceps muscle in response to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, H. E.; Dudley, G. A.; Hather, B.; Tesch, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The response of skeletal muscle to unweighting was studied in six healthy males who were subjected to four weeks of lowerlimb suspension. They performed three bouts of 30 consecutive maximal concentric knee extensions, before unloading and the day after (POST 1), 4 days after (POST 2) and 7 weeks after (REC) resumed weight-bearing. Peak torque of each contraction was recorded and work was calculated as the mean of the average peak torque for the three bouts and fatigability was measured as the decline in average peak torque over bouts. Needle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis of each limb before and at POST 1. Muscle fibre type composition and area, capillarity and the enzyme activities of citrate synthase (CS) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) were subsequently analysed. Mean average peak torque for the three bouts at POST1, POST2 and REC was reduced (P < 0.05) by 17, 13 and 7%, respectively. Fatigability was greater (P < 0.05) at POST2 than before unloading. Type I, IIA and IIB percentage, Type I and II area and capillaries per fibre of Type I and II did not change (P > 0.05) in response to unloading. The activity of CS, but not PFK, decreased (P < 0.05) after unloading. The weight-bearing limb showed no changes in the variables measured. The results of this study suggest that this human lowerlimb suspension model produces substantial impairments of work and oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. The performance decrements are most likely induced by lack of weight-bearing.

  13. Site- and compartment-specific changes in bone with hindlimb unloading in mature adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.; Allen, M. R.; Hogan, H. A.; Delp, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine site- and compartment-specific changes in bone induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) in the mature adult male rat (6 months old). Tibiae, femora, and humeri were removed after 14, 21, and 28 days of HU for determination of bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical properties, and bone formation rate (BFR), and compared with baseline (0 day) and aging (28 day) controls. HU resulted in 20%-21% declines in cancellous BMD at the proximal tibia and femoral neck after 28 day HU vs. 0 day controls (CON). Cortical shell BMD at these sites was greater (by 4%-6%) in both 28 day HU and 28 day CON vs. 0 day CON animals, and nearly identical to that gain seen in the weight-bearing humerus. Mechanical properties at the proximal tibia exhibited a nonsignificant decline after HU vs. those of 0 day CON rats. At the femoral neck, a 10% decrement was noted in ultimate load in 28 day HU rats vs. 28 day CON animals. Middiaphyseal tibial bone increased slightly in density and area during HU; no differences in structural and material properties between 28 day HU and 28 day CON rats were noted. BFR at the tibial midshaft was significantly lower (by 90%) after 21 day HU vs. 0 day CON; this decline was maintained throughout 28 day HU. These results suggest there are compartment-specific differences in the mature adult skeletal response to hindlimb unloading, and that the major impact over 28 days of unloading is on cancellous bone sites. Given the sharp decline in BFR for midshaft cortical bone, it appears likely that deficits in BMD, area, or mechanical properties would develop with longer duration unloading.

  14. Possible mechanism for changes in glycogen metabolism in unloaded soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been shown to be affected in a number of ways by different models of hypokinesia. In vivo glycogen levels in the soleus muscle are known to be increased by short-term denervation and harness suspension. In addition, exposure to 7 days of hypogravity also caused a dramatic increase in glycogen concentration in this muscle. The biochemical alterations caused by unloading that may bring about these increases in glycogen storage in the soleus were sought.

  15. Calpain-dependent regulation of the skeletal muscle atrophy following unloading.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris S; Belova, Svetlana P; Lomonosova, Yulia N; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y; Nemirovskaya, Tatyana L

    2015-10-15

    Unloading causes rapid skeletal muscle atrophy due to increased protein degradation via activation of calpains and decreased protein synthesis. Our study elucidated role of calpain-1 in the regulation of ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) and anabolic processes mediated by Akt-mTOR-p70S6K and MAPK-Erk (p90RSK) signaling. We hypothesized that blocking calpain will inhibit activation of UPP and decrease protein degradation resulting in reduction of unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. Rats were divided into three groups: non-treated control (C), three day hindlimb suspension with (HSPD) or without (HS) treatment with calpain inhibitor PD150606. When compared with control PD150606 treatment during unloading: 1) attenuated loss of muscle mass, 2) prevented accumulation of calpain-1 (1.8-fold in HS vs 1.3-fold in HSPD) and ubiquitin (2.3-fold in HS vs 0.7-fold in HSPD) mRNA and ubiquitinated proteins (1.6-fold in HS vs 0.8-fold in HSPD), 3) prevented decrease in the pAkt (0.4-fold in HS vs 1-fold in HSPD) and pFOXO3 (0.2-fold in HS vs 1.2-fold in HSPD) levels, 4) prevented increase in MAFbx (3.8-fold in HS vs 1.3-fold in HSPD) and eEF2k (1.8-fold in HS vs 0.6-fold in HSPD) mRNA. Our study indicates that blocking of calpain during unloading decreases skeletal muscle atrophy by inhibiting UPP activation and preserving anabolic signaling. PMID:26297661

  16. Effects of skeletal unloading on the vasomotor properties of the rat femur principal nutrient artery

    PubMed Central

    Prisby, Rhonda D.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Allen, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest induce deconditioning of the cardiovascular system and bone loss. Previous research has shown declines in femoral bone and marrow perfusion during unloading and with subsequent reloading in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats, an animal model of chronic disuse. We hypothesized that the attenuated bone and marrow perfusion may result from altered vasomotor properties of the bone resistance vasculature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of unloading on the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator properties of the femoral principal nutrient artery (PNA), the main conduit for blood flow to the femur, in 2 wk HU and control (CON) rats. Vasoconstriction of the femoral PNA was assessed in vitro using norepinephrine, phenylephrine, clonidine, KCl, endothelin-1, arginine vasopressin, and myogenic responsiveness. Vasodilation through endothelium-dependent [acetylcholine, bradykinin, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] and endothelium-independent mechanisms [sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and adenosine] were also determined. Vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the PNA from HU rats was not enhanced through any of the mechanisms tested. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine (CON, 86 ± 3%; HU, 48 ± 7% vasodilation) and FMD (CON, 61 ± 9%; HU, 11 ± 11% vasodilation) were attenuated in PNAs from HU rats, while responses to bradykinin were not different between groups. Endothelium-independent vasodilation to SNP and adenosine were not different between groups. These data indicate that unloading-induced decrements in bone and marrow perfusion and increases in vascular resistance are not the result of enhanced vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the bone resistance arteries but are associated with reductions in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. PMID:25635000

  17. Differences in Cartilage Repair between Loading and Unloading Environments in the Rat Knee

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Taro; Yoshida, Shinya; Kitade, Ippei; Hoso, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the histopathological and immunohistochemical effects of loading on cartilage repair in rat full-thickness articular cartilage defects. A total of 40 male 9-week-old Wistar rats were studied. Full-thickness articular cartilage defects were created over the capsule at the loading portion in the medial condyle of the femur. Twenty rats were randomly allocated into each of the 2 groups: a loading group and a unloading group. Twenty rats from these 2 groups were later randomly allocated to each of the 2 groups for evaluation at 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. At the end of each period, knee joints were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. In both groups at 1 and 2 weeks, the defects were filled with a mixture of granulation tissue and some remnants of hyaline cartilage. The repair tissue was not stained with toluidine blue in both groups. Strong staining of type I collagen was observed in the repair tissue of both groups. The area stained with type I collagen was smaller in the unloading group than in the loading groups, and the stained area was smaller at 2 weeks than at 1 week. In the staining for type II collagen, apparent staining of type II collagen was observed in the repair tissue of both groups at 1 week. At 2 weeks, there was a tendency toward a higher degree of apparent staining in the loading group than in the unloading group. Accordingly, these results indicated that loading and unloading in the early phase of cartilage repair have both merits and demerits. PMID:25792905

  18. Non-random nectar unloading interactions between foragers and their receivers in the honeybee hive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyret, Joaquín; Farina, Walter M.

    2005-09-01

    Nectar acquisition in the honeybee Apis mellifera is a partitioned task in which foragers gather nectar and bring it to the hive, where nest mates unload via trophallaxis (i.e. mouth-to-mouth transfer) the collected food for further storage. Because forager mates exploit different feeding places simultaneously, this study addresses the question of whether nectar unloading interactions between foragers and hive-bees are established randomly, as it is commonly assumed. Two groups of foragers were trained to exploit a different scented food source for 5 days. We recorded their trophallaxes with hive-mates, marking the latter ones according to the forager group they were unloading. We found non-random probabilities for the occurrence of trophallaxes between experimental foragers and hive-bees, instead, we found that trophallactic interactions were more likely to involve groups of individuals which had formerly interacted orally. We propose that olfactory cues present in the transferred nectar promoted the observed bias, and we discuss this bias in the context of the organization of nectar acquisition: a partitioned task carried out in a decentralized insect society.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior in Unloading Conditions of Sandstone After High-Temperature Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qi-Le; Ju, Feng; Mao, Xian-Biao; Ma, Dan; Yu, Bang-Yong; Song, Shuai-Bing

    2016-07-01

    A detailed understanding of damage evolution in rock after high-temperature treatment in unloading conditions is extremely important in underground engineering applications, such as the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear waste, underground coal gasification, and post-disaster reconstruction. We have studied the effects of temperature (200, 400, 600 and 800 °C) and confining pressure (20, 30 and 40 MPa) on the mechanical properties of sandstone. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed that at temperatures exceeding 400 °C, new cracks formed, and original cracks extended substantially. When the confining pressure was 20 MPa, a temperature increase from 400 to 800 °C resulted in a 75.2% increase in peak strain, a decrease in Young's modulus and peak strength of 62.5 and 35.8 %, respectively, and transition of the failure mechanism from brittleness to ductility. In the triaxial compression tests, the specimen deformed in a more obvious ductile failure manner at higher confining pressure, whereas in the unloading confining pressure experiments, brittle failure was more obvious when the initial confining pressure was higher. We focused on the effects of temperature and initial confining pressure on peak effective loading stress and peak ductile deformation during unloading. At temperatures of >400 °C, the peak ductile deformation increased rapidly with increases in the high temperature treatment or initial confining pressure. The peak effective loading stress decreased sharply with increased temperature but barely changed when the initial confining pressure was varied.

  20. Mechanics unloading analysis and experimentation of a new type of parallel biomimetic shoulder complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yulei; Li, Zhisen; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Wenwen; Zeng, Daxing; Zhou, Yulin

    2016-06-01

    The structure design for high ratio of carrying capacity to deadweight is one of the challenges for the bionic mechanism, while the problem concerning high carrying capacity has not yet be solved for the existing shoulder complex. A new type biomimetic shoulder complex, which adopts 3-PSS/S(P for prismatic pair, S for spherical pair) spherical parallel mechanism (SPM), is proposed. The static equilibrium equations of each component are established by using the vector method and the equations for constrain forces with certain load are solved. Then the constrain force on the middle limb and that on the side limbs are compared in order to verify the unloading performance of the mechanism. In addition, the prototype mechanism of the shoulder complex is developed, and the force feedback experiment is conducted to verify the static analysis, which indicates that the middle limb suffers most of the external force and the effect of mechanics unloading is achieved. The 3-PSS/S spherical parallel mechanism is presented for the shoulder complex, and the realization of mechanics unloading is benefit for the improvement of the carrying capacity of the shoulder complex.

  1. Biaxial unloading and springback behavior of dual-phase DP590 steel using cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Yannis P.; Deng, Nengxiu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    The unloading behavior of a dual-phase steel (DP590) from a biaxial state of stress was probed using a newly-designed cruciform specimen. The specimen was designed to develop uniform and relatively large plastic strains (over 15% equivalent logarithmic plastic strain) in the gage section, before failure. Nine radial loading paths in the 1st quadrant of the plane stress space were probed. The experiments involved repeated loading and unloading up to failure. At every unloading, the initial response was found to agree with the linear, orthotropically elastic response of the undeformed material. This first linear response was followed by a second one, at a reduced slope. Beyond that, the recorded response was fully non-linear. The same sequence of events was observed during each reloading. The biaxial non-linear strain recovery components ɛxnl and ɛynl were measured to be on average approximately 11% of the elastic strains ɛxe and ɛye, respectively. This ratio was found to increase with plastic deformation. Subsequently, these biaxial experiments were used to calibrate the Yld2000-2D yield function.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  3. Gravitational force modulates G2/M phase exit in mechanically unloaded myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Egli, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight gives rise to muscle loss and reduced strength, a condition commonly referred to as space atrophy. During exposure to microgravity, skeletal muscle myoblasts are mechanically unloaded and respond with attenuated cell proliferation, slowed cell cycle progression, and modified protein expression. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which muscle mass declines in response to prolonged microgravity exposure, we grew C2C12 mouse muscle cells under conditions of simulated microgravity (SM) and analyzed their proliferative capacity, cell cycle progression, and cyclin B and D expression. We demonstrated that the retarded cell growth observed in SM was correlated with an approximate 16 h delay in G2/M phase progression, where cells accumulated specifically between the G2 checkpoint and the onset of anaphase, concomitantly with a positive expression for cyclin B. The effect was specific for gravitational mechanical unloading as cells grown under conditions of hypergravity (HG, 4 g) for similar durations of time exhibited normal proliferation and normal cell cycle progression. Our results show that SM and HG exert phenomenological distinct responses over cell cycle progression. The deficits of SM can be restored by terrestrial gravitational force, whereas the effects of HG are indistinguishable from the 1 g control. This suggests that the mechanotransduction apparatus of cells responds differently to mechanical unloading and loading. PMID:23974110

  4. Increased GABA(A) inhibition of the RVLM after hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, Julia A.; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2002-01-01

    Attenuated baroreflex-mediated increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats apparently are due to changes within the central nervous system. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is increased after hindlimb unloading. Responses to bilateral microinjection of the GABA(A) antagonist (-)-bicuculline methiodide (BIC) into the RVLM were examined before and during caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) inhibition in Inactin-anesthetized control and HU rats. Increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and RSNA in response to BIC in the RVLM were significantly enhanced in HU rats. Responses to bilateral CVLM blockade were not different. When remaining GABA(A) inhibition in the RVLM was blocked by BIC during CVLM inhibition, the additional increases in MAP and RSNA were significantly greater in HU rats. These data indicate that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons is augmented after hindlimb unloading. Effects of input from the CVLM were unaltered. Thus, after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents, the attenuated increase in sympathetic nerve activity in response to hypotension is associated with greater GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons originating at least in part from sources other than the CVLM.

  5. Nerve-responsive troponin I slow promoter does not respond to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Hodgson, V. R.; Hardeman, E. C.; Booth, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the regulation of the troponin I slow (TnIs) promoter during skeletal muscle unloading-induced protein isoform transition, by using a transgenic mouse line harboring the -4,200 to +12 base pairs region of the human TnIs promoter. Eighteen female transgenic mice ( approximately 30 g body mass) were randomly divided into two groups: weight-bearing (WB) controls (n = 9) and hindlimb unloaded (HU; n = 9). The HU mice were tail suspended for 7 days. Body mass was unchanged in the WB group but was reduced (-6%; P < 0.05) after the HU treatment. Absolute soleus muscle mass (-25%) and soleus mass relative to body mass (-16%) were both lower (P < 0.05) in the HU group compared with the WB mice. Northern blot analyses indicate that 7 days of HU result in a 64% decrease (P < 0.05) in the abundance of endogenous TnIs mRNA (microg/mg muscle) in the mouse soleus. Furthermore, there is a trend for the abundance of the fast troponin I mRNA to be increased (+34%). Analysis of transgenic chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in the soleus muscle revealed no difference (P > 0.05) between WB and HU groups. We conclude that additional elements are necessary for the TnIs gene to respond to an unloading-induced, slow-to-fast isoform transition stimulus.

  6. EUK-134 ameliorates nNOSμ translocation and skeletal muscle fiber atrophy during short-term mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Mary; Hord, Jeff M.; Lee, Yang; Joshi, Kumar; Botchlett, Rachel E.; Ramirez, Angelo; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced mechanical loading during bedrest, spaceflight, and casting, causes rapid morphological changes in skeletal muscle: fiber atrophy and reduction of slow-twitch fibers. An emerging signaling event in response to unloading is the translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma to the cytosol. We used EUK-134, a cell-permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase, to test the role of redox signaling in nNOSμ translocation and muscle fiber atrophy as a result of short-term (54 h) hindlimb unloading. Fischer-344 rats were divided into ambulatory control, hindlimb-unloaded (HU), and hindlimb-unloaded + EUK-134 (HU-EUK) groups. EUK-134 mitigated the unloading-induced phenotype, including muscle fiber atrophy and muscle fiber-type shift from slow to fast. nNOSμ immunolocalization at the sarcolemma of the soleus was reduced with HU, while nNOSμ protein content in the cytosol increased with unloading. Translocation of nNOS from the sarcolemma to cytosol was virtually abolished by EUK-134. EUK-134 also mitigated dephosphorylation at Thr-32 of FoxO3a during HU. Hindlimb unloading elevated oxidative stress (4-hydroxynonenal) and increased sarcolemmal localization of Nox2 subunits gp91phox (Nox2) and p47phox, effects normalized by EUK-134. Thus, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that oxidative stress triggers nNOSμ translocation from the sarcolemma and FoxO3a dephosphorylation as an early event during mechanical unloading. Thus, redox signaling may serve as a biological switch for nNOS to initiate morphological changes in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24477538

  7. Effect of Proton Irradiation Followed by Hindlimb Unloading on Bone in Mature Mice: A Model of Long-Duration Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Riffle, Stephanie E.; Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Nelson, Gregory A.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2012-01-01

    Bone loss associated with microgravity unloading is well documented; however, the effects of spaceflight-relevant types and doses of radiation on the skeletal system are not well defined. In addition, the combined effect of unloading and radiation has not received much attention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation followed by mechanical unloading via hindlimb suspension (HLS) in mice. Sixteen-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were either exposed to 1 Gy of protons or a sham irradiation procedure (n=30/group). One day later, half of the mice in each group were subjected to four weeks of HLS or normal loading conditions. Radiation treatment alone (IRR) resulted in approximately 20% loss of trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in the tibia and femur, with no effect in the cortical bone compartment. Conversely, unloading induced substantially greater loss of both trabecular bone (60–70% loss of BV/TV) and cortical bone (approximately 20% loss of cortical bone volume) in both the tibia and femur, with corresponding decreases in cortical bone strength. Histological analyses and serum chemistry data demonstrated increased levels of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in unloaded mice, but not IRR. HLS+IRR mice generally experienced greater loss of trabecular bone volume fraction, connectivity density, and trabecular number than either unloading or irradiation alone. Although the duration of unloading may have masked certain effects, the skeletal response to irradiation and unloading appears to be additive for certain parameters. Appropriate modeling of the environmental challenges of long duration spaceflight will allow for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms mediating spaceflight-associated bone loss and for the development of effective countermeasures. PMID:22789684

  8. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( p<0.05) and 40% and 25% in the HSN group, as compared to the CTR group ( p<0.05), respectively. CSA of ST and FT muscle fibers were 25% and 16% larger in the HSL group in comparison with the HS group ( p<0.05), respectively. The atrophy of FT muscle fibers in the HSL group was completely prevented since FT fiber CSA had no significant differences from the CTR group. In HS group, the percentage of fibers revealing either gaps/disruption of the dystrophin layer of the myofiber surface membrane increased by 27% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the controls (CTR group, p<0.05). The destructions in dystrophin layer integrity and reductions of desmin content were significantly prevented in HSL group. NO concentration decreased by 60% in the HS group (as well as HSN group) and at the same time no changes were detectable in the HSL group. This fact indicates the compensation of NO content in the unloaded muscle under L-arginine administration. The levels of atrogin-1 mRNA were considerably altered in suspended animals (HS group: plus 27%, HSL group: minus 13%) as compared to the control level. Conclusion: L

  9. Shuttle Discovery Being Unloaded from SCA-747 at Palmdale, California, Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery being unloaded from NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at Rockwell Aerospace's Palmdale facility for nine months of scheduled maintenance. Discovery and the 747 were completing a two-day flight from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, that began at 7:04 a.m. Eastern Standard Time on 27 September and included an overnight stop at Salt Lake City International Airport, Utah. At the conclusion of this mission, Discovery had flown 21 shuttle missions, totaling more than 142 days in orbit. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide

  10. Transforming growth factor beta2 inhibits adipocyte differentiation induced by skeletal unloading in rat bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Ahdjoudj, Souhila; Lasmoles, Françoise; Holy, Xavier; Zerath, Erik; Marie, Pierre J

    2002-04-01

    Skeletal unloading induced by hindlimb suspension in rats reduces bone formation and induces osteopenia, but its effect on adipogenesis is unknown. We assessed the effects of unloading and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta2 on bone marrow stromal cell adipocyte differentiation in relation with osteoblast differentiation. Skeletal unloading rapidly (4-7 days) decreased osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, osteocalcin (OC), and type I collagen messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and reduced bone formation in the long bone metaphysis. Conversely, unloading increased expression of the adipocyte transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2) at 4 days and increased expression of the adipocyte differentiation genes lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and aP2 in the bone marrow stroma at 7 days. Consistently, unloading increased the number and volume of adipocytes in the bone marrow stroma. Continuous (0-7 days) and late (4-7 days) treatments with TGF-beta2 corrected the abnormal expression of Cbfa1/Runx2, OC, and type I collagen mRNAs and normalized bone formation in unloaded metaphyseal bone. Moreover, both TGF-beta2 treatments decreased PPARy2 and C/EBPalpha mRNA levels at 4 days and normalized aP2 and LPL expression and adipocyte number and volume at 7 days. These results show that skeletal unloading increases adipocyte differentiation concomitantly with inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These abnormalities are prevented and reversed by TGF-beta2, suggesting a role for TGF-beta in the control of adipogenic differentiation in the bone marrow stroma. PMID:11918224

  11. Impaired Axonal Na+ Current by Hindlimb Unloading: Implication for Disuse Neuromuscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Banzrai, Chimeglkham; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Higashi, Saki; Okada, Ryo; Mori, Atsuko; Shimatani, Yoshimitsu; Osaki, Yusuke; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading (HLU), which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. HLU was performed in normal 8-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal's cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes [2.2 ± 1.3 mV (HLU) vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV (Control), P = 0.03]. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC) and late subexcitability (recovery cycle) than the controls [0.075 ± 0.01 (HLU) vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 (Control), P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 (HLU) vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % (Control), P = 0.01, respectively]. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na+ currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na+ channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by HLU. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy. PMID:26909041

  12. Project UM-HAUL: A self-unloading reusable lunar lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The establishment of a lunar base is technologically and financially challenging. Given the necessary resources and political support, it can be done. In addition to the geopolitical obstacles, however, there are logistical problems involved in establishing such bases that can only be overcome with the acquisition of a significant transportation and communications network in the Earth-Moon spatial region. Considering the significant number of payloads that will be required in this process, the mass-specific cost of launching these payloads, and the added risk and cost of human presence in space, it is clearly desirable to automate major parts of such an operation. One very costly and time-consuming factor in this picture is the delivery of payloads to the Moon. Foreseeable payloads would include atmospheric modules, inflatable habitat kits, energy and oxygen plant elements, ground vehicles, laboratory modules, crew supplies, etc. The duration of high-risk human presence on the Moon could be greatly reduced if all such payloads were delivered to the prospective base site in advance of crew arrival. In this view, the idea of a 'Self-Unloading Reusable Lunar Lander' (SURLL) arises naturally. The general scenario depicts the lander being brought to low lunar orbit (LLO) from Earth atop a generic Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). From LLO, the lander shuttles payloads down to the lunar surface, where, by means of some resident, detachable unloading device, it deploys the payloads and returns to orbit. The general goal is for the system to perform with maximum payload capability, automation, and reliability, while also minimizing environmental hazards, servicing needs, and mission costs. Our response to this demand is UM-HAUL, or the UnManned Heavy pAyload Unloader and Lander. The complete study includes a system description, along with a preliminary cost analysis and a design status assessment.

  13. Vasopressin responses to unloading arterial baroreceptors during cardiac nerve blockade in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of afferent input from the heart and from arterial baroreceptors in the stimulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in response to hypotension caused by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC). Afferent input from cardiac receptors was reversibly blocked by infusing 2% procaine into the pericardial space to anesthetize the cardiac nerves. Acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) alone caused a rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 24 +/- 3 mmHg but no change in plasma AVP. If the rise in MAP was prevented by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 39 +/- 15 pg/ml, and if MAP was allowed to increase and then was forced back to control by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 34 +/- 15 pg/ml. Thus the rise in MAP during CNB stimulated arterial baroreceptors, which in turn compensated for the loss of inhibitory input from cardiac receptors on AVP secretion. These results indicate that the maximum secretory response resulting from complete unloading of cardiac receptors at a normal MAP results in a mean increase in plasma AVP of 39 pg/ml in this group of dogs. When MAP was reduced 25% below control levels (from 95 +/- 5 to 69 +/- 3 mmHg) by TIVCC during pericardial saline infusion, plasma AVP increased by 79 +/- 42 pg/ml. However, the same degree of hypotension during CNB (MAP was reduced from 120 +/- 5 to 71 +/- 3 mmHg) led to a greater (P less than 0.05) increase in plasma AVP of 130 +/- 33 pg/ml. Because completely unloading cardiac receptors can account for an increase of only 39 pg/ml on average in this group of dogs, the remainder of the increase in plasma AVP must be due to other sources of stimulation. We suggest that the principal stimulus to AVP secretion after acute CNB in these studies arises from unloading the arterial baroreceptors.

  14. Reloading partly recovers bone mineral density and mechanical properties in hind limb unloaded rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Li, Dijie; Arfat, Yasir; Chen, Zhihao; Liu, Zonglin; Lin, Yu; Ding, Chong; Sun, Yulong; Hu, Lifang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-12-01

    Skeletal unloading results in decreased bone formation and bone mass. During long-term space flight, the decreased bone mass is impossible to fully recover. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the effective countermeasures to prevent spaceflight-induced bone loss. Hindlimb Unloading (HLU) simulates effects of weightlessness and is utilized extensively to examine the response of musculoskeletal systems to certain aspects of space flight. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a 4-week HLU in rats and subsequent reloading on the bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties of load-bearing bones. After HLU for 4 weeks, the rats were then subjected to reloading for 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks, and then the BMD of the femur, tibia and lumbar spine in rats were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) every week. The mechanical properties of the femur were determined by three-point bending test. Dry bone and bone ash of femur were obtained through Oven-Drying method and were weighed respectively. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum calcium were examined through ELISA and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results showed that 4 weeks of HLU significantly decreased body weight of rats and reloading for 1 week, 2 weeks or 3 weeks did not recover the weight loss induced by HLU. However, after 2 weeks of reloading, BMD of femur and tibia of HLU rats partly recovered (+10.4%, +2.3%). After 3 weeks of reloading, the reduction of BMD, energy absorption, bone mass and mechanical properties of bone induced by HLU recovered to some extent. The changes in serum ALP and serum calcium induced by HLU were also recovered after reloading. Our results indicate that a short period of reloading could not completely recover bone after a period of unloading, thus some interventions such as mechanical vibration or pharmaceuticals are necessary to help bone recovery.

  15. Development of a functional food or drug against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Nakao, Reiko; Kagawa, Sachiko; Yamada, Chiharu; Abe, Manami; Tamura, Seiko; Kohno, Shohei; Sukeno, Akiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Okumura, Yuushi; Ishidoh, Kazumi

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a primary regulator of muscle protein turnover, providing a mechanism for selective degradation of regulatory and structural proteins. This pathway is constitutively active in muscle fibers and mediates both intracellular signaling events and normal muscle protein turnover. However, conditions of decreased muscle use, so called unloading, remarkably stimulate activity of this pathway, resulting in loss of muscle protein. In fact, we previously reported that expression of several ubiquitin ligase genes, such as MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, are significantly up-regulated in rat skeletal muscle during spaceflight. Moreover, we found that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an important intermediates of IGF-1 signal transduction, contributes to muscle atrophy during unloading. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 leads to prevention of muscle atrophy during unloading. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oligopeptide as an inhibitor against ubiquitination of IRS-1 by Cbl-b. We synthesized various oligopeptides that may competitively inhibit the binding of Cbl-b to IRS-1 on the basis of their structures and screened inhibitory effects of these synthesized oligopeptides on Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 using in vitro ubiquitination systems. We found that two synthetic oligopeptides with specific amino acid sequences effectively inhibited interaction with Cbl-b and IRS-1, resulting in decreased ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 (Patent pending). In contrast, we also found inhibitory activity against Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 in soy protein-derived oligopeptides, whereas their inhibitory effects were weaker than those of synthetic oligopeptides. Our results suggest that specific oligopeptides may be available as a functional food against the muscle

  16. Project UM-HAUL: A self-unloading reusable lunar lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a lunar base is technologically and financially challenging. Given the necessary resources and political support, it can be done. In addition to the geopolitical obstacles, however, there are logistical problems involved in establishing such bases that can only be overcome with the acquisition of a significant transportation and communications network in the Earth-Moon spatial region. Considering the significant number of payloads that will be required in this process, the mass-specific cost of launching these payloads, and the added risk and cost of human presence in space, it is clearly desirable to automate major parts of such an operation. One very costly and time-consuming factor in this picture is the delivery of payloads to the Moon. Foreseeable payloads would include atmospheric modules, inflatable habitat kits, energy and oxygen plant elements, ground vehicles, laboratory modules, crew supplies, etc. The duration of high-risk human presence on the Moon could be greatly reduced if all such payloads were delivered to the prospective base site in advance of crew arrival. In this view, the idea of a 'Self-Unloading Reusable Lunar Lander' (SURLL) arises naturally. The general scenario depicts the lander being brought to low lunar orbit (LLO) from Earth atop a generic Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). From LLO, the lander shuttles payloads down to the lunar surface, where, by means of some resident, detachable unloading device, it deploys the payloads and returns to orbit. The general goal is for the system to perform with maximum payload capability, automation, and reliability, while also minimizing environmental hazards, servicing needs, and mission costs. Our response to this demand is UM-HAUL, or the UnManned Heavy pAyload Unloader and Lander. The complete study includes a system description, along with a preliminary cost analysis and a design status assessment.

  17. Isometric resistance exercise fails to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy processes during the initial stages of unloading.

    PubMed

    Haddad, F; Adams, G R; Bodell, P W; Baldwin, K M

    2006-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that an isometric resistance training paradigm targeting the medial gastrocnemius of adult rodents is effective in preventing muscle atrophy during the early stages of hindlimb unloading by maintaining normal activation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. This pathway has been shown to simultaneously create an anabolic response while inhibiting processes upregulating catabolic processes involving expression of key enzymes in the ubiquitination of proteins for degradation. The findings show that during the 5 days of unloading 1) absolute medial gastrocnemius muscle weight reduction occurred by approximately 20%, but muscle weight corrected to body weight was not different from normal weight-bearing controls (P < 0.05); 2) normalized myofibril fraction concentration and content were decreased; and 3) a robust isometric training program, known to induce a hypertrophy response, failed to maintain the myofibril protein content. This response occurred despite fully blunting the increases in the mRNA for of atrogin-1, MURF-1, and myostatin, e.g., sensitive gene markers of an activated catabolic state. Analyses of the IRS-1/PI3K/Akt markers indicated that abundance of IRS-1 and phosphorylation state of Akt and p70S6 kinase were decreased relative to normal control rats, and the resistance training failed to maintain these signaling markers at normal regulatory level. Our findings suggest that to fully prevent muscle atrophy responses affecting the myofibril system during unloading, the volume of mechanical stress must be augmented sufficiently to maintain optimal activity of the IRS-1/PI3K/Akt pathway to provide an effective anabolic stimulus on the muscle. PMID:16239603

  18. Impaired Axonal Na(+) Current by Hindlimb Unloading: Implication for Disuse Neuromuscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Banzrai, Chimeglkham; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Higashi, Saki; Okada, Ryo; Mori, Atsuko; Shimatani, Yoshimitsu; Osaki, Yusuke; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading (HLU), which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. HLU was performed in normal 8-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal's cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes [2.2 ± 1.3 mV (HLU) vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV (Control), P = 0.03]. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC) and late subexcitability (recovery cycle) than the controls [0.075 ± 0.01 (HLU) vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 (Control), P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 (HLU) vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % (Control), P = 0.01, respectively]. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na(+) currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na(+) channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by HLU. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy. PMID:26909041

  19. Shock compression and unloading response of 1050 aluminum to 70 GPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Deep; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2012-03-01

    Using laser-interferometry, shock compression and unloading profiles were measured in 1050 aluminum shocked to ~70 GPa. These results were compared to published data on relatively pure (99.99wt% ultra pure, 1050, 1060, and 1100) and precipitate - hardened (2024, 6061) aluminum. Within experimental scatter, Hugoniots and longitudinal sound speeds (in the shocked state) of pure and precipitate-hardened aluminum are quite comparable to 70GPa. This agreement demonstrates that impurity content has minimal influence on the longitudinal stress-volume response and acoustic speeds under shock compression.

  20. The molecular response of bone to growth hormone during skeletal unloading: regional differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Hind limb elevation of the growing rat provides a good model for the skeletal changes that occur during space flight. In this model the bones of the forelimbs (normally loaded) are used as an internal control for the changes that occur in the unloaded bones of the hind limbs. Previous studies have shown that skeletal unloading of the hind limbs results in a transient reduction of bone formation in the tibia and femur, with no change in the humerus. This fall in bone formation is accompanied by a fall in serum osteocalcin (bone Gla protein, BGP) and bone BGP messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, but a rise in bone insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) protein and mRNA levels and resistance to the skeletal growth-promoting actions of IGF-I. To determine whether skeletal unloading also induced resistance to GH, we evaluated the response of the femur and humerus of sham and hypophysectomized rats, control and hind limb elevated, to GH (two doses), measuring mRNA levels of IGF-I, BGP, rat bone alkaline phosphatase (RAP), and alpha 1(1)-procollagen (coll). Hypophysectomy (HPX) decreased the mRNA levels of IGF-I, BGP, and coll in the femur, but was either less effective or had the opposite effect in the humerus. GH at the higher dose (500 micrograms/day) restored these mRNA levels to or above the sham control values in the femur, but generally had little or no effect on the humerus. RAP mRNA levels were increased by HPX, especially in the femur. The lower dose of GH (50 micrograms/day) inhibited this rise in RAP, whereas the higher dose raised the mRNA levels and resulted in the appearance of additional transcripts not seen in controls. As for the other mRNAs, RAP mRNA in the humerus was less affected by HPX or GH than that in the femur. Hind limb elevation led to an increase in IGF-I, coll, and RAP mRNAs and a reduction in BGP mRNA in the femur and either had no effect or potentiated the response of these mRNAs to GH. We conclude that GH stimulates a number of markers of bone

  1. High Salt Diets, Bone Strength and Mineral Content of Mature Femur After Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that high salt diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) loss, but it is not known whether this effect weakens bone during space flight. The Bone Hormone Lab has studied the effect of high salt diets on Ca balance and whole body Ca in a space flight model (2,8). Neither the strength nor mineral content of the femurs from these studies has been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of high salt diets (HiNa) and skeletal unloading on femoral bone strength and bone mineral content (BMC) in mature rats.

  2. Interdependence of Muscle Atrophy and Bone Loss Induced by Mechanical Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A.; Lang, Charles H.; Zhang, Yue; Paul, Emmanuel M.; Laufenberg, Lacee J.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical unloading induces muscle atrophy and bone loss; however, the time course and interdependence of these effects is not well defined. We subjected 4-month-old C57BL/6J mice to hindlimb suspension (HLS) for three weeks, sacrificing 12-16 mice on day (D) 0, 7, 14, and 21. Lean mass was 7-9% lower for HLS vs. control from D7-21. Absolute mass of the gastrocnemius (gastroc) decreased 8% by D7, and was maximally decreased 16% by D14 of HLS. mRNA levels of Atrogin-1 in the gastroc and quad were increased 99% and 122%, respectively, at D7 of HLS. Similar increases in MuRF1 mRNA levels occurred at D7. Both atrogenes returned to baseline by D14. Protein synthesis in gastroc and quad was reduced 30% from D7-14 of HLS, returning to baseline by D21. HLS decreased phosphorylation of SK61, a substrate of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), on D7-21, while 4E-BP1 was not lower until D21. Cortical thickness of the femur and tibia did not decrease until D14 of HLS. Cortical bone of controls did not change over time. HLS mice had lower distal femur bone volume fraction (−22%) by D14; however, the effects of HLS were eliminated by D21 due to the decline of trabecular bone mass of controls. Femur strength was decreased approximately 13% by D14 of HLS, with no change in tibia mechanical properties at any time point. This investigation reveals that muscle atrophy precedes bone loss during unloading and may contribute to subsequent skeletal deficits. Countermeasures that preserve muscle may reduce bone loss induced by mechanical unloading or prolonged disuse. Trabecular bone loss with age, similar to that which occurs in mature astronauts, is superimposed on unloading. Preservation of muscle mass, cortical structure, and bone strength during the experiment suggests muscle may have a greater effect on cortical than trabecular bone. PMID:24127218

  3. Development and application of an information-analytic system on the problem of flow accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Kiselev, A. N.; Shepelev, S. V.; Galanin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    Specific features relating to development of the information-analytical system on the problem of flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant are considered. The results from a statistical analysis of data on the quantity, location, and operating conditions of the elements and preinserted segments of pipelines used in the condensate-feedwater and wet steam paths are presented. The principles of preparing and using the information-analytical system for determining the lifetime to reaching inadmissible wall thinning in elements of pipelines used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered.

  4. Systemic administration of IGF-I enhances healing in collagenous extracellular matrices: evaluation of loaded and unloaded ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, Paolo P; Alejandro-Osorio, Adriana L; Grorud, Kelley W; Martinez, Daniel A; Vailas, Arthur C; Grindeland, Richard E; Vanderby, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a crucial role in wound healing and tissue repair. We tested the hypotheses that systemic administration of IGF-I, or growth hormone (GH), or both (GH+IGF-I) would improve healing in collagenous connective tissue, such as ligament. These hypotheses were examined in rats that were allowed unrestricted activity after injury and in animals that were subjected to hindlimb disuse. Male rats were assigned to three groups: ambulatory sham-control, ambulatory-healing, and hindlimb unloaded-healing. Ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals underwent surgical disruption of their knee medial collateral ligaments (MCLs), while sham surgeries were performed on control animals. Healing animals subcutaneously received systemic doses of either saline, GH, IGF-I, or GH+IGF-I. After 3 weeks, mechanical properties, cell and matrix morphology, and biochemical composition were examined in control and healing ligaments. Results Tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline had significantly greater strength than tissue from saline receiving hindlimb unloaded animals. Addition of IGF-I significantly improved maximum force and ultimate stress in tissues from both ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals with significant increases in matrix organization and type-I collagen expression. Addition of GH alone did not have a significant effect on either group, while addition of GH+IGF-I significantly improved force, stress, and modulus values in MCLs from hindlimb unloaded animals. Force, stress, and modulus values in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals receiving IGF-I or GH+IGF-I exceeded (or were equivalent to) values in tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline with greatly improved structural organization and significantly increased type-I collagen expression. Furthermore, levels of IGF-receptor were significantly increased in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals treated with IGF-I. Conclusion These results

  5. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  6. Phloem unloading follows an extensive apoplasmic pathway in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit from anthesis to marketable maturing stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liping; Sun, Huihui; Li, Ruifu; Zhang, Lingyun; Wang, Shaohui; Sui, Xiaolei; Zhang, Zhenxian

    2011-11-01

    The phloem unloading pathway remains unclear in fruits of Cucurbitaceae, a classical stachyose-transporting species with bicollateral phloem. Using a combination of electron microscopy, transport of phloem-mobile symplasmic tracer carboxyfluorescein, assays of acid invertase and sucrose transporter, and [(14)C]sugar uptake, the phloem unloading pathway was studied in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) fruit from anthesis to the marketable maturing stage. Structural investigations showed that the sieve element-companion cell (SE-CC) complex of the vascular bundles feeding fruit flesh is apparently symplasmically restricted. Imaging of carboxyfluorescein unloading showed that the dye remained confined to the phloem strands of the vascular bundles in the whole fruit throughout the stages examined. A 37 kDa acid invertase was located predominantly in the cell walls of SE-CC complexes and parenchyma cells. Studies of [(14)C]sugar uptake suggested that energy-driven transporters may be functional in sugar trans-membrane transport within symplasmically restricted SE-CC complex, which was further confirmed by the existence of a functional plasma membrane sucrose transporter (CsSUT4) in cucumber fruit. These data provide a clear evidence for an apoplasmic phloem unloading pathway in cucumber fruit. A presumption that putative raffinose or stachyose transporters may be involved in soluble sugars unloading was discussed. PMID:21707653

  7. Replication-Coupled PCNA Unloading by the Elg1 Complex Occurs Genome-wide and Requires Okazaki Fragment Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takashi; Katou, Yuki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The sliding clamp PCNA is a crucial component of the DNA replication machinery. Timely PCNA loading and unloading are central for genome integrity and must be strictly coordinated with other DNA processing steps during replication. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Elg1 replication factor C-like complex (Elg1-RLC) unloads PCNA genome-wide following Okazaki fragment ligation. In the absence of Elg1, PCNA is retained on chromosomes in the wake of replication forks, rather than at specific sites. Degradation of the Okazaki fragment ligase Cdc9 leads to PCNA accumulation on chromatin, similar to the accumulation caused by lack of Elg1. We demonstrate that Okazaki fragment ligation is the critical prerequisite for PCNA unloading, since Chlorella virus DNA ligase can substitute for Cdc9 in yeast and simultaneously promotes PCNA unloading. Our results suggest that Elg1-RLC acts as a general PCNA unloader and is dependent upon DNA ligation during chromosome replication. PMID:26212319

  8. Icaritin requires Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zong-Kang; LI, Jie; LIU, Jin; GUO, Baosheng; LEUNG, Albert; ZHANG, Ge; ZHANG, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Counteracting muscle atrophy induced by mechanical unloading/inactivity is of great clinical need and challenge. A therapeutic agent that could counteract muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading in safety is desired. This study showed that natural product Icaritin (ICT) could increase the phosphorylation level of Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) at p110 catalytic subunit and promote PI3K/Akt signaling markers in C2C12 cells. This study further showed that the high dose ICT treatment could significantly attenuate the decreases in the phosphorylation level of PI3K at p110 catalytic subunit and its downstream markers related to protein synthesis, and inhibit the increases in protein degradation markers at mRNA and protein levels in rat soleus muscle following 28-day hindlimb unloading. In addition, the decreases in soleus muscle mass, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, twitch force, specific force, contraction time and half relaxation time could be significantly attenuated by the high dose ICT treatment. The low dose ICT treatment could moderately attenuate the above changes induced by unloading. Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K at p110 catalytic subunit, could abolish the above effects of ICT in vitro and in vivo, indicating that PI3K/Akt signaling could be required by ICT to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading. PMID:26831566

  9. Multi-step loading/unloading experiments that challenge constitutive models of glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, James; Medvedev, Grigori

    2014-03-01

    The mechanical response of glassy polymers depends on the thermal and deformational history, where the resulting relaxation phenomenon remains a significant challenge for constitutive modeling. For strain controlled experiments the stress response is measured during loading/unloading ramps and a constant strain. By judiciously combining the basic steps, a set of multi-step experiments have been designed to challenge existing constitutive models for glassy polymers. A particular example is the ``stress memory'' experiment, i.e. loading through yield, unloading to zero stress, and holding at final strain, where the subsequent evolution of the stress exhibits an overshoot. The observed dependence of the overshoot on the loading strain rate cannot be explained by the models where the relaxation time is a function of stress or strain. Another discriminating multi-step history experiment involves strain accumulation to test the common assumption that the phenomenon of strain hardening is caused by a purely elastic contribution to stress. Experimental results will be presented for a low Tg epoxy system, and the data will be used to critically analyze the predictions of both traditional viscoelastic/viscoplastic constitutive models and a recently developed Stochastic Constitutive Model.

  10. An unload-induced direct-shear model for granular gouge friction in rock discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zou, Yang; Li, Xing; Zhao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The experimental study introduces an unload-induced direct-shear model to investigate the frictional slip of a layer of simulated granular gouges induced by the combination of a decreasing normal stress and a constant shear stress. A frictional equilibrium state of the gouge layer is initially established under fixed normal and shear stresses. The normal stress is proposed to decrease at a constant unloading rate to induce the frictional slip of the gouge layer, and the shear stress is proposed to keep a constant value during the test. A displacement meter and load cells synchronously measure the slip displacement and the applied normal and shear stresses, respectively. The normal and shear stresses sharply decrease with the frictional slip, owing to damage of gouge contacts. The frictional slip is then gradually arrested with new formation of gouge contacts. A greater initial shear stress induces larger normal and shear stress reductions and a smaller slip displacement. The strain energy stored in the discontinuous system before the frictional slip is found to affect the slip displacement. The advantages and the limitations of this model are discussed at the end. PMID:25273734

  11. Early changes in costameric and mitochondrial protein expression with unloading are muscle specific.

    PubMed

    Flück, Martin; Li, Ruowei; Valdivieso, Paola; Linnehan, Richard M; Castells, Josiane; Tesch, Per; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesised that load-sensitive expression of costameric proteins, which hold the sarcomere in place and position the mitochondria, contributes to the early adaptations of antigravity muscle to unloading and would depend on muscle fibre composition and chymotrypsin activity of the proteasome. Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of eight men before and after 3 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and subjected to fibre typing and measures for costameric (FAK and FRNK), mitochondrial (NDUFA9, SDHA, UQCRC1, UCP3, and ATP5A1), and MHCI protein and RNA content. Mean cross-sectional area (MCSA) of types I and II muscle fibres in VL and type I fibres in SOL demonstrated a trend for a reduction after ULLS (0.05 ≤ P < 0.10). FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 showed a 20% reduction in VL muscle (P = 0.029). SOL muscle demonstrated a specific reduction in UCP3 content (-23%; P = 0.012). Muscle-specific effects of ULLS were identified for linear relationships between measured proteins, chymotrypsin activity and fibre MCSA. The molecular modifications in costamere turnover and energy homoeostasis identify that aspects of atrophy and fibre transformation are detectable at the protein level in weight-bearing muscles within 3 days of unloading. PMID:25313365

  12. Bone and hormonal changes induced by skeletal unloading in the mature male rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehority, W.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Curren, T.; Kostenuik, P. J.; Wronski, T. J.; Shen, Y.; Rabkin, B.; Bouraoui, A.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether the rat hindlimb elevation model can be used to study the effects of spaceflight and loss of gravitational loading on bone in the adult animal, and to examine the effects of age on bone responsiveness to mechanical loading, we studied 6-mo-old rats subjected to hindlimb elevation for up to 5 wk. Loss of weight bearing in the adult induced a mild hypercalcemia, diminished serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, decreased vertebral bone mass, and blunted the otherwise normal increase in femoral mass associated with bone maturation. Unloading decreased osteoblast numbers and reduced periosteal and cancellous bone formation but had no effect on bone resorption. Mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate decreased during unloading. Our results demonstrate the utility of the adult rat hindlimb elevation model as a means of simulating the loss of gravitational loading on the skeleton, and they show that the effects of nonweight bearing are prolonged and have a greater relative effect on bone formation in the adult than in the young growing animal.

  13. A Hypomagnetic Field Aggravates Bone Loss Induced by Hindlimb Unloading in Rat Femurs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Bin; Xie, Li; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Peng-fei; Zhang, Wei-ju; Ding, Chong; Qian, Ai-rong; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    A hypomagnetic field is an extremely weak magnetic field—it is considerably weaker than the geomagnetic field. In deep-space exploration missions, such as those involving extended stays on the moon and interplanetary travel, astronauts will experience abnormal space environments involving hypomagnetic fields and microgravity. It is known that microgravity in space causes bone loss, which results in decreased bone mineral density. However, it is unclear whether hypomagnetic fields affect the skeletal system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the complex effects of a hypomagnetic field and microgravity on bone loss. To study the effects of hypomagnetic fields on the femoral characteristics of rats in simulated weightlessness, we established a rat model of hindlimb unloading that was exposed to a hypomagnetic field. We used a geomagnetic field-shielding chamber to generate a hypomagnetic field of <300 nT. The results show that hypomagnetic fields can exacerbate bone mineral density loss and alter femoral biomechanical characteristics in hindlimb-unloaded rats. The underlying mechanism might involve changes in biological rhythms and the concentrations of trace elements due to the hypomagnetic field, which would result in the generation of oxidative stress responses in the rat. Excessive levels of reactive oxygen species would stimulate osteoblasts to secrete receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and promote the maturation and activation of osteoclasts and thus eventually cause bone resorption. PMID:25157571

  14. Fractal dimension analysis of weight-bearing bones of rats during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pornprasertsuk, S.; Ludlow, J. B.; Webber, R. L.; Tyndall, D. A.; Sanhueza, A. I.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Fractal analysis was used to quantify changes in trabecular bone induced through the use of a rat tail-suspension model to simulate microgravity-induced osteopenia. Fractal dimensions were estimated from digitized radiographs obtained from tail-suspended and ambulatory rats. Fifty 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups of 24 ambulatory (control) and 26 suspended (test) animals. Rats of both groups were killed after periods of 1, 4, and 8 weeks. Femurs and tibiae were removed and radiographed with standard intraoral films and digitized using a flatbed scanner. Square regions of interest were cropped at proximal, middle, and distal areas of each bone. Fractal dimensions were estimated from slopes of regression lines fitted to circularly averaged plots of log power vs. log spatial frequency. The results showed that the computed fractal dimensions were significantly greater for images of trabecular bones from tail-suspended groups than for ambulatory groups (p < 0.01) at 1 week. Periods between 1 and 4 weeks likewise yielded significantly different estimates (p < 0.05), consistent with an increase in bone loss. In the tibiae, the proximal regions of the suspended group produced significantly greater fractal dimensions than other regions (p < 0.05), which suggests they were more susceptible to unloading. The data are consistent with other studies demonstrating osteopenia in microgravity environments and the regional response to skeletal unloading. Thus, fractal analysis could be a useful technique to evaluate the structural changes of bone.

  15. Hind limb unloading, a model of spaceflight conditions, leads to decreased B lymphopoiesis similar to aging.

    PubMed

    Lescale, Chloé; Schenten, Véronique; Djeghloul, Dounia; Bennabi, Meriem; Gaignier, Fanny; Vandamme, Katleen; Strazielle, Catherine; Kuzniak, Isabelle; Petite, Hervé; Dosquet, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Goodhardt, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Within the bone marrow, the endosteal niche plays a crucial role in B-cell differentiation. Because spaceflight is associated with osteoporosis, we investigated whether changes in bone microstructure induced by a ground-based model of spaceflight, hind limb unloading (HU), could affect B lymphopoiesis. To this end, we analyzed both bone parameters and the frequency of early hematopoietic precursors and cells of the B lineage after 3, 6, 13, and 21 d of HU. We found that limb disuse leads to a decrease in both bone microstructure and the frequency of B-cell progenitors in the bone marrow. Although multipotent hematopoietic progenitors were not affected by HU, a decrease in B lymphopoiesis was observed as of the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) stage with a major block at the progenitor B (pro-B) to precursor B (pre-B) cell transition (5- to 10-fold decrease). The modifications in B lymphopoiesis were similar to those observed in aged mice and, as with aging, decreased B-cell generation in HU mice was associated with reduced expression of B-cell transcription factors, early B-cell factor (EBF) and Pax5, and an alteration in STAT5-mediated IL-7 signaling. These findings demonstrate that mechanical unloading of hind limbs results in a decrease in early B-cell differentiation resembling age-related modifications in B lymphopoiesis. PMID:25376832

  16. Hindlimb unloading has a greater effect on cortical compared with cancellous bone in mature female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of 28 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) on the mature female rat skeleton. In vivo proximal tibia bone mineral density and geometry of HU and cage control (CC) rats were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 28. Postmortem pQCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical testing were performed on tibiae and femora. After 28 days, HU animals had significantly higher daily food consumption (+39%) and lower serum estradiol levels (-49%, P = 0.079) compared with CC. Proximal tibia bone mineral content and cortical bone area significantly declined over 28 days in HU animals (-4.0 and 4.8%, respectively), whereas total and cancellous bone mineral densities were unchanged. HU animals had lower cortical bone formation rates and mineralizing surface at tibial midshaft, whereas differences in similar properties were not detected in cancellous bone of the distal femur. These results suggest that cortical bone, rather than cancellous bone, is more prominently affected by unloading in skeletally mature retired breeder female rats.

  17. Hindlimb unloading induces a collagen isoform shift in the soleus muscle of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. A.; Lesniewski, L. A.; Muller-Delp, J. M.; Majors, A. K.; Scalise, D.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether hindlimb unloading (HU) alters the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 0 (n = 11), 1 (n = 11), 14 (n = 13), or 28 (n = 11) days of unloading. Remodeling of the soleus and plantaris muscles was examined biochemically for collagen abundance via measurement of hydroxyproline, and the percentage of cross-sectional area of collagen was determined histologically with picrosirius red staining. Total hydroxyproline content in the soleus and plantaris muscles was unaltered by HU at any time point. However, the relative proportions of type I collagen in the soleus muscle decreased relative to control (Con) with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 68 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 53 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 53 +/- 7%). Correspondingly, type III collagen increased in soleus muscle with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 32 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 47 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 48 +/- 7%). The proportion of type I muscle fibers in soleus muscle was diminished with HU (Con 96 +/- 2%; 14 days HU 86 +/- 1%; 28 days HU 83 +/- 1%), and the proportion of hybrid type I/IIB fibers increased (Con 0%; 14 days HU 8 +/- 2%; 28 days HU 14 +/- 2%). HU had no effect on the proportion of type I and III collagen or muscle fiber composition in plantaris muscle. The data demonstrate that HU induces a shift in the relative proportion of collagen isoform (type I to III) in the antigravity soleus muscle, which occurs concomitantly with a slow-to-fast myofiber transformation.

  18. The Hindlimb Unloading Rat Model: Literature Overview, Comparison with Spaceflight Data, and Technique Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily; Globus, Ruth K.; Kaplansky, Alexander; Durnova, Galina

    2004-01-01

    The hindlimb unloading (HU) rodent model is used extensively to study the response of many physiological systems to certain aspects of spaceflight, as well as to disuse and recovery from disuse for Earth benefits. This chapter describes the evolution of HU, and is divided into three sections. The first section examines the characteristics of 1063 articles using or reviewing the HU model, published between 1976 and April 1, 2004. The characteristics include number of publications, journals, countries, major physiological systems, method modifications, species, gender, genetic strains and ages of rodents, experiment duration, and countermeasures. The second section provides a comparison of results between space flown and Hu animals from the 14-day Cosmos 2044 mission. The final section describes modifications to HU required by different experimental paradigms and a method to protect the tail harness for long duration studies. HU in rodents has enabled improved understanding of the responses of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, renal, neural, metabolic, and reproductive systems to unloading and/or to reloading on Earth with implications for both long-duration human spaceflight and disuse on Earth.

  19. Can footwall unloading explain late Cenozoic uplift of the Sierra Nevada crest?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, G.A.; Parsons, T.

    2009-01-01

    Globally, normal-fault displacement bends and warps rift flanks upwards, as adjoining basins drop downwards. Perhaps the most evident manifestations are the flanks of the East African Rift, which cuts across the otherwise minimally deformed continent. Flank uplift was explained by Vening Meinesz (1950, Institut Royal Colonial Belge, Bulletin des Seances, v. 21, p. 539-552), who recognized that isostasy should cause uplift of a normal-faulted footwall and subsidence of its hanging wall. Uplift occurs because slip on a dipping normal fault creates a broader root of less-dense material beneath the footwall, and a narrowed one beneath the hanging wall. In this paper, we investigate the potential influence of this process on the latest stages of Sierra Nevada uplift. Through theoretical calculations and 3D finite element modelling, we find that cumulative slip of about 4km on range-front faults would have produced about 1.3km peak isostatic uplift at the ridge crest. Numerical models suggest that the zone of uplift is narrow, with the width controlled by bending resistance of the seismogenic crust. We conclude that footwall unloading cannot account for the entire elevation of the Sierran crest above sea level, but if range-front faulting initiated in an already elevated plateau like the adjacent Basin and Range Province, then a hybrid model of pre-existing regional uplift and localized footwall unloading can account for the older and newer uplift phases suggested by the geologic record.

  20. Effects of space flight conditions on the function of the immune system and catecholamine production simulated in a rodent model of hindlimb unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    The rodent model of hindlimb unloading has been successfully used to simulate some of the effects of space flight conditions. Previous studies have indicated that mice exposed to hindlimb-unloading conditions have decreased resistance to infections compared to restrained and normally housed control mice. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanisms involved in resistance to infection in this model by examining the effects of hindlimb unloading on the function of the immune system and its impact on the production of catecholamines. METHODS: Female Swiss Webster mice were hindlimb-unloaded during 48 h and the function of the immune system was assessed in spleen and peritoneal cells immediately after this period. In addition, the kinetics of catecholamine production was measured throughout the hindlimb-unloading period. RESULTS: The function of the immune system was significantly suppressed in the hindlimb-unloaded group compared to restrained and normally housed control mice. Levels of catecholamines were increased in the hindlimb-unloaded group and peaked at 12 h following the commencement of unloading. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that physiological responses of mice are altered early after hindlimb unloading and that catecholamines may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system. These changes may affect the ability of mice to resist infections. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Effect of a magnetic field on crack length measurement of 9NI steel by unloading compliance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, C.; Matsui, K.; Shibata, K.

    2002-05-01

    In the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials in high magnetic fields, it has not been clarified whether we can use the same formulas as ones used in a non-magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the magnetic effect in the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials. As the first step, crack length was measured at 4 K by unloading compliance method in the testing of CT specimen of 9% nickel steel. The same formula was used in the magnetic field of 0 and 8 Tesla. They were compared with the length measured by optical fractography. The magnetic field had little effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method. The small amount of retained austenite in Q T heat-treated specimen did not exhibit a magnetic effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method.

  2. Muscle progenitor cells proliferation doesn't sufficiently contribute to maintaining stretched soleus muscle mass during gravitational unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakina, M. V.; Turtikova, O. V.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Kokontcev, A. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    Skeletal muscle work hypertrophy is usually connected with muscle progenitor satellite cells (SC) activation with subsequent incorporation of their nuclei into myofibers. Passive stretch of unloaded muscle was earlier established to prevent atrophic processes and is accompanied by enhanced protein synthesis. We hypothesized that elimination of SC proliferation capacity by γ-irradiation would partly avert stretched muscle fiber capability to maintain their size under the conditions of gravitational unloading. To assess the role of muscle progenitor (satellite) cells in development of passive stretch preventive effect SC proliferation was suppressed by local exposing to ionized radiation (2500 rad), subsequent hindlimb suspension or hindlimb suspension with concomitant passive stretch were carried out. Reduction of myofiber cross-sectional area and decrease in myonuclei number accompanying unloaded muscle atrophy were completely abolished by passive stretch both in irradiated and sham-treated animals. We conclude that SC did not make essential contribution to passive stretch preventive action under the conditions of simulated weightlessness.

  3. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  4. Skeletal unloading causes resistance of osteoprogenitor cells to parathyroid hormone and to insulin-like growth factor-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostenuik, P. J.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Turner, R. T.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bikle, D. D.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal unloading decreases bone formation and osteoblast number in vivo and decreases the number and proliferation of bone marrow osteoprogenitor (BMOp) cells in vitro. We tested the ability of parathyroid hormone (PTH) to stimulate BMOp cells in vivo by treating Sprague Dawley rats (n = 32) with intermittent PTH(1-34) (1 h/day at 8 microg/100 g of body weight), or with vehicle via osmotic minipumps during 7 days of normal weight bearing or hind limb unloading. Marrow cells were flushed from the femur and cultured at the same initial density for up to 21 days. PTH treatment of normally loaded rats caused a 2.5-fold increase in the number of BMOp cells, with similar increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, compared with cultures from vehicle-treated rats. PTH treatment of hind limb unloaded rats failed to stimulate BMOp cell number, ALP activity, or mineralization. Hind limb unloading had no significant effect on PTH receptor mRNA or protein levels in the tibia. Direct in vitro PTH challenge of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone failed to stimulate their proliferation and inhibited their differentiation, suggesting that the in vivo anabolic effect of intermittent PTH on BMOp cells was mediated indirectly by a PTH-induced factor. We hypothesize that this factor is insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which stimulated the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone, but not from unloaded bone. These results suggest that IGF-I mediates the ability of PTH to stimulate BMOp cell proliferation in normally loaded bone, and that BMOp cells in unloaded bone are resistant to the anabolic effect of intermittent PTH therapy due to their resistance to IGF-I.

  5. Effect of short-term microgravity and long-term hindlimb unloading on rat cardiac mass and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Vasques, M.; Miller, T. A.; Wilkerson, M. K.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exposure to short-term microgravity or long-term hindlimb unloading induces cardiac atrophy in male Sprague-Dawley rats. For the microgravity study, rats were subdivided into four groups: preflight (PF, n = 12); flight (Fl, n = 7); flight cage simulation (Sim, n = 6), and vivarium control (Viv, n = 7). Animals in the Fl group were exposed to 7 days of microgravity during the Spacelab 3 mission. Animals in the hindlimb-unloading study were subdivided into three groups: control (Con, n = 20), 7-day hindlimb-unloaded (7HU, n = 10), and 28-day hindlimb-unloaded (28HU, n = 19). Heart mass was unchanged in adult animals exposed to 7 days of actual microgravity (PF 1.33 +/- 0.03 g; Fl 1.32 +/- 0.02 g; Sim 1.28 +/- 0.04 g; Viv 1.35 +/- 0.04 g). Similarly, heart mass was unaltered with hindlimb unloading (Con 1.40 +/- 0.04 g; 7HU 1.35 +/- 0.06 g; 28HU 1.42 +/- 0.03 g). Hindlimb unloading also had no effect on the peak rate of rise in left ventricular pressure, an estimate of myocardial contractility (Con 8,055 +/- 385 mmHg/s; 28HU 8,545 +/- 755 mmHg/s). These data suggest that cardiac atrophy does not occur after short-term exposure to microgravity and that neither short- nor long-term simulated microgravity alters cardiac mass or function.

  6. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  7. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  8. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  9. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  10. Beta-Catenin Haplo Insufficient Male Mice Do Not Lose Bone in Response to Hindlimb Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua; Cheng, An-Lin; Johnson, Mark L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2016-01-01

    As the β-catenin pathway has been shown to be involved in mechanotransduction, we sought to determine if haploinsufficiency would affect skeletal response to unloading. It has previously been shown that deletion of both alleles of β-catenin in bone cells results in a fragile skeleton highly susceptible to fracture, but deletion of one allele using Dmp1-Cre (Ctnnb1+/loxP; Dmp1-Cre, cKO HET) has little effect on the 2 mo old skeleton. We found that under normal housing conditions, trabecular bone volume was significantly less in 5 mo old male cKO HET mice compared to controls (Ctrl/HET:Tb. BV/TV = 13.96±2.71/8.92±0.95%, Tb.N. = 4.88±0.51/3.95±0.44/mm, Tb. Sp. = 0.20±0.02/0.26±0.03mm, a 36%, 19% and 30% change respectively) but not in females suggesting an age and gender related effect. Before performing suspension experiments and to control for the environmental effects, animals with the same tail attachment and housing conditions, but not suspended (NS), were compared to normally housed (NH) animals. Attachment and housing resulted in weight loss in both genders and phenotypes. Cortical bone loss was observed in the cKO HET males (NH/NS, Ct BV/TV: 90.45±0.72/89.12±0.56%) and both diaphyseal (0.19±0.01/0.17±0.01mm) and metaphyseal (0.10±0.01/0.08±0.01mm) thickness, but not in female cKO HET mice suggesting that male cKO HET mice are susceptible to attachment and housing conditions. These results with transgenic mice emphasizes the importance of proper controls when attributing skeletal responses to unloading. With suspension, cKO HET male mice did not lose bone unlike female cKO HET mice that had greater trabecular bone loss than controls (Ctrl 9%:cKO HET 21% decrease Tb. N; Ctrl 12%:cKO HET 27% increase Tb. Sp.). Suspended and non-suspended mice lost weight compared to normally housed animals. Taken together, the data suggest a protective effect of β-catenin against the effects of stress in males and partial protection against unloading in females

  11. Role of Growth Hormone, Exercise and Serum Phosphorus in Unloaded Bone of Young Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnnaud, Sara B.; Harper, J. S.; Gosselink, K. L.; Navidi, M.; Fung, P.; Grindeland, R. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone, known to be stimulated by exercise, is suppressed in rats after space flight and in a ground-based model in which the hind-limbs are unloaded (S). To determine the role of GH in the osteopenia of unloaded bones of S rats, young males were treated with GH combined with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a peptide that mediates the local actions of the hormone. 200 g rats, hypophysectomized (hypox) 17 d earlier, were treated with 1 mg/kg/d GH/IGF-1 (H) or saline (C) in 3 divided daily doses x10 d. Hind-limb bones were unloaded (S), ambulated (A) or exercised (X) by climbing a ladder while carrying a weight. Growth was monitored daily. Tibial growth plate (Tepi) was measured with a micrometer, and femoral (F) area, length, and mineral content (BMC) by DEXA. Parameters of calcium metabolism were measured by autoanalyzer and calciotropic hormones by radioimmunoassay. F bone density, g/square cm, (BMD) or BW were not affected by S in Hypox. However, FBMD was lower in S+H than A+H (p is less than 0.002) and H stimulated whole body growth in S (5.2 g/d) and SX (5.6 g/d) to a lesser extent than in A (6.6 g/d) (p is less than 0.05). Adjusted for BW, Tepi showed the greatest increase in S+H+X (64%), the next highest increase in S+H (50%) and no change in S+X. F area, length and BMC/100 g BW were lower in all H groups than respective C's. By multiple regression analysis, serum phosphorus (Pi) which correlated with Tepi (r = 0.88, p is less than 0.001) and was inversely related to FBMC (r = -0.68, p is less than 0.001) proved to be the most significant determinant of BMC. This illustrates the dependence of osteopenia in S on GH, the maximizing effect of X for epiphyseal growth and the major role of Pi metabolism on BMC in weight bearing bone during growth.

  12. Body Unloading Associated with Space Flight and Bed-rest Impacts Functional Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Ballard, K. L.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Phillips, T.; Platts, S. H.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J. W.; Stenger, M. B.; Taylor, L. C.; Wood, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Functional Task Test study is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. Ultimately this information will be used to assess performance risks and inform the design of countermeasures for exploration class missions. We are currently conducting studies on both ISS crewmembers and on subjects experiencing 70 days of 6 degrees head-down bed-rest as an analog for space flight. Bed-rest provides the opportunity for us to investigate the role of prolonged axial body unloading in isolation from the other physiological effects produced by exposure to the microgravity environment of space flight. This allows us to parse out the contribution of the body unloading component on functional performance. In this on-going study both ISS crewmembers and bed-rest subjects were tested using an interdisciplinary protocol that evaluated functional performance and related physiological changes before and after 6 months in space and 70 days of 6? head-down bed-rest, respectively. Functional tests included ladder climbing, hatch opening, jump down, manual manipulation of objects and tool use, seat egress and obstacle avoidance, recovery from a fall, and object translation tasks. Crewmembers were tested three times before flight, and on 1, 6 and 30 days after landing. Bed-rest subjects were tested three times before bed-rest and immediately after getting up from bed-rest as well as 1, 6 and 12 days after reambulation. A comparison of bed-rest and space flight data showed a significant concordance in performance changes across all functional tests. Tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with

  13. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  14. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  15. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  16. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  17. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  18. Accelerating the discontinuous Galerkin method for seismic wave propagation simulations using the graphic processing unit (GPU)—single-GPU implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Dawei; Chen, Po; Wang, Liqiang

    2013-02-01

    We have successfully ported an arbitrary high-order discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method for solving the three-dimensional elastic seismic wave equation on unstructured tetrahedral meshes to an Nvidia Tesla C2075 GPU using the Nvidia CUDA programming model. On average our implementation obtained a speedup factor of about 24.3 for the single-precision version of our GPU code and a speedup factor of about 12.8 for the double-precision version of our GPU code when compared with the double precision serial CPU code running on one Intel Xeon W5880 core. When compared with the parallel CPU code running on two, four and eight cores, the speedup factor of our single-precision GPU code is around 12.9, 6.8 and 3.6, respectively. In this article, we give a brief summary of the ADER-DG method, a short introduction to the CUDA programming model and a description of our CUDA implementation and optimization of the ADER-DG method on the GPU. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores the potential of accelerating the ADER-DG method for seismic wave-propagation simulations using a GPU.

  19. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Magnetic Tail Loading and Unloading During its Third Flyby of Mercury: Substorms?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury on September 29, 2009, a variable interplanetary magnetic field produced a series of several minute enhancements of the tail magnetic field hy factors of approx. 2 to 3.5. The magnetic field flaring during these intervals indicates that they result from loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. The unloading intervals were associated with plasmoids and traveling compression regions, signatures of tail reconnection. The peak tail magnetic flux during the smallest loading events equaled 30% of the magnetic flux emanating from Mercury, and may have reached 100% for the largest event. In this case the dayside magnetic shielding is reduced and solar wind flux impacting the surface may be greatly enhanced. Despite the intensity of these events and their similarity to terrestrial substorm magnetic flux dynamics, no energetic charged particles with energies greater than 36 keV were observed.

  20. Application of constitutive model considering nonlinear unloading behavior for Gen.3 AHSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wagoner, R. H.

    2013-05-01

    Nonlinear unloading behavior has been reported as an important factor for accurate springback prediction. In this study, a newly proposed special component of strain: "Quasi-Plastic-Elastic" ("QPE") strain was utilized to study the springback behavior of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). Several types of steels, including IF steel, DP780, TRIP780, DP980, TWIP980 and QP980 were considered in this research. The results showed that all the tested steels have following behavior: 1) QPE strain is recoverable, like elastic deformation. 2) It dissipates work, like plastic deformation. A 3-D constitutive model considering QPE behavior was implemented in Abaqus/Standard with shell element and applied to draw-bend springback test for Gen. 3 AHSS, QP980. Predictions for springback using the QPE model were more accurate compared with standard elastic-plastic models.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of void coalescence in monocrystalline copper under loading and unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Wenjun; Chen, Kaiguo; Deng, Xiaoliang; Wei, Yongkai

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamic calculations are used to examine the anisotropy of voids coalescence under loading and unloading conditions in monocrystalline coppers. In this paper, three typical orientations are investigated, including [100], [110], and [111]. The study shows that voids collapse after the shock loading, leaving two disordered regions at the initial voids sites. Voids re-nucleate in the disordered regions and grow by the emission of dislocations on various slip planes. The dislocation motion contributes to local stress relaxation, which causes the voids to expand to certain radius and then coalesce with each other by dislocation emission. Due to the influence of the anisotropy shear field and different slip systems around the voids, the dislocations emit more easily at specific position, which lead to the anisotropy of void coalescence. A two-dimensional analysis model based on a shear dislocation is proposed and it explains the phenomena of void coalescence in the simulations quite well.

  2. Relationship between sprint ability and loaded/unloaded jump tests in elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; DʼAngelo, Ricardo A; Fernandes, Victor; Gil, Saulo; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C; Kitamura, Katia; Nakamura, Fabio Y

    2015-03-01

    The neuromechanical determinants of sprint running performance have been investigated in team sports athletes and non-elite sprinters. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationships between kinetic and performance parameters, obtained in loaded and unloaded vertical and horizontal jumps, and sprinting in elite athletes. Twenty-two sprinters performed squat jumps, countermovement jumps, horizontal jumps, and jump squats with different loads on a force platform, in addition to a 50-m sprint. Results indicated that jumping height and distance in vertical and horizontal jumps are more strongly correlated (R ≈ 0.81) to sprinting speed than the respective peak forces (R ≈ 0.36). Furthermore, the optimum load generating the maximum power in the jump squat is also highly correlated to sprint performance (R ≈ 0.72). These results reveal that vertical and horizontal jump tests may be used by coaches for assessing and monitoring qualities related to sprinting performance in elite sprinters. PMID:25162648

  3. Role of Glucocorticoids in the Response to Unloading of Muscle Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Intact control (weight bearing) and suspended rats gained weight at a similar rate during a 6 day period. Adrenaectomized (adx) weight bearing rats gained less weight during this period while adrenalectomized suspended rats showed no significant weight gain. Cortisol treatment of both of these groups of animals caused a loss of body weight. Results from these studies show several important findings: (1) Metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating gluccorticoids; (2) Metabolic changes in the soleus due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of receptors; and (3) Not all metabolic responses in the unloaded soleus muscle are due to direct action of elevated glucocorticoids or increased sensitivity to these hormones.

  4. Effects of Unloading and Reloading on Expressions of Skelatal Muscle Membrane Proteins in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Y.; Ikuta, A.; Goto, A.; Sugiura, T.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Goto, K.

    2013-02-01

    Effects of unloading and reloading on the expression levels of tripartite motif-containing 72 (TRIM72) and caveolin-3 (Cav-3) of soleus muscle in mice were investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice (11-week old) were randomly assigned to control and hindlimb-suspended groups. Some of mice in hindlimb-suspended group were subjected to continuous hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks with or without 7 days of ambulation recovery. Following HS, the muscle weight and protein expression levels of TRIM72 and Cav-3 in soleus were decreased. On the other hand, the gradual increases in muscle mass, TRIM72 and Cav-3 were observed after reloading following HS. Therefore, it was suggested that mechanical loading played a key role in a regulatory system for protein expressions of TRIM72 and Cav-3.

  5. 15 CFR 758.8 - Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs Service. 758.8 Section 758.8 Commerce and... Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs Service....

  6. 15 CFR 758.8 - Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs Service. 758.8 Section 758.8 Commerce and... Return or unloading of cargo at direction of BIS, the Office of Export Enforcement or Customs Service....

  7. Preload substantially influences the intervertebral disc stiffness in loading-unloading cycles of compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Schilling, Christoph; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-06-14

    Disc hydration is controlled by fluid imbibition and exudation and hence by applied load magnitude and history, internal osmotic pressure and disc conditions. It affects both the internal load distribution and external load-bearing of a disc while variations therein give rise to the disc time-dependent characteristics. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of changes in compression preload magnitude on the disc axial cyclic compression stiffness under physiological loading. After 20h of free hydration, effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa, applied for eight hours) and disc-bone preparation conditions on disc height and axial stiffness were investigated using 36 disc-bone and 24 isolated disc (without bony endplates) bovine specimens. After preloading, specimens were subjected to ten loading/unloading cycles each of 7.5min compression at 0.5MPa followed by 7.5min at 0.06MPa. Under 0.06MPa preload, the specimen height losses during high loading periods of cyclic loading were greater than corresponding height recoveries during low loading phases. This resulted in a progressive reduction in the specimen height and increase in its stiffness. Differences between disc height losses in high cyclic loads and between stiffness in both load increase and release phases were significant for 0 and 0.06MPa vs. 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude/history and hence disc height and hydration on disc stiffness in loading/unloading and disc height loss in loading periods. Proper preconditioning and hence hydration level should be achieved if recovery in height loss similar to in vivo conditions is expected. PMID:27209550

  8. Axial Creep Loading and Unloaded Recovery of the Human Intervertebral Disc and the Effect of Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Sen, Sounok; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc maintains a balance between externally applied loads and internal osmotic pressure. Fluid flow plays a key role in this process, causing fluctuations in disc hydration and height. The objectives of this study were to quantify and model the axial creep and recovery responses of nondegenerate and degenerate human lumbar discs. Two experiments were performed. First, a slow compressive ramp was applied to 2000 N, unloaded to allow recovery for up to 24 hours, and re-applied. The linear-region stiffness and disc height were within 5% of the initial condition for recovery times greater than 8 hours. In the second experiment, a 1000 N creep load was applied for four hours, unloaded recovery monitored for 24 hours, and the creep load repeated. A viscoelastic model comprised of a “fast” and “slow” exponential response was used to describe the creep and recovery, where the fast response is associated with flow in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and endplate, while the slow response is associated with the annulus fibrosus (AF). The study demonstrated that recovery is 3-4X slower than loading. The fast response was correlated with degeneration, suggesting larger changes in the NP with degeneration compared to the AF. However, the fast response comprised only 10-15% of the total equilibrium displacement, with the AF-dominated slow response comprising 40-70%. Finally, the physiological loads and deformations and their associated long equilibrium times confirm that diurnal loading does not represent “equilibrium” in the disc, but that over time the disc is in steady-state. PMID:21783103

  9. Importance of loading and unloading procedures for gecko-inspired controllable adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2013-08-27

    The importance of loading and unloading procedures has been shown in a variety of different methods for biological dry adhesives, such as the fibers on the feet of the Tokay gecko, but biomimetic dry adhesives have yet to be explored in a similar manner. To date, little work has systematically varied multiple parameters to discern the influence of the testing procedure, and the effect of the approach angle remains uncertain. In this study, a synthetic adhesive is moved in 13 individual approach and retraction angles relative to a flat substrate as well as 9 different shear lengths to discern how loading and unloading procedures influence the preload, adhesion, and shear/friction forces supported. The synthetic adhesive, composed of vertical 10 μm diameter semicircular poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, is tested against a 4 mm diameter flat glass puck on a home-built microtribometer using both vertical approach and retraction tests and angled approach and retraction tests. The results show that near maximum adhesion and friction can be obtained for most approach and retraction angles, provided that a sufficient shear length is performed. The results also show that the reaction forces during adhesive placement can be significantly reduced by using specific approach angles, resulting for the vertical fibers in a 38-fold increase in the ratio of adhesion force to preload force, μ', when compared to that when using a vertical approach. These results can be of use to those currently researching gecko-inspired adhesives when designing their testing procedures and control algorithms for climbing and perching robots. PMID:23875720

  10. EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION vs. COUNTERPULSATILE, PULSATILE, AND CONTINUOUS LEFT VENTRICULAR UNLOADING FOR PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Carlo R.; Koenig, Steven C.; Ionan, Constantine; Gillars, Kevin J.; Mitchell, Mike E.; Austin, Erle H.; Gray, Laman A.; Pantalos, George M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite progress with adult ventricular assist devices (VADs), limited options exist to support pediatric patients with life-threatening heart disease. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) remains the clinical standard. To characterize (patho)physiologic responses to different modes of mechanical unloading of the failing pediatric heart, ECMO was compared to either intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), pulsatile-flow (PF)VAD, or continuous-flow (CF)VAD support in a pediatric heart failure model. DESIGN Experimental. SETTING Large animal laboratory operating room. SUBJECTS Yorkshire piglets (n=47, 11.7±2.6 kg). INTERVENTIONS In piglets with coronary ligation-induced cardiac dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support devices were implanted and studied during maximum support. MEASUREMENTS and MAIN RESULTS Left ventricular, right ventricular, coronary, carotid, systemic arterial, and pulmonary arterial hemodynamics were measured with pressure and flow transducers. Myocardial oxygen consumption and total-body oxygen consumption (VO2) were calculated from arterial, venous, and coronary sinus blood sampling. Blood flow was measured in 17 organs with microspheres. Paired student t-tests compared baseline and heart failure conditions. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA compared heart failure, device support mode(s), and ECMO. Statistically significant (p<0.05) findings included: 1) improved left ventricular blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, CFVAD, and ECMO but not IABP support, 2) improved global myocardial blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, and CFVAD but not IABP or ECMO support, and 3) diminished pulsatility during ECMO and CFVAD but not IABP and PFVAD support. A profile of systems-based responses was established for each type of support. CONCLUSIONS Each type of pediatric VAD provided hemodynamic support by unloading the heart with a different mechanism that created a unique profile of physiological changes. These data contribute novel, clinically

  11. Spaceflight and hind limb unloading induce similar changes in electrical impedance characteristics of mouse gastrocnemius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sung, M.; Li, J.; Spieker, A.J.; Spatz, J.; Ellman, R.; Ferguson, V.L.; Bateman, T.A.; Rosen, G.D.; Bouxsein, M.; Rutkove, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the potential of electrical impedance myography (EIM) to serve as a marker of muscle fiber atrophy and secondarily as an indicator of bone deterioration by assessing the effects of spaceflight or hind limb unloading. Methods In the first experiment, 6 mice were flown aboard the space shuttle (STS-135) for 13 days and 8 earthbound mice served as controls. In the second experiment, 14 mice underwent hind limb unloading (HLU) for 13 days; 13 additional mice served as controls. EIM measurements were made on ex vivo gastrocnemius muscle. Quantitative microscopy and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements of the hindlimb were also performed. Results Reductions in the multifrequency phase-slope parameter were observed for both the space flight and HLU cohorts compared to their respective controls. For ground control and spaceflight groups, the values were 24.7±1.3°/MHz and 14.1±1.6°/MHz, respectively (p=0.0013); for control and HLU groups, the values were 23.9±1.6°/MHz and 19.0±1.0°/MHz, respectively (p=0.014). This parameter also correlated with muscle fiber size (ρ=0.65, p=0.011) for spaceflight and hind limb aBMD (ρ=0.65, p=0.0063) for both groups. Conclusions These data support the concept that EIM may serve as a useful tool for assessment of muscle disuse secondary to immobilization or microgravity. PMID:24292610

  12. GPU accelerated dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the computational bottlenecks in discrete dislocation dynamics modeling (associated with segment-segment interactions as well as the treatment of free surfaces), discuss the parallelization and optimization strategies, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) computation in accelerating dislocation dynamics simulations and expanding their scope. Individual algorithmic benchmark tests as well as an example large simulation of a thin film are presented.

  13. 49 CFR 176.108 - Supervision of Class 1 (explosive) materials during loading, unloading, handling and stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supervision of Class 1 (explosive) materials... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials § 176.108 Supervision of Class 1 (explosive) materials during loading, unloading, handling...

  14. 9 CFR 72.17 - Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Unloading noninfected cattle for rest... cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for such purpose. (a) Specifications for construction and maintenance. Cattle of the free area, and cattle of the quarantined area...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  19. Stress-displacement relation of fiber for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites during (indentation) loading and unloading

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, C.; Ferber, M.K.; Becher, P.F. )

    1989-11-01

    The stress-displacement relation of the fiber is analyzed for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites during axial compressive loading (indentation) and unloading on the exposed end of an embedded fiber. An unbonded fiber/matrix interface subject to Coulomb friction and residual radial clamping stresses is considered in the present study. The results show that the stress-displacement curves during loading and unloading can be used to evaluate the magnitude of the clamping stress, the coefficient of friction, and the frictional stress distribution at the interface. Specifically, in the absence of Poisson's effect (i.e., when Poisson's ratio of the fiber is zero), the interfacial shear stress is constant, the loading curve is parabolic, and, after complete unloading, the residual fiber displacement equals half of the maximum fiber displacement at the peak loading stress. In the presence of Poisson's effect, the interfacial shear stress is not constant, and, after complete unloading, the residual fiber displacement is less than half of the maximum fiber displacement at the peak loading stress.

  20. 9 CFR 72.17 - Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unloading noninfected cattle for rest, feed, and water only, permitted in authorized pens for such purpose. 72.17 Section 72.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY)...

  1. Critical Compressive Stress for Flat Rectangular Plates Supported Along All Edges and Elastically Restrained Against Rotation along the Unloaded Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Stowell, Elbridge Z

    1942-01-01

    A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in flat rectangular plates supported along all edges and, in addition, elastically restrained against rotation along the unloaded edges. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required in the construction of the chart are given.

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  3. The declined phosphorylation of Hsp27 in rat cardiac muscle after simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ming; Jiang, Shizhong; Li, Zhili; Yuan, Min; Dong, Weijun

    Many studies have shown that simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading can decrease the contractility of rat cardiac muscle however the mechanisms responsible for which remain unclear Actin polymerization which can be regulated by Hsp27 has important role in the transmission of stress force during the contraction of cardiac muscle In this study western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Hsp27 and phosphorylated Hsp27 FAK and phosphorylated FAK P38 MAPK and phosphorylated P38 MAPK in rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading The results showed that the phosphorylation levels of both Hsp27 and P38 MAPK were declined significantly which may decrease actin polymerization and inhibit the transmission of stress force during the contraction of rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading However the phosphorylation level of FAK was not declined significantly in cardiac muscle The results suggested that the declined phosphorylation level of Hsp27 which may be ascribable to the decline of contractility of rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading may be induced by the declined phosphorylation level of P38 MAPK but not phosphorylation level of FAK

  4. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  5. Regulation of eIF2α phosphorylation in hindlimb-unloaded and STS-135 space-flown mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liming; Tanjung, Nancy; Swarnkar, Gaurav; Ledet, Eric; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-09-01

    Various environmental stresses elevate the phosphorylation level of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) and induce transcriptional activation of a set of stress responsive genes such as activating transcription factors 3 and 6 (ATF3 and ATF6), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and Xbp1 (X-box binding protein 1). These stress sources include radiation, oxidation, and stress to the endoplasmic reticulum, and it is recently reported that unloading by hindlimb unloading is such a stress source. No studies, however, have examined the phosphorylation level of eIF2α (eIF2α-p) using skeletal samples that have experienced microgravity in space. In this study we addressed a question: Does a mouse tibia flown in space show altered levels of eIF2α-p? To address this question, we obtained STS-135 flown samples that were harvested 4-7 h after landing. The tibia and femur isolated from hindlimb unloaded mice were employed as non-flight controls. The effects of loading were also investigated in non- flight controls. Results indicate that the level of eIF2α-p of the non-flight controls was elevated during hindlimb unloading and reduced after being released from unloading. Second, the eIF2α-p level of space-flown samples was decreased, and mechanical loading to the tibia caused the reduction of the eIF2α-p level. Third, the mRNA levels of ATF3, ATF6, and CHOP were lowered in space-flown samples as well as in the non-flight samples 4-7 h after being released from unloading. Collectively, the results herein indicated that a release from hindlimb unloading and a return to normal weight environment from space provided a suppressive effect to eIF2α-linked stress responses and that a period of 2-4 h is sufficient to induce this suppressive outcome.

  6. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  7. Radiation and mechanical unloading effects on mouse vertebral bone: Ground-based models of the spaceflight environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwood, Joshua Stewart

    Astronauts on long-duration space missions experience increased ionizing radiation background levels and occasional acute doses of ionizing radiation from solar particle events, in addition to biological challenges introduced by weightlessness. Previous research indicates that cancer radiotherapy damages bone marrow cell populations and reduces mechanical strength of bone. However, the cumulative doses in radiotherapy are an order of magnitude or greater than dose predictions for long-duration space missions. Further detriments to the skeletal system are the disuse and mechanical unloading experienced during weightlessness, which causes osteopenia in weight-bearing cancellous bone (a sponge-like bony network of rods, plates and voids) and cortical bone (dense, compact bone). Studies of radiation exposure utilizing spaceflight-relevant types and doses, and in combination with mechanical unloading, have received little attention. Motivated by the future human exploration of the solar system, the effects of acute and increased background radiation on astronaut skeletal health are important areas of study in order to prevent osteopenic deterioration and, ultimately, skeletal fracture. This dissertation addresses how spaceflight-relevant radiation affects bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties in the cancellous-rich vertebrae and compares results to that of mechanical unloading. In addition, a period of re-ambulation is used to test whether animals recover skeletal tissue after irradiation. Whether radiation exposure displays synergism with mechanical unloading is further investigated. Finite element structural and statistical analyses are used to investigate how changes in architecture affect mechanical stress within the vertebra and to interpret the mechanical testing results. In this dissertation, ground-based models provide evidence that ionizing radiation, both highly energetic gamma-rays and charged iron ions, resulted in a persistent loss of cancellous

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung malignancies: preliminary toxicity results using a flattening filter-free linear accelerator operating at 2400 monitor units per minute

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators (linacs) are capable of delivering dose rates more than 4-times higher than conventional linacs during SBRT treatments, causing some to speculate whether the higher dose rate leads to increased toxicity owing to radiobiological dose rate effects. Despite wide clinical use of this emerging technology, clinical toxicity data for FFF SBRT are lacking. In this retrospective study, we report the acute and late toxicities observed in our lung radiosurgery experience using a FFF linac operating at 2400 MU/min. Methods We reviewed all flattening filter-free (FFF) lung SBRT cases treated at our institution from August 2010 through July 2012. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had at least one clinical assessment at least 30 days following SBRT. Pulmonary, cardiac, dermatologic, neurologic, and gastrointestinal treatment related toxicities were scored according to CTCAE version 4.0. Toxicity observed within 90 days of SBRT was categorized as acute, whereas toxicity observed more than 90 days from SBRT was categorized as late. Factors thought to influence risk of toxicity were examined to assess relationship to grade > =2 toxicity. Results Sixty-four patients with >30 day follow up were eligible for inclusion. All patients were treated using 10 MV unflattened photons beams with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse planning. Median SBRT dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range: 30–60 Gy in 3–5 fractions). Six patients (9%) experienced > = grade 2 acute pulmonary toxicity; no non-pulmonary acute toxicities were observed. In a subset of 49 patients with greater than 90 day follow up (median 11.5 months), 11 pulmonary and three nerve related grade > =2 late toxicities were recorded. Pulmonary toxicities comprised six grade 2, three grade 3, and one each grade 4 and 5 events. Nerve related events were rare and included two cases of grade 2 chest wall pain and one grade 3

  9. Overexpression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice does not prevent unloading-induced atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Booth, F. W.; DeMayo, F.; Schwartz, R. J.; Gordon, S. E.; Fiorotto, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the association between local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) overexpression and atrophy in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that endogenous skeletal muscle IGF-I mRNA expression would decrease with hindlimb unloading (HU) in mice, and that transgenic mice overexpressing human IGF-I (hIGF-I) specifically in skeletal muscle would exhibit less atrophy after HU. Male transgenic mice and nontransgenic mice from the parent strain (FVB) were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): 1) transgenic, weight-bearing (IGF-I/WB); 2) transgenic, hindlimb unloaded (IGF-I/HU); 3) nontransgenic, weight-bearing (FVB/WB); and 4) nontransgenic, hindlimb unloaded (FVB/HU). HU groups were hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Body mass was reduced (P < 0.05) after HU in both IGF-I (-9%) and FVB mice (-13%). Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the relative abundance of mRNA for the endogenous rodent IGF-I (rIGF-I) was unaltered by HU in the gastrocnemius (GAST) muscle of wild-type FVB mice. High-level expression of hIGF-I peptide and mRNA was confirmed in the GAST and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of the transgenic mice. Nevertheless, masses of the GAST and TA muscles were reduced (P < 0.05) in both FVB/HU and IGF-I/HU groups compared with FVB/WB and IGF-I/WB groups, respectively, and the percent atrophy in mass of these muscles did not differ between FVB and IGF-I mice. Therefore, skeletal muscle atrophy may not be associated with a reduction of endogenous rIGF-I mRNA level in 14-day HU mice. We conclude that high local expression of hIGF-I mRNA and peptide in skeletal muscle alone cannot attenuate unloading-induced atrophy of fast-twitch muscle in mice.

  10. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  11. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Lithosphere stress changes due to groundwater unloading in North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yajin; Zhang, Huai; Shi, Yaolin

    2015-04-01

    During the past 50 years, excessive groundwater pumping has led to the continuous decline of groundwater table in North China Plain, which becomes one of the global hotspots of groundwater depletion. Over most of the rural areas of the plain, the shallow aquifer has experienced a water-table decline of more than 15m, with greater declines up to 50m in most urban centres, such as Beijing, Tangshan, Shijiangzhuang and so forth in 1960-2000. The entire groundwater depletion area covers a total area of approximately 56,273 km2 , more than 40% of the North China Plain. The vast area of enormous groundwater exploitation in North China Plain will definitely unload the lithosphere and create stress perturbations, the problem is if the stresses change large enough to affect tectonic activities. In this essay, we set up a 3 dimensional numerical visco-elastic model to discuss the effect of groundwater over-pumping on the lithosphere deformation and stress state in North China Plain. Based on the records of total groundwater-table decline during 1960-2010 in North China Plain, we estimate the accumulated deformation and lithosphere stress due to unloading of human-induced groundwater depletion. The area in the model ranges from 34° To 42°N, and 112° To 119°E, including the major groundwater depression cones in North China Plain. According to the simulating result, the maximum surface vertical uplift caused by groundwater unloading is 8cm. Meanwhile cumulative horizontal crustal stress changes near the surface goes up to 100kPa, and up to 40kPa at 15km depth where most earthquakes occurred in this area. The tectonic compressive stress rate is about 0.25kPa per year. Therefore, the stress changes due to groundwater pumping is significant compared with the tectonic driven stress changes. As China developed rapidly since 1978, the groundwater table mainly declined after 1978. Taking the earthquake catalog in the vicinity of groundwater depression zone into consideration, we

  14. Rat soleus muscle satellite cells during the recovery after gravitational unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtikova, Olga; Shenkman, Boris; Altaeva, Erzhena; Leinsoo, Toomas

    In this study the attempt was made to assess alterations of rat soleus satellite cell (SC) population during muscle regrowth after 14-day gravitational unloading (using the hindlimb suspension model). Myofiber size increases during the recovery period. SCs are supposed to participate in muscle growth by fusion with myofibers and supplying them with new myonuclei [Mitchell PO, Pavlath GK, 2001; Oishi Y., 2008]. Other points of view are known about SC participation in the recovery of atrophied muscle mass during the readaptation period [Bruusgaard J.C. et al., 2011; Jackson JR et al., 2012]. After 2 weeks of hindlimb suspension mki67 expression was fivefold lower as compared to control animals and increased gradually up to 28 times by the day 7 of reloading. Cdh15 was decreased after hindlimb unloading and rose from the 1st day of reloading. The expression reached control level to the day 7th of reloading. Cellular response was going on concurrently with the spike of IGF-1 blood level and the increase in muscle IGF-1 concentration. It is possible that in the early days of reloading period differentiation and fusion of satellite cells which were active by the end of hindlimb suspension occurred. Satellite cell incorporation was assessed by counting the amount of BrdU+ myonuclei under myofiber dystrophin layer. It came more intensively in the 1st day of readaptation. It is in accordance with the 4,5 time increase in myogenin expression as compared to hindlimb suspended animals detected at the same time point. Myogenin expression 3 fold decreased by 3rd day of readaptation. We observed only the tendency of resizing but no significant changes in in myonuclear domain size. The number of myonuclei per myofiber cross section was decreased after hindlimb suspension and was not restored by the day 14th of readaptation. Cdh15 and myogenin expression at some extent stabilized after 7 days of readaptation, but high mki67 level pointed to intensive proliferation, which could

  15. Effects of Hind Limb Unloading on Pharmacokinetics of Procainamide in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Semyon A.; Dasgupta, Amitava; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.; Risin, Diana

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of medications administered to astronauts could be altered by the conditions in space. It is prudent to expect that low gravity and free floating (and associated hemodynamic changes) could affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of the drugs. Knowledge of these alterations is essential for adjusting the dosage and the regimen of drug administration. Among the medications of special interest are the cardiovascular drugs, especially the antiarrhythmic agents. In this study we used hind limb unloaded (HLU) mice as a model to investigate possible changes in the PK of a common antiarrhythmic drug procainamide (PA). Prior to drug administration the experimental animals were tail suspended for 24 hours and the control animals were kept free. PA (150-250 mg per kg) was given orally by a gavage procedure. After that the experimental mice were kept suspended for additional 1, 2, 3 and 6 hours. At these time points the serum concentration of PA and N-acetyl-procainamide (NAPA), an active metabolite which is formed by N-acetyltransferase in the liver, were measured by the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on the AxSYM autoanalyzer (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL). The serum level of PA in HLU mice at 1 hour after administration was almost 40% lower than in controls. At 2-3 hours the difference still maintained, however, it was not statistically significant; at 6 hours no difference was detected. The level of NAPA in HLU mice was slightly lower at 1 and 2 hours but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The estimated PA half-life time in HLU mice was almost 55% longer than in control animals. These results confirm that hind limb unloading and related hemodynamic changes significantly alter the PK of PA. The effects are most likely primarily associated with a decrease in the drug absorption, especially within the first two hours after administration. At the same time prolongation of the PA half

  16. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  17. Programmed administration of parathyroid hormone increases bone formation and reduces bone loss in hindlimb-unloaded ovariectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Cavolina, J. M.; Halloran, B.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1998-01-01

    Gonadal insufficiency and reduced mechanical usage are two important risk factors for osteoporosis. The beneficial effects of PTH therapy to reverse the estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in the laboratory rat are well known, but the influence of mechanical usage in this response has not been established. In this study, the effects of programed administration of PTH on cancellous bone volume and turnover at the proximal tibial metaphysis were determined in hindlimb-unloaded, ovariectomized (OVX), 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats. PTH was administered to weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats with osmotic pumps programed to deliver 20 microg human PTH (approximately 80 microg/kg x day) during a daily 1-h infusion for 7 days. Compared with sham-operated rats, OVX increased longitudinal and radial bone growth, increased indexes of cancellous bone turnover, and resulted in net resorption of cancellous bone. Hindlimb unloading of OVX rats decreased longitudinal and radial bone growth, decreased osteoblast number, increased osteoclast number, and resulted in a further decrease in cancellous bone volume compared with those in weight-bearing OVX rats. Programed administration of PTH had no effect on either radial or longitudinal bone growth in weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats. PTH treatment had dramatic effects on selected cancellous bone measurements; PTH maintained cancellous bone volume in OVX weight-bearing rats and greatly reduced cancellous bone loss in OVX hindlimb-unloaded rats. In the latter animals, PTH treatment prevented the hindlimb unloading-induced reduction in trabecular thickness, but the hormone was ineffective in preventing either the increase in osteoclast number or the loss of trabecular plates. Importantly, PTH treatment increased the retention of a baseline flurochrome label, osteoblast number, and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis regardless of the level of mechanical usage. These findings demonstrate that

  18. The Effects of Ligustrazine on the Ca2+ Concentration of Soleus and Gastrocnemius Muscle Fibers in Hindlimb Unloaded Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunfang; Goswami, Nandu; Du, Bei; Hu, Huanxin; Wu, Xue

    Background:Spaceflight or inactivity (bed rest, limb immobilization, hindlimb unloading) causes skeletal muscle atrophy. Recent studies show that an increase in protein degradation is an important mechanism for disuse atrophy. Furthermore, the calcium overload of disuse-atrophied muscle fiber has been shown to initiate the skeletal muscle proteolysis in disuse atrophy. Ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP), one of the important active ingredient extracted from Chuanxiong, has been shown by our group to increase muscle fiber cross-sectional area in atrophied soleus induced by 14 days hindlimb unloading. However, the underlying mechanisms of ligustrazine effects on disuse-atrophied muscle fibers remain unknown. Objective: We investigated the effects of ligustrazine on the cytoplasmic calcium overloading in soleus and gastrocnemius in 14 days hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats. Methods: Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to three groups (n=8, each group): 1) synchronous control (CON); HU + intragastric water instillation (HU+W); HU + intragastric 60.0 mg kg-1 ligustrazine instillation (HU+Tmp). Laser scanning confocal microscope assessed the concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium ions. Spaceflight disuse atrophy was simulated by hindlimb unloading, provided by tail suspension. Results: 1) Compared with CON, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 330% and 86% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 130%(P<0.01). 2) Compared with CON, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 189.8% and 32.1% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 119.3% (P<0.01). Conclusion: After 14 days of hindlimb unloading, cytoplasmic calcium of soleus (slow-twitch muscle) and gastrocnemius (fast

  19. Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-3) Range Biases and Momentum Unload Modeling for Terra (EOS-AMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) reports its performance in meeting Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) predicted ephemeris accuracy requirements with TDRS-3. The Terra (Earth Observing System AM-1) satellite has 3-sigma TDRS requirements of 75 m for total position accuracy predicted over one day onboard. The study sample includes selected cases over 21 months after Guam Remote Ground Terminal (GRGT) support started in June 1998. For daily solutions with a 1.5-day prediction span, predicted results of the study were below the Terra requirement by at least 12 m. Refined range bias estimation and modeled momentum unloads are needed to meet Terra's requirements for TDRS-3. Maintained at 275 W longitude over the zone of exclusion, TDRS-3 is analyzed separately from other TDRSs because of its unique tracking data. Only the Bilateration Ranging Transponder (BRT) at Alice Springs (ALS), Australia, and the Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C) system at Guam are used for routine operational tracking data for TDRS-3. Simultaneous batch orbit solutions with three TDRSs and either the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) or Terra were done with the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) to periodically refine the TT&C and BRT System (BRTS) range biases. As new biases were determined, significant changes were made in estimating the absolute position. FDF achieved similar results using a sequential filter with all operational TDRSs and four user satellites. Definitive accuracy (3-sigma) is expected to be below 50 m. The White Sands Complex (WSC) performs momentum unloads to maintain three-axis stabilized attitude of TDRSs. The relationship between velocity changes (delta-V) and reaction wheel speed changes was empirically determined for roll/yaw unloads. A theoretical relationship was verified and used for pitch unloads. Modeling both pitch and roll/yaw momentum unloads is necessary to meet the 75-m requirement. Moving the orbit solution epoch an hour before a

  20. Prospects for Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Accelerator technology today is a greater than US$5 billion per annum business. Development of higher-performance technology with improved reliability that delivers reduced system size and life cycle cost is expected to significantly increase the total accelerator technology market and open up new application sales. Potential future directions are identified and pitfalls in new market penetration are considered. Both of the present big market segments, medical radiation therapy units and semiconductor ion implanters, are approaching the "maturity" phase of their product cycles, where incremental development rather than paradigm shifts is the norm, but they should continue to dominate commercial sales for some time. It is anticipated that large discovery-science accelerators will continue to provide a specialty market beset by the unpredictable cycles resulting from the scale of the projects themselves, coupled with external political and economic drivers. Although fraught with differing market entry difficulties, the security and environmental markets, together with new, as yet unrealized, industrial material processing applications, are expected to provide the bulk of future commercial accelerator technology growth.

  1. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  2. Investigation of countermeasure for unloading-related muscle plasticity: role of heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, A.; Akema, T.; Sugiura, T.; Yamada, S.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    We have been studying the mechanisms responsible for unloading- or loading-related muscle plasticity. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of heat stress on the growth of mammalian skeletal muscles in vivo. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were divided into two groups: control (n = 24) and heat stress (n = 24). Rats of heat stressed group were exposed to environmental heat stress (41°C for 60 min) in a heat chamber without anesthesia. The soleus muscles were dissected 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after the heat exposure. The wet weights of muscle relative to body weights in heat stressed group were significantly higher than control group 7 days after the exposure (p<0.05). The relative proportion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the cell proliferation, were increased 1 day after heating (p<0.05). Pax7-positive nuclei, that are indicators for the muscle satellite cells, were also increased 3 day after heat exposure. The expression of phosphorylated p70 S6 kinase was increased 1 day following heat exposure. These results suggest that heat stress could promote cell proliferation, activate satellite cells, and induce muscular hypertrophy.

  3. Aquaporins and unloading of phloem-imported water in coats of developing bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Setz, Nathan; Niemietz, Christa; Qu, Hongxia; Offler, Christina E; Tyerman, Stephen D; Patrick, John W

    2007-12-01

    Nutrients are imported into developing legume seeds by mass flow through the phloem, and reach developing embryos following secretion from their symplasmically isolated coats. To sustain homeostasis of seed coat water relations, phloem-delivered nutrients and water must exit seed coats at rates commensurate with those of import through the phloem. In this context, coats of developing French bean seeds were screened for expression of aquaporin genes resulting in cloning PvPIP1;1, PvPIP2;2 and PvPIP2;3. These genes were differentially expressed in all vegetative organs, but exhibited their strongest expression in seed coats. In seed coats, expression was localized to cells of the nutrient-unloading pathway. Transport properties of the PvPIPs were characterized by expression in Xenopus oocytes. Only PvPIP2;3 showed significant water channel activity (Pos = 150-200 microm s(-1)) even when the plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were co-expressed in various combinations. Permeability increases to glycerol, methylamine and urea were not detected in oocytes expressing PvPIPs. Transport active aquaporins in native plasma membranes of seed coats were demonstrated by measuring rates of osmotic shrinkage of membrane vesicles in the presence and absence of mercuric chloride and silver nitrate. The functional significance of aquaporins in nutrient and water transport in developing seeds is discussed. PMID:17927694

  4. Effects of inorganic phosphate analogues on stiffness and unloaded shortening of skinned muscle fibres from rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Martyn, D A; Kushmerick, M J; Gordon, A M

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the effects of aluminofluoride (AlFx) and orthovanadate (Vi), tightly binding analogues of orthophosphate (Pi), on the mechanical properties of glycerinated fibres from rabbit psoas muscle. Maximum Ca(2+)-activated force, stiffness, and unloaded shortening velocity (Vus) were measured under conditions of steady-state inhibition (up to 1 mM of inhibitor) and during the recovery from inhibition. 2. Stiffness was measured using either step or sinusoidal (1 kHz) changes in fibre length. Sarcomere length was monitored continuously by helium-neon laser diffraction during maximum Ca2+ activation. Stiffness was determined from the changes in sarcomere length and the corresponding changes in force. Vus was measured using the slack test method. 3. AlF chi and Vi each reversibly inhibited force, stiffness and Vus. Actively cycling cross-bridges were required for reversal of these inhibitory effects. Recovery from inhibition by AlF chi was 3- to 4-fold slower than that following removal of V1. 4. At various degrees of inhibition, AlF chi and Vi both inhibited steady-state isometric force more than either Vus or stiffness. For both AlF chi and Vi, the relatively greater inhibition of force over stiffness persisted during recovery from steady-state inhibition. We interpret these results to indicate that the cross-bridges with AlF chi or Vi bound are analogous to those which occur early in the cross-bridge cycle. PMID:8487194

  5. MutSα maintains the mismatch repair capability by inhibiting PCNA unloading

    PubMed Central

    Kawasoe, Yoshitaka; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Takuro; Masukata, Hisao; Takahashi, Tatsuro S

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mismatch repair (MMR) utilizes single-strand breaks as signals to target the strand to be repaired. DNA-bound PCNA is also presumed to direct MMR. The MMR capability must be limited to a post-replicative temporal window during which the signals are available. However, both identity of the signal(s) involved in the retention of this temporal window and the mechanism that maintains the MMR capability after DNA synthesis remain unclear. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we discovered a mechanism that ensures long-term retention of the MMR capability. We show that DNA-bound PCNA induces strand-specific MMR in the absence of strand discontinuities. Strikingly, MutSα inhibited PCNA unloading through its PCNA-interacting motif, thereby extending significantly the temporal window permissive to strand-specific MMR. Our data identify DNA-bound PCNA as the signal that enables strand discrimination after the disappearance of strand discontinuities, and uncover a novel role of MutSα in the retention of the post-replicative MMR capability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15155.001 PMID:27402201

  6. Altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor input following hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Schadt, J. C.; Hasser, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on central nervous system processing of baroreceptor afferent activity was evaluated following 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU). Inactin-anesthetized rats were instrumented with catheters, renal sympathetic nerve electrodes, and aortic depressor nerve electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and aortic depressor nerve activity (ADNA). Baroreceptor and baroreflex functions were assessed during infusion of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Central processing of baroreceptor afferent input was evaluated by linear regression relating RSNA to ADNA. The maximum baroreflex-elicited increase in RSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (122 +/- 3.8 vs. 144 +/- 4.9% of baseline RSNA), whereas ADNA was not altered. The slope (-0.18 +/- 0.04 vs. -0.40 +/- 0.04) and y-intercept (121 +/- 3.2 vs. 146 +/- 4.3) of the linear regression relating increases in efferent RSNA to decreases in afferent ADNA during hypotension were significantly reduced in HU rats. There were no differences during increases in arterial pressure. Results demonstrate that the attenuation in baroreflex-mediated increases in RSNA following HU is due to changes in central processing of baroreceptor afferent information rather than aortic baroreceptor function.

  7. Review of spaceflight and hindlimb suspension unloading induced sarcomere damage and repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Thompson, J. L.; Krippendorf, B. B.; Slocum, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) and spaceflight microgravity induce atrophy of the slow adductor longus muscle fibers which, following reloading, exhibit eccentric contraction (EC)-like lesions (abnormal widening of sarcomeres with A band disruption and excessively wavy, extracted Z lines). These lesions are similar morphologically to those produced in normal muscles after strenuous eccentric exercise. It appears that atrophic muscles exhibit increased susceptibility to eccentric damage because lesions are produced during nonstressful voluntary movements upon return to weightbearing. The EC-like lesions are absent in the unweighted conditions, but appear in HSU rats 15-60 minutes after reloading and in space-flown rates about 4 hrs after landing. By 12 hours, many EC-like lesioned sarcomeres are fully covered by longitudinal patches of Z line-like material which increases in density by 48 hours, producing the so-called "Z line streaming" morphology. In this case, Z line streaming is indicative of rapid repair of damaged sarcomeres rather than the onset of sarcomere breakdown. Immunoelectron microscopy is necessary to determine the composition of this dense material. By 9 days of reloading at 1 gravity, sarcomeres have regained normal structure, except for very rare persistence of faint Z patches. The morphological data indicate that Z patches serve at least two functions: 1) to permit contractile force to be transmitted across the damaged sarcomeres and 2) to provide a scaffold upon which sarcomeres are reconstructed in an active functional muscle.

  8. Quantifiable patterns of limb loading and unloading during hemiparetic gait: Relation to kinetic and kinematic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Bhavana; Neptune, Richard R.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Persons with poststroke hemiparesis are characterized by asymmetry in limb loading (LL) and limb unloading (LU), which has been reported in static and quasi-static tasks but has not been quantified during walking. The purpose of this study was to determine the asymmetry in magnitude and duration of LL and LU in individuals with hemiparesis and its relationship with functional walking status and specific kinematic and kinetic variables during walking. Forty-four participants with chronic hemiparesis walked at their self-selected speeds and eighteen nondisabled control subjects of similar ages walked at predetermined matched speeds while three-dimensional ground reaction forces and body-segment kinematics were recorded. Magnitude of paretic LL was reduced, while duration was increased compared with the nonparetic leg and nondisabled controls walking at matched speeds. The paretic LL and LU was significantly correlated with average leg angle, while the nonparetic leg significantly correlated with average knee angle. Three different patterns of LL and LU were identified (concave, convex, and linear). Individuals with hemiparesis make several biomechanical adjustments that minimize LL of the paretic leg. LL deviations were more pronounced with increased lateral placement of the paretic foot and with decreased functional gait speed. Characterization of these deviations may inspire new strategies for rehabilitation. PMID:23408212

  9. Swimming Activity Prevents the Unloading Induced Loss of Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Falcai, Maurício J.; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; de Sousa Neto, Manoel Damião; Volpon, Jose B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether swimming activity associated with a three-week period of hypoactivity could prevent the deleterious effects of disuse on the tibias of tail-suspended rats. Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (HS) permanently hindlimb suspension rats; (HS + Swim) rats submitted to unloading interrupted by swimming exercise; (HS + WB) hindlimb suspension rats with interruption for regular weight bearing for the same length of time as the HS+Swim rats; (Control) control rats that were allowed regular cage activities; and (Control + Swim) control rats that underwent swimming exercise. At the end of the experiment, bone mineral density, bone strength, and trabecular quantification were analyzed. The hindlimb-suspended rats exhibited bone quality loss (significant decrease in BMD, bone strength, and deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone architecture; decrease in BV/TV, TbN, TbTh, ConnD, CtV, and CtTh; and increase in TbSp) when compared to control rats. In contrast, trained rats showed a significant increase of 43% in bone mass, 29% in bone strength, 58% in trabecular thickness, 85% in bone volume, 27% in trabeculae number, and 30% in cortical volume, when compared to the hindlimb-suspended rats. We conclude that swimming activity not only ameliorates but also fully prevents the deleterious effects on bone quality in osteopenic rats. PMID:26090414

  10. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  11. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  12. Patterns of global gene expression in rat skeletal muscle during unloading and low-intensity ambulatory activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Lionel; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Hamilton, Marc T.

    2003-01-01

    Physical inactivity and unloading lead to diverse skeletal muscle alterations. Our goal was to identify the genes in skeletal muscle whose expression is most sensitive to periods of unloading/reduced physical activity and that may be involved in triggering initial responses before phenotypic changes are evident. The ability of short periods of physical activity/loading as an effective countermeasure against changes in gene expression mediated by inactivity was also tested. Affymetrix microarrays were used to compare mRNA levels in the soleus muscle under three experimental treatments (n = 20-29 rats each): 12-h hindlimb unloading (HU), 12-h HU followed by 4 h of intermittent low-intensity ambulatory and postural activity (4-h reloading), and control (with ambulatory and postural activity). Using a combination of criteria, we identified a small set of genes (approximately 1% of 8,738 genes on the array or 4% of significant expressed genes) with the most reproducible and largest responses to altered activity. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation of transcription for a large number of key signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in protein synthesis/degradation and energy metabolism. Most (21 of 25) of the gene expression changes that were downregulated during HU returned at least to control levels during the reloading. In surprising contrast, 27 of 38 of the genes upregulated during HU remained significantly above control, but most showed trends toward reversal. This introduces a new concept that, in general, genes that are upregulated during unloading/inactivity will be more resistant to periodic reloading than those genes that are downregulated. This study reveals genes that are the most sensitive to loading/activity in rat skeletal muscle and indicates new targets that may initiate muscle alterations during inactivity.

  13. Menopause accelerates biological aging.

    PubMed

    Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Chen, Brian H; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D J; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Horvath, Steve

    2016-08-16

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the "epigenetic clock"), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  14. Climate effects on volcanism: influence on magmatic systems of loading and unloading from ice mass variations, with examples from Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Pinel, Virginie; Lund, Björn; Albino, Fabien; Pagli, Carolina; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2010-05-28

    Pressure influences both magma production and the failure of magma chambers. Changes in pressure interact with the local tectonic settings and can affect magmatic activity. Present-day reduction in ice load on subglacial volcanoes due to global warming is modifying pressure conditions in magmatic systems. The large pulse in volcanic production at the end of the last glaciation in Iceland suggests a link between unloading and volcanism, and models of that process can help to evaluate future scenarios. A viscoelastic model of glacio-isostatic adjustment that considers melt generation demonstrates how surface unloading may lead to a pulse in magmatic activity. Iceland's ice caps have been thinning since 1890 and glacial rebound at rates exceeding 20 mm yr(-1) is ongoing. Modelling predicts a significant amount of 'additional' magma generation under Iceland due to ice retreat. The unloading also influences stress conditions in shallow magma chambers, modifying their failure conditions in a manner that depends critically on ice retreat, the shape and depth of magma chambers as well as the compressibility of the magma. An annual cycle of land elevation in Iceland, due to seasonal variation of ice mass, indicates an annual modulation of failure conditions in subglacial magma chambers. PMID:20403840

  15. Expression of IGF-I and Protein Degradation Markers During Hindlimb Unloading and Growth Hormone Administration in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinsoo, T. A.; Turtikova, O. V.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2013-02-01

    It is known that hindlimb unloading or spaceflight produce atrophy and a number of phenotypic alterations in skeletal muscles. Many of these processes are triggered by the axis growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I. However growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) expression relationship in rodent models of gravitational unloading is weakly investigated. We supposed the IGF-I is involved in regulation of protein turnover. In this study we examined the IGF-I expression by RT-PCR assay in the rat soleus, tibialis anterior and liver after 3 day of hindlimb suspension with growth hormone administration. Simultaneously were studied expression levels of MuRF-1 and MAFbx/atrogin as a key markers of intracellular proteolysis. We demonstrated that GH administration did not prevent IGF-I expression decreasing under the conditions of simulated weightlessness. It was concluded there are separate mechanisms of action of GH and IGF-I on protein metabolism in skeletal muscles. Gravitational unloading activate proteolysis independently of growth hormone activity.

  16. High-Pressure Quasi-Isentropic Loading and Unloading of Interferometer Windows on the Veloce Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James; Knudson, Marcus; Davis, Jean-Paul

    2007-06-01

    The Isentropic Compression Experiment technique has proven to be a valuable complement to the well-established method of shock compression of condensed matter. However, whereas the high-pressure compression response of window materials has been studied extensively under shock loading, similar knowledge of these materials under ICE loading is limited. We present recent experimental results on the isentropic compression of the high-pressure windows sapphire and LiF. It has previously been observed that c-cut sapphire yields under shock loading at the HEL of ˜15-18GPa, and subsequently loses transparency at higher stresses. However, it will be shown that under isentropic ramp wave loading sapphire appears to remain elastic and transparent at stresses well above 20GPa [D.B. Hayes et al, JAP 94, 2331 (2003)]. LiF is another frequently used window material in isentropic loading and unloading experiments, yet the unloading response of LiF is usually neglected. Research is in progress to measure strength properties of LiF for ramp loading and unloading. It will be shown how the strength of LiF may influence wave profile analysis and thus inferred material strength. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE's NNSA under Contract No.DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Effect of anti-osteoporotic agents on the prevention of bone loss in unloaded bone.

    PubMed

    Siu, Wing Sum; Ko, Chun Hay; Hung, Leung Kim; Lau, Ching Po; Lau, Clara Bik San; Fung, Kwok Pui; Leung, Ping Chung

    2013-10-01

    Pharmaceutical countermeasures to treat disuse osteoporosis are rarely studied. Pharmaceutical studies for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis depend on the ovariectomized rat model, which is a suitable model for the disease in women. Disuse osteoporosis affects men and women, but there is lack of awareness and relevant pharmaceutical studies for this condition. The objectives of this study were to verify the validity of an unusual tail-suspension rat model in the induction of disuse osteoporosis and subsequent pharmaceutical treatments. This model was created by unloading the hind limbs of the rats in order to create a state of weightlessness in their hindlimb bones. Validation of the model was performed with non-suspended rats. This study included five groups of suspended rats fed with different agents, such as distilled water (control), high-, medium- and low-dose raloxifene and a bisphosphonate (alendronate). The experiment lasted for 28 days. Comparisons were made between the suspended control and treatment groups. Ovariectomized and sham‑operated rats were also included as a reference for bone changes during osteoporosis. Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) at the distal femur and proximal tibia, microarchitecture at the distal femur and biomechanical strength at the diaphyseal femur were studied. Reduction of BMD and deterioration of trabeculae were similar between the suspended control and ovariectomized rats. Loss of BMD induced by tail suspension was reduced most effectively by medium-dose raloxifene. Deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture was also prevented by raloxifene. The tail-suspension rat model is suitable for the study of disuse osteoporosis under the effects of various therapeutic agents. The preventive effects of raloxifene against bone loss under disuse conditions have been demonstrated using this model. PMID:23970373

  18. Left ventricular volume unloading with axial and centrifugal rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Axial (AX) and centrifugal (CFG) rotary blood pumps have gained clinical acceptance for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Differences between AX and CFG designs and mechanism of blood flow delivery may offer clinical advantages. In this study, pump characteristics, and acute physiologic responses during support with AX (HeartMate II) and CFG (HVAD) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) were investigated in mock loop and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models. In the mock loop model, pump performance was characterized over a range of pump speeds (HeartMate II: 7,000-11,000 rpm, HVAD: 2,000-3,600 rpm) and fluid viscosities (2.7 cP, 3.2 cP, 3.7 cP). In the ischemic heart failure bovine model, hemodynamics, echocardiography, and end-organ perfusion were investigated. CFG LVAD had a flatter HQ curve, required less power, and had a more linear flow estimation relation than AX LVAD. The flow estimation error for the AX LVAD (±0.9 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.7 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.8 L/min at 3.7 cP) was higher than the CFG LVAD (±0.5 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.2 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.5 L/min at 3.7 cP). No differences in acute hemodynamics, echocardiography, or end-organ perfusion between AX and CFG LVAD over a wide range of support were statistically discernible. These findings suggest no pronounced acute differences in LV volume unloading between AX and CFG LVAD. PMID:25635936

  19. Effects of Loading or Unloading on the Regenerative Potential of Injured Skeletal Muscle in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Katsumasa; Matsuba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Sugiura, Takao; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada

    2008-06-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the influence of unloading on the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscle. Male mice (C57BL/6J), aged 8 weeks, were randomly divided into 4 groups; normal cage control (CC), cardiotoxin (CTX)-injected (CX), hindlimb suspended (HS), and HS+CX (SX) groups. HS, as the preconditioning, was performed for 2 weeks in group HS and SX. The animals in group CC and CX were maintained in 1-G environment. And then, CTX was injected into soleus muscles bilaterally in CX and SX groups. HS was continued for additional 6 weeks in group HS and SX. Soleus muscles were dissected after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Wet weight and protein content of soleus in group CX decreased, but recovered to the level of group CC after 6 weeks. Atrophy, caused by 2-week HS, in group HS and SX was maintained throughout the experimental period. The numbers of satellite cells in HS and SX groups after 2, 4, and 6 weeks were lower than those in group CC. The number of satellite cells in CX group was increased by the CTX-injection compared with group CC. On the other hand, satellite cell number in CTX-injected group SX after 2, 4, and 6 weeks were lower than that in group HS. Percentage of fibers with central nuclei, relative to the total muscle fibers, in HS and SX groups at week 6 was higher than that in group CC. That in group CX was also increased at 2nd and 4th week, but was lowered toward the control level after 6 week. It was suggested that loading plays a key role for the activation of the regenerating potential of injured skeletal muscle.

  20. Costamere remodeling with muscle loading and unloading in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruowei; Narici, Marco V; Erskine, Robert M; Seynnes, Olivier R; Rittweger, Jörn; Pišot, Rado; Šimunič, Boštjan; Flück, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Costameres are mechano-sensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that provide a structural anchor for myofibrils. Their turnover is regulated by integrin-associated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). We hypothesized that changes in content of costamere components (beta 1 integrin, FAK, meta-vinculin, gamma-vinculin) with increased and reduced loading of human anti-gravity muscle would: (i) relate to changes in muscle size and molecular parameters of muscle size regulation [p70S6K, myosin heavy chain (MHC)1 and MHCIIA]; (ii) correspond to adjustments in activity and expression of FAK, and its negative regulator, FRNK; and (iii) reflect the temporal response to reduced and increased loading. Unloading induced a progressive decline in thickness of human vastus lateralis muscle after 8 and 34 days of bedrest (-4% and -14%, respectively; n = 9), contrasting the increase in muscle thickness after 10 and 27 days of resistance training (+5% and +13%; n = 6). Changes in muscle thickness were correlated with changes in cross-sectional area of type I muscle fibers (r = 0.66) and beta 1 integrin content (r = 0.76) at the mid-point of altered loading. Changes in meta-vinculin and FAK-pY397 content were correlated (r = 0.85) and differed, together with the changes of beta 1 integrin, MHCI, MHCII and p70S6K, between the mid- and end-point of resistance training. By contrast, costamere protein level changes did not differ between time points of bedrest. The findings emphasize the role of FAK-regulated costamere turnover in the load-dependent addition and removal of myofibrils, and argue for two phases of muscle remodeling with resistance training, which do not manifest at the macroscopic level. PMID:24010829

  1. Effects of gravitational unloading on activity of motoneurones of m. soleus in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, Albina; Shigueva, Tatiana; Tomilovskaya, Elena

    The aim of recent work was to study of participation of spinal and supraspinal structures (motor cortex) in the development of hypogravitational hyperreflexia of stretch reflexes observed under weightlessness (Kozlovskaya I.B. et. al., 1981; Reschke M.F. et al., 1984; Saenko I.V., 2007). Methods. 11 healthy volunteers took part in the research. Dry immersion (DI) with the duration of 3 and 5 days was used as onground model of weightlessness. Before and after DI thresholds and amplitudes of m. soleus H-reflex; as well as thresholds and amplitudes of m. soleus motor potentials (MEPs) evoked by magnetic stimulation of spinal roots at L5-S1 segments and cortex motor zones were defined. Results. Exposure to DI was accompanied with significant decrease of the H-reflex threshold by 23.8±8.2%, and with an increase of the relative H-reflex amplitudes by 12.89±8.3% in comparison with background. At the same time thresholds of spinal MEPs were reduced by 5% as well as and their amplitudes were increased significantly by 13.8±4.2%. The obtained data indicate an increase of motoneurones pool’s excitability of m. soleus under gravitational unloading conditions. At the same time after DI exposure a tendency to increase of thresholds of cortical MEPs was observed by 11.7±6.8% from background, and their amplitudes didn’t change in comparison with background, which gives evidence of a non-changed excitability of the motor cortex structures. In general the results of the experiments indicate the spinal nature of the hypogravitational hyperreflexia. The work was supported by RFBR projects NN 13-04-12091 Ofi-m and 11-04-01240-а.

  2. Effect of ramp configuration on easiness of handling, heart rate, and behavior of near-market weight pigs at unloading.

    PubMed

    Goumon, S; Faucitano, L; Bergeron, R; Crowe, T; Connor, M L; Gonyou, H W

    2013-08-01

    Three experiments, each using 280 pigs, were conducted in a simulated compartment to test the effect of angle of entrance (AOE) to the ramp (90°, 60°, 30°, or 0°), ramp slope (0°, 16°, 21°, or 26°), and an initial 20-cm step associated with 16° or 21° ramp slopes on the ease of handling, heart rate (HR), and behavior of near market-weight pigs during unloading. Heart rate (pigs and handler), unloading time, interventions of the handler, and reactions of the pigs were monitored. The results of the first experiment show that using a 90° AOE had detrimental effects on ease of handling (P < 0.05), HR of the pig (P < 0.05), and behavior (P < 0.05). The 0° and 30° AOE appeared to improve the ease of unloading, whereas the 60° AOE had an intermediate effect. The 30° AOE appeared to be preferable, because pigs moved at this angle balked less frequently (P < 0.01) and required less manipulation (P < 0.05) than pigs moved with a 0° AOE. The results of the second experiment show that the use of a flat ramp led to the easiest unloading, as demonstrated by the lower number of balks (P < 0.001) when pigs were moved to the ramp and less frequent use of paddle (P = 0.001) or voice (P < 0.001) on the ramp, compared with the other treatments. However, the flat ramp did not differ from the 21° ramp in many of the variables reflecting ease of handling, which may be explained by the difference in configuration between the ramps. The results also show that the use of the steepest ramp slope had the most detrimental effect on balking and backing up behavior of pigs (P < 0.001), and handling (touches, slaps, and pushes; P < 0.05 for all) when moved to the ramp and on unloading time (P < 0.01). No differences in pig HR (P < 0.05) and ease of handling on the ramp (P < 0.05) were found between a 26° and 16° ramp slope, suggesting that the length of the ramp may be one of the factors that make unloading more difficult. The results of the last experiment show that an initial

  3. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  4. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  5. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  6. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  7. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  8. Effects of Growth Hormone/IGF-I and Exercise on Unloaded Bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. S.; Arnaud, S. B.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in combination with exercise prevent muscle atrophy induced by unloading in the tail-suspension rat model for space flight (Gosselink et al, FASEB J 1994). This study evaluated the effects of these treatments on bone. Hypophysectomized rats were suspended (S) and treated with 1mg/kg/day CH plus IGF-I (H) or vehicle (Sal) daily by injection and exercised (Ex) by 3 climbs up a 1m ladder carrying a load equal to 30% the initial body weight (BW) 3x/day for 10 days. Tibial epiphysis (Epi) widths were measured by micrometry and femoral Bone Mineral Content (fBMC) in excised femurs by DEXA (Lunar DPX-L). Serum calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (Pi) were measured by COBAS Autoanalyzer (Roche Diag.). Ambulatory (Amb)-H treated rats showed growth rates of 6.6+-0.9 g/day, similar to S-H-Ex and higher than S-H (3.210.6, p less than 0.05) and S-Sal (-0.711.0, p less than 0.05). Epi widths were 10% lower in S-Sal, and S-Sal-Ex, and increased 100% in all H groups. fBMC was less in S than Amb, only when all S groups are compared to both Amb groups (p less than 0.03). H treatment increased fBMC (p less than 0.05) but reduced fBMC/100g BW in all H groups (p less than 0.001). The reduced density of H bone cannot be attributed to low circulating Ca. and Pi since they were higher in H than Sal (p less than 0.001). H treatment for 10 days in doses sufficient to support normal growth in BW failed to produce normal Epi widths or fBMC, even when combined with exercise. The suspension effect observed in Epi widths was not corrected by H or Ex alone, but was improved by H plus a This regimen. although effective in preventing muscle atrophy, failed to return bone measures, Epi widths and fBMC, to normal.

  9. Whole body and regional body composition changes following 10-day hypoxic confinement and unloading-inactivity.

    PubMed

    Debevec, Tadej; McDonnell, Adam C; Macdonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-03-01

    Future planetary habitats will expose inhabitants to both reduced gravity and hypoxia. This study investigated the effects of short-term unloading and normobaric hypoxia on whole body and regional body composition (BC). Eleven healthy, recreationally active, male participants with a mean (SD) age of 24 (2) years and body mass index of 22.4 (3.2) kg·m(-2) completed the following 3 10-day campaigns in a randomised, cross-over designed protocol: (i) hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB; FIO2 = 0.147 (0.008); PIO2 = 93.8 (0.9) mm Hg), (ii) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; FIO2 = 0.147 (0.008); PIO2 = 93.8 (0.9) mm Hg), and (iii) normoxic bed rest (NBR; FIO2 = 0.209; PIO2 = 133.5 (0.7) mm Hg). Nutritional requirements were individually precalculated and the actual intake was monitored throughout the study protocol. Body mass, whole body, and regional BC were assessed before and after the campaigns using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The calculated daily targeted energy intake values were 2071 (170) kcal for HBR and NBR and 2417 (200) kcal for HAMB. In both HBR and NBR campaigns the actual energy intake was within the targeted level, whereas in the HAMB the intake was lower than targeted (-8%, p < 0.05). Body mass significantly decreased in all 3 campaigns (-2.1%, -2.8%, and -2.0% for HAMB, HBR, and NBR, respectively; p < 0.05), secondary to a significant decrease in lean mass (-3.8%, -3.8%, -4.3% for HAMB, HBR, and NBR, respectively; p < 0.05) along with a slight, albeit not significant, increase in fat mass. The same trend was observed in the regional BC regardless of the region and the campaign. These results demonstrate that, hypoxia per se, does not seem to alter whole body and regional BC during short-term bed rest. PMID:24552383

  10. Five myofibrillar lesion types in eccentrically challenged, unloaded rat adductor longus muscle--a test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Sarcomere disruptions are observed in the adductor longus (AL) muscles following voluntary reloading of spaceflown and hindlimb suspension unloaded (HSU) rat, which resemble lesions in eccentrically challenged muscle. We devised and tested an eccentric contraction (ECCON) test system for the 14-day HSU rat AL. Six to 7 hours following ECCON, ALs were fixed to allow immunostaining and electron microscopy (EM). Toluidine blue-stained histology semithin sections were screened for lesion density (#/mm2). Serial semithin sections from the ECCON group were characterized for myosin immunointensity of lesions. Five myofibrillar lesion types were identified in histological semithin sections: focal contractions; wide A-bands; opaque areas; missing A-bands; and hyperstretched sarcomeres. Lesion density by type was greater for ECCON than NonECCON ALs (P< or =0.05; focal contractions and opaque regions). Lesion density (#-of-all-five-types/mm2) was significantly different (ECCON: 23.91+/-10.58 vs. NonECCON: 5.48+/-1.28, P< or =0.05; ECCON vs. SHAM: 0.00+/-0.00; P< or = 0.025). PostECCON optimal tension decreased (Poi-drop, 17.84+/-4.22%) and was correlated to lesion density (R2=0.596), but prestretch tension demonstrated the highest correlation with lesion density (R2=0.994). In lesions, the darkly staining A-band lost the normally organized thick filament alignment to differing degrees across the different lesion types. Ranking the five lesion types by a measure of lesion length deformation (hypercontracted to hyperstretched) at the light microscopy level, related to the severity of thick filament registry loss across the lesion types at the electron microscopic level. This ranking suggested that the five lesion types seen in semithin sections at the light level represented a lesion progression sequence and paralleled myosin immunostaining loss as the distorted A-band filaments spread across the hyperlengthening lesion types. Lesion ultrastructure indicated damage involved

  11. Phloem Unloading in Sink Leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana: Comparison of a Fluorescent Solute with a Fluorescent Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A. G.; Cruz, S. S.; Roberts, I. M.; Prior, DAM.; Turgeon, R.; Oparka, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    Using noninvasive imaging techniques, we compared phloem unloading of the membrane-impermeant, fluorescent solute carboxyfluorescein (CF) with that of potato virus X expressing the gene for the green fluorescent protein. Although systemic virus transport took considerably longer to occur than did CF transport, unloading of both solute and virus occurred predominantly from the class III vein network, a highly branched veinal system found between class II veins. The minor veins (classes IV and V) played no role in solute or virus import but were shown to be functional in xylem transport at the time of import by labeling with Texas Red dextran. After virus exit from the class III phloem, the minor veins eventually became infected by cell-to-cell virus movement from the mesophyll. During the sink/source transition, phloem unloading of CF was inhibited from class III veins before the cessation of phloem import through them, suggesting a symplastic isolation of the phloem in class III veins before its involvement in export. The progression of the sink/source transition for carbon was unaffected by the presence of the virus in the sink leaf. However, the virus was unable to cross the sink/source boundary for carbon that was present at the time of viral entry, suggesting a limited capacity for cell-to-cell virus movement into the apical (source) region of the leaf. A functional model of the sink/source transition in Nicotiana benthamiana is presented. This model provides a framework for the analysis of solute and virus movement in leaves. PMID:12237387

  12. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  13. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These

  14. Response of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate (+ asparagine) and alanine were compared in hindlimb muscles of SL-3 and ground control rats. Alanine was lower in the soleus of flown rats but not of suspended animals, with no response in other muscles except a slight increase in the unloaded plantaris. With recovery, alanine in the soleus was elevated. Since no differences in alanine metabolism were found by isolated muscle, changes in muscle alanine are probably due to altered body use of this amino acid leading to varied plasma levels.

  15. Unloading-induced slow-to-fast myosin shift in soleus muscle: nuclear MuRFs and calsarcin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris; Lomonosova, Yulia

    Exposure to actual and simulated microgravity is known to induce decrease in slow MyHC mRNA expression and increase in fast MyHC mRNAs expression. We supposed that altered expression of the calsarcin (CS) I and II (specific for type I and type II fibers respectively) may provide the control over myosin phenotype during unloading. We found that after 3 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) the content of CSII mRNA increased two-fold in rat soleus as compared to the cage controls. This level was maintained till the 7th day of the exposure and increased by more than 5-fold (as compared to controls) after two weeks of HU. In contrast to CSII, CSI mRNA expression didn’t change after 3 days of HU, but decreased more than 2-fold by the 7th and 14th day of HU. The increase of CSII RNA (in type II fibers) may be explained as the mechanism of stabilization of fast phenotype in all, but more important, in newly transformed type II fibers. At the same time, the decrease of CSI mRNA (in type I fibers) may be understood as counteracting the slow-to-fast transformation. Morriscot et al, (2010) demonstrated that calsarcin II expression decreased only in the double knockouts MuRF1-/MuRF2-. So, we hypothesized that CSII expression in unloaded soleus muscle might be associated with the cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of MuRF1 and MuRF2. We observed significant accumulation of MuRF1 and MuRF2 in the nuclear fraction after 3 days of HU. Thus the accumulation of MuRFs in myonuclei may promote the expression of CSII, necessary for stabilization of fast phenotype in the course of slow-to-fast shift in unloaded soleus muscle. We express our gratitude to Prof. S. Labeit (Mannheim) for kind presenting us the best antibodies against MuRF1 and MuRF2.

  16. Effects of fatigue on the chemical and mechanical degradation of model stent sub-units.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Maureen L; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Batchelor, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fatigue and durability performance of implantable cardiovascular stents is critical for assessing their performance. When the stent is manufactured from an absorbable material, however, this durability assessment is complicated by the transient nature of the device. Methodologies for evaluating the fatigue performance of absorbable stents while accurately simulating the degradation are limited and little is known about the interaction between fatigue and degradation. In this study, we investigated the fatigue behavior and effect of fatigue on the degradation rate for a model absorbable cardiovascular stent. Custom v-shaped stent sub-units manufactured from poly(L-lactide), i.e., PLLA, were subjected to a simultaneous fatigue and degradation study with cycle counts representative of one year of expected in vivo use. Fatigue loading was carried out such that the polymer degraded at a rate that was aligned with a modest degree of fatigue acceleration. Control, un-loaded specimens were also degraded under static immersion conditions representative of simulated degradation without fatigue. The study identified that fatigue loading during degradation significantly increased specimen stiffness and lowered the force at break. Fatigue loading also significantly increased the degree of molecular weight decline highlighting an interaction between mechanical loading and chemical degradation. This study demonstrates that fatigue loading during degradation can affect both the mechanical properties and the chemical degradation rate. The results are important for defining appropriate in vitro degradation conditions for absorbable stent preclinical evaluation. PMID:26759973

  17. Transcription regulation of gene expression in rat brown adipose tissue in response to unloading or 2G loading during growing period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Hitomi, Y.; Kawano, F.; Ohira, Y.; Kizaki, T.; Nakano, N.; Sakurai, T.; Izawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Sudoh, M.; Roy, R. R.; Ohno, H.

    2007-05-01

    The effects were investigated of long-term unloading and macrogravity on the expression of 15 genes at the mRNA levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT) from rat pups, particularly focusing on uncoupling protein (UCP) family, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes, and antioxidant enzymes. The animals in the unloaded group (a simulation model of spaceflight) were hindlimb-unloaded by tail suspension between postnatal day 4 and month 3, followed by 2-mo ambulation recovery. Moreover, centrifugation at 2G (an imitation of the hypergravity effects) was performed during the same period as the unloading, also followed by 2-mo ambulation recovery (adaptation to 1G from 2G). Compared with the age-matched control group, significantly lower expression levels of mRNA for UCP2, iNOS, and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD) in BAT were observed immediately after unloading, but not immediately after exposure to 2G. During 2-mo ambulation recovery from both extreme conditions, the expression of mRNA for Mn-SOD was enhanced, suggesting an increase in oxidative stress. These findings suggest that both micro- and macrogravity may have some influence upon the function of BAT, and that changes in the BAT function may be involved in the mechanisms subserving adaptation to such extreme conditions by what humans have to be faced with during the spaceflight and return to 1G.

  18. Systemic administration of transforming growth factor-beta 2 prevents the impaired bone formation and osteopenia induced by unloading in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Machwate, M; Zerath, E; Holy, X; Hott, M; Godet, D; Lomri, A; Marie, P J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recombinant human transforming growth factor beta 2 (rhTGF-beta 2) administration on trabecular bone loss induced by unloading in rats. Hind limb suspension for 14 d inhibited bone formation and induced osteopenia as shown by decreased bone volume, calcium and protein contents in long bone metaphysis. Systemic infusion of rhTFG-beta 2 (2 micrograms/kg per day) maintained normal bone formation rate, and prevented the decrease in bone volume, bone mineral content, trabecular thickness and number induced by unloading. In vitro analysis of tibial marrow stromal cells showed that rhTGF-beta 2 infusion in unloaded rats increased the proliferation of osteoblast precursor cells, but did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity or osteocalcin production. Northern blot analysis of RNA extracted from the femoral metaphysis showed that rhTGF-beta 2 infusion in unloaded rats increased steady-state levels of type I collagen mRNA but not alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels. rhTGF-beta 2 infusion at the dose used had no effect on metaphyseal bone volume and formation, osteoblast proliferation or collagen expression in control rats. The results show that systemic administration of rhTGF-beta 2 enhances osteoblast precursor cell proliferation and type I collagen expression by osteoblasts, and prevents the impaired bone formation and osteopenia induced by unloading. Images PMID:7657798

  19. Regulation of unloaded cell shortening by sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchange in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, R A; Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    1993-01-01

    1. Regulation of unloaded cell shortening and relaxation by sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange was investigated in rat ventricular myocytes. Contraction of single cells at 22 +/- 1 degrees C was measured simultaneously with membrane current and voltage using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique in combination with a video edge-detection device. 2. The extent of mechanical activation (cell shortening amplitude) was strongly dependent on diastolic membrane potential over the voltage range -140 to -50 mV. This voltage sensitivity of contraction was abolished completely when a recently described inhibitory peptide of the cardiac Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger (XIP, 2 x 10(-5) M) was present in the recording pipette, demonstrating that in rat ventricular cells Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange is modulated by diastolic membrane potential. 3. Possible influences of Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange on contraction were studied from a holding potential of -80 mV. Depolarizations (-50 to +60 mV) resulted in a bell-shaped shortening-voltage (S-V) relationship. These contractions were suppressed completely by either Cd2+ (10(-4) M) or verapamil (10(-5) M), but remained unchanged during superfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1.5 x 10(-5) M), when [NA+]o was reduced from 140 to 10 mM by substitution with either Li+ or Cs+ ions or when pipette Na+ was varied between 8 and 13 mM. XIP (2 x 10(-5) M) increased the magnitude and duration of twitch contractions, but had no effect on the shape of the S-V relationship. Thus, the Ca2+ current but not the Na+ current or Ca2+ influx due to reversed Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange can release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) under these experimental conditions. 4. The effect of the rate of repolarization on cell shortening was studied under voltage clamp by applying ramp waveforms immediately following the depolarizations which activated contraction. Although slowing of the rate of repolarization had no effect on the first contraction following a train of conditioning depolarizations

  20. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  1. Autonomic Heart Rate Control at Rest and During Unloading of the Right Ventricle in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Saul, J. Philip; Barbieri, Riccardo; de Lange, Charlotte; Hopp, Einar; Norum, Ingvild B.; Thaulow, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Arrhythmias in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) might be due in part to altered autonomic heart rate (HR) control caused by altered right ventricle hemodynamics. This study investigated autonomic HR control in ToF adolescents at rest and during unloading of the right ventricle. A total of 17 ToF patients and 56 healthy controls aged 12 to 18 years underwent orthostatic stress with lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of −20 mm Hg. HR, blood pressure and stroke volume were recorded non-invasively. Indices of HR variability were computed in time and frequency domains. All ToF patients also underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating pulmonary regurgitation and right ventricular dilation. At rest, HR variability indices of vagal heart rate control were non-significantly lower in the ToF patients compared to controls. During LBNP, HR increased more in controls than ToF patients (p ≤ 0.001). Further, most HR variability indices decreased among controls, but increased among ToF patients (p ≤ 0.01 or p ≤ 0.001 for all variables), suggesting vagal activation in the ToF patients. In conclusion, adolescents after ToF repair have fairly normal HR control at rest despite altered right ventricular hemodynamics. During unloading of the right ventricle, however, vagal HR control increases in the ToF patients and decreases in the controls. PMID:18929714

  2. The Enok acetyltransferase complex interacts with Elg1 and negatively regulates PCNA unloading to promote the G1/S transition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Kusch, Thomas; Swanson, Selene K; Szerszen, Leanne T; Li, Ge; Dutta, Arnob; Washburn, Michael P; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-05-15

    KAT6 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are involved in cell cycle regulation. However, information regarding their roles in regulating cell cycle progression is limited. Here, we report the identification of subunits of the Drosophila Enok complex and demonstrate that all subunits are important for its HAT activity. We further report a novel interaction between the Enok complex and the Elg1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-unloader complex. Depletion of Enok in S2 cells resulted in a G1/S cell cycle block, and this block can be partially relieved by depleting Elg1. Furthermore, depletion of Enok reduced the chromatin-bound levels of PCNA in both S2 cells and early embryos, suggesting that the Enok complex may interact with the Elg1 complex and down-regulate its PCNA-unloading function to promote the G1/S transition. Supporting this hypothesis, depletion of Enok also partially rescued the endoreplication defects in Elg1-depleted nurse cells. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the roles of KAT6 HATs in cell cycle regulation through modulating PCNA levels on chromatin. PMID:27198229

  3. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  4. Comparison of hindlimb unloading and partial weight suspension models for spaceflight-type condition induced effects on white blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jolaine M.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wagner, Erika B.; Mick, Rosemarie; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models are frequently used to assist in the determination of the long- and short-term effects of space flight. The space environment, including microgravity, can impact many physiological and immunological system parameters. It has been found that ground based models of microgravity produce changes in white blood cell counts, which negatively affects immunologic function. As part of the Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR), we compared the acute effects on white blood cell parameters induced by the more traditionally used animal model of hindlimb unloading (HU) with a recently developed reduced weightbearing analog known as partial weight suspension (PWS). Female ICR mice were either hindlimb unloaded or placed in the PWS system at 16% quadrupedal weightbearing for 4 h, 1, 2, 7 or 10 days, at which point complete blood counts were obtained. Control animals (jacketed and non-jacketed) were exposed to identical conditions without reduced weightbearing. Results indicate that significant changes in total white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts were observed within the first 2 days of exposure to each system. These differences in blood cell counts normalized by day 7 in both systems. The results of these studies indicate that there are some statistically significant changes observed in the blood cell counts for animals exposed to both the PWS and HU simulated microgravity systems.

  5. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration. PMID:21442893

  6. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in peach fruit: potential role of two transporters localized in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Laura; Falchi, Rachele; Santi, Simonetta; Vizzotto, Giannina

    2015-06-01

    Several complex physiological processes, which include long-distance translocation in the phloem and unloading in sink tissues, govern the partitioning of sugars in economically important organs, such as peach fruit. In this study, we took advantage of a symplastic tracer, carboxyfluorescein (CF), providing evidence for an apoplastic sucrose transfer in the early (SI) and middle (SIII) phases of peach fruit development. Moreover, using a combination of in situ hybridization and laser microdissection-assisted expression analysis, three putative sucrose transporters encoding genes (PpSUT1, PpSUT2, PpSUT4) were transcriptionally analyzed to relate their expression with sucrose storage in this organ. Our study revealed that PpSUT2 and PpSUT4 are the genes predominantly expressed in fruit flesh, and the detailed analysis of their expression pattern in the different cell types enabled us to suggest a specialized role in sucrose distribution. Both PpSUTs transporters could be involved in the retrieval of sucrose lost from the symplastic continuum of the phloem and, when expressed in parenchyma cells, they could be active in the import of sucrose into sink tissues, via symport from the apoplast. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed and discussed for PpSUT4 because of its putative tonoplastic localization. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning sucrose unloading and accumulation in peach fruit. PMID:25348206

  7. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  8. Pre-accelerator design by estimation of erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kashii, H. ); Yamada, M.; Shikura, T. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce a parameter to evaluate erosion of the main acceleration rail of a railgun with a pre-accelerator. The authors use transfer charge per unit length as the parameter in our calculation and use an augmented railgun as a pre-accelerator. The results of our analysis show that the erosion of the breech of the main acceleration rail of a railgun can be greatly reduced by changing the turns of the pre-accelerator to control current waveforms, and that such erosion can be satisfactorily evaluated with our transfer-charge-per-unit- length parameter.

  9. Acceleration Environment of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Kelly, Eric; Keller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment on the International Space Station has been accomplished by two accelerometer systems since 2001. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System records the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. Measurement of the vibratory/transient regime, comprised of vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances, has been accomplished by the Space Acceleration Measurement System-II. Until the arrival of the Columbus Orbital Facility and the Japanese Experiment Module, the location of these sensors, and therefore, the measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment, has been limited to within the United States Laboratory. Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a vibratory acceleration measurement system called the Microgravity Measurement Apparatus which will be deployed within the Japanese Experiment Module to make distributed measurements of the Japanese Experiment Module's vibratory acceleration environment. Two Space Acceleration Measurement System sensors from the United States Laboratory will be re-deployed to support vibratory acceleration data measurement within the Columbus Orbital Facility. The additional measurement opportunities resulting from the arrival of these new laboratories allows Principal Investigators with facilities located in these International Space Station research laboratories to obtain microgravity acceleration data in support of their sensitive experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project, at NASA Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland, Ohio, has supported acceleration measurement systems and the microgravity scientific community through the processing, characterization, distribution, and archival of the microgravity acceleration data obtained from the International Space Station acceleration measurement systems. This paper summarizes the PIMS capabilities available

  10. Influence of anthropogenic groundwater unloading in Indo-Gangetic plains on the 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Bhaskar; Vissa, Naresh Krishna; Gahalaut, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater usage in the Indo-Gangetic plains exceeds replenishment of aquifers, leading to substantial reduction in the mass. Such anthropogenic crustal unloading may promote long-term fault slip or may modulate seismic activity in the adjoining Himalayan region. Our simulation using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment data and hydrological models of such a process indicates that the thrust earthquakes on the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), including the recent 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake, are probably influenced by the anthropogenic groundwater unloading process in the Gangetic plains. The groundwater withdrawal leading to crustal unloading in the Gangetic plains causes a significant component of horizontal compression which adds to the secular interseimic compression at the seismogenic depth (5-20 km) on the MHT beneath the Himalayan arc and at hypocentral depth of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake. This effect enhances the Coulomb stress on the locked zone of MHT.

  11. Time/motion observations and dose analysis of reactor loading, transportation, and dry unloading of an overweight truck spent fuel shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, C.J.; Lavender, J.C.; Wakeman, B.H.

    1992-04-01

    This document presents observed activity durations and radiation dose analyses for an overweight truck shipment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel from the Surry Power Station in Virginia to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The shipment consisted of a TN-8L shipping cask carrying three 9-year-old PWR spent fuel assemblies. Handling times and dose analyses for at-reactor activities were completed by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power) personnel. Observations of in-transit and unloading activities were made by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) personnel, who followed the shipment for approximately 2800 miles and observed cask unloading activities. In-transit dose estimates were calculated using dose rate maps provided by Virginia Power for a fully loaded TN-8L shipping cask. The dose analysis for the cask unloading operations is based on the observations of PNL personnel.

  12. [Electrogenic activity of Na-K-ATPase and calcium ions in m. soleus fibers of rats and Mongolian gerbil during simulation of gravitational unloading].

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, V V; Ogneva, I V; Altaeva, E G; Razgovorova, I A; Tiapkina, O V; Nikol'skiĭ, E E; Shenkman, B S; Krivoĭ, I I

    2010-01-01

    Some of the electrophysiological parameters of m. soleus of rat and Mongolian gerbil, and Ca ions content in fiber myoplasm were compared in different periods of gravitational unloading simulated by tail-suspension. No difference was found between the control animals as for membrane potential at rest, electrogenic activities of Na-K-ATPase and its isoforms, and input resistance of m. soleus fibers. At the same time, unlike rats, gerbils exhibited a substantial Ca decrease in myoplasm. From day one to 14 of gravitational unloading the pace of electrophysiological changes in gerbil's m. soleus was noticeably slower than of rat's, whereas Ca ions depositing in myoplasm was observed in both species already at the beginning ofsuspension. Analysis of the results suggests that adaptive changes in m. soleus of Mongolian gerbil and rat during simulated gravitational unloading are fundamentally different due to, probably, peculiar water-electrolyte metabolism, type of locomotion, and other factors which are still unclear. PMID:20799658

  13. In Vivo Hypobaric Hypoxia Performed During the Remodeling Process Accelerates Bone Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marjorie; Collombet, Jean-Marc; Frasca, Sophie; Begot, Laurent; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of respiratory hypobaric hypoxia on femoral bone-defect repair in mice because hypoxia is believed to influence both mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, a process involved in the bone-healing mechanism. To mimic conditions of non-weight-bearing limb immobilization in patients suffering from bone trauma, our hypoxic mouse model was further subjected to hind-limb unloading. A hole was drilled in the right femur of adult male C57/BL6J mice. Four days after surgery, mice were subjected to hind-limb unloading for 1 week. Seven days after surgery, mice were either housed for 4 days in a hypobaric room (FiO2 at 10%) or kept under normoxic conditions. Unsuspended control mice were housed in either hypobaric or normoxic conditions. Animals were sacrificed on postsurgery day 11 to allow for collection of both contralateral and lesioned femurs, blood, and spleen. As assessed by microtomography, delayed hypoxia enhanced bone-healing efficiency by increasing the closing of the cortical defect and the newly synthesized bone volume in the cavity by +55% and +35%, respectively. Proteome analysis and histomorphometric data suggested that bone-repair improvement likely results from the acceleration of the natural bone-healing process rather than from extended mobilization of MSC-derived osteoprogenitors. Hind-limb unloading had hardly any effect beyond delayed hypoxia-enhanced bone-healing efficiency. PMID:24944208

  14. A New Animal Model for Investigation of Mechanical Unloading in Hypertrophic and Failing Hearts: Combination of Transverse Aortic Constriction and Heterotopic Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stenzig, Justus; Biermann, Daniel; Jelinek, Marisa; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwoerer, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous small animal models for simulation of mechanical unloading are solely performed in healthy or infarcted hearts, not representing the pathophysiology of hypertrophic and dilated hearts emerging in heart failure patients. In this article, we present a new and economic small animal model to investigate mechanical unloading in hypertrophic and failing hearts: the combination of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTx) in rats. Methods To induce cardiac hypertrophy and failure in rat hearts, three-week old rats underwent TAC procedure. Three and six weeks after TAC, hHTx with hypertrophic and failing hearts in Lewis rats was performed to induce mechanical unloading. After 14 days of mechanical unloading animals were euthanatized and grafts were explanted for further investigations. Results 50 TAC procedures were performed with a survival of 92% (46/50). When compared to healthy rats left ventricular surface decreased to 5.8±1.0 mm² (vs. 9.6± 2.4 mm²) (p = 0.001) after three weeks with a fractional shortening (FS) of 23.7± 4.3% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.01). Six weeks later, systolic function decreased to 17.1± 3.2% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.0001) and left ventricular inner surface increased to 19.9±1.1 mm² (p = 0.0001). Intraoperative graft survival during hHTx was 80% with 46 performed procedures (37/46). All transplanted organs survived two weeks of mechanical unloading. Discussion Combination of TAC and hHTx in rats offers an economic and reproducible small animal model enabling serial examination of mechanical unloading in a truly hypertrophic and failing heart, representing the typical pressure overloaded and dilated LV, occurring in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. PMID:26841021

  15. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  16. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  17. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  18. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  19. Status and results from the next linear collider test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.

    1996-08-01

    The design for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) at SLAC is based on two 11.4 GHz linacs operating at an unloaded acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m increasing to 85 MV/m as the energy is increased from {1/2} TeV to 1 TeV in the center of mass. During the past several years there has been tremendous progress on the development of 11.4 GHz (X-band) RF systems. These developments include klystrons which operate at the required power and pulse length, pulse compression systems that achieve a factor of four power multiplication and structures that are specially designed to reduce long-range wakefields. Together with these developments, we have constructed a {1/2} GeV test accelerator, the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The NLCTA will serve as a test bed as the design of the NLC is refined. In addition to testing the RF system, the NLCTA is designed to address many questions related to the dynamics of the beam during acceleration, in particular the study of multibunch beam loading compensation and transverse beam break-up. In this paper we present the status of the NLCTA and the results of initial commissioning.

  20. [Emergency units as urban seismograph].

    PubMed

    Leccia, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Our hypothesis: the city accelerates or provokes specific conditions of stress, and generates its own clinic. The emergency units will indicate how the uncertainty of the premises, the acceleration of itinerary and the lability of boundaries, inherent to metropolises are interiorized in symptoms capable of sustainably affecting our mental balance. PMID:23254834

  1. Proposed Few-optical Cycle Laser-driven ParticleAccelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Lu, P.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2006-10-06

    We describe a transparent dielectric grating accelerator structure that is designed for ultra-short laser pulse operation. The structure is based on the principle of periodic field reversal to achieve phase synchronicity for relativistic particles, however to preserve ultra-short pulse operation it does not resonate the laser field in the vacuum channel. The geometry of the structure appears well suited for application with high average power lasers and high thermal loading. Finally, it shows potential for an unloaded gradient of 10 GeV/m with 10 fsec laser pulses and the possibility to accelerate 10{sup 6} electrons per bunch at an efficiency of 8%. The fabrication procedure and a proposed near term experiment with this accelerator structure are presented.

  2. Scaling of the Longitudinal Electric Field and Transformer Ratio in a Nonlinear Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, I.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Kirby, N.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2012-06-12

    The scaling of the two important figures of merit, the transformer ratio T and the longitudinal electric field E{sub z}, with the peak drive-bunch current I{sub p}, in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator is presented for the first time. The longitudinal field scales as I{sub P}{sup 0.623{+-}0.007}, in good agreement with nonlinear wakefield theory ({approx}I{sub P}{sup 0.5}), while the unloaded transformer ratio is shown to be greater than unity and scales weakly with the bunch current. The effect of bunch head erosion on both parameters is also discussed.

  3. Microgravity acceleration measurement and environment characterization science (17-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is a general purpose instrumentation system designed to measure the accelerations onboard the Shuttle Orbiter and Shuttle/Spacelab vehicles. These measurements are used to support microgravity experiments and investigation into the microgravity environment of the vehicle. Acceleration measurements can be made at locations remote from the SAMS main instrumentation unit by the use of up to three remote triaxial sensor heads. The prime objective for SAMS on the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission will be to measure the accelerations experienced by the Fluid Experiment System (FES). The SAMS acceleration measurements for FES will be complemented by low level, low frequency acceleration measurements made by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) installed on the shuttle. Secondary objectives for SAMS will be to measure accelerations at several specific locations to enable the acceleration transfer function of the Spacelab module to be analyzed. This analysis effort will be in conjunction with similar measurements analyses on other Spacelab missions.

  4. Energy Absorption in a Load-Unload Cycle of Knee Implant Using Fractal Model of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, Mohammad; Farhang, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Roughness measurement of knee implant surfaces is investigated. The study of roughness measurement show that the topography of knee implant surface is multi-scale and surface spectra follows a power law behavior. A magnification of rough surface topography implies that there is no difference between original and magnified profile of implant surface. For implant surface, statistical parameters such as variance of height, curvature, and slope are found to be scale-dependent. Fractal representation of implant surface shows that the size-distribution of the multi-scale contacts spots follows a power law and is characterized by the fractal dimension of implant surface. Fractal surface description of the rough surfaces of knee implant is used to obtain force-displacement relationship of the contact force. Using an approximate function through the fusion of two piecewise functions, energy absorption of a knee implant in a single cycle of load-unload is obtained.

  5. PGC-1α is important for maintaining the balance of muscle mass and myofiber types in unloaded muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoping; He, Jian; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hongju; Li, Wenjiong

    2016-07-01

    PGC-1α, a transcriptional co-activator, has been shown mainly to determine the development of oxidative myofibers in skeletal muscle. However, whether PGC-1α functions to regulate the unloaded muscle atrophy and composition of myofiber types keeps unclear. MCK-PGC-1α overexpression transgenic mice (TG) and its wild type littermates (WT) were subjected to hindlimb unloading (HU) and induced unloaded muscle atrophy. After 14 days of HU, the mass of gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris muscles in WT mice decreased 17.9%, 28.2%, and 14.8%, respectively (P<0.01), compared with ground weight-bearing control muscles. PGC-1α transgenic mice showed a 14.0% (P<0.05), 20.4% (P<0.01), 11.8% decrease in gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris muscles mass after HU. To further confirm the effect of PGC-1α over-expression on the muscle mass loss under HU, change rate of muscle-body weight ratio was calculated, and the results indicated that the reduction of change rate of muscle-body weight ratio in PGC-1α transgenic gastrocnemius and soleus was significantly less than in WT mice (P<0.01). Moreover, in TG mice compared to WT mice there were significantly less reduction rate of slow-twitch myofiber MHC-I and MHC-IIa (MHC-I, -3.0±0.2% vs -14.9±4.2%, p<0.01, MHC-IIa, -3.5±2.7% vs -6.2±3.7%, p<0.01 ), while there was significantly less induction rate of fast-twitch myofiber MHC-IIb (MHC-IIb, +0.6±0.6% vs +3.7±2.9%, p<0.01 ). The real-time PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed that PGC-1α overexpression mice markedly rescued the muscle atrophy and myofiber switching from oxidative to glycolytic associated with a decrease in pSmad3 level after 14 days of HU. Importantly, overexpression of PGC-1α in C2C12 myoblasts protected PGC-1α-transfected myotubes from atrophy in vitro and the effect could be partially blocked by inducing pSmad3 with constitutively activated Smad3(C.A. smad3) transfection. Therefore, this study demonstrated a novel role and mechanism for PGC-1α in

  6. Effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation during unloading on regulatory components of protein synthesis in atrophied soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Bajotto, Gustavo; Sato, Yuzo; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2011-08-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle mass depends on the equilibrium between protein synthesis and protein breakdown; diminished functional demand during unloading breaks this balance and leads to muscle atrophy. The current study analyzed time-course alterations in regulatory genes and proteins in the unloaded soleus muscle and the effects of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on muscle atrophy and abundance of molecules that regulate protein turnover. Short-term (6 days) hindlimb suspension of rats resulted in significant losses of myofibrillar proteins, total RNA, and rRNAs and pronounced atrophy of the soleus muscle. Muscle disuse induced upregulation and increases in the abundance of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), increases in gene and protein amounts of two ubiquitin ligases (muscle RING-finger protein 1 and muscle atrophy F-box protein), and decreases in the expression of cyclin D1, the ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and ERK1/2. BCAA addition to the diet did not prevent muscle atrophy and had no apparent effect on regulators of proteasomal protein degradation. However, BCAA supplementation reduced the loss of myofibrillar proteins and RNA, attenuated the increases in 4E-BP1, and partially preserved cyclin D1, mTOR and ERK1 proteins. These results indicate that BCAA supplementation alone does not oppose protein degradation but partly preserves specific signal transduction proteins that act as regulators of protein synthesis and cell growth in the non-weight-bearing soleus muscle. PMID:21222129

  7. Differential impact of mechanical unloading on structural and nonstructural components of the extracellular matrix in advanced human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sakamuri, Siva S V P; Takawale, Abhijit; Basu, Ratnadeep; Fedak, Paul W M; Freed, Darren; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2016-06-01

    Adverse remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a significant characteristic of heart failure. Reverse remodeling of the fibrillar ECM secondary to mechanical unloading of the left ventricle (LV) by left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been subject of intense investigation; however, little is known about the impacts on nonfibrillar ECM and matricellular proteins that also contribute to disease progression. Explanted failing hearts were procured from patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with or without LVAD support, and compared to nonfailing control hearts. LV free wall specimens were formalin-fixed, flash-frozen or optimum cutting temperature-mount frozen. Histologic and biochemical assessment of fibrillar ECM showed that LVAD support was associated with lower levels of insoluble collagen, collagen type I mRNA, and collagen I/III ratio compared with no-LVAD hearts. A disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs-2 (ADAM-TS2), a procollagen endopeptidase, was reduced in no-LVAD but not in LVAD hearts. The rise in ECM proteolytic activities was significantly lower in LVAD hearts. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP2, MMP8, MMP13, and MT1-MMP/MMP14) were comparable between DCM hearts. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)3 and TIMP4 messenger RNA and protein showed the greatest reduction in no-LVAD hearts. Basement membrane proteins exhibited less severe disarray of laminin and fibronectin-1 in LVAD-supported hearts. The rise in matricellular protein, osteopontin, was suppressed in LVAD hearts, whereas secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) levels was unaffected by LVAD. Mechanical unloading of the failing DCM hearts can restore the fibrillar ECM and the basement membrane, contributing toward improved clinical outcomes. However, persistent elevation of matricellular proteins such as SPARC could contribute to the relapse of failing hearts on removal of LVAD support. PMID:26963743

  8. The influence of acute unloading on left ventricular strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Geir Olav; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-05-15

    Noninvasive measurements of myocardial strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography correlate to cardiac contractile state but also to load, which may weaken their value as indices of inotropy. In a porcine model, we investigated the influence of acute dynamic preload reductions on left ventricular strain and strain rate and their relation to the pressure-conductance catheter-derived preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LV-dP/dtmax). Speckle tracking strain and strain rate in the longitudinal, circumferential, and radial directions were measured during acute dynamic reductions of end-diastolic volume during three different myocardial inotropic states. Both strain and strain rate were sensitive to unloading of the left ventricle (P < 0.001), but the load dependency for strain rate was modest compared with strain. Changes in longitudinal and circumferential strain correlated more strongly to changes in end-diastolic volume (r = -0.86 and r = -0.72) than did radial strain (r = 0.35). Longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain significantly correlated with LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.53, r = -0.46, and r = 0.86), whereas only radial strain correlated with PRSW (r = 0.55). Strain rate in the longitudinal, circumferential and radial direction significantly correlated with both PRSW (r = -0.64, r = -0.58, and r = 0.74) and LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.95, r = -0.70, and r = 0.85). In conclusion, the speckle tracking echocardiography-derived strain rate is more robust to dynamic ventricular unloading than strain. Longitudinal and circumferential strain could not predict load-independent contractility. Strain rates, and especially in the radial direction, are good predictors of preload-independent inotropic markers derived from conductance catheter. PMID:26968547

  9. Brassinosteroids are involved in controlling sugar unloading in Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Sauvignon' berries during véraison.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Sugar unloading in grape berries is a crucial step in the long-distance transport of carbohydrates from grapevine leaves to berries. Brassinosteroids (BRs) mediate many physiological processes in plants including carbohydrate metabolism. Here, 'Cabernet Sauvignon' (Vitis vinifera L.) grape berries cultivated in clay loam fields were treated with an exogenous BR (24-epibrassinolide; EBR), a BR synthesis inhibitor (brassinazole; Brz), Brz + EBR (sprayed with EBR 24 h after a Brz treatment), and deionized water (control) at the onset of véraison. The EBR treatment sharply increased the soluble sugars content in the berries, but decreased it in the skins. The EBR and Brz + EBR treatments significantly promoted the activities of both invertases (acidic and neutral) and sucrose synthase (sucrolytic) at various stages of ripening. The mRNA levels of genes encoding sucrose metabolic invertase (VvcwINV), and monosaccharide (VvHT3, 4, 5 and 6) and disaccharide (VvSUC12 and 27) transporters were increased by the EBR and/or Brz + EBR treatments. Generally, the effects of the Brz treatment on the measured targets contrasted with the effects of the EBR treatments. The EBR and Brz treatments inhibited the biosynthesis of the endogenous BRs 6-deoxocastastarone and castasterone. Both EBR and Brz + EBR treatments increased the brassinolide contents, down-regulated the expression of genes encoding BRs biosynthetic enzymes BRASSINOSTEROID-6-OXIDASE and DWARF1, (VvBR6OX1 and VvDWF1) and induced BR receptor gene BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (VvBRI1) expression in deseeded berries. Together, these results show that BRs are involved in controlling sugar unloading in grape berries during véraison. PMID:26113159

  10. Enabling Technologies for Petascale Electromagnetic Accelerator Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Li-Xin; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar, Ravi; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; Luo, Xiaojun; Shephard, Mark; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-11-09

    The SciDAC2 accelerator project at SLAC aims to simulate an entire three-cryomodule radio frequency (RF) unit of the International Linear Collider (ILC) main Linac. Petascale computing resources supported by advances in Applied Mathematics (AM) and Computer Science (CS) and INCITE Program are essential to enable such very large-scale electromagnetic accelerator simulations required by the ILC Global Design Effort. This poster presents the recent advances and achievements in the areas of CS/AM through collaborations.

  11. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  12. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  13. Storage peak gas-turbine power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinkotski, B.

    1980-01-01

    A storage gas-turbine power plant using a two-cylinder compressor with intermediate cooling is studied. On the basis of measured characteristics of a .25 Mw compressor computer calculations of the parameters of the loading process of a constant capacity storage unit (05.3 million cu m) were carried out. The required compressor power as a function of time with and without final cooling was computed. Parameters of maximum loading and discharging of the storage unit were calculated, and it was found that for the complete loading of a fully unloaded storage unit, a capacity of 1 to 1.5 million cubic meters is required, depending on the final cooling.

  14. 46 CFR 35.35-42 - Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB/ALL. 35.35-42 Section 35.35-42 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-42 Restrictions on...

  15. 46 CFR 35.35-42 - Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB/ALL. 35.35-42 Section 35.35-42 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-42 Restrictions on...

  16. 46 CFR 35.35-42 - Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB/ALL. 35.35-42 Section 35.35-42 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-42 Restrictions on...

  17. 46 CFR 35.35-42 - Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restrictions on vessels alongside a tank vessel loading or unloading cargo of Grade A, B, or C-TB/ALL. 35.35-42 Section 35.35-42 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-42 Restrictions on...

  18. 46 CFR 153.1119 - When to prewash and discharge NLS residues from a prewash; unloading an NLS cargo in a country...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prewash; unloading an NLS cargo in a country whose Administration is not signatory to MARPOL 73/78... country whose Administration is not signatory to MARPOL 73/78: Categories A, B, and C. (a) Except as... Administration is signatory to MARPOL 73/78, a written attestation from the person in charge of each prewash...

  19. Reactive accelerated cluster erosion (RACE) for micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gspann, J.

    1997-02-01

    Accelerated ionized cluster beams are used for micromachining of bulk diamond, CVD diamond films, single-crystalline silicon, or Pyrex glass, among others. Beams of clusters of CO2 or of SF6 with about 1000 molecules per unit charge are accelerated to up to 120 KeV kinetic energy for mask projective surface bombardment. Patterning is achieved via physical as well as chemical surface erosion: reactive accelerated cluster erosion (RACE). Very smooth eroded surfaces result for bulk natural diamond, silicon, metals and glass. Polycrystalline, strongly faceted CVD diamond films are effectively planarized. Submicrometer structures with adjustable wall inclination can be generated. Surface melting seems to govern the cluster impact induced nanomodifications.

  20. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  1. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  2. Curcumin counteracts loss of force and atrophy of hindlimb unloaded rat soleus by hampering neuronal nitric oxide synthase untethering from sarcolemma

    PubMed Central

    Vitadello, Maurizio; Germinario, Elena; Ravara, Barbara; Libera, Luciano Dalla; Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Gorza, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant administration aimed to antagonize the development and progression of disuse muscle atrophy provided controversial results. Here we investigated the effects of curcumin, a vegetal polyphenol with pleiotropic biological activity, because of its ability to upregulate glucose-regulated protein 94 kDa (Grp94) expression in myogenic cells. Grp94 is a sarco-endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, the levels of which decrease significantly in unloaded muscle. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with curcumin and soleus muscle was analysed after 7 days of hindlimb unloading or standard caging. Curcumin administration increased Grp94 protein levels about twofold in muscles of ambulatory rats (P < 0.05) and antagonized its decrease in unloaded ones. Treatment countered loss of soleus mass and myofibre cross-sectional area by approximately 30% (P ≤ 0.02) and maintained a force–frequency relationship closer to ambulatory levels. Indexes of muscle protein and lipid oxidation, such as protein carbonylation, revealed by Oxyblot, and malondialdehyde, measured with HPLC, were significantly blunted in unloaded treated rats compared to untreated ones (P = 0.01). Mechanistic involvement of Grp94 was suggested by the disruption of curcumin-induced attenuation of myofibre atrophy after transfection with antisense grp94 cDNA and by the drug-positive effect on the maintenance of the subsarcolemmal localization of active neuronal nitric oxide synthase molecules, which were displaced to the sarcoplasm by unloading. The absence of additive effects after combined administration of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor further supported curcumin interference with this pro-atrophic pathway. In conclusion, curcumin represents an effective and safe tool to upregulate Grp94 muscle levels and to maintain muscle function during unweighting. PMID:24710058

  3. Transforming growth factor-{beta} inhibits CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein expression and PPAR{gamma} activity in unloaded bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahdjoudj, S.; Kaabeche, K.; Holy, X.; Fromigue, O.; Modrowski, D.; Zerath, E.; Marie, P.J. . E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr

    2005-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-{beta}2) on transcription factors involved in adipogenic differentiation induced by hind limb suspension in rat bone marrow stromal cells in vivo. Time course real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression showed that skeletal unloading progressively increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP){alpha} and C/EBP{beta} {alpha} at 5 days in bone marrow stromal cells resulting in increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}2) transcripts at 7 days. TGF-{beta}2 administration in unloaded rats corrected the rise in C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} transcripts induced by unloading in bone marrow stromal cells. This resulted in inhibition of PPAR{gamma}2 expression that was associated with increased Runx2 expression. Additionally, the inhibition of C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} expression by TGF-{beta}2 was associated with increased PPAR{gamma} serine phosphorylation in bone marrow stromal cells, a mechanism that inhibits PPAR{gamma} transactivating activity. The sequential inhibitory effect of TGF-{beta}2 on C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma}2 resulted in reduced LPL expression and abolition of bone marrow stromal cell adipogenic differentiation, which contributed to prevent bone loss induced by skeletal unloading. We conclude that TGF-{beta}2 inhibits the excessive adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by skeletal unloading by inhibiting C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma} expression and activity, which provides a sequential mechanism by which TGF-{beta}2 regulates adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo.

  4. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  5. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  6. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  7. Sustained linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The subjective effects of sustained acceleration are discussed, including positive, negative, forward, backward, and lateral acceleration effects. Physiological effects, such as retinal and visual response, unconsciousness and cerebral function, pulmonary response, and renal output, are studied. Human tolerance and performance under sustained acceleration are ascertained.

  8. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  9. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  10. Chronic acceleration and brain density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, L. F.; Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tests carried out on rabbits show that the effect of chronic acceleration is not uniform among the various tissues studied. Although body mass is reduced by the treatment, as expected, no change is apparent in brain mass or in the density of cerebrospinal fluid. Acceleration-induced changes are encountered in tissue density, the myocardium exhibiting a transient increase followed by an exponential decrease toward a limit and the brain showing an arithmetic increase in density with continued exposure to 2.5 G. The data are seen as suggesting that a specific brain load is not a regulated phenomenon and that no physiological processes occur to attenuate the increased load imposed by the hyperdynamic environment. An equation is derived indicating that the stimulus potential per unit of brain load increases with body size, even though brain density decreases and cerebrospinal fluid density increases.

  11. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  12. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  13. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  14. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  15. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  16. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  17. Long-term monitoring of feral genetically modified herbicide-tolerant Brassica napus populations around unloading Japanese ports

    PubMed Central

    Katsuta, Kensuke; Matsuo, Kazuhito; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape. Such introductions have potential biodiversity effects (as defined by the Cartagena Protocol): these include replacement of native elements in the biota through competitive suppression or hybridization. We conducted surveys in the period 2006–2011 to assess such threats. We examined shifts in the population distribution and occurrence of GMHT plants in 1,029 volunteer introduced assemblages of B. napus, 1,169 of B. juncea, and 184 of B. rapa around 12 ports. GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location. Over the survey period, the distributions of a pure non-GMHT population around Tobata and a pure GMHT population around Hakata increased significantly. However, there was no common trend of population expansion or contraction around the 12 ports. Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus. Therefore, GMHT B. napus is not invading native vegetation surrounding its populations and not likely to cross with congeners in Japanese environment. PMID:26175624

  18. An Inverse Finite Element u/p-Formulation to Predict the Unloaded State of In Vivo Biological Soft Tissues.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, Vasileios; Hipwell, John H; Hawkes, David J

    2016-01-01

    Physically realistic patient-specific biomechanical modelling is of paramount importance for many medical applications, where the geometry of tissues or organs is usually constructed from in vivo images. However, it is common for such biological structures to correspond to a deformed state due to being under external loadings. This necessitates the determination of the stress distribution of the known deformed state through an inverse analysis approach. To achieve this, we propose here a generalised finite element displacement/pressure (u/p)-formulation for evaluating the unloaded configuration of in vivo biological soft tissues that exhibit quasi-incompressible behaviour under finite deformations. Validity and applicability of the proposed numerical framework to practical inverse analysis problems in biomechanics is demonstrated through various numerical examples. The corresponding simulations utilise in vivo measurements of patient-specific geometries derived from different medical imaging modalities, and include recovery of the pressure-free configuration of human aortas and the gravity-free shape of the female breast. PMID:26219402

  19. Characterization of solid-phase extraction of Fe(III) by unloaded polyurethane foam as thiocyanate complex.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Gil Nunes; de Sousa, Leandro M; Pereira Netto, Annibal D; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2007-11-01

    This work presents a detailed study about the adsorption of iron(III)-thiocyanate complexes onto unloaded polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). A novel strategy was employed for this purpose, utilizing the adjustment of the plug cylinder of PUF to the arm of an overhead stirrer. The system was characterized in relation to equilibrium and kinetic aspects and it was modeled by applying Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results obtained showed that adsorption occurs on a monolayer and that external transport of the solute from solution to adsorbent was the rate-determining mechanism. A maximum adsorption capacity of 2.06 x 10(-4) mol Fe g(-1) was obtained under established experimental conditions (0.5 mol L(-1) SCN(-) and 0.005 mol L(-1) HCl). Sequential extraction experiments were carried out by changing PUF in time intervals previously defined (5, 20, and 40 min), and the obtained results showed that it is possible to remove around 95% of the Fe(III) in solution through five consecutive extractions of 5 min with five 200 mg PUF cylinders. PMID:17662992

  20. Long-term monitoring of feral genetically modified herbicide-tolerant Brassica napus populations around unloading Japanese ports.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Kensuke; Matsuo, Kazuhito; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2015-06-01

    Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape. Such introductions have potential biodiversity effects (as defined by the Cartagena Protocol): these include replacement of native elements in the biota through competitive suppression or hybridization. We conducted surveys in the period 2006-2011 to assess such threats. We examined shifts in the population distribution and occurrence of GMHT plants in 1,029 volunteer introduced assemblages of B. napus, 1,169 of B. juncea, and 184 of B. rapa around 12 ports. GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location. Over the survey period, the distributions of a pure non-GMHT population around Tobata and a pure GMHT population around Hakata increased significantly. However, there was no common trend of population expansion or contraction around the 12 ports. Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus. Therefore, GMHT B. napus is not invading native vegetation surrounding its populations and not likely to cross with congeners in Japanese environment. PMID:26175624