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Sample records for accelerator eta final

  1. GYMNOS Modeling of Electron Beam Dynamics for the Injector and Final Focus Regions of the ETA-II Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueny, C. S.; Wang, L.-F.; Chen, Y.-J.; Hewett, D. W.

    1999-11-01

    The 2-D axisymmetric PIC code GYMNOS has been used to model electron beam dynamics in the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL. Experiments on ETA-II seek to produce a high-brightness, low-emittance electron beam and deliver it to an X-ray converter target. These experiments are relevant to the DARHT II (Dual Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test) and AHF (Advanced Hydrotest Facility) projects, which will provide X-ray radiography diagnostics as part of the US Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. We present simulations of both the ETA-II injector which produces the initial beam, and of the target region where X-ray generation occurs. GYMNOS employs the Embedded Curved Boundary (ECB) model to provide accurate beam modeling near the injector cathode and the target surfaces, and was recently upgraded with a non-uniform mesh to efficiently model the beam over a range of spatial scales. Modeling of the ETA-II injector has provided guidance on experimental parameters necessary for producing a high-quality beam for transport through the accelerator. Simulations of the target region have modeled the effects of backstreaming ions and backscattered electrons on beam dynamics, and investigated possible measures to minimize degradation in beam quality and final spot size.

  2. High brightness cathode experiments on the experimental test accelerator (ETA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.; Proulx, G.

    1984-01-01

    The experiments performed on the ETA during the months of September through October of 1984 were intended to accomplish two objectives; to discover or develop a source capable of producing an electron beam whose brightness is substantially higher than that of previous sources, and to determine, if possible, the mechanisms which limit the source brightness so that further enhancements might be obtained. The results of the experiments met these objectives to a limited degree. A cathode material (velvet) and a diode geometry were identified which resulted in more than a factor of two improvements in brightness over that obtained with previous flashboard cathodes. Experiments were performed which have yielded information about mechanisms which may limit beam brightness, and have suggested approaches for further work to improve brightness. However, the desired brightness of 10/sup 5/ A/(cm/sup 2/-rad/sup 2/) was not achieved in these experiments. This report contains a discussion of the cathodes used, the diode geometries employed, the diagnostics, the typical characteristics of a single beam experiment, and the characteristics of the collimator used to measure the brightness. The entire ensemble of brightness data is presented and broken down into classes of experiments. In addition, the results of an EBQ calculation of one diode geometry are discussed, and differences between the results of similar experiments on ETA and ATA are noted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  3. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  4. DARHT II Scaled Accelerator Tests on the ETA II Accelerator*

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J T; Anaya Jr, E M; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Chen, Y; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Paul, A C; Raymond, B A; Richardson, R A; Watson, J A; Chan, D; Davis, H A; Day, L A; Scarpetti, R D; Schultze, M E; Hughes, T P

    2005-05-26

    The DARHT II accelerator at LANL is preparing a series of preliminary tests at the reduced voltage of 7.8 MeV. The transport hardware between the end of the accelerator and the final target magnet was shipped to LLNL and installed on ETA II. Using the ETA II beam at 5.2 MeV we completed a set of experiments designed reduce start up time on the DARHT II experiments and run the equipment in a configuration adapted to the reduced energy. Results of the beam transport using a reduced energy beam, including the kicker and kicker pulser system will be presented.

  5. ETA-II accelerator upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, D.G.; Deadrick, F.J.; Hibbs, S.M.; Sampayan, S.E.; Petersen, D.E.

    1991-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements to the ETA-II linear induction electron accelerator. The accelerator`s cells have been carefully reconditioned to raise the maximum accelerating gap voltage from approximately 100 kV to 125 kV. Insulators of Rexolite plastic in a new ``zero-gap`` arrangement replaced the alumina originals after several alternative materials were investigated. A new multi-cable current feed system will be used to eliminate pulse reflection interactions encountered in earlier experiments. Improved alignment fixtures have been installed to help minimize beam perturbation due to poorly aligned intercell magnets between 10-cell groups. A stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) has been utilized to enhance overall magnetic alignment, and to characterize irreducible alignment errors. These changes are in conjunction with an expansion of the accelerator from a 20-cell to a 60-cell configuration. When completed, the upgraded accelerator is expected to deliver 2.5 kA of electron beam current at 7.5 MeV in bursts of up to fifty 70-ns pulses at a 5-kHz repetition rate. A 5.5-meter-long wiggler will convert the energy into 3-GW microwave pulses at 140 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX).

  6. ETA-II accelerator upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, D.G.; Deadrick, F.J.; Hibbs, S.M.; Sampayan, S.E.; Petersen, D.E.

    1991-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements to the ETA-II linear induction electron accelerator. The accelerator's cells have been carefully reconditioned to raise the maximum accelerating gap voltage from approximately 100 kV to 125 kV. Insulators of Rexolite plastic in a new zero-gap'' arrangement replaced the alumina originals after several alternative materials were investigated. A new multi-cable current feed system will be used to eliminate pulse reflection interactions encountered in earlier experiments. Improved alignment fixtures have been installed to help minimize beam perturbation due to poorly aligned intercell magnets between 10-cell groups. A stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) has been utilized to enhance overall magnetic alignment, and to characterize irreducible alignment errors. These changes are in conjunction with an expansion of the accelerator from a 20-cell to a 60-cell configuration. When completed, the upgraded accelerator is expected to deliver 2.5 kA of electron beam current at 7.5 MeV in bursts of up to fifty 70-ns pulses at a 5-kHz repetition rate. A 5.5-meter-long wiggler will convert the energy into 3-GW microwave pulses at 140 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX).

  7. Search for B Meson Decays to eta' eta' K

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-05

    The authors describe searches for decays of B mesons to the charmless final states {eta}'{eta}'K. The data consist of 228 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The 90% confidence level upper limits for the branching fractions are {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup 0}) < 31 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup +}) < 25 x 10{sup -6}.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the electromagnetic environment in the immediate vicinity of the ETA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cabayan, H.S.; Bogdan, E.; Zicker, J.; Wythe, D.; Burke, G.J.

    1980-04-01

    The electromagnetic fields in the immediate vicinity of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have been characterized. Various EM sensors that cover the frequency band from the very low frequencies up into the GHz region have been used. The report describes in detail the probes, the test set-up and the data processing techniques.

  9. Measurements of reduced corkscrew motion on the ETA-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Brand, H.R.; Chambers, F.W.; Chen, Y.J.; Coffield, F.E.; Deadrick, F.J.; Griffith, L.V.; Lager, D.L.; Mauer, W.J.; Nexsen, W.E.; Paul, A.C.; Sampayan, S.; Turner, W.C.

    1991-05-01

    The ETA-II linear induction accelerator is used to drive a microwave free electron laser (FEL). Corkscrew motion, which previously limited performance, has been reduced by: (1) an improved pulse distribution system which reduces energy sweep, (2) improved magnetic alignment achieved with a stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) and (3) a unique magnetic tuning algorithm. Experiments have been carried out on a 20-cell version of ETA-II operating at 1500 A and 2.7 MeV. The measured transverse beam motion is less than 0.5 mm for 40 ns of the pulse, an improvement of a factor of 2 to 3 over previous results. Details of the computerized tuning procedure, estimates of the corkscrew phase, and relevance of these results to future FEL experiments are presented. 11 refs.

  10. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE EXPANDING BLAST WAVE OF {eta} CARINA'S GREAT ERUPTION OF 1843

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, S.; Domainko, W.; Hinton, J. A. E-mail: wilfried.domainko@mpi-hd.mpg.d

    2010-08-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV {<=} E {<=} 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission in the direction of {eta} Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE, and Fermi satellites. So far this emission has been interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars. However, the existence of a very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 'Great Eruption' provides an alternative particle acceleration site in this system. Here, we explore an alternate scenario and find that inverse Compton emission from electrons accelerated in the blast wave can naturally explain both the flux and spectral shape of the measured hard X-ray and HE {gamma}-ray emission. This scenario is further supported by the lack of significant variability in the INTEGRAL and Fermi measured fluxes.

  11. B-meson decays to eta' rho, eta' f0, and eta' K*

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We present measurements of B-meson decays to the final states {eta}{prime} {rho}, {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}, and {eta}{prime} K*, where K* stands for a vector, scalar, or tensor strange meson. We observe a significant signal or evidence for {eta}{prime} {rho}{sup +} and all the {eta}{prime}K* channels. We also measure, where applicable, the charge asymmetries, finding results consistent with no direct CP violation in all cases. The measurements are performed on a data sample consisting of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Our results favor the theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD and QCD Factorization and we observe an enhancement of the tensor K*{sub 2} (1430) with respect to the vector K*(892) component.

  12. Branching Fraction Limits for B0 Decays to eta' eta, eta' pi0 and eta pi0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-10

    We describe searches for decays to two-body charmless final states {eta}'{eta}, {eta}'{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}{pi}{sup 0} of B{sup 0} mesons produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 232 million produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions are, in units of 10{sup -6} (upper limits at 90% C.L.): {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}) = 0.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7} {+-} 0.4 (< 1.7), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} {+-} 0.1 (< 1.3), and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.8{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} {+-} 0.1 (< 2.1). The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  13. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2014-05-13

    physics motivation for our experiment, one that requires only a few dozen researchers but must effectively integrate plasma, accelerator, atomic, and fundamental physics, as well as combine numerous technologies in the control, manipulation, and measurement of neutral and non-neutral particles. The ELENA ring (to which we hope to contribute, should funding be provided) is expect, when completed, to significantly enhance the performance of antihydrogen trapping by increasing by a factor of 100 the number of antiprotons that can be successfully trapped and cooled. ELENA operation is scheduled to commence in 2017. In collaboration with LBNL scientists, we proposed a frictional cooling scheme. This is an alternative cooling method to that used by ELENA. It is less complicated, experimentally unproven, and produces a lower yield of cold antiprotons. Students and postdoctoral researchers work on the trapping, cooling, transport, and nonlinear dynamics of antiprotons bunches that are provided by the AD to ALPHA; they contribute to the operation of the experiment, to software development, and to the design and operation of experiments. Students are expected to spend at summers at CERN while taking courses; after completion of courses they typically reside at CERN for most of the half-year run. The Antiproton Decelerator [AD] at CERN, along with its experiments, is the only facility in the world where antiprotons can be trapped and cooled and combined with positrons to form cold antihydrogen, with the ultimate goal of studying CPT violation and, subsequently, gravitational interactions of antimatter. Beyond the ALPHA experiment, the group worked on beam physics problems including limits on the average current in a time-dependent period cathode and new methods to create longitudinally coherent high repetition rate soft x-ray sources and wide bandwidth mode locked x-ray lasers. We completed a detailed study of quantum mechanical effects in the transit time cooling of muons.

  14. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron-laser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1992-05-01

    We have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (intense Microwave Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT). and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA. 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. We summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations.

  15. IR (infrared radiation) observations of the ETA (Experimental Test Accelerator) beam channel. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.L.; Ditteon, R.P.; Frazier, E.N.; Giguere, R.P.; Rice, C.J.

    1985-09-30

    Aerospace Corporation scientists observed infrared radiation from the ETA beam channel in the wavelength range 0.65 -14.4 micrometer on September 12-16, 1983. The data consisted of time profiles of radiation pulses from the beam channel, measured with a limiting time resolution of 100 nanoseconds. Isolation of spectral bands was achieved through the use of broadband filters and circular variable filters (CVF). The latter had resolution lambda/delta lambda = 50 - 100, where lambda is wavelength. A total of 1076 radiation pulses were recorded. The beam propagation tube was filled with either ambient laboratory air or synthetic (dry) air at pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 500 Torr.

  16. Observation of B^+\\to\\eta\\rho^+ and Search for B^0 Decays to\\eta^\\prime\\eta, \\eta\\pi^0, \\eta^\\prime\\pi^0, and \\omega\\pi^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, Marcella; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, Marco; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, Janice; Cahn, Robert N.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-04-22

    The authors present measurements of branching fractions for five B-meson decays to two-body charmless final states. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 459 million B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions are, in units of 10{sup -6} (upper limits at 90% C.L.): {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{rho}{sup +}) = 9.9 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.8, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}) = 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.2), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.9 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.5), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.9 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.5), and {Beta}(B{sup 0}{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup 0}) = {eta}{rho}{sup +} mode, they measure the charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch} (B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{rho}{sup +}) = 0.13 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.02.

  17. Modified betatron accelerator studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.P.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1984-12-01

    This final report describes work carried out on the equilibrium and stability properties of circular accelerators. A rigid-disk beam model in which the fields are treated exactly is used to study linear instabilities. This approach has uncovered an important inductive effect which at high toroidal mode numbers leads to either stability or to a hybrid instability. A corresponding effect has been found in electron-layer geometry. The new theory also shows that moving the equilibrium position toward the inner wall can stabilize low mode numbers. With the aid of IVORY code simulation results it is shown that the transverse motion of beam partilces is a key factor in determining beam stability. The upper bound on particle circulation frequency spread is shown to be a function only of the beam major and minor radii. This leads to upper bounds on stable currents in the modified betatron. Numerical results on stability in the stellatron and reversing-solenoidal-lens betatrons are presented. In addition, the sensitivity of equilibrium particle orbits in the stellatron to initial conditions is calculated.

  18. B meson decays to charmless meson pairs containing eta or eta'

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-12-14

    The authors present updated measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}K{sup 0}, {eta}{eta}, {eta}{phi}, {eta}{omega}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}, {eta}{prime}, {phi}, and {eta}{prime}{omega} and branching fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for B{sup +} decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, and {eta}{prime} K{sup +}. The data represent the full dataset of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Besides large signals for the four charged B decays modes and for B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, they find evidence for three B{sup 0} decays modes at greater than 3.0{sigma} significance. They find {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) = (1.15{sub -0.38}{sup +0.43} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) = (0.94{sub -0.30}{sup +0.35} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) = (1.01{sub -0.38}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic). For the B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} decay mode, they measure the charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch} (B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}) = -0.36 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.03.

  19. eta. prime -. eta. -. pi. sup 0 mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B. ); Lahiri, A. ); Niyogi, S. )

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the saturation of anomalous Ward identities by the low-lying pseudoscalars {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {eta}{prime} to determine the sizes of {eta}{prime}-{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}, and {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}{prime} mixing angles. The {eta}{prime}-{eta} mixing angle turns out to be about {minus}20{degree} which is consistent with the recent findings. Our estimate for the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing angle shows that it could be bigger than the older value obtained from the {rho}-{omega} mixing, baryon mass splittings, and kaon mass difference.

  20. Searches for Charmless Decays B0 --> eta omega, B0 --> eta K0, B+ --> eta rho+, and B+ --> eta' pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-13

    The authors report results for measurements of the decay branching fractions of B{sup 0} to the charmless final states {eta}{omega} and {eta}K{sup 0}, and of B{sup +} to {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}'{pi}{sup +}. None of these decays have been observed definitively. Measurements of the related decays B{sup +} --> {eta}K{sup +}, B{sup +} --> {eta}{pi}{sup +}, and B --> {eta}'K were published recently. Charmless decays with kaons are usually expected to be dominated by b --> s loop (''penguin'') transitions, while b --> u tree transitions are typically larger for the decays with pions and {rho} mesons. However the B --> {eta}K decays are especially interesting since they are suppressed relative to the abundant B --> {eta}'K decays due to destructive interference between two penguin amplitudes. The CKM-suppressed b --> u amplitudes may interfere significantly with penguin amplitudes, possibly leading to large direct CP violation in B{sup +} --> {eta}{rho}{sup +} and B{sup +} --> {eta}'{pi}{sup +}; numerical estimates are available in a few cases. The authors search for such direct CP violation by measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub ch} {equivalent_to} ({Gamma}{sup -} - {Gamma}{sup +})/({Gamma}{sup -} + {Gamma}{sup +}) in the rates {Gamma}{sup {+-}} = {Gamma}(B{sup {+-}} --> f{sup {+-}}), for each observed charged final state f{sup {+-}}. Charmless B decays are becoming useful to test the accuracy of theoretical predictions. Phenomenological fits to the branching fractions and charge asymmetries can be used to understand the importance of tree and penguin contributions and may provide sensitivity to the CKM angle {gamma}.

  1. Eta(547) and Eta(958) Meson Photoproduction on the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Dugger

    2001-12-01

    Photoproduction of {eta} and {eta}{prime} mesons has been studied at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a tagged photon beam incident on a hydrogen target with photon energies from the respective production thresholds up to 2.4 GeV. The photoproduced mesons were identified via missing mass reconstruction using recoil proton momentum and time of flight information. Data were obtained in a range of {radical}s from threshold to 2.2 GeV for each meson. In this study, differential cross-section measurements for the {gamma}p {yields} p{eta} and {gamma}p {yields} p{eta}{prime} reactions are presented, and the results compared to recent data. An isobar analysis of the differential cross-sections is performed. The predicted differential cross-sections from the isobar analysis are used to predict behavior in unmeasured regions of phase space, and to infer total cross sections. For the {gamma}p {yields} p{eta} reaction, a value of the S{sub 11}(1535) proton helicity amplitude also was extracted and compared to recent analyses. The data presented greatly extends the energy and angle coverage for differential cross-sections of {eta} photoproduction, and significantly improves the accuracy with which {eta}{prime} cross sections are known.

  2. Searches for B0 Decays to eta K0, eta eta,eta' eta', eta phi, and eta'phi

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-07-31

    The authors search for B{sup 0} meson decays into two-body combinations of K{sup 0}, {eta}, {eta}', and {phi} mesons in 324 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They measure the following branching fractions (upper limits at 90% confidence level) in units of 10{sup -6}: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) = 1.8{sub -0.6}{sup +0.7} {+-} 0.1 (< 2.9), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) = 1.1{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} {+-} 0.1(< 1.8), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) = 0.1 {+-} 0.2 {+-} 0.1(< 0.6), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{phi}) = 0.2{sub -0.3}{sup +0.4} {+-} 0.1(< 1.0), and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}') = 1.0{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} {+-} 0.1 (< 2.4), where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. Photoproduction of eta-mesic 3He.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Beck, R; Caselotti, G; Cherepnya, S; Föhl, K; Fog, L S; Hornidge, D; Janssen, S; Kashevarov, V; Kondratiev, R; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; Mengel, K; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Novotny, R; Rost, M; Sack, S; Sanderson, R; Schadmand, S; Thomas, A; Watts, D P

    2004-06-25

    The photoproduction of eta-mesic 3He has been investigated using the TAPS calorimeter at the Mainz Microtron accelerator facility MAMI. The total inclusive cross section for the reaction gamma3He-->etaX has been measured for photon energies from threshold to 820 MeV. The total and angular differential coherent eta cross sections have been extracted up to energies of 745 MeV. A resonancelike structure just above the eta production threshold with an isotropic angular distribution suggests the existence of a resonant quasibound state. This is supported by studies of a competing decay channel of such a quasibound eta-mesic nucleus into pi(0)pX. A binding energy of (-4.4+/-4.2) MeV and a width of (25.6+/-6.1) MeV is deduced for the quasibound eta-mesic state in 3He. PMID:15244998

  4. Observation of B-->eta'K* and evidence for B+-->eta'rho+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-02-01

    We present an observation of B-->eta'K*. The data sample corresponds to 232x10(6) BB[over ] pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6)) B(B(0)-->eta'K*0)=3.8+/-1.1+/-0.5 and B(B+-->eta'K*+)=4.9(1.7)(+1.9)+/-0.8, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. A simultaneous fit results in the observation of B-->eta'K* with B(B-->eta'K*)=4.1(-0.9)(+1.0)+/-0.5. We also search for B-->eta'rho and eta'f(0)(980)(f(0)-->pi+pi-) with results and 90% confidence level upper limits B(B+-->eta'rho+)=8.7(-2.8-1.3)(+3.1+2.3) (<14), B(B(0)-->eta'rho0)<3.7, and B(B(0)-->eta'f(0)(980)(f(0)-->pi+pi-))<1.5. Charge asymmetries in the channels with significant yields are consistent with zero. PMID:17358844

  5. Measurement of the Color-Suppressed B0->D(*)0 pi0 /omega/eta/eta Prime Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, X

    2008-11-05

    The authors report results on the branching fraction (BF) measurement of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}, and D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}. They measure the branching fractions BF(D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.78 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.78 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.41 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.32 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{omega}) = (2.77 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{omega}) = (4.44 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.38 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4} and BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.29 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The result is based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance from 1999 to 2007, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions is confirmed and the measurements seem to be more in favor of SCET compared to pQCD.

  6. Measurement of branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B+ decays to eta pi+, eta K+, eta rho+, and eta' pi+, and search for B0 decays to eta K0 and eta omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morg An, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Derrington, I M; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for six B-meson decay modes with an eta or eta(') meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6)): B(B+ -->eta pi(+))=5.1+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B+ etaK+)=3.3+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B0-->etaK0)=1.5+/-0.7+/-0.1 (<2.5 at 90% C.L.), B(B+-->eta rho(+))=8.4+/-1.9+/-1.1, B(B0-->eta omiga)=1.0+/-0.5+/-0.2 (<1.9 at 90% C.L.), and B(B+-->eta(')pi(+))=4.0+/-0.8+/-0.4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and second systematic. For the charged modes we also determine the charge asymmetries, all found to be compatible with zero. PMID:16197132

  7. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  8. Eta-nucleon interaction and nuclear production of eta mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Eta-nucleon interaction and eta-nucleus dynamics are discussed. The possibility of using {eta} to probe unnatural-parity nuclear states and to study spin-isospin correlations between two nucleons are demonstrated.

  9. Search For {eta}-Bound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Machner, H.

    2011-10-24

    The {eta} meson can be bound to atomic nuclei. Experimental search is discussed in the form of final state interaction for the reactions dp{yields}{sup 3}He{eta} and dd{yields}{sup 4}He{eta}. For the latter case tensor polarized deuterons were used in order to extract the s-wave strength. For both reactions complex scattering lengths are deduced: In a two-nucleon transfer reaction under quasi-free conditions, p{sup 27}Al{yields}{sup 3}HeX, was investigated. The system X can be the bound {sup 25}Mg x {eta} at rest. When a possible decay of an intermediate N{sup *}(1535) is required, a highly significant bump shows up in the missing mass spectrum. The data give for a bound state a binding energy of 13.3{+-}1.6 MeV and a width of {sigma} = 4.4{+-}1.3 MeV.

  10. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  11. Final report on the LLNL compact torus acceleration project

    SciTech Connect

    Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.; Hartman, C.; McLean, H.; Molvik, A.

    1995-03-19

    In this report, we summarize recent work at LLNL on the compact torus (CT) acceleration project. The CT accelerator is a novel technique for projecting plasmas to high velocities and reaching high energy density states. The accelerator exploits magnetic confinement in the CT to stably transport plasma over large distances and to directed kinetic energies large in comparison with the CT internal and magnetic energy. Applications range from heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices, generation of intense pulses of x-rays or neutrons for weapons effects and high energy-density fusion concepts.

  12. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  13. Study of B Meson Decays with Excited eta and eta-prime Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-04-18

    Using 383 million B{bar B} pairs from the BABAR data sample, they report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to K{bar K}* or {eta}{pi}{pi} final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c{sup 2}. They observe a significant enhancement at the low K{bar K}* invariant mass which is interpreted as B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1475)K{sup +}, find evidence for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1295)K{sup +}, and place upper limits on the decays B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1405)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1420)K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1680)K{sup +}.

  14. Branching Fraction and P-violation Charge Asymmetry Measurements for B-meson Decays to eta K+-, eta pi+-, eta'K, eta' pi+-, omega K, and omega pi+-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-28

    The authors present measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} and {omega}K{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions and CP-violation charge asymmetries for B{sup +} meson decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup +}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 383 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The measurements agree with previous results; they find no evidence for direct CP violation.

  15. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-06-12

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation.

  16. Single particles accelerate final stages of capillary break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Anke; Fiscina, Jorge Eduardo; Wagner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite-time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well-known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. This accelerated regime is characterized by an asymmetric shape of the filament with an enhanced curvature that depends on the size and the spatial distribution of the particles within the capillary thread.

  17. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  18. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  19. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Irving

    2009-10-31

    The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.

  20. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.

  1. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2007-04-30

    This chapter describes the accelerator physics aspects, the engineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to the accelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator (also called the ''electron beam delivery system'') covers the region from the exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. The considerations that led to the proposed configuration were made on the basis of a study that explored various options and performance limits. This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS [1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL [5], LBNL LUX [6], Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developed there. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had not yet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. A particularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement for high peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification for the ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness of the electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of the LCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce an electron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energy distributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducing novel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the fact that there were no readily available computational tools to carry out reliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of the information reported in this study is available in the form of scientific publications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of the reader.

  2. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  3. Advanced Klystrons for High Efficiency Accelerator Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2014-03-26

    This program explored tailoring of RF pulses used to drive accelerator cavities. Simulations indicated that properly shaping the pulse risetime to match accelerator cavity characteristics reduced reflected power and increased total efficiency. Tailoring the pulse requires a high power, gridded, klystron to shape the risetime while also controlling the beam current. The Phase I program generated a preliminary design of a gridded electron gun for a klystron producing 5-10 MW of RF power. This required design of a segmented cathode using Controlled Porosity Reservoir cathodes to limit power deposition on the grid. The program was successful in computationally designing a gun producing a high quality electron beam with grid control. Additional analysis of pulse tailoring indicated that technique would only be useful for cavity drive pulses that were less than approximately 2-3 times the risetime. Otherwise, the efficiency gained during the risetime of the pulse became insignificant when considering the efficiency over the entire pulse. Consequently, it was determined that a Phase II program would not provide sufficient return to justify the cost. Never the less, other applications for a high power gridded gun are currently being pursued. This klystron, for example, would facilitate development inverse Comptom x-ray sources by providing a high repetition rate (10 -100 kHz) RF source.

  4. [Advanced accelerator R and D program]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for a 3-year renewal of the DOE advanced accelerator R and D (AARD) program at Texas A and M University. The program to date has focused on the development of the gigatron, a compact high-efficiency microwave driver for future linear colliders. The author reports results and progress in that project, and plans to bring it to a milestone and conclusion by mid-1995. He proposes to initiate a second project, the development of a new technology for ultra-high field superconducting magnets for future hadron colliders. This project builds upon two magnet designs which he has introduced during the past year, which have the potential for a dramatic extension of the achievable field strength for both dipoles and quadrupoles.

  5. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the accelerator physics aspects, theengineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to theaccelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator(also called the "electron beam delivery system") covers the region fromthe exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. Theconsiderations that led to the proposed configuration were made on thebasis of a study that explored various options and performance limits.This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS[1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL[5], LBNL LUX [6],Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developedthere. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had notyet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. Aparticularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement forhigh peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification forthe ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness ofthe electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of theLCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce anelectron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energydistributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducingnovel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the factthat there were no readily available computational tools to carry outreliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of theinformation reported in this study is available in the form of scientificpublications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of thereader.

  6. Accelerator development for the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) free-electron-laser program. Final report, July 1981-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lucey, R.; Putnam, S.

    1988-06-01

    Included in the report are descriptions of the final assembly and operation of the Linear Induction Accelerator(LIA), installation and testing of a new accelerating gap in the five-core stage of the accelerator to operate at 150 kV, and the moving of and modifications of the charging and firing controls for remote operation of the accelerator.

  7. Final Report for "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulations".

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Stoltz, P. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B. T.; Bell, G.; Paul, K.; Veitzer, S.

    2013-04-19

    This final report describes the work that has been accomplished over the past 5 years under the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator and Simulations (ComPASS) at Tech-X Corporation. Tech-X had been involved in the full range of ComPASS activities with simulation of laser plasma accelerator concepts, mainly in collaboration with LOASIS program at LBNL, simulation of coherent electron cooling in collaboration with BNL, modeling of electron clouds in high intensity accelerators, in collaboration with researchers at Fermilab and accurate modeling of superconducting RF cavity in collaboration with Fermilab, JLab and Cockcroft Institute in the UK.

  8. The Uncloaking of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopy has revealed much new detail of the ejecta thrown out of Eta Carinae. We have now accomplished eight visits of the star and the Homunculus using the STIS with a 52" x 0.1" aperture and with spectral coverage from 1640A to 10400A. Moreover we now have FUV observations with the STIS and with FUSE. From the FUSE and FUV observations, we see strong evidence for a hot companion star, likely in agreement with the binaricity of the spectrum in the near red. From the STIS observations, we see evidence of much substructure of the ejecta, ranging from the fast moving strings noted by Kirstin Weis, the outer emission nebula, to the Homunculus lobes and a disk. Deep within, we find a bipolar structure, the Integral Nebula and finally close to the star, a small ionized gas region that shows evidence of the stellar wind being resolved from the central source(s).

  9. Measurements of Branching Fraction and CP Violation inB Meson Rare Decays to Final States containing eta or eta' Mesons in the BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Alfio

    2007-04-11

    Note that the main goal of this thesis work is the measurement of the branching fractions, charge asymmetry, and Time-Dependent CP Violation in η'K0 mode. All other measurements are reported here for completion because they are connected by similar physics arguments. They are part of the Milan analysis activity, done by undergraduate students. They should not be considered as done in this thesis work. The measurements of the two body-modes ηη, ηΦ, and η'Φare used to determine a theoretical bound based on SU(3) flavor symmetry for the difference between SM prediction and the experimental measurements of CP violation parameters in b → s loop-dominated modes. In general for this estimation we need to measure the branching fractions (or upper limits) of neutral B decays to two-body modes with η', η, Φ, ω, π0, K0, K*0 [13, 14, 15, 16]. There is an important issue related to the branching fractions of η'K (charged and neutral) modes. Since the discover of B → η'K in 1997 [17] with high branching fraction (higher than expected), it was found that the corresponding mode with η is suppressed. This fact was pointed out by Lipkin in 1991 [18]. In particular, using arguments concerning the η-η' mixing angle and the parity of K or K* we can say that η'K and vK* are enhanced, while ηK and η'K* are suppressed. This scheme is experimentally verified. The branching fraction of all these modes are already measured, but the B0 → ηK0. So it is important to measure also this mode to complete the scenario. Finally we report on the measurements of the radiative modes B → η'Kγ and of the three-body mode B → η'η'K. Both cases are good candidates to manifest effects due to NP in CP violations [19, 20]. For all measurements we use an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to extract the number of signal yields and CP parameters. To perform these fits we have developed a flexible program in C

  10. Search for B^0 meson decays to \\pi^0 K^0_S K^0_S, \\eta K^0_S K^0_S, and \\eta^{\\prime}K^0_S K^0_S

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-05-08

    We describe searches for B{sup 0} meson decays to the charmless final states {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, and {eta}{prime}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation and collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We find no significant signals and determine the 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions, in units of 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 12, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 10, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 20.

  11. Study of B meson decays with excited eta and eta' mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-08-29

    Using 383 x 10(6) BBover pairs from the BABAR data sample, we report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to KKover* or etapipi final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c2. We observe a significant enhancement at the low KKover* invariant mass which is interpreted as B+-->eta(1475)K+, find evidence for the decay B+-->eta(1295)K+, and place upper limits on the decays B+-->eta(1405)K+, B+-->f1(1285)K+, B+-->f1(1420)K+, and B+-->phi(1680)K+. PMID:18851601

  12. Physics Design of the Eta-II Double Pulse Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Ho, Darwin D.-H.; McCarrick, James; Paul, Arthur; Sampayan, Stephen; Wang, Li-Fang; Weir, John

    2000-10-01

    The second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility will provide four 2.1 mm spot size, x-ray pulses within 2 ms with their x-doses in the range of several hundred rads at a meter for x-ray imaging. To achieve its performance specifications, there should be a sufficient amount of the DARHT-II x-ray converter material remaining while it turns into plasma and expands rapidly due to the heating of previous beam pulses. Furthermore, the beam-target interactions, such as the unwanted focusing by the backstreaming ions from the desorbed gas from the target surface for the first pulse and by those from the target plasma for the subsequent pulses, and the instability of the beam propagating in dense plasma, should be mitigated. We have modified the single pulse target experimental facility on the Experimental Test Accelerator II (ETA-II) to perform the double pulse target experiments to validate the DARHT-II multi-pulse target concept. The 1.15 MeV, 2 kA Snowtron injector will be used to provide the first electron pulse. The 6 MeV, 2 kA ETA-II beam will be used as the probe beam, i.e., the second pulse. The ETA-II target is located inside a focusing magnet (near the center). To use the same ETA-II final focus lens, an iron sleeve will be inserted from the downstream side of the magnet to reduce the downstream side’s magnetic field, and the Snowtron beam will strike the x-ray converter from the back. The physics design of the final focus area will be presented. We have modeled the hydrodynamics of the target expansion for the Snowtron beam. Comparison against the DARHT-II target will be presented.

  13. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  14. Summary of the [eta]-meson sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This summary describes the contents of the nineteen talks related to research on the [eta] meson and presented at the Workshop of Future Directions. The subjects of this area include threshold [eta] production, [eta]-nuclear spectroscopy, baryon spectroscopy, [eta] decays, facilities, and instrumentation.

  15. Summary of the {eta}-meson sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1993-06-01

    This summary describes the contents of the nineteen talks related to research on the {eta} meson and presented at the Workshop of Future Directions. The subjects of this area include threshold {eta} production, {eta}-nuclear spectroscopy, baryon spectroscopy, {eta} decays, facilities, and instrumentation.

  16. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  17. The seismology of eta Bootes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarque, Pierre; Guenther, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    Some p-mode frequencies and other observations were used to determine the mass, the age and the helium abundance of eta Bootes. It is shown how, by direct application, the p-mode frequencies and stellar seismological tools help in constraining the physical parameters of eta Boo. The existence of mode bumping is confirmed and it is discussed how it may be used to refine the estimate of the eta Boo's age. The effect of the OPAL equation of state on the p-mode frequencies is described.

  18. Observation of B0-->omega K0, B+-->eta pi+, and B+-->eta K+ and study of related decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Lee, C L; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-02-13

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for seven B-meson decays with an eta, eta', or omega meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 89x10(6) BB pairs produced from e(+)e(-) annihilation at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the following branching fractions in units of 10(-6): B(B+-->eta pi(+))=5.3+/-1.0+/-0.3, B(B+-->eta K+)=3.4+/-0.8+/-0.2, B(B0-->eta K0)=2.9+/-1.0+/-0.2 (<5.2, 90% C.L.), B(B+-->eta(')pi(+))=2.7+/-1.2+/-0.3 (<4.5, 90% C.L.), B(B+-->omega pi(+))=5.5+/-0.9+/-0.5, B(B+-->omega K+)=4.8+/-0.8+/-0.4, and B(B0-->omega K0)=5.9(+1.6)(-1.3)+/-0.5. The charge asymmetries are A(ch)(B+-->eta pi(+))=-0.44+/-0.18+/-0.01, A(ch)(B+-->eta K+)=-0.52+/-0.24+/-0.01, A(ch)(B+-->omega pi(+))=0.03+/-0.16+/-0.01, and A(ch)(B+-->omega K+)=-0.09+/-0.17+/-0.01. PMID:14995230

  19. A Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerator for the Final Acceleration Stage of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pasternak, J.; Witte, H.; Bliss, N. Cordwell M.; Jones, T.; Muir, A., Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2011-09-04

    The International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has recently completed its Interim Design Report (IDR), which presents our current baseline design of the neutrino factory. To increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of acceleration, the IDR design uses a linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) for its final acceleration stage. We present the current lattice design of that FFAG, including the main ring plus its injection and extraction systems. We describe parameters for the main ring magnets, kickers, and septa, as well as the power supplies for the kickers. We present a first pass at an engineering layout for the ring and its subsystems.

  20. Final Report to the Department of Energy on the 1994 International Accelerator School: Frontiers of Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, F.A.

    1998-09-17

    The international accelerator school on Frontiers of Accelerator Technology was organized jointly by the US Particle Accelerator School (Dr. Mel Month and Ms. Marilyn Paul), the CERN Accelerator School, and the KEK Accelerator School, and was hosted by the University of Hawaii. The course was held on Maui, Hawaii, November 3-9, 1994 and was made possible in part by a grant from the Department of Energy under award number DE-FG03-94ER40875, AMDT M006. The 1994 program was preceded by similar joint efforts held at Santa Margherita di Pula, Sardinia in February 1985, South Padre Island, Texas in October 1986, Anacapri, Italy in October 1988, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina in October 1990, and Benalmedena, Spain in October/November 1992. The most recent program was held in Montreux, Switzerland in May 1998. The purpose of the program is to disseminate knowledge on the latest ideas and developments in the technology of particle accelerators by bringing together known world experts and younger scientists in the field. It is intended for individuals with professional interest in accelerator physics and technology, for graduate students, for post-docs, for those interested in accelerator based sciences, and for scientific and engineering staff at industrial firms, especially those companies specializing in accelerator components.

  1. Ultraviolet and visual wavelength spectroscopy of gas around ETA Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K.; Dufour, R. J.; Walborn, N. R.; Gull, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    Observational results of Eta Carinae are reported, especially spectroscopy of the outer 'S condensation' supplemented by data on the homunculus and its core. Theoretical calculations of atmosphere/wind models and of the shock-heated S condensation are needed for a proper analysis of the data, but some simplified results are discussed. The helium abundance at the surface of Eta Car appears to be roughly 0.4, and most of the CNO is nitrogen. There does not appear to be any reason, at present, to alter the often quoted temperature estimate of 30,000 K for the radiating surface (which may or may not be the surface of the star itself). The presently observed mass loss rate is probably less than 10 exp -2.4 solar masses/yr if the outflow is not strongly direction-dependent. Finally, a largely forgotten but highly relevant historical conjecture concerning Eta Car is mentioned.

  2. eta Carinae Continues to Evolve (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Eta Carinae affords us a unique opportunity to study the pre-supernova evolution of the most massive stars. For at least the last half century, it has maintained a 5.5-year spectroscopic cycle that culminates with abrupt decreases in the strong stellar wind emission features. Over the last 15 years, the star has brightened at an accelerated rate and altered its spectrum, in addition to the spectroscopic cycle, indicating an ongoing change in state. We present Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy and synthetic photometry from the most recent spectroscopic event (2014.5) that shows notable differences with past events and provides clues to the on-going evolution of the star.

  3. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  4. Intercampus institute for research at particle accelerators. Final report, March 15, 1992--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-22

    This is the final report to the DOE for the Intercampus Institute for Research at Particle Accelerators, or IIRPA, at least for the San Diego branch. Over the years that DOE supported IIRPA, we were told that yearly reports (and the final report) were not necessary because the previous year`s summary in our annual request for funds constituted those reports. Therefore, it has taken some effort, and a corresponding long time, to put something together, after the fact. The IIRPA was born as an idea that arose during discussions at the 1974 PEP summer study, and began to be funded by DoE during the early stages of PEP detector design and construction. The intent was for the members of the Institute to be responsible for the PEP-9 Facility; all of the PEP experiments were supposed to be facilities, rather than just experimental setups for a particular group or research goal. IIRPA was approved as a Multicampus Research Unit (MRU) in 1977 by the University of California, and it was active on the UCD, UCSB and UCSD campuses for 10 years. This report concentrates on the period of time when the Directorship of IIRPA was once again at the San Diego campus, 1989 to 1995. The collection of yearly reports consisting of research in different areas of particle physics, make up this report in the appendices.

  5. Rare semileptonic B{sub s} decays to {eta} and {eta}' mesons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, K.; Khosravi, R.; Falahati, F.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the rare semileptonic B{sub s}{yields}({eta},{eta}{sup '})l{sup +}l{sup -}, (l=e,{mu},{tau}), and B{sub s}{yields}({eta},{eta}{sup '}){nu}{nu} transitions probing the ss content of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons via three-point QCD sum rules. We calculate responsible form factors for these transitions in full theory. Using the obtained form factors, we also estimate the related branching fractions and longitudinal lepton polarization asymmetries. Our results are in a good consistency with the predictions of the other existing nonperturbative approaches.

  6. UCLA Final Technical Report for the "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation”.

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren

    2015-08-14

    The UCLA Plasma Simulation Group is a major partner of the “Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation”. This is the final technical report. We include an overall summary, a list of publications, progress for the most recent year, and individual progress reports for each year. We have made tremendous progress during the three years. SciDAC funds have contributed to the development of a large number of skeleton codes that illustrate how to write PIC codes with a hierarchy of parallelism. These codes cover 2D and 3D as well as electrostatic solvers (which are used in beam dynamics codes and quasi-static codes) and electromagnetic solvers (which are used in plasma based accelerator codes). We also used these ideas to develop a GPU enabled version of OSIRIS. SciDAC funds were also contributed to the development of strategies to eliminate the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which is an issue when carrying laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) simulations in a boosted frame and when quantifying the emittance and energy spread of self-injected electron beams. This work included the development of a new code called UPIC-EMMA which is an FFT based electromagnetic PIC code and to new hybrid algorithms in OSIRIS. A new hybrid (PIC in r-z and gridless in φ) algorithm was implemented into OSIRIS. In this algorithm the fields and current are expanded into azimuthal harmonics and the complex amplitude for each harmonic is calculated separately. The contributions from each harmonic are summed and then used to push the particles. This algorithm permits modeling plasma based acceleration with some 3D effects but with the computational load of an 2D r-z PIC code. We developed a rigorously charge conserving current deposit for this algorithm. Very recently, we made progress in combining the speed up from the quasi-3D algorithm with that from the Lorentz boosted frame. SciDAC funds also contributed to the improvement and speed up of the quasi-static PIC

  7. Recent results on eta and eta-prime photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Ritchie

    2004-06-01

    The experimental situation on eta and eta' photoproduction on the proton is reviewed, emphasizing progress made since 2001. New preliminary results for eta' photoproduction on the proton from Jefferson Lab are presented. Experimental results are compared with several theoretical approaches, with an emphasis on consequences for understanding baryon spectroscopy.

  8. Recirculation acceleration of high current relativistic electron beams--a feasibility study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.

    1981-06-01

    One of the advanced accelerator concepts under study at NBS involves multiplying the energy gained by a long-pulse, high current relativistic electron beam by directing the beam several times through the same induction accelerator during the time of one voltage pulse. Should this concept of the recirculation acceleration of intense electron beams be proven feasible, the savings in cost, size, and weight of a high current accelerator would be considerable. Energy gain by recirculation acceleration through a small-scale proof-of principle facility has been demonstrated at NBS. The study employs a 750A, 750keV electron beam pulse, 2 microsec long, generated by a linear induction accelerator of unique design which was also developed at NBS.

  9. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  10. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  11. Resolving Eta Carinae and It's Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull Theodore R.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy of Eta Carinae and the Homunculus has led to considerable new insight on the excitation mechanisms, the elemental abundances, and the physical properties of ejecta from Eta Carinae. With HST/STIS we have been able to resolve the central source into many substructures.

  12. Eta Carinae: an Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Gull, Theodore R.

    2009-05-01

    Eta Carinae provides a unique example to investigate a massive star in a late evolutionary phase and how CNO-processed material is ejected and mixed with the interstellar medium. The absorbing gas surrounding Eta Carinae (η Car) shows similar characteristics to the intervening gas in spectra of gamma ray burst progenitors. Consequently, the η Car spectrum may provide clues about the nature of other extreme objects such as hypernovae and supernova impostors. In the 1840s, η Car underwent a massive ejection, which was repeated to a lesser extent in the 1890s. Today we see the Homunculus, a bipolar expanding neutral shell, and the Little Homunculus, an interior, spectroscopically time-variable, ionized structure. The η Car system is ideal as a laboratory for absorption and emission line spectroscopy. In the line-of-sight towards η Car, multiple narrow absorption lines are observed from environments with densities around 107 cm- 3 and temperatures ranging from 60 to 7000 K. Thousands of neutral/singly ionized metal lines are identified, in addition to molecular lines in species such as H2, CH, OH and NH. The input from the laboratory spectroscopy community has furthered the analysis of η Car. Future observations of η Car in the infrared through radio wavelength region will enable new detections of atomic and molecular transitions, most notably of hydrides and nitrides. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where future work is needed.

  13. The Enigmatic Eta Carinae: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. J.

    2008-06-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most famous Luminous Blue Variables but also one of the least understood. Our understanding of η Carinae is severely hindered by the dense wind of the primary star, the influence of a binary companion, the complex circumstellar environment, the asymmetric nature of the mass loss, and the presence of an ``intrinsic" coronagraph which biases our view of Eta Carinae. With the advent of extensive new Hubble Space Telescope data, X-ray data, and ground-based spectroscopic and interferometric observations of Eta Carinae, there has been a dramatic increase in observational material which can be used to place constraints on Eta Carinae and its Homunculus. We summarize recent results, and highlight how recent data is providing new insight into the nature of Eta Carinae.

  14. Development of a two-beam high-current ion accelerator based on Doppler effect. Final report (1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B.I.; Yegorov, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    This Final Report presents the results of work accomplished in accordance with the Scope of Work to the Purchase Order No 4596310. The amount of works includes the following items: 1. Start of the manufacture of the Experimental Accelerating Stand (EAS)-the section for proton acceleration from 5 MeV to 8 MeV, in which RF fields are excited by an electron beam at the anomalous Doppler effect. 2. Theoretical investigation and computer simulation of field excitation and ion acceleration in the EAS. Under item 1, the EAS manufacturing is begun. To present time, a pedestal for the EAS and a stainless steel vacuum chamber for RF resonator are made (length of the chamber is about 180 cm, diameter is about 40 cm). Besides, parts of the EAS resonator with the acceleration structure are manufactured, and its assembly is begun. Under item 2, it is realized three works: calculation of increment and frequency shift of the EAS resonator excited by electron beam, calculation of the solenoid for creation of magnetic field with required spatial distribution, and theoretical investigation and computer simulation of ion acceleration in the EAS. 14 figs., 16 refs.

  15. Dilution jets in accelerated cross flows. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments are designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio and the densimetric Froude number.

  16. Pseudoscalar glueball and {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vento, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    We have performed a dynamical analysis of the mixing in the pseudoscalar channel with the goal of understanding the existence and behavior of the pseudoscalar glueball. Our philosophy has not been to predict precise values of the glueball mass but to exploit an adequate effective theory to the point of breaking and to analyze which kind of mechanisms restore compatibility with data. Our study has led to analytical solutions which allow a clear understanding of the phenomena. The outcome of our calculation leads to a large mass glueball M{sub {Theta}>}2000 MeV, to a large glue content of the {eta}{sup '}, and to mixing angles in agreement with previous numerical studies.

  17. Eta Carinae: A Demanding Mistress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    In the 1840's a southern star, Eta Argus, brightened to rival Sirius for nearly a decade, then faded. Today, we see the Homunculus, an hourglass figure with tutu, a dusty shell exceeding 12 solar masses expanding outward at 500 km/s. Many observers have systematically studied the massive binary total shrouded by interacting winds and its ejecta. More recently 3-D wind-wind collision models have begun to explain the extended structures resolved by Hubble Space Telescope. Now Herschel Space Observatory infrared scans are revealing wind interaction emissions and complex molecules left over from the dust that formed out of gas originally overabundant in nitrogen and greatly-depleted in oxygen and carbon. Many questions remain to be answered: What is the dust that formed in the 1840s event? What are the end states of the two massive companions ... SN, GRB, Hypernova? and When

  18. ETA-II experiments for determining advanced radiographic capabilities of induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.T.; Caporaso, G.J.; Clark, J.C.; Kirbie, H.C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Lund, S.M.; Westenskow, G.A.; Paul, A.C

    1997-05-01

    LLNL has proposed a multi-pulsed, multi-line of sight radiographic machine based on induction linac technology to be the core of the advanced hydrotest facility (AHF) being considered by the Department of Energy. In order to test the new technologies being developed for AHF we have recommissioned the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA II). We will conduct our initial experiments using kickers and large angle bending optics at the ETA II facility. Our current status and our proposed experimental schedule will be presented.

  19. Phenomenology of some rare and forbidden. eta. -decays

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the contribution from possible new physics to the decays {eta} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} {mu}e and {eta} {pi}{mu}e, and assess the sensitivities required for experimental studies of these decays to extend our knowledge about the new interactions. 61 refs.

  20. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The original purpose of this research was an investigation into the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three main objectives namely, the development of a suitable ion injector, the growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components parts into a suitable proof of principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. This work focusses on the first two of these objectives.

  1. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-04-01

    The Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is intended to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) consists of three tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, and Technology Verification. As currently conceived, the ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. This report covers activities during the first 6 months of the 3-year ETA program.

  2. Eta Carinae and Its Ejecta, the Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae (Eta Car), its interacting winds and historical ejecta provide an unique astrophysical laboratory that permits addressing a multitude of questions ranging from stellar evolution, colliding winds, chemical enrichment, nebular excitation to the formation of molecules and dust. Every 5.54 years, Eta Car changes from high excitation to several-months-long low excitation caused by modulation of the massive interacting winds due to a very eccentric binary orbit. The surrounding Homunculus (Figure 1) and Little Homunculus, thrown out in the 1840s Great Eruption and the 1890s Lesser Eruption, respond to the changing flux, providing clues to many physical phenomena of great interest to astrophysicists.

  3. Investigation of the electromagnetic structure of. eta. and. eta. prime mesons by two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A.R.; Barnett, B.A.; Bauer, D.A.; Bay, A.; Bobbink, G.J.; Buchanan, C.D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.; Chun, S.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Erne, F.C.; Fairfield, K.H.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kenney, R.W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R.R.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G.R.; Madaras, R.J.; Magnuson, B.D.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Miller, E.S.; Moses, W.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Paar, H.P.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Smith, J.R.; Steinman, J.S.; Stephens, R.W.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Strauss, M.G.; Sullivan, M.K.; Takahashi, T.; Toutounchi, S.; van Tyen, R.; TPC /Two-Gamma Collaboration

    1990-01-08

    The TPC/Two-Gamma facility at the SLAC {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} storage ring PEP was used to study the reactions {gamma}{gamma}{sup *}{r arrow}{eta} and {gamma}{gamma}{sup *}{r arrow}{eta}{prime}. The {eta}{gamma}{sup *}{gamma} and {eta}{prime}{gamma}{sup *}{gamma} transition form factors were measured as functions of {ital Q}{sup 2}, the negative of the invariant mass squared of the tagged photon, in the range 0.1{lt}{ital Q}{sup 2}{lt}7 GeV{sup 2}. These determinations of the electromagnetic structure of the {eta} and {eta}{prime} mesons are consistent with both vector-meson dominance and QCD. They also provide new measurements of the pseudoscalar mixing angle and decay constants.

  4. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The program consisted of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` and TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders.``

  5. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-12-19

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  6. Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in Radiative B Decays to eta K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-14

    The authors present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}; for B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} they also measure the branching fractions and for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} the time-integrated charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The results are S = -0.18{sub -0.46}{sup +0.49} {+-} 0.12, C = -0.32{sub -0.39}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.07, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = (7.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = (7.7 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Alpha}{sub ch} = (-9.0{sub -9.8}{sup +10.4} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -2}. The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  7. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst). PMID:19905689

  8. Final report: Accelerated beta decay for disposal of fission fragment wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Howard R.

    2000-03-06

    The fundamental theory of the interaction of intense, low-frequency electromagnetic fields with certain radioactive nuclei has been fully formulated. The nuclei are of the type that exists in high-level radioactive wastes that are end products of the production of energy from nuclear fission. The basic physical mechanisms that underlie the coupling of the applied field to the nucleus have been identified. Both the basic theory and numerical predictions that stem from it support the conclusion that high-level radioactive wastes can be disposed of by substantially accelerating the rate of radioactive decay. Some old experiments on the acceleration of this type of radioactivity, with results that were not understood at the time, have been re-examined. Their interpretation is now clear, and the experiments are found to be in agreement with the theory.

  9. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes work carried out on DOE contract number DE-AC02-80ER10569 during the period December 15, 1979 to May 31, 1992. The original purpose of this research was to investigate the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three major objectives: development of a suitable ion injector, growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components into a suitable proof-of-principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. Work focused on the first two of these objectives. Control of the space charge waves` phase velocity was not obtained to the degree required for a working accelerator, so the project was duly terminated in favor of a program which focused on generating ultra high power microwave signals suitable for use in the next linear collider. Work done to develop suitable efficient, inexpensive, phase-stable microwave sources, with peak powers of up to 1 GW in the X band in pulses shorter than 1 ns, is described. Included are lists of the journal and conference papers resulting from this work, as well as a list of graduate students who completed their Ph.D. studies on the projects described in this report.

  10. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy has completed the third year of its three-year funding cycle and an additional one-year, no-cost extension. The program consisted of the following three tasks: Task A -- Study of the transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; Task B -- Study of high-brightness beam generation in pseudospark devices; Task C -- Study of a gyroklystron high-power microwave source for linear colliders. The research carried out for each task and progress made is reported.

  11. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy is currently in the third year of its three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: Task A -- Study of the transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; Task B -- Study of high-brightness beam generation in pseudospark devices; Task C -- Study of a gyroklystron high-power microwave source for linear colliders. The research for each task is detailed in this report.

  12. Final report for CAFDA project entitled, Experimental and numerical investigation of accelerated fluid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, J.A.; Jacobs, J.W.; Marcus, D.L.

    1997-03-26

    The main thrust of this collaborative effort can be summarized as an attempt to use the strengths of physical experiments and numerical simulations in understanding the dynamics of accelerated interfaces. Laboratory experiments represent the true nature of the physical processes and the simulations represent a model of these processes. We have taken the first steps toward this goal through development and calibration of new experimental techniques as well as validation and direct, systematic, and quantitative comparison with computational results. This report summarizes accomplishments made towards these goals. More detailed information is provided in reprints appended to this document.

  13. Effect of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing on D{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-08-01

    Charmed meson decays to a light pseudoscalar (P) and light vector (V) meson are analyzed taking account of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing. A frequently-used octet-singlet mixing angle of 19.5 degree sign is compared with a value of 11.7 degree sign favored by a recent analysis of D{yields}PP decays.

  14. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2. gamma. decays of. pi. sup 0 ,. eta. and. eta. prime

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  15. Eta Squared and Partial Eta Squared as Measures of Effect Size in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2011-01-01

    Eta squared measures the proportion of the total variance in a dependent variable that is associated with the membership of different groups defined by an independent variable. Partial eta squared is a similar measure in which the effects of other independent variables and interactions are partialled out. The development of these measures is…

  16. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  17. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  18. Final Commissioning of the Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator at IUAC, Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Tripti Sekhar; Choudhury, Anup; Chacko, Jacob; Kar, Soumen; Antony, Joby; Babu, Suresh; Kumar, Manoj; Mathuria, D. S.; Sahu, Santosh; Kanjilal, Dinakar

    The superconducting linac as a booster of the 15UD Pelletron accelerator was partly commissioned with one linac module housing eight quarter wave bulk niobium cavities along with the superbuncher and rebuncher cryomodules. Subsequently two more linac cryomodules were added to have in total 24 cavities for acceleration. In addition, a new Linde helium refrigerator of capacity 750 W @ 4.2 K was installed in parallel to the earlier CCI refrigerator. The new refrigerator was integrated with the earlier cryogenics network system through a specially designed liquid helium distribution line without any valve box. The cooling philosophy with this new system is modified to have a faster cool down rate in the critical zone (150 - 70 K) to avoid Q disease. The helium gas pressure fluctuation in the cavities is reduced significantly to have stable RF locking. The full linac is being operated and beams with higher energy are being delivered to the users. The present paper will highlight the performance of the new cryogenic system with respect to cool down rate, and helium pressure fluctuation.

  19. School Nurse Achievement Program II: Curriculum Adaptation for Expanded and Accelerated Dissemination. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann N.; Burgess, Heidi

    The final report of a 3-year project to improve the delivery of inservice training for school nurses through the development of computer assisted instructional programs and videotapes concerning handicapped children is presented. The School Nurse Achievement Program (SNAP) is an on-going national inservice training course. The evaluation project…

  20. Observation of B to eta' K* and Evidence for B+ to eta' rho+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    The authors presented an observation of B {yields} {eta}{prime}K*. The data sample corresponds to 232 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They measure the branching fractions (in units of 10{sup -6}) {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K*{sup 0}) = 3.8 {+-} 1.1 {+-} 0.5 and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}K*{sup +}) = 4.9{sub -1.7}{sup +1.9} {+-} 0.8, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. A simultaneous fit results in the observation of B {yields} {eta}{prime}K* with {Beta}(B {yields} {eta}{prime}K*) = 4.1{sub -0.9}{sup +1.0} {+-} 0.5. They also search for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{rho} and {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}(980)(f{sub 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) with results and 90% confidence level upper limits {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}{rho}{sup +}) = 8.7{sub -2.8-1.3}{sup +3.1+2.3} (< 14), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{rho}{sup 0}) < 3.7, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}(980)(f{sub 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})) < 1.5. Charge asymmetries in the channels with significant yields are consistent with zero.

  1. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the third volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of appendices C through U of the report

  2. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Suprotim; Raje, Sanyukta; Kumar, Satish; Sartor, Dale; Greenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  3. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  4. Dedekind's eta-function and the cohomology of infinite dimensional Lie algebras.

    PubMed

    Garland, H

    1975-07-01

    We compute the cohomology of certain infinite dimensional Lie algebras which are subalgebras of Lie algebras introduced by Moody and Kac. We note a relation between our results and the cohomology of loop spaces of compact groups. Finally, we derive, by Euler-Poincaré, identities of Macdonald for powers of the Dedekind eta-function. PMID:16592258

  5. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  6. Eta Carinae, the most brutal binary bipolar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icke, V.

    Eta Carinae, one of the most extreme and fascinating objects in our Galaxy, is a supermassive interacting binary at the centre of a bipolar nebula, expanding at about 500 km s^{-1}. Finding the mechanisms behind Eta's appearance, behaviour and evolution is the main goal of this investigation. I have constructed a large series of numerical models of dual-wind binary stars, of which I present here one that probably comes close to the Eta Carinae parameters. I presume that the gaseous `skirt' surrounding Eta is an equatorial `excretion disk' formed by the interacting binary, that the bipolar `Homunculus' nebula above and below this plane is due to the collision between the material ejected in the 1840 `Giant Eruption' and the disk, and the `Little Homunculus' similarly in the smaller 1890 eruption. I have extensively explored the general types of flow pattern expected here. My Theory Group is working towards 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for quantitative comparison with Eta, which many believe to be a key to understanding a variety of hitherto unexplained phenomena in and around massive stars, be they binary or single.

  7. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    The $\\eta N$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $\\Delta$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $E\\sim 2.3$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $\\pi N\\to \\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $K\\Lambda$ and $K\\Sigma$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  8. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    Themore » $$\\eta N$$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $$\\Delta$$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $$E\\sim 2.3$$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $$\\pi N\\to \\pi N$$, $$\\eta N$$, $$K\\Lambda$$ and $$K\\Sigma$$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.« less

  9. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Schroeder

    2011-11-13

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II, Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling at Kitware Inc. in collaboration with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The goal of the work was to develop collaborative visualization tools for large-scale data as illustrated in the figure below. The solutions we proposed address the typical problems faced by geographicallyand organizationally-separated research and engineering teams, who produce large data (either through simulation or experimental measurement) and wish to work together to analyze and understand their data. Because the data is large, we expect that it cannot be easily transported to each team member's work site, and that the visualization server must reside near the data. Further, we also expect that each work site has heterogeneous resources: some with large computing clients, tiled (or large) displays and high bandwidth; others sites as simple as a team member on a laptop computer. Our solution is based on the open-source, widely used ParaView large-data visualization application. We extended this tool to support multiple collaborative clients who may locally visualize data, and then periodically rejoin and synchronize with the group to discuss their findings. Options for managing session control, adding annotation, and defining the visualization pipeline, among others, were incorporated. We also developed and deployed a Web visualization framework based on ParaView that enables the Web browser to act as a participating client in a collaborative session. The ParaView Web Visualization framework leverages various Web technologies including WebGL, JavaScript, Java and Flash to enable interactive 3D visualization over the web using ParaView as the visualization server. We steered the development of this technology by teaming with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC has a computationally-intensive problem

  10. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  11. Mobile-accelerator neutron-radiography system. Final report, February 1978-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Dance, W.E.; Carollo, S.F.; Bumgardner, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    The use of neutron radiography for the inspection and maintenance of large structures such as aircraft has been delayed by the absence of a mobile system particularly suited to the requirements of field use. This report describes the production, extensive field testing, evaluation and disposition of the first mobile neutron radiography system to satisfy the majority of requirements for field use. The system is based upon the concept of a mobile on-off neutron radiography system based on a sealed-tube ion accelerator as neutron source demonstrated earlier by the Vought Corporation. Primary features of the system are its self-propelled mobility, versatile positioning capability scaled to Army helicopter dimensions, an on-off beam capability, exposure capability measured in minutes, and suitability for AMMRC laboratory and field use. Included in the report are a description of all components of the system, an evaluation of the operation of the system, an evaluation of its radiographic capabilities, a description of installation elements for the AMMRC site, and recommendations for next-generation systems.

  12. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  13. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike; Collings, E.

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  14. The electroproduction of etas and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    O.K. Baker

    2001-12-01

    Experimental results for the electromagnetic production of eta and K mesons are compared with QCD-inspired models. The eta mesons from the decay of S_11 resonance were used to study the momentum transfer dependence of the relevant helicity amplitude and cross section in the reaction ^1H(e,e'p)eta. The ^1H(e,e'K+)Lambda reaction was studied as a function of squared four-momentum transfer, Q^2, and of the virtual photon polarization parameter, epsilon. Both of these experiments were performed at Jefferson Lab during the early years of operation. The new precision data serve to constrain model calculations and provide new insights into the physical processes.

  15. Horizon crossing and inflation with large {eta}

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.

    2005-07-15

    I examine the standard formalism of calculating curvature perturbations in inflation at horizon crossing, and derive a general relation which must be satisfied for the horizon-crossing formalism to be valid. This relation is satisfied for the usual cases of power-law and slow-roll inflation. I then consider a model for which the relation is strongly violated, and the curvature perturbation evolves rapidly on superhorizon scales. This model has Hubble slow-roll parameter {eta}=3, but predicts a scale-invariant spectrum of density perturbations. I consider the case of hybrid inflation with large {eta}, and show that such solutions do not solve the '{eta} problem' in supergravity. These solutions correspond to field evolution which has not yet relaxed to the inflationary attractor solution, and may make possible new, more natural models on the string landscape.

  16. Experimental puzzles in heavy flavor decays anomalously high {eta}' appearance in charmless strange B decays - flavor SU(3) breaking in charm decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Sciences; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2000-11-30

    Simple experimental tests are proposed which can clarify the origin for the anomalously high {eta}' appearance in charmless strange final states in B decays and can investigate the nature of SU(3) symmetry-breaking in weak heavy flavor decays.

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-21

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervals-where the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  18. Study of high momentum eta' production in B --> eta'Xs.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-01

    We measure the branching fraction for the charmless semi-inclusive process B --> eta'Xs, where the eta' meson has a momentum in the range 2.0 to 2.7 GeV/c in the upsilon4S center-of-mass frame and Xs represents a system comprising a kaon and zero to four pions. We find B(B --> eta'Xs) = [3.9 +/- 0.8(stat) +/- 0.5(syst) +/- 0.8(model)] x 10(-4). We also obtain the Xs mass spectrum and find that it fits models predicting high masses. PMID:15323619

  19. An upgraded version of the Eta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Fedor; Chou, Sin Chan; Gomes, Jorge L.; Jovic, Dusan; Bastos, Paulo; Bustamante, Josiane F.; Lazic, Lazar; Lyra, André A.; Morelli, Sandra; Ristic, Ivan; Veljovic, Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Upgrades implemented over a number of years in an open source version of the Eta model, posted at the CPTEC web site http://etamodel.cptec.inpe.br/ , are summarized and examples of benefits are shown. The version originates from the NCEP's Workstation Eta code posted on the NCEP web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/wrkstn_eta eta" TargetType="URL"/> , which differs from the NCEP's latest operational Eta by having the WRF-NMM nonhydrostatic option included. Most of the upgrades made resulted from attention paid to less than satisfactory performance noted in several Eta results, and identification of the reasons for the problem. Others came from simple expectation that including a feature that is physically justified but is missing in the code should help. The most notable of the upgrades are the introduction of the so-called sloping steps, or discretized shaved cells topography; piecewise-linear finite-volume vertical advection of dynamic variables; vapor and hydrometeor loading in the hydrostatic equation, and changes aimed at refining the convection schemes available in the Eta. Several other modifications have to do with the calculation of exchange coefficients, conservation in the vertical diffusion, and diagnostic calculation of 10-m winds. Several examples showing improved performance resulting from the dynamics changes are given. One includes a case of unrealistically low temperatures in several mountain basins generated by a centered vertical advection difference scheme's unphysical advection from below ground, removed by its replacement with a finite-volume scheme. Another is that of increased katabatic winds in the Terra Nova Bay Antarctica region. Successful forecast of the severe downslope zonda wind case in the lee of

  20. THE LONG-LIVED DISKS IN THE {eta} CHAMAELEONTIS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Bouwman, Jeroen; Juhasz, Attila; Henning, Thomas; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Lawson, Warrick A.; Acke, Bram; Decin, Leen; Feigelson, Eric D.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn

    2009-08-20

    We present Infrared Spectrograph spectra and revised Multiband Imaging Photometer photometry for the 18 members of the {eta} Chamaeleontis cluster. Aged 8 Myr, the {eta} Cha cluster is one of the few nearby regions within the 5-10 Myr age range, during which the disk fraction decreases dramatically and giant planet formation must come to an end. For the 15 low-mass members, we measure a disk fraction {approx}50%, high for their 8 Myr age, and four of the eight disks lack near-IR excesses, consistent with the empirical definition of 'transition' disks. Most of the disks are comparable to geometrically flat disks. The comparison with regions of different ages suggests that at least some of the 'transition' disks may represent the normal type of disk around low-mass stars. Therefore, their flattened structure and inner holes may be related to other factors (initial masses of the disk and the star, environment, binarity), rather than to pure time evolution. We analyze the silicate dust in the disk atmosphere, finding moderate crystalline fractions ({approx}10%-30%) and typical grain sizes {approx}1-3 {mu}m, without any characteristic trend in the composition. These results are common to other regions of different ages, suggesting that the initial grain processing occurs very early in the disk lifetime (<1 Myr). Large grain sizes in the disk atmosphere cannot be used as a proxy for age, but are likely related to higher disk turbulence. The dust mineralogy varies between the 8-12 {mu}m and the 20-30 {mu}m features, suggesting high temperature dust processing and little radial mixing. Finally, the analysis of IR and optical data on the B9 star {eta} Cha reveals that it is probably surrounded by a young debris disk with a large inner hole, instead of being a classical Be star.

  1. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  2. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  3. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  4. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  5. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  6. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  7. Microwave and accelerator research. Final report on Grant DE-FG02-92ER40731

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, John A.

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the main technical objectives and accomplishments during the life of the grant, and concludes with data on publications describing the research. The main activity was the development of very high power microwave sources, initially in X-band, and recent initial work on a Ka band TWT amplifier. There was additional activity on ferroelectric emitters. Highlights include the following: (1) The development of a relatively broad band microwave source yielding approx. 75 MW power at a power efficiency of 54% and an energy conversion efficiency of 43%. (2) The development of a ferroelectric cathode electron gun which yielded a beam current of up to 350 A at 500 kV. The device was shown to operate satisfactorily at a low repetition rate, limited by the available power supplies. The final beam power obtained exceeds that achieved elsewhere by several orders of magnitude. The gun development achieved was shown to give an electron beam suitable for high power X-band microwave sources with the demonstration of a 5-MW tunable X-band TWT single-stage amplifier. (3) Work was initiated on a Ka-Band TWT amplifier. Gains of over 30 dB were achieved at peak output powers of about 4 MW. Appendices include two submitted papers: Symmetric and asymmetric mode interaction in high-power traveling wave amplifiers: experiments and theory and High power microwave generation using a ferroelectric cathode electron gun.

  8. Superluminous supernovae: no threat from eta Carinae.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Melott, Adrian L; Fields, Brian D; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of approximately 10(44) Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to eta Carinae, which resides in our own Galaxy at a distance of about 2.3 kpc. eta Carinae appears ready to detonate. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given that its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a gamma-ray burst oriented toward Earth, eta Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We have found that, given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over approximately 10(4) y and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possible effect of supernovae-e-ndocrine disruption induced by blue light near the peak of the optical spectrum. This is a possibility for nearby supernovae at distances too large to be considered "dangerous" for other reasons. However, due to reddening and extinction by the interstellar medium, eta Carinae is unlikely to trigger such effects to any significant degree. PMID:18199005

  9. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-10-01

    The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

  10. A SEA CHANGE IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Martin, John C.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2010-07-01

    Major stellar-wind emission features in the spectrum of {eta} Car have recently decreased by factors of order 2 relative to the continuum. This is unprecedented in the modern observational record. The simplest, but unproven, explanation is a rapid decrease in the wind density.

  11. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Khemchandani, K. P.; Upadhyay, N. J.; Jain, B. K.

    2013-06-01

    Back in the mid-1980s, a new branch of investigation related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta-meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works that studied various aspects of eta-producing reactions such as the π+n → ηp, pd → 3Heη, p 6Li → 7Be η and γ 3He → η X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta-nucleon (ηN) and hence the η-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some η-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the ηN and hence the η-nucleus interaction. Therefore, this review is an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations. The ηN scattering length (which represents the strength of the η-nucleon interaction) using different theoretical models and analyzing the data on η production in pion, photon and proton induced reactions was found to be spread out in a wide range, namely, 0.18 ⩽ ℜe aηN ⩽ 1.03 fm and 0.16 ⩽ ℑm aηN ⩽ 0.49 fm. Theoretical searches of heavy η-mesic nuclei based on η-nucleus optical potentials and lighter ones based on Faddeev type few-body approaches predict the existence of several quasibound and resonant states. Although some hints of η-mesic states such as ^3_{\\eta} He and ^{25}_{\\eta} Mg do exist from previous experiments, the promise of clearer signals for the existence of η-mesic nuclei lies in the experiments to be performed at the J-PARC, MAMI and COSY facilities in the near future. This review is aimed at giving an overall

  12. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  13. Glue content and mixing angle of the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} system: The effect of the isoscalar 0{sup -} continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, N.F.

    2004-12-01

    Masses and topological charges of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons are expressed in terms of the singlet-octet mixing angle {theta}. Contributions of the pseudoscalar 0{sup -} continuum are evaluated in a model independent way. Applications to the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi} and to the radiative decay of vector mesons involving {eta} and {eta}{sup '} are considered. Agreement with experiment is, in general, good and the results quite stable for -30.5 deg. < or approx. {theta} < or approx. -18.5 deg.

  14. Differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p-> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, Z. Krahn, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer, for the CLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p -> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The eta-prime results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The eta measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the eta-prime measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  15. etas_solve: A robust program to estimate the ETAS parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Y.; Kasahara, A.

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model introduced by Ogata (1988) has been widely used to quantitatively describe seismicity (e.g. Ogata, 1992; Llenos et al., 2009). However, only a few programs for estimation of the ETAS parameters are publicly available, and it is difficult to automatically apply some of them to observed data due to initial value dependence (e.g. Ogata, 2006). A robust ETAS estimation program is required to meet the recent enhancement of earthquake catalogs. In this study, we developed a new program, etas_solve, that is based on Newton's method and calculates exact gradient and Hessian by using the automatic differentiation technique (Griewank, 1989). The program also supports auxiliary window in time and magnitude (Wang et al., 2010).To demonstrate robustness of the developed program, we tested the dependence of estimated parameters on the choice of initial value by running the program from 1,024 randomly chosen initial values, and then compared the results with that of SAPP (Ogata 2006). We used aftershock data of 26th July 2003 earthquake of M6.2 at the northern Miyagi japan, which is shipped with SAPP, as a testing data. We found that estimation values with etas_solve were independent of the initial value for the testing data, while that with SAPP were varied with the initial value. Although there was initial value dependence in the SAPP's results, the estimated values by SAPP with small (≤10-5) gradient coincided with the solution by etas_solve. etas_solve took longer computation time per iteration than SAPP due to the exact Hessian calculation, but total execution time was comparable to that of SAPP since less number of iterations for convergence was required. In addition, etas_solve was faster than SAPP on multicore machines (around 8-fold speed up with a 16 core machine) since etas_solve is parallelized by OpenMP.etas_solve is written in Fortran and distributed under GNU General Public License at https

  16. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R

    2014-09-08

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  17. The ETA-II induction linac as a high-average-power FEL driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nexsen, W. E.; Atkinson, D. P.; Barrett, D. M.; Chen, Y.-J.; Clark, J. C.; Griffith, L. V.; Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Paul, A. C.; Sampayan, S.; Throop, A. L.; Turner, W. C.

    1990-10-01

    The Experimental Test Accelerator II (ETA-II) is the first induction linac designed specifically to FEL requirements. It is primarily intended to demonstrate induction accelerator technology for high-average-power, high-brightness electron beams, and will be used to drive a 140 and 250 GHz microwave FEL for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL. Its features include high-vacuum design which allows the use of an intrinsically bright dispenser cathode, induction cells designed to minimize BBU growth rate, and careful attention to magnetic alignment to minimize radial sweep due to beam corkscrew. The use of magnetic switches allows high-average-power operation. At present ETA-II is being used to drive 140 GHz plasma heating experiments. These experiments require nominal beam parameters of 6 MeV energy, 2 kA current, 20 ns pulse width and a brightness of 1 × 108 A/(m rad)2 at the wiggler with a pulse repetition frequency (prf) of 0.5 Hz. Future 250 GHz experiments require beam parameters of 10 MeV energy, 3 kA current, 50 ns pulse width and a brightness of 1 × 108 A/(m rad)2 with a 5 kHz prf for 0.5 s. In this paper we discuss the present status of ETA-II parameters and the phased development program necessary to satisfy these future requirements.

  18. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  19. HUBBLE SHOWS EXPANSION OF ETA CARINAE DEBRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The furious expansion of a huge, billowing pair of gas and dust clouds are captured in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope comparison image of the supermassive star Eta Carinae. To create the picture, astronomers aligned and subtracted two images of Eta Carinae taken 17 months apart (April 1994, September 1995). Black represents where the material was located in the older image, and white represents the more recent location. (The light and dark streaks that make an 'X' pattern are instrumental artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the central star. The bright white region at the center of the image results from the star and its immediate surroundings being 'saturated' in one of the images.)Photo Credit: Jon Morse (University of Colorado), Kris Davidson (University of Minnesota), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  20. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgη and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.

  1. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgηmore » and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.« less

  2. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M.K.; Goetz, J; Lapik, A; Korolija, M; Prakhov, S; Starostin, A

    2011-05-18

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup }0, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {eta} , {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4 . It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G-parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta} ,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta} and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron

  3. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  4. Measurements of the branching fractions of exclusive charmless B meson decays with eta(') or omega mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Hall, T L; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffner, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocain, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-26

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless two-body final states containing eta(') or omega mesons, based on 20.7 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We find the branching fractions Beta(B(+)-->eta(')K(+)) = (70+/-8+/-5) x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->eta(')K(0)) = (42(+13)(-11) +/- 4) x 10(-6), and Beta(B(+)-->omega pi(+)) = (6.6(+2.1)(-1.8) +/- 0.7) x 10(-6), where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. We give measurements of four additional modes for which the 90% confidence level upper limits are Beta(B(+)-->eta(')pi(+)) < 12 x 10(-6), Beta(B(+)-->omega K(+)) < 4 x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->omega K(0)) < 13 x 10(-6), and Beta(B(0)-->omega pi(0)) < 3 x 10(-6). PMID:11736395

  5. The radio source around Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Duncan, R. A.; Lim, J.; Nelson, G. J.; Drake, S. A.; Kundu, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution radio observations of the peculiar southern star Eta Carinae, made with the Australian Telescope. The images, at 8 and 9 GHz with a resolution of 1.0 arcsec show a source of dimension 10 arcsec and total flux of 0.7 Jy dominated by a strong central peak. The radio emission is unpolarized and offers no support to models which invoke degenerate stars or more exotic objects within the core of Eta Car. In these data we find no evidence for more than one energy source in the core with arcsecond separations as some infrared observations have suggested. Several levels of structure are evident in the radio image, which shows symmetry on the larger scales. Conventional formulae for stellar wind radio sources give a mass loss rate of order 3 x 10(exp -4) Solar Mass/yr based on the radio flux in the central peak, which yields a wind momentum flux of order 20% of the momentum flux available from the star's radiation field. The radio emission at these frequencies is consistent with thermal emission from gas flowing away from a 'luminous blue variable' star (LBV) Eta Car is probably the brightest thermal stellar wind radio source in the sky.

  6. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P; Upadhyay, N J; Jain, B K

    2013-06-01

    Back in the mid-1980s, a new branch of investigation related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta-meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works that studied various aspects of eta-producing reactions such as the π(+)n → ηp, pd → (3)Heη, p (6)Li → (7)Be η and γ (3)He → η X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta-nucleon (ηN) and hence the η-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some η-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the ηN and hence the η-nucleus interaction. Therefore, this review is an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.The ηN scattering length (which represents the strength of the η-nucleon interaction) using different theoretical models and analyzing the data on η production in pion, photon and proton induced reactions was found to be spread out in a wide range, namely, 0.18 ≤ Re aηN ≤ 1.03 fm and 0.16 ≤ Rm aηN ≤ 0.49 fm. Theoretical searches of heavy η-mesic nuclei based on η-nucleus optical potentials and lighter ones based on Faddeev type few-body approaches predict the existence of several quasibound and resonant states. Although some hints of η-mesic states such as (3)(η)He and (25)(η)Mg do exist from previous experiments, the promise of clearer signals for the existence of η-mesic nuclei lies in the experiments to be performed at the J-PARC, MAMI and COSY facilities in the near future. This review is aimed at giving an overall status

  7. Induction linear accelerator for the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-12-01

    A new design for an induction accelerator for FELs is proposed. The operation of the accelerator, which is based on Faraday's laws, is discussed. The use of an oxide or a dispenser cathode for the high-brightness injector of the accelerator is examined. The designs of the induction cells and nonlinear magnetic pulse compressor for the FELs are described. Ten induction cells form an induction module that is driven by the nonlinear magnetic pulse generator. An experimental test accelerator (ETA) has been developed and is being tested. Diagrams of the injector, induction cell, nonlinear magnetic pulse generator, and the ETA are presented.

  8. Charmless B{yields}K{sub h{eta}}{sup (')} decays with K{sub h}=K, K{sup *}, K{sub 0}{sup *}(1430), K{sub 2}{sup *}(1430)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2010-08-01

    ) |f{sub {eta}}{sup 's}|>|f{sub {eta}}{sup s}| and (ii) a destructive (constructive) interference between type-I and type-II penguin diagrams for K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}} (K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}'}). However, the predicted rates of B{yields}K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}(')} in naive factorization are too small by 1 order of magnitude and this issue remains to be resolved. There are two K{sup (*){eta}(')} modes in which direct CP asymmetries have been measured with significance around 4{sigma}: A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta})=-0.37{+-}0.09 and A{sub CP}(K{sup *0}{eta})=0.19{+-}0.05. In QCDF, power corrections from penguin annihilation which are needed to resolve CP puzzles in K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} modes will flip A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta}) into a wrong sign. We show that soft corrections to the color-suppressed tree amplitude a{sub 2} in conjunction with the charm content of the {eta} will finally lead to A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta})=-0.15{sub -0.28}{sup +0.19}. Likewise, this power correction is needed to improve the prediction for A{sub CP}(K{sup *0{eta}}).

  9. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  10. Short-term foreshocks in Southern California and Italy revisited: Observed deviations from the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, Stefanie; Mignan, Arnaud; Wiemer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that short-term foreshocks observed prior to large earthquakes are undistinguishable from the normal behaviour of seismicity, which is well described for example by the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. Here we show that these studies fail to extract abnormal foreshock behaviour due to the much more frequent occurrence of aftershocks in comparison to potential foreshocks, which results in undervaluing the role of foreshocks. We first define mainshocks as earthquakes of magnitude M6+ and use a space-time-magnitude window method with a maximum distance of 10 km to the mainshock, a maximum time range of 3 days before the mainshock and a minimum magnitude M4+ to define foreshocks in Southern California and in Italy. We then compare the observed rate of foreshock-mainshock pairs to the rate expected by ETAS simulations. Similar to previous studies, these results indicate that the foreshock activity observed in real catalogues is compatible with the ETAS model. Definition of foreshocks with a window method is, however, simplistic, since any individual event may be considered a foreshock although it is impossible to distinguish a foreshock from background or aftershock activity at a one-to-one event basis. We extend our foreshock analysis based on the predictions of the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory (NC PAST), which are: (1) foreshocks are due to overloading on the main fault and occur in clusters, the activity of which is significantly higher than background activity, (2) microseismicity (M<3) must be included for the emergence of a reliable signal and (3) foreshocks are not systematic before large earthquakes due to aleatoric uncertainty on the rupture process. Following these guidelines, we systematically investigate foreshock sequences before large earthquakes (M6+) in Southern California and Italy. Using different approaches, we finally show that significant anomalies are observed before some

  11. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  12. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  13. Spectrophotometric Evolution of Eta Carinae's Great Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Prieto, Jose Luis; Bianco, Federica; Matheson, Thomas; Smith, Nathan; Smith, Chris; Chornock, Ryan; Sinnott, Brendan; Welch, Douglas; Walborn, Nolan

    2013-06-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most massive binaries in the Milky Way, and its expanding circumstellar nebula has been studied in detail. It was seen as the second brightest star in the sky during its 1800s "Great Eruption", but only visual estimates of its brightness were recorded. We discovered light echoes of the Great Eruption, which allowed us to obtain a spectrum of this event now, 150 years after it was first observed. We will present our new follow-up observations with which we have started to retrace its spectrophotometric evolution during and before the eruption.

  14. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  15. A LIGHTHOUSE EFFECT IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H.

    2012-02-20

    We present a new model for the behavior of scattered time-dependent, asymmetric near-UV emission from the nearby ejecta of {eta} Car. Using a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation of {eta} Car's binary colliding winds, we show that the 3D binary orientation derived by Madura et al. in 2012 is capable of explaining the asymmetric near-UV variability observed in the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Camera F220W images of Smith et al.. Models assuming a binary orientation with i Almost-Equal-To 130 Degree-Sign -145 Degree-Sign , {omega} Almost-Equal-To 230 Degree-Sign -315 Degree-Sign , P.A.{sub z} Almost-Equal-To 302 Degree-Sign -327 Degree-Sign are consistent with the observed F220W near-UV images. We find that the hot binary companion does not significantly contribute to the near-UV excess observed in the F220W images. Rather, we suggest that a bore-hole effect and the reduction of Fe II optical depths inside the wind-wind collision cavity carved in the extended photosphere of the primary star lead to the time-dependent directional illumination of circumbinary material as the companion moves about in its highly elliptical orbit.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, J. J.; Westphal, James A.; Light, Robert M.; Currie, Douglas G.; Groth, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    New high spatial resolution observations of the material around Eta Carinae, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera, are presented. The star Eta Carinae is one of the most massive and luminous stars in the Galaxy, and has been episodically expelling significant quantities of gas over the last few centuries. The morphology of the bright central nebulosity (the homunculus) indicates that it is a thin shell with very well defined edges, and is clumpy on 0.2 arcsec (about 10 to the 16th cm) scales. An extension to the northeast of the star (NN/NS using Walborn's 1976 nomenclature) appears to be a stellar jet and its associated bow shock. The bow shock is notable for an intriguing series of parallel linear features across its face. The S ridge and the W arc appear to be part of a 'cap' of emission located to the SW and behind the star. Together, the NE jet and the SW cap suggest that the symmetry axis for the system runs NE-SW rather than SE-NW, as previously supposed. Overall, the data indicate that the material around the star may represent an oblate shell with polar blowouts, rather than a bipolar flow.

  17. Far UV Spectroscopy of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Massa, D.; Hutchings, J. B.; Gull, T. R.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution observations of the Luminous Blue Variable eta Carinae between the Lyman limit and 1180 Angstroms. High resolution spectra (R approximately 20,000) were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite on Feb. 1 and Mar. 20, 2000. The observations were made with a 30x30 arcsec aperture and includes the entire Homunculus region. However, the spatial extent of the far UV flux is consistent with a point source. With the limited spatial resolution of the FUSE instrument, we can only constrain the far UV emission to be within +/-5 arcsec of the star. The far UV spectrum of eta Car is dominated by strong absorption features of molecular hydrogen. The observed flux level at 1150 Angstroms is approximately 4\\times 10(exp 12) erg/sq cm/s/Angstrom and decreases approximately linearly to approximately 920 Angstroms where converging HI and HII features completely blanket the spectrum. These observations were obtained as part of the FUSE Early Release Observation program.

  18. MID-CYCLE CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Mehner, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    In late 2006, ground-based photometry of {eta} Car plus the Homunculus showed an unexpected decrease in its integrated apparent brightness, an apparent reversal of its long-term brightening. Subsequent Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 photometry of the central star in the near-UV showed that this was not a simple reversal. This multi-wavelength photometry did not support increased extinction by dust as the explanation for the decrease in brightness. A spectrum obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South telescope revealed subtle changes mid-way in {eta} Car's 5.5 yr spectroscopic cycle when compared with HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra at the same phase in the cycle. At mid-cycle the secondary star is 20-30 AU from the primary. We suggest that the spectroscopic changes are consistent with fluctuations in the density and velocity of the primary star's wind, unrelated to the 5.5 yr cycle but possibly related to its latitude-dependent morphology. We also discuss subtle effects that must be taken into account when comparing ground-based and HST/STIS spectra.

  19. Far UV Spectroscopy of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Massa, D. L.; Hutchings, J. B.; Gull, T. R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution observations of the Luminous Blue Variable eta Carinae between the Lyman limit and 1180 A. High resolution spectra (R approx. 20,000) were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite on Feb. 1 and Mar. 20, 2000. The observations were made with a 30 x 30 arcsec aperture and includes the entire Homunculus region. However, the spatial extent of the far UV flux is consistent with a point source. With the limited spatial resolution of the FUSE instrument, we can only constrain the far UV emission to be within +/- 5 arcsec of the star. The far UV spectrum of eta Car is dominated by strong absorption features of molecular hydrogen. The observed flux level at 1150A is approx. 4 times 10(exp 12) erg /cm(exp -2) /sec(exp -1) / A(exp -1) and decreases approximately linearly to approx. 920 A where converging H1 and H2 features completely blanket the spectrum. These observations were obtained as part of the FUSE Early Release Observation program.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of Eta Carinae

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, J.J.; Westphal, J.A.; Light, R.M.; Currie, D.G.; Groth, E.J. Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA Maryland Univ., College Park Princeton Univ., NJ )

    1991-08-01

    New high spatial resolution observations of the material around Eta Carinae, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera, are presented. The star Eta Carinae is one of the most massive and luminous stars in the Galaxy, and has been episodically expelling significant quantities of gas over the last few centuries. The morphology of the bright central nebulosity (the homunculus) indicates that it is a thin shell with very well defined edges, and is clumpy on 0.2 arcsec (about 10 to the 16th cm) scales. An extension to the northeast of the star (NN/NS using Walborn's 1976 nomenclature) appears to be a stellar jet and its associated bow shock. The bow shock is notable for an intriguing series of parallel linear features across its face. The S ridge and the W arc appear to be part of a 'cap' of emission located to the SW and behind the star. Together, the NE jet and the SW cap suggest that the symmetry axis for the system runs NE-SW rather than SE-NW, as previously supposed. Overall, the data indicate that the material around the star may represent an oblate shell with polar blowouts, rather than a bipolar flow. 26 refs.

  1. {eta}-Nucleon scattering length and effective range uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.M.; Wycech, S.

    2005-01-01

    The coupled {eta}N, {pi}N, {gamma}N, {pi}{pi}N system is described by a K-matrix method. The parameters in this model are adjusted to get an optimal fit to {pi}N{yields}{pi}N, {pi}N{yields}{eta}N, {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N, and {gamma}N{yields}{eta}N data in an energy range of about 100 MeV or so each side of the {eta} threshold. Compared with our earlier analysis, we now utilize recent Crystal Ball data. However, the outcome confirms our previous result that the {eta}-nucleon scattering length a is large with a value of 0.91(6)+i 0.27(2) fm.

  2. Search for non-thermal radio emission from Eta Carina's outer blast wave with ATCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohm, Stefan; Urquhart, James; Skilton, Joanna Lucy; Hinton, Jim; Domainko, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the direction of Eta Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE and Fermi satellites. This emission can be either interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars or in the very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 "Great Eruption". The detection of a radio shell at the location of the shock would support the latter scenario and confirm Eta Carina as prime example of a new source type, namely, an LBV star whose massive ejecta accelerates electrons to non-thermal energies. While Fermi and INTEGRAL do not provide sufficient angular resolution to resolve the blast wave, high resolution radio observations using ATCA will be able to test non-thermal radio emission from this acceleration site. The current sensitivity of ATCA is such that a relatively modest observation time of 12 hours will be sufficient to image the synchrotron emission from the blast region down to magnetic field strengths well below typical ISM values and hence prove or reject our blast-wave hypothesis for the high energy emission.

  3. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2{gamma} decays of {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  4. Radiolabeled microsphere technique in conscious subjects during acceleration exposures on the USAFAM centrifuge. Final report, August 1977-November 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M.H.; Jaggars, J.L.

    1980-03-01

    The methods used to apply the radiolabeled microsphere technique for the study of the effects of +Gz acceleration on regional blood flows are presented. A remote-control system designed to infuse suspensions of microspheres into the left atrium on conscious animals is outlined as is a device which allows the remote, sequential withdrawal of six blood samples. Results are presented which demonstrate that the cautious application of the radiolabeled microsphere technique using the outlined systems can produce good information about the effects of +Gz acceleration on regional blood flows.

  5. MTX final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  6. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  7. Structure and mechanism of human DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Zhao, Ye; Kondo, Yuji; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gregory, Mark; Lee, Jae Young; Masutani, Chikahide; Lehmann, Alan R.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Yang, Wei

    2010-11-03

    The variant form of the human syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) is caused by a deficiency in DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}), a DNA polymerase that enables replication through ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human Pol{eta} at four consecutive steps during DNA synthesis through cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers. Pol{eta} acts like a 'molecular splint' to stabilize damaged DNA in a normal B-form conformation. An enlarged active site accommodates the thymine dimer with excellent stereochemistry for two-metal ion catalysis. Two residues conserved among Pol{eta} orthologues form specific hydrogen bonds with the lesion and the incoming nucleotide to assist translesion synthesis. On the basis of the structures, eight Pol{eta} missense mutations causing XPV can be rationalized as undermining the molecular splint or perturbing the active-site alignment. The structures also provide an insight into the role of Pol{eta} in replicating through D loop and DNA fragile sites.

  8. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1 180 Angsroms) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car By was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, are consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system.

  9. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnebom, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D. L.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car B, was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, is consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system

  10. The Rapid Brightening of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most dynamic and well-observed massive stars. Its bipolar Homunculus Nebula and other observations imply it has a strong latitude dependent stellar wind. The significant brightening of the star itself over the last two decades has been commonly explained as an evolution of the latitude structure of the wind , change in mass-loss rate, and/or clearing of circumstellar material in our direct line sight. Hubble Space Telescope images (with a much higher spatial resolution than ground-based images) document an increase in contrast between the brightness of the star and the Homunculus reflection nebula. We present measurements of the nebula's brightness, sampling the changing brightness of the star viewed from angles differing from our own direct line of sight. We also present ultraviolet photometry of the star synthesized from recent HST/STIS observations.

  11. Error Sources in the ETA Energy Analyzer Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Nexsen, W E

    2004-12-13

    At present the ETA beam energy as measured by the ETA energy analyzer and the DARHT spectrometer differ by {approx}12%. This discrepancy is due to two sources, an overestimate of the effective length of the ETA energy analyzer bending-field, and data reduction methods that are not valid. The discrepancy can be eliminated if we return to the original process of measuring the angular deflection of the beam and use a value of 43.2cm for the effective length of the axial field profile.

  12. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context. PMID:25673036

  13. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  14. Observation of {eta}{sup '} Decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Robichaud, A. N.; Tatishvili, G.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.

    2009-02-13

    Using {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we make the first observations of the decays {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -}, measuring absolute branching fractions (37{sub -9}{sup +11}{+-}4)x10{sup -4} and (25{sub -9}{sup +12}{+-}5)x10{sup -4}, respectively. For {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, this result probes the mechanism of isospin violation and the roles of {pi}{sup 0}/{eta}/{eta}{sup '}-mixing and final state rescattering in strong decays. We also set upper limits on branching fractions for {eta}{sup '} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup 0}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup 0}, 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), and invisible final states.

  15. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    A group of astronomers from the Aarhus University (Denmark) and the European Southern Observatory (2) have for the first time succeeded in detecting solar-type oscillations in another star. They observed the temperature of the bright northern star Eta Bootis during six nights with the 2.5-metre Nordic Optical Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) and were able to show that it varies periodically by a few hundredths of a degree. These changes are caused by pressure waves in the star and are directly dependent on its inner structure. A detailed analysis by the astronomers has shown that the observed effects are in good agreement with current stellar models. This is a most important, independent test of stellar theory. The Sun is an Oscillating Star About twenty years ago, it was discovered that the nearest star, our Sun, oscillates like the ringing of a bell with a period of about 5 minutes. The same phenomenon is known in the Earth, which begins to vibrate after earthquakes; in this way seismologists have been able to discern a layered structure in the Earth's interior. The recent impacts of a comet on Jupiter most likely had a similar effect on that planet. The observed solar oscillations concern the entire gaseous body of the Sun, but we can of course only observe them on its surface. It has been found that each mode moves the surface up and down by less than 25 metres; the combined motion is very complicated, because there are many different, simultaneous modes, each of which has a slightly different period. The exact values of these periods are sensitive to the speed of sound in the Sun's interior, which in turn depends on the density of the material there. Thus, by measuring the periods of solar oscillations, we may probe the internal structure of the Sun, that is otherwise inaccessible to observations. Why does the Sun oscillate and what is the cause of these oscillations ? We do not know yet, but it is

  16. {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{eta}{gamma}{gamma}: A primer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Rafel

    2012-10-23

    The electromagnetic rare decays {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} are analysed for the first time and their predicted branching ratios given. The vector meson exchange dominant contribution is treated using Vector Meson Dominance and the scalar component is estimated by means of the Linear Sigma Model. The agreement between our calculation and the measurement of the related process {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} is a check of the procedure. Scalar meson effects are seen to be irrelevant for {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}, while a significant scalar contribution due to the {sigma}(500) resonance seems to emerge in the case of {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}. Future measurements coming from KLOE-2, Crystal Ball, WASA, and BES-III will elucidate if any of these processes carry an important scalar contribution or they are simply driven by the exchange of vector mesons.

  17. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  18. Accelerated test methods for life prediction of hermetic motor insulation systems exposed to alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.F.

    1995-04-19

    In 1992, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc. (ARTI) contracted Radian Corporation to ascertain whether an improved accelerated test method or procedure could be developed that would allow prediction of the life of motor insulation materials used in hermetic motors for air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment operated with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 1 of the project, Conceptual Design of an accelerated test method and apparatus, was successfully completed in June 1993. The culmination of that effort was the concept of the Simulated Stator Unit (SSU) test. The objective of the Phase 2 limited proof-of-concept demonstration was to: answer specific engineering/design questions; design and construct an analog control sequencer and supporting apparatus; and conduct limited tests to determine the viability of the SSU test concept. This report reviews the SSU test concept, and describes the results through the conclusion of the proof-of-concept prototype tests in March 1995. The technical design issues inherent in transforming any conceptual design to working equipment have been resolved, and two test systems and controllers have been constructed. Pilot tests and three prototype tests have been completed, concluding the current phase of work. One prototype unit was tested without thermal stress loads. Twice daily insulation property measurements (IPMs) on this unit demonstrated that the insulation property measurements themselves did not degrade the SSU.

  19. Eta Carinae viewed from different vantages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The spatially-resolved winds of the massive binary, Eta Carinae, extend an arcsecond on the sky, well beyond the 10 to 20 milliarcsecond binary orbital dimension. Stellar wind line profiles, observed at very different angular resolutions of VLTI/AMBER, HST/STIS and VLT/UVES, provide spatial information on the extended wind interaction structure as it changes with orbital phase. These same wind lines, observable in the starlight scattered off the foreground lobe of the dusty Homunculus, provide time-variant line profiles viewed from significantly different angles. Comparisons of direct and scattered wind profiles observed in the same epoch and at different orbital phases provide insight on the extended wind structure and promise the potential for three-dimensional imaging of the outer wind structures. Massive, long-lasting clumps, including the nebularWeigelt blobs, originated during the two historical ejection events. Wind interactions with these clumps are quite noticeable in spatially-resolved spectroscopy. As the 2009.0 minimum approaches, analysis of existing spectra and 3-D modeling are providing bases for key observations to gain further understanding of this complex massive binary.

  20. Eta Carinae: Viewed from Multiple Vantage Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    The central source of Eta Carinae and its ejecta is a massive binary system buried within a massive interacting wind structure which envelops the two stars. However the hot, less massive companion blows a small cavity in the very massive primary wind, plus ionizes a portion of the massive wind just beyond the wind-wind boundary. We gain insight on this complex structure by examining the spatially-resolved Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the central source (0.1") with the wind structure which extends out to nearly an arcsecond (2300AU) and the wind-blown boundaries, plus the ejecta of the Little Homunculus. Moreover, the spatially resolved Very Large Telescope/UltraViolet Echelle Spectrograph (VLT/UVES) stellar spectrum (one arcsecond) and spatially sampled spectra across the foreground lobe of the Homunculus provide us vantage points from different angles relative to line of sight. Examples of wind line profiles of Fe II, and the.highly excited [Fe III], [Ne III], [Ar III] and [S III)], plus other lines will be presented.

  1. Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.H.; Bubp, D.G.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hester, R.E.; Neil, V.K.; Paul, A.C.; Prono, D.S.

    1983-03-09

    The ATA injector, developed from experience gained from the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) linac, has recently been completed. The injector consists of ten 0.25 MV cells that are used to develop 2.5 MV across a single diode gap. The 10 kA beam is extracted from a 500 cm/sup 2/ plasma cathode at average rates of up to 5 Hz and burst rates to 1 kHz. Pulsed power from 20 water filled blumleins is divided and introduced symmetrically through four ports on each cell. All major insulators are fabricated from filled epoxy castings. With these improvements, the ATA injector is smaller than the ETA injector; has a faster pulse response; has lower voltage stress on insulators and higher ultimate performance. Injector characterization tests began in October 1982. These tests include beam current, energy, and emittance measurements.

  2. High transverse momentum {eta} meson production in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Aronson, S. H.; Chujo, T.; David, G.; Desmond, E. J.; Drees, K. A.; Ewell, L.; Franz, A.; Guryn, W.; Haggerty, J. S.; Harvey, M.; Johnson, B. M.; Kistenev, E.; Kroon, P. J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitchell, J. T.; Morrison, D. P.; O'Brien, E.; Pinkenburg, C.

    2007-02-15

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx_equal}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The {eta} mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, R{sub dAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest p{sub T} broadening (''Cronin enhancement''). In central Au+Au reactions, the {eta} yields are significantly suppressed, with R{sub AuAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of p{sub T} for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-p{sub T} world average of R{sub {eta}/{pi}{sup 0}}{approx_equal}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s{sub NN}){approx_equal}3-1800 GeV) as well as, for high scaled momentum x{sub p}, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-p{sub T} {eta} production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

  3. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.; Alabau Pons, M.; Amann, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Apsimon, R.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bellomo, P.; Bett, D.; Blair, G.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Deacon, L.; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  4. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambade, P.; Alabau Pons, M.; Amann, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Apsimon, R.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bellomo, P.; Bett, D.; Blair, G.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Deacon, L.; Elsen, E.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Fukuda, M.; Gao, J.; Geffroy, N.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Guler, H.; Hayano, H.; Heo, A.-Y.; Honda, Y.; Huang, J. Y.; Hwang, W. H.; Iwashita, Y.; Jeremie, A.; Jones, J.; Kamiya, Y.; Karataev, P.; Kim, E.-S.; Kim, H.-S.; Kim, S. H.; Komamiya, S.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuroda, S.; Lam, B.; Lyapin, A.; Masuzawa, M.; McCormick, D.; Molloy, S.; Naito, T.; Nakamura, T.; Nelson, J.; Okamoto, D.; Okugi, T.; Oroku, M.; Park, Y. J.; Parker, B.; Paterson, E.; Perry, C.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.; Renier, Y.; Resta-Lopez, J.; Rimbault, C.; Ross, M.; Sanuki, T.; Scarfe, A.; Schulte, D.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Suehara, T.; Sugahara, R.; Swinson, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; Urakawa, J.; Urner, D.; Verderi, M.; Wang, M.-H.; Warden, M.; Wendt, M.; White, G.; Wittmer, W.; Wolski, A.; Woodley, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Yan, Y.; Yoda, H.; Yokoya, K.; Zhou, F.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-04-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  5. Endothelin-1 critically contribute to EPC reduction and dysfunction via an ETA/NADPH oxidase pathway-induced oxidative stress in salt-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan-Dan; Dong, Yu-Gang; Chen, Alex F.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are reduced in hypertension, which inversely correlates with its mortality. DOCA–salt hypertension features elevated ET-1 and oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that ET-1 induces EPC dysfunction by elevating oxidative stress through the ETA/NADPH oxidase pathway in salt-sensitive hypertension. Both ETA and ETB receptors were expressed in EPCs, but only ETA receptors were significantly increased in EPCs of DOCA-salt rats. EPC number and function were reduced in DOCA-salt rats compared with Sham controls, both were reversed by in vivo blockade of ETA receptors or NADPH oxidase. The enzymatic activity of NAPDH oxidase and its subunits gp91phox, p22phox and Rac1 were augmented in EPCs of DOCA-salt rats, with concomitantly decreased antioxidant enzymes MnSOD, CuZnSOD, and GPx-1. ROS level was elevated in EPCs from DOCA-salt rats, accompanied by increased EPC telomerase inactivation, senescence and apoptosis, which were rescued by ETA or NADPH oxidase blockade. Cell therapy of normal or treated DOCA EPCs, but not untreated DOCA EPCs, significantly increased capillary density and blood perfusion in ischemic hindlimbs of DOCA-salt rats. p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were increased in EPCs of DOCA-salt rats, which were reversed by ETA antagonist or NADPH oxidase inhibitor or superoxide scavenger (PEG-SOD). Finally, in ETB-deficient rats, plasma ET-1 was elevated and EPC number and telomerase activity were diminished. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that ET-1 contributes to EPC reduction and dysfunction via an ETA/NADPH oxidase pathway-induced oxidative stress in salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:22431579

  6. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta) is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    PubMed

    Satish, Latha; Johnson, Sandra; Wang, James H-C; Post, J Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D; Kathju, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult) wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta) is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA) reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular beta-actin but

  7. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  9. Tracing the wind interface of the massive binary Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Krister

    2007-07-01

    The binarity of Eta Carinae has been debated for a long time, but most recent evidence favors a binary star interpretation. However, very little is known about the nature of the companion star. Over Eta Carinae's spectroscopic period many observable wind lines in the NUV/Optical region, have been shown to exhibit peculiar line profiles with unusual velocity shifts relative to the system velocity. Some of the lines are exclusively blue-shifted over the entire 5.54 yr cycle and their ionization/excitation imply formation in the interface between the two massive stars. Especially, the He I emission lines are mainly formed in the wind interface region. Since the wind momentum is much larger for the primary star than its companion, the wind interface is located fairly close to the companion. Consequently, by tracing the He I emission we can construct a radial velocity curve that will describe the motion of the companion star and will derive the relation between the masses of the binary system stars. Furthermore, we will measure velocity and intensity variations in H I and Fe II to further investigate the ionization/excitation structure throughout Eta Carinae's wind. The analysis of the central source of Eta Carinae, due to the closeness of the two stars in the binary system {30 AU} and the intervening matter in line-of-sight towards Eta Carinae, is extremely dependent on data obtained with high angular resolving power. The HST archival data is crucial for the continuance of this project.

  10. Excited Ejecta in Light of Sight from Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the NUV spectrum of Eta Car, we have resolved many narrow absorption lines of neutral and singly-ionized elements with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We report for the first time the detection of interstellar vanadium in absorption, and many highly-excited absorption lines of Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, Co, Mn, and Mg. These elements, normally tied up in dust grains in the ISM, are located within wall of the Homunculus within 20,000 A.U. of Eta Car. Stellar radiation and stellar wind are interacting with the wall. Dust is likely being modified and/or destroyed. Previous Homunculus studies have demonstrated that nitrogen is overabundant and that carbon and oxygen emission lines are weak, or non-existent. Are the large column densities of these heavy elements due to abundance effects, excitation mechanisms, or modified grains? We may gain insight as Eta Car goes through its spectroscopic minimum in the summer of 2003.

  11. Is the Ejecta of ETA Carinae Overabundant or Overexcited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore; Davidson, Kris; Johansson, Sveneric; Damineli, Augusto; Ishibashi, Kaxunori; Corcoran, Michael; Hartman, Henrick; Viera, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister

    2003-01-01

    The ejecta of Eta Carinae, revealed by HST/STIS, are in a large range of physical conditions. As Eta Carinae undergoes a 5.52 period, changes occur in nebular emission and nebular absorption. "Warm" neutral regions, partially ionized regions, and fully ionized regions undergo significant changes. Over 2000 emission lines, most of Fe-like elements, have been indentified in the Weigelt blobs B and D. Over 500 emission lines have been indentified in the Strontium Filament. An ionized Little Homunculus is nestled within the neutral-shelled Homunculus. In line of sight, over 500 nebular absorption lines have been identified with up to twenty velocity components. STIS is following changes in many nebular emission and absorption lines as Eta Carinae approaches the minimum, predicted to be in June/July 2003, during the General Assembly. Coordinated observations with HST, CHANDRA, RXTE, FUSE, UVES/VLT, Gemini and other observatories are following this minimum.

  12. 75 FR 53982 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determination Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Determination Activities Report; Comment Request on Extension Without Change (OMB 1205-0150) AGENCY: Employment... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The ETA 207 Report, Nonmonetary Determination Activities, contains... proposed extension collection of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determinations Activities Report. Comments...

  13. 76 FR 12760 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Report ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ..., Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities (OMB Control No. 1205- 0051): Extension Without Change AGENCY... ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and.... Background The ETA 902 Report, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) Activities, is a monthly...

  14. Start of Eta Car's X-ray Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Liburd, Jamar; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using quicklook data from the XRay Telescope on Swift shows that the flux on July 30, 2014 was 4.9 plus or minus 2.0×10(exp-12) ergs s(exp-1)cm(exp-2). This flux is nearly equal to the X-ray minimum flux seen by RXTE in 2009, 2003.5, and 1998, and indicates that Eta Car has reached its X-ray minimum, as expected based on the 2024-day period derived from previous 2-10 keV observations with RXTE.

  15. The 2011 Eta-Aquariids observing campaign from La Palma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, Felix; Weiland, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Because the Eta-Aquariids, the most prominent stream for Southern Hemisphere observers, are difficult to watch from mid-northern latitudes, a week-long visual observing campaign was carried out in May 2011 from La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. There, on the grounds of the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos (ORM), at an altitude of more than 2000 m above sea level, observing conditions were nearly perfect. As a consequence, we managed to record more than 300 Eta-Aquariids in about 30 hours of effective observing time. An impression of the campaign together with a summary of the results is given.

  16. Current status of E/f sub 1 (1420) and. iota. /. eta. (1450)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U. )

    1989-09-01

    The current status and future prospects are given of the E/f{sub 1} (1420) and the {eta}(1430) region containing the {iota}/{eta}(1450). These states are seen in the channels K{bar K}{pi} and {eta}{pi}{pi}. 43 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. 75 FR 3927 - Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report; Comment Request on... unemployment compensation programs. The data in the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report, includes... extension for the collection of the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience report. Comments are...

  18. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  19. EMISSIONS PROCESSING FOR THE ETA/ CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA and EPA have created an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This AQF system links an adaptation of the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality Model with the 12 kilometer ETA model running operationally at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP). One of the...

  20. Eta Car's spectroscopic event begins to differ from 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Humphreys, Roberta; Ishibash, K.; Martin, J. C.

    2014-08-01

    The middle of eta Car's 2014.6 spectroscopic event (periastron passage) occurred in mid-August (ATEL #6334, #6336, #6357, #6368, #6380). HST/STIS observations on July 13, July 30, and August 15 strongly suggest that the exotic He II 4687 emission is reappearing sooner than in the 2009.1 event.

  1. The Corrected Eta-Squared Coefficient: A Value Added Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnette, J. Jackson; McLean, James E.

    Eta-Squared (ES) is often used as a measure of strength of association of an effect, a measure often associated with effect size. It is also considered the proportion of total variance accounted for by an independent variable. It is simple to compute and interpret. However, it has one critical weakness cited by several authors (C. Huberty, 1994;…

  2. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, Mairan Macedo; Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of three HST/STIS spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from eta Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  3. Recent Results from HST/STIS Spectroscopy of eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2001-06-01

    Repeated HST/STIS observations of eta Carinae and its ejecta have produced a large spectroscopic data set which is a unique resource for the astrophysics of massive stars, ejecta, and related topics. Here we report the existence of this data set and mention some implications concerning the star, spatially resolved from its bright diffuse ejecta.

  4. Eta Sigma Gamma: Preparing Leaders Today for Tomorrow's Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kelli McCormack

    2007-01-01

    There is no one definition for a leader or for leadership, but most people can identify a leader and can provide qualities of a good leader or good leadership. The founders of Eta Gamma Gamma--William Bock, Warren Schaller, and Robert Synovitz--all displayed a critical characteristic of leadership by having and acting on a vision. Leadership has…

  5. Spectra of Eta Carina from Objective Prism Photographic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, M.; Barker, T.

    2008-05-01

    Brightness and spectral variations of Eta Carina occur over a 5.5 year cycle. Emission lines were observed to fade in 1948, 1962, 1981, 1987, and 1992 (Damineli 1996, ApJ, 460, L49), and 1997 (Eta Carinae at the Millennium, ASP Conf. Ser. 179, ed. J.A. Morse, R.M. Humphreys, and A. Damineli). Gaps in the observation of spectra occur in 1970 and 1975 when two other such occurrences of the 5.5 year cycle were expected. Objective prism photographic plates of Eta Carina were found in the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive located at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. The plates belong to the University of Michigan survey (Houk 1978, Michigan Catalogue of Two-dimensional Spectral Types for the HD Stars). One plate, IN emulsion + RG1 filter, was taken on 1968 July 4 UT. The other plate, IIaO emulsion, was taken on 1972 March 12 UT. These plates were taken between the 5.5 year cyclic events of 1970 and 1975 and therefore represent the usual emission line spectra. The spectrum of Eta Car was extracted from each of the objective prism plates and will be presented.

  6. The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, J. H.; Ellingson, S. W.; Patterson, C. D.; Taylor, W.; Venugopal, V.; Cutchin, S.; Boor, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) is a radio telescope utilizing a low-cost backend, which implements flexible, reconfigurable computing techniques. It is designed to continuously monitor nearly the entire northern sky at 29-47MHz in a search for low-frequency radio transients (short pulses) from high-energy astrophysical phenomena. This antenna array, which is currently under construction, is located in a relatively radio-quiet area in the Blue Ridge Mountains southwest of Asheville, NC, at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). The array consists of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. The core of the array is 10 antenna stations arranged in a 16-m diameter circle with one antenna station at the center. In addition, one antenna station is situated about 50m to the north of the core and another is about 50m to the east of the core. A 26-m dish on the PARI site (about 1km from the ETA core) will be used for follow-up, added aperture, longer baselines, and additional radio frequency interference (RFI) mitigation. Preliminary observations with one test antenna station have detected the expected Galactic emission in this frequency range; ETA will be Galactic-noise limited. The ETA backend will utilize off-the-shelf components and a cluster of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for detecting pulses of various lengths, dispersion measures, and directions (synthesized delay beams), while incorporating various RFI countermeasures. Potential sources of radio transients that might be observed by ETA include gamma-ray bursts (prompt emission), supernovae (prompt emission), coalescing compact-object binaries (e.g., neutron star -- neutron star, neutron star -- black hole), and exploding primordial black holes. This array should detect giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar, and possibly other pulsars. ETA is a collaboration of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Physics Department at Virginia Tech, and PARI. ETA work at Virginia

  7. Origin of the Central Constant Emission Component of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corocoran, M. F.; Gull, T.; Ishibashi, K.; Pittard, J. M.; Hillier, D. J.; Damineli, A.; Davidson, K.; Nielsen, K. E.; Owocki, S.; Henley, D.; Pollock, A.; Okazaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray campaign observation of the wind-wind colliding (WWC) binary system, Eta Carinae, targeted at its periastron passage in 2003, presented a detailed view of the flux and spectral variations of the X-ray minimum phase. One of the discoveries in this campaign was a central constant emission (CCE) component very near the central WWC source (Hamaguchi et al. 2007, ApJ, 663, 522). The CCE component was noticed between 1-3 keY during the X-ray minima and showed no variation on either short timescales within any observation or long timescales of up to 10 years. Hamaguchi et al. (2007) discussed possible origins as collisionally heated shocks from the fast polar winds from Eta Car or the fast moving outflow from the WWC with the ambient gas, or shocked gas that is intrinsic to the wind of Eta Car. During the 2009 periastron passage, we launched another focussed observing campaign of Eta Carinae with the Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observatories, concentrating on the X-ray faintest phase named the deep X-ray minimum. Thanks to multiple observations during the deep X-ray minimum, we found that the CCE spectrum extended up to 10 keV, indicating presence of hot plasma of kT approx.4-6 keV. This result excludes two possible origins that assume relatively slow winds (v approx. 1000 km/s) and only leaves the possibility that the CCE plasma is wind blown bubble at the WWC downstream. The CCE spectrum in 2009 showed a factor of 2 higher soft band flux as the CCE spectrum in 2003, while the hard band flux was almost unchanged. This variation suggests decrease in absorption column along the line of sight. We compare this result with recent increase in V-band magnitude of Eta Carinae and discuss location of the CCE plasma.

  8. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  9. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  10. Turbidity of a binary fluid mixture: Determining eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A ground based (1-g) experiment is in progress that will measure the turbidity of a density-matched, binary fluid mixture extremely close to the critical point. By covering the range of reduced temperatures t is equivalent to (T-T(sub c))/T(sub c) from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -2), the turbidity measurements will allow the critical exponent eta to be determined. No experiment has determined a value of the critical exponent eta, yet its value is significant to theorists in critical phenomena. Interpreting the turbidity correctly is important if future NASA flight experiments use turbidity as an indirect measurement of relative temperature in shuttle experiments on critical phenomena in fluids.

  11. Turbidity of a Binary Fluid Mixture: Determining Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.

    1996-01-01

    A ground based (1-g) experiment is in progress that will measure the turbidity of a density-matched, binary fluid mixture extremely close to its liquid-liquid critical point. By covering the range of reduced temperatures t equivalent to (T-T(sub c)) / T(sub c) from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -2), the turbidity measurements will allow the critical exponent eta to be determined. No experiment has precisely determined a value of the critical exponent eta, yet its value is significant to theorists in critical phenomena. Relatively simple critical phenomena, as in the liquid-liquid system studied here, serve as model systems for more complex systems near a critical point.

  12. A closer look at eta Carinae's surprising nitrogen chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Jones, Paul; Millar, Tom; Charnley, Steven; Mcelroy, Daniel; Milam, Stefanie

    2013-04-01

    The ejecta of the luminous blue variable (LBV) star eta Carinae has recently been found to be surprisingly rich in simple nitrogen-bearing molecules, and theory predicts that more complex species such as HC3N and CH3CN are abundant in the warm inner regions of the Homunculus. We therefore propose to search for emission from HC3N, CH3CN and other nitrogen-bearing molecules in eta Carinae. We will also map HCN and HNC with unprecedented spatial detail to determine the origin and spatial extent of these species. The proposed observations will be crucial for developing chemical models of this source, which we will use to (1) promote understanding of the chemistry of this star and its mysterious ejecta and (2) provide information on molecule formation around massive stars that are about to undergo Type II supernova explosions.

  13. Mapping the interacting winds of Eta Carinae: Changes Across the Apastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the May 2009 servicing mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, we have systematically mapped the central 1-2" region of Eta Carinae with the 0.1"-wide, long slit of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Six mappings of selected forbidden emission lines began in the late recovery after the 2009.1 periastron event and now extend to phase 0.85 of Eta Carina's 5.54 year period. In addition to the recovery of the high state as depicted by [Fe III] (IP=16.6 eV) strictures and the stabilization of [Fe II] (IP=7.8 eV) features, we see components of at least three wind-blown shells that expand outward at 400 to 500 km/s. Virtually all forbidden emission originates from primary wind structures. The [Fe II] shells, moving at 470 km/s, are primary wind (420 km/s) structures slightly accelerated by the fast secondary wind (Teodoro et al, 2013 ApJ 773, L16T). The [Fe III] arcs, directly photo-ionized by the secondary star, also shift outward with time. Structures in both emissions shift in a general clockwork direction consistent with the derived orbital motion by Gull et al (2009 MNRAS 396, 1308) and revised by Madura et al (2012 MNRAS 420, 2064). With the continued development of the 3D hydrodynamic models we are able to compare the changing structures and determine limits to changes in the mass loss rate over this period of time. Additional mappings, to be obtained by seven additional HST visits, are scheduled at selected orbital phases to follow major changes in ionization structue due to the drop of high ionization to low ionization across the 2014.5 periastron passage. This work is funded by NASA grants to support HST research.

  14. Violent Encounters During The Great Eruption Of Eta Carinae And Other Luminous Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Frew, David

    2011-01-01

    We present newly uncovered historical data containing over 50 observations of the brightness of Eta Carinae during the peak of its 19th century Great Eruption, which correct some mistakes in previously published lightcurves and paint a substantially different picture of the eruption. We compare the timing of brightening events to expected times of periastron encounters in the eccentric binary system, and we evaluate the extent to which such interactions may account for the observed variability. Periaston encounters may explain some aspects of the light curve, but new questions arise as well, and we discuss a possible physical model for the eruption. Finally, we mention potentially far-reaching implications for so-called "Supernova Impostors" and other luminous transients seen in other galaxies, which will be discovered in increasing numbers in upcoming transient searches like LSST.

  15. The eta Carinae Treasury Project and the HST/STIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris

    2006-01-01

    The HST Eta Carinae Treasury Project made extensive use of the HST/STIS from 1998 to the time of its failure in 2004. As one of the most prolific users of that instrument, the Treasury Project used the cross-dispersed spatial resolution of the STIS as few projects did. We present several enhancements to the existing STIS data reduction methods that are applicable to non-Treasury Project data in the STIS archive.

  16. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  17. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Chandra X-Ray Observatory image of the mysterious superstar Eta Carinae reveals a surprising hot irner core, creating more questions than answers for astronomers. The image shows three distinct structures: An outer, horseshoe shaped ring about 2 light-years in diameter, a hot inner core about 3 light-months in diameter, and a hot central source less than a light-month in diameter which may contain the superstar. In 1 month, light travels a distance of approximately 489 billion miles (about 788 billion kilometers). All three structures are thought to represent shock waves produced by matter rushing away from the superstar at supersonic speeds. The temperature of the shock-heated gas ranges from 60 million degrees Kelvin in the central regions to 7 million degrees Kelvin on the outer structure. Eta Carinae is one of the most enigmatic and intriguing objects in our galaxy. Between 1837 and 1856, it increased dramatically in brightness to become the most prominent star in the sky except for Sirius, even through it is 7,500 light-years away, more than 80 times the distance to Sirius. This 'Great Eruption,' as it is called, had an energy comparable to a supernova, yet did not destroy the star, which faded to become a dim star, invisible to the naked eye. Since 1940, Eta Carinae has begun to brighten again, becoming visible to the naked eye. Photo credit: NASA/CXC/SAO

  19. Fresh Clues in Eta Carinae's 2009.0 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris; Martin, J. C.; Humphreys, R. M.; Mehner, A.; Ishibashi, K.; Ferland, G.; Hamann, F.

    2009-05-01

    Eta Carinae's most recent spectroscopic event climaxed in January 2009 and revealed significant new information. We obtained UV images with the HST/WFPC2, and violet-to-red spectroscopy with GMOS on the Gemini South telescope. The new NICI instrument on Gemini South obtained a remarkable set of near-IR images shortly after the peak of the event. Improved temporal coverage proves to be critical. With both HST/WFPC2 and Gemini/GMOS, the time intervals between observations were substantially smaller than we had achieved with HST/STIS and HST/ACS during the preceding event in mid-2003. Thus we find, for example, that the UV brightness of the central wind changed much faster than previous data could show or even hint. Meanwhile the behavior of the strange He II 4686 emission is greatly clarified, and a number of other features differed from the 2003 event. Regarding pre-event developments, Gemini/GMOS spectroscopy in 2007--2008 can be used to derive fresh constraints on the orbit of eta Car's hypothetical hot companion star. The high-spatial-resolution near-IR images obtained with Gemini/NICI show a dramatic new view of eta Car's Homunculus ejecta-nebula. Because of lesser extinction, these show deeper structure than the familiar HST images; some of the most conspicuous large near-IR structures have no UV-to-red counterparts. This program is partially funded by grants from STScI.

  20. Future directions in searching for eta-mesic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Quamrul; Liu, Lon-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Future directions in searching for eta-mesic nuclei: Q. Haider, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, N.Y. 10458, U.S.A. and L.C. Liu, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M 87545, U.S.A. Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong-interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. In experimental search for η-mesic nucleus, transfer reactions have been frequently employed. One such reaction has led to the observation of the η-mesic nucleus 25Mg η . However, searching quasibound η-nucleus states in lighter nuclei such as 3He, 4He, and 11B has not yet yielded positive results. Searching η-mesic nuclei in medium-mass nuclear systems other than 25Mg is highly valuable. In view of the aforementioned experimental results, we suggest searching for more η-mesic nuclei in target nuclei having a mass number A >= 12 . Bronx, N.Y. 10458.

  1. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  2. 2{eta} or not 2{eta}? Insights into the Cu CVD process using a Cu(I) precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Maverick, A.W.; Fronczek, F.R.; Kim, A.J.; Butler, L.G.

    1993-12-31

    One of the first successful Cu(I) CVD precursors is (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD), and this species continues to served as a model system. In the CVD process, a significant step is dissociation of the COD ligand. The energetics of this process have been estimated previously. However, it now appears that, in the solid state, (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) undergoes an exchange process that allows additional insight into the potential energy surface governing the Cu-COD interaction. The solid-state structure of (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) has been difficult to establish, but a combination of variable temperature X-ray and solid-state {sup 13}C NMR studies leads to the following picture. Cu{sup I} is three-coordinate, bound to the hfac ligand and bound preferentially to one olefin of the COD ligand. There is a small energy barrier associated with motion of the Cu into position for {eta}{sup 2}-binding to the other olefin; the COD and hfac ligands remain approximately stationary. Thus, there are two sites for Cu, now labeled {eta}{sup 2} and {eta}{sup 2}. This new interpretation of the solid-state structure differs from that of our 300 K data set and a previous report. In addition, the exchange process is intimately connected with the Cu-COD dissociation step in the CVD process.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  4. Rare decay {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi}{gamma}{gamma} in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.; Drechsel, D.

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the rare radiative {eta} decay modes {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} within the framework of chiral perturbation theory at {ital O}({ital p}{sup 4}). We present photon spectra and partial decay rates for both processes as well as a Dalitz contour plot for the charged decay. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  6. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  7. Measurements of the mass and width of the eta(c) meson and of an eta(c)(2S) candidate.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-04-01

    The mass m(eta(c)) and total width Gamma(eta(c))(tot) of the eta(c) meson have been measured in two-photon interactions at the SLAC e(+)e(-) asymmetric B Factory with the BABAR detector. With a sample of approximately 2500 reconstructed eta(c)-->K(0)(S)K+/-pi(-/+) decays in 88 fb(-1) of data, the results are m(eta(c))=2982.5+/-1.1(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2) and Gamma(eta(c))(tot)=34.3+/-2.3(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2). Using the same decay mode, a second resonance with 112+/-24 events is observed with a mass of 3630.8+/-3.4(stat)+/-1.0(syst) MeV/c(2) and width of 17.0+/-8.3(stat)+/-2.5(syst) MeV/c(2). This observation is consistent with expectations for the eta(c)(2S) state. PMID:15089530

  8. New measurement of exclusive decays of the {chi}{sub c0} and {chi}{sub c2} to two-meson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Robichaud, A. N.; Tatishvili, G.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    Using a sample of 2.59x10{sup 7} {psi}(2S) decays collected by the CLEO-c detector, we present results of a study of {chi}{sub c0} and {chi}{sub c2} decays into two-meson final states. We present the world's most precise measurements of the {chi}{sub cJ,(J=0,2)}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {eta}{eta}, and {eta}{sup '}{eta}{sup '} branching fractions, and a search for {chi}{sub c} decays into {eta}{eta}{sup '}. These results shed light on the mechanism of charmonium decays into pseudoscalar mesons.

  9. Eta Carinae, the Integral Nebula and the Homunculus Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2000-07-01

    In the past two years, observations of Eta Carina have revealed much new and very exciting information. Augusto Damineli noted a 5.5 year period in the visible and near infrared spectroscopy. Michael Corcoran and Bish Ishibashi noticed modulation of the x-ray fluxes with various periodicities around 90 days before and after the xray and radio minimum in December 1997. Observations, done in March 1998 under proposal 7302 {Davidson et al} from 1640A to 10400A using STIS in GXXXM mode and the 50x0.1 arcsecond slit, revealed much new information in the immediate regions of Eta Carina. The slit orientation was slightly off the major axis of the Homunculus, but passed through Weigelt components B and D. Bish Ishibashi and Ted Gull have reduced the data and provided it to various team members. Torgil Zethson has identified well over 90 percent of the emission lines in the March 1998 spectrum and finds most to be FeII emission lines. Based upon the past ground-based history of Eta Carina, we expected that FeIII and other high ionization states would return within the year. STIS GTO observations {Ted Gull, PI program 8036} characterized a bright internal emission nebula by turning the slit 90 degrees for visit 1 and studying the changes in spectrum as the FeIII lines appear by using visit 2 with the identical slit orientation from March 19, 1998. Data from the four visits of STIS to Eta Carinae between December 1997 and February 1999 demonstrate that the star has brightened by a factor of two during that interval and that the immediate nebulosity has tripled in surface brightness. Moreover a small circular nebular shell, seen in multiple [Fe II] lines has disappeared and the opacity in the 2000 to 3000A region obscuring the star has lifted considerable as the Fe II is converting to Fe III. Given the strong changes in the spectrum, we have chosen to use the six orbits in two visits. Visit 1 will be a precise repeat of the March 1998 and February 1999 observations, adjusted

  10. Endothelin ETA receptor expression in human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J. C.; Pickard, J. D.; Davenport, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) has been implicated in cerebrovasospasm for example, following subarachnoid haemorrhage, and blocking the interaction of ET with its receptors on cerebral vessels, may be of therapeutic benefit. The aim of our study was to characterize endothelin receptor sub-types on medial smooth muscle cells of human cerebral vessels. Cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells were explanted from human cerebral resistance vessels and characterized as human brain smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). 2. Over a 48 h incubation period, HBSMC cultures secreted comparable levels of immunoreactive (IR) big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) and IR endothelin (ET): 12.7 +/- 10.3 and 8.3 +/- 5.6 pmol/10(6) cells, respectively (mean +/- s.e. mean from three different individuals), into the culture medium. 3. Total RNA was extracted from cultures of human brain smooth muscle cells. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RI-PCR) assays and subsequent product separation by agarose gel electrophoresis revealed single bands corresponding to the expected product sizes encoding cDNA for ETA (299 base pairs) and ETB (428 base pairs) (n = 3 different cultures). 4. Autoradiography demonstrated the presence of specific binding sites for [125I]-ET-1 which labels all ET receptors, and [125I]-PD151242, an ETA subtype-selective antagonist which exclusively labels ETA receptors, but no specific-binding was detected using ETB subtype-selective [125I]-BQ3020 (n = 3 different cultures, in duplicate). 5. In saturation binding assays, [123I]-ET-1 bound with high affinity: KD = 0.8 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 690 +/- 108 fmol mg-1. A one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range (10(-12) to 10(-8) M). [125I]-PD151242 also bound with similar affinity: KD = 0.4 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 388 +/- 68 fmol mg-1 (mean +/- s.e. mean, n = 3 different cultures). Again, a one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range. Unlabelled PD

  11. UV nebular absorption in Eta Car and Weigelt D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Lindler, D. J.; Eta Car HST Treasury Team

    2003-12-01

    The high angular and high spectral resolution of the HST/STIS MAMA echelle mode, provide an unique means to distinguish the physical structures surrounding Eta Car. Observations are parts of the HST treasury program (K. Davidson P.I.) for monitoring variations over Eta Car's spectroscopic minimum. Nebular emission is present above and below the stellar spectrum which is about 0.03'' wide. We have extracted the nebular part of the central source spectrum and compared it with the spectrum of Weigelt D, located approximately 0.2'' Northwest of the central source. The spectra show significant similarities and our conclusions are two-fold. First, the radiation from the Wiegelt blobs give an unwanted contribution to the spectrum of the central source, which emphasizes the importance of using an extracted spectrum in a spectral analysis. Second, the Weigelt blobs have so far been assumed to produce a pure emission line spectrum. However, this comparison shows the presence of similar absorption structures previously observed in the spectrum of the central star (Gull et al., 2003, submitted ApJL). Two velocity structures at approximately -50 and -500 km/s, respectively, have been observed in the Weigelt D spectrum. We present identifications of the absorption structures to supplement the emission line work performed by T. Zethson (2000, PhD Thesis) and provide additional information regarding the geometry of the inner parts of the Eta Car nebula. The -50 km/s velocity component is similar to the absorption structure at -146 km/s observed in the spectrum of the central object. If these velocity systems are related, this implies that the absorption component is located close to the central parts of the nebular system.

  12. The {eta}(2225) observed by the BES Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Li Demin; Ma Bing

    2008-05-01

    In the framework of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} meson decay model, the strong decays of the 3{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 4{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss states are investigated. It is found that in the presence of the initial state mass being 2.24 GeV, the total widths of the 3{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 4{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss states are about 438 MeV and 125 MeV, respectively. Also, when the initial state mass varies from 2220 to 2400 MeV, the total width of the 4{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss state varies from about 100 to 132 MeV, while the total width of the 3{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss state varies from about 400 to 594 MeV. A comparison of the predicted widths and the experimental result of (0.19{+-}0.03{sub -0.06}{sup +0.04}) GeV, the width of the {eta}(2225) with a mass of (2.24{sub -0.02-0.02}{sup +0.03+0.03}) GeV recently observed by the BES Collaboration in the radiative decay J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{phi}{yields}{gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub L}{sup 0}, suggests that it would be very difficult to identify the {eta}(2225) as the 3{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss state, and the {eta}(2225) seams a good candidate for the 4{sup 1}S{sub 0} ss state.

  13. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  14. [Sr II] Detected in a Nebular Filament Near Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.R.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope reveal a peculiar emission line region in the close vicinity to Eta Carinae. The lines of [SrII], [MnII], [CoII], [TiII], [NiII] and [FeI] are detected in the 6400-7000 Angstrom spectral interval at a blue-shifted velocity of approximately 95 km/sec and seem to be associated with a long, narrow filament with dimensions of less than 0.5 inches by 1.1 inches. The filament is notable as it is separate both in velocity and structure from the bright emission of the Integral Nebula. This filament is buried within the Homunculus and is not visible in direct images which are dominated by reflection nebulosities. In our literature searches we have found no evidence of strontium emission lines in nebulae. We are aware of permitted transitions of strontium seen in AGB stars. S-processed elements like strontium are not expected in the ejecta of a massive star like Eta Carinae. Detection of [SrII] and the fact that the [NiII], [MnII] and [CoII] lines are unusually strong compared to [FeI] are quite a surprise. It has long been known that nitrogen is overabundant in the ejecta of Eta Carinae. Is this processed material from the present star(s)? Has there been processed material ejected from a more evolved companion? The situation is decidedly mysterious. This research has been supported by NASA through STScI grants and the STIS GTO funding.

  15. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  16. Implementation of an Eta Belt Domain on Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, Jules; Rancic, Miodrag; Norris, Peter; Geiger, Jim

    2001-01-01

    We extend the Eta weather model from a regional domain into a belt domain that does not require meridional boundary conditions. We describe how the extension is achieved and the parallel implementation of the code on the Cray T3E and the SGI Origin 2000. We validate the forecast results on the two platforms and examine how the removal of the meridional boundary conditions affects these forecasts. In addition, using several domains of different sizes and resolutions, we present the scaling performance of the code on both systems.

  17. Eta Carinae and the Homunculus: A Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Luminous Blue Variable, Eta Carinae, and its ejecta, thrown out since the 1840s, are proving to be a very challenging system to explain. The > 100 solar mass central source (which is likely a binary system) is very complex with P-Cygni lines throughout the spectrum. Superimposed upon the stellar spectrum are many thousands of narrow absorption lines. Indeed we have found twenty different velocities between -140km/s and -580km/s with many lower levels well elevated above the ground states of numerous ions.

  18. Stratified X-ray Plasmas around Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael

    At a distance of ˜2.3 kpc, eta Carinae is the best super massive star to study the LBV phenomenon. It is a binary composed of two massive stars on a highly elliptical orbit (e ˜0.9-0.95, P˜5.54 years). The current best estimate is that the primary star has M gtrsim90M_{⊙} and v_{wind} ˜420 km s(-1) , while the companion star has M˜30M_{⊙} and v_{wind} ˜3000 km s(-1) . Strong winds from both stars collide (the wind-wind collision: WWC), which produces hot thermal plasmas of kT˜4 keV and emits strong X-rays. The luminosity increases toward periastron, but it abruptly declines by two orders of magnitudes around periastron. We had an observing campaign of eta Car around periastron in 2009.0, which revealed that the X-ray decline is caused by a hybrid mechanism of a true eclipse and an activity decay of the WWC plasma. During the activity decay, the head-on wind collision seems to shut off, possibly due to the overwhelming momentum of the primary wind. The secondary winds flowing backward may still collide with the twisted primary winds and produce hot X-ray plasma. During the eclipse of the WWC plasma, faint X-ray emission from a different plasma component within ˜500 AU from eta Car emerged. The plasma is as hot as the WWC plasma (˜50 MK) and in strong non-equilibrium ionization state (nt ≤sssim4×10(10) cm(-3) s). The plasma may originate from collision of winds ejected a few orbits ago. Inside the bipolar lobe of eta Car, the Chandra observatory spatially resolved emission from extended hot cool (˜6 MK) plasmas, as well as the X-ray reflection component. The spectrum showed unusually strong lines around the Si and S K-shell energies, which may be originated in the collision of the secondary winds with cold circumstellar material. We discuss the circumstellar hot plasma structures of LBVs based on these results.

  19. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DE-FG02-05ER64097 Systems and Methods for Injecting Helium Beams into a Synchrotron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A

    2008-09-30

    A research grant was approved to fund development of requirements and concepts for extracting a helium-ion beam at the LLUMC proton accelerator facility, thus enabling the facility to better simulate the deep space environment via beams sufficient to study biological effects of accelerated helium ions in living tissues. A biologically meaningful helium-ion beam will be accomplished by implementing enhancements to increase the accelerator's maximum proton beam energy output from 250MeV to 300MeV. Additional benefits anticipated from the increased energy include the capability to compare possible benefits from helium-beam radiation treatment with proton-beam treatment, and to provide a platform for developing a future proton computed tomography imaging system.

  20. Scalar mesons in the decays {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Samoylenko, V. D.

    2010-10-15

    The decays {eta} {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} are considered within the isobar model. It is shown that, in order to explain the branching ratio and the shape of the Dalitz plot for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0}, it is sufficient to take into account the contributions of the {sigma} and a{sub 0} mesons. The inclusion of the {sigma} meson is necessary for reproducing the shape of the distribution over the Dalitz plot. The branching ratio for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} is obtained. The predictions for the distributions over the Dalitz plot for this decay are presented. These predictions depend strongly on model parameters.

  1. 78 FR 40194 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determination Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Determination Activities Report; Comment Request on Extension Without Change (OMB 1205-0150) AGENCY: Employment....Edward@dol.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA 207 Report, Nonmonetary Determination... concerning the proposed extension collection of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determinations Activities...

  2. Observation of eta'c production in gammagamma fusion at CLEO.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Haynes, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Weinstein, A J; Mahapatra, R; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Severini, H; Skubic, P

    2004-04-01

    We report on the observation of the eta(')(c)(2(1)S0), the radial excitation of the eta(c)(1(1)S0) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gammagamma-->eta(')(c)-->K(0)(S)K+/-pi(-/+) in 13.6 fb(-1) of CLEO II/II.V data and 13.1 fb(-1) of CLEO III data. We obtain M(eta(')(c))=3642.9+/-3.1(stat)+/-1.5(syst) MeV and M(eta(c))=2981.8+/-1.3(stat)+/-1.5(syst) MeV. The corresponding values of hyperfine splittings between 1S0 and 3S1 states are DeltaM(hf)(1S)=115.1+/-2.0 MeV and DeltaM(hf)(2S)=43.1+/-3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta(c) and eta(')(c) have equal branching fractions to K(S)Kpi, we obtain Gamma(gammagamma)(eta(')(c))=1.3+/-0.6 keV. PMID:15089529

  3. 77 FR 35060 - Employment and Training Administration; Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 538...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... addresses section below on or before August 13, 2012. ADDRESSES: Submit written comments to Scott Gibbons... toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 1-877-889-5627 (TTY/TDD). Email: gibbons.scott@dol.gov.... Gibbons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA 538 and ETA 539 reports are weekly reports...

  4. 77 FR 2089 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 204, Experience Rating Report; Comment Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ..., telephone number (202) 693-2927 (this is not a toll-free number) or by email: dullaghan.edward@dol.gov... different experience rating systems. Used in conjunction with other data, the ETA-204 assists in determining... and Training Administration (ETA). Title: Experience Rating Report. OMB Number: 1205-0164....

  5. 76 FR 27090 - Comment Request for Extension of Information Collection (Without Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in... collection by Form ETA 9033-A, OMB Control Number 1205-0352, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers.... The INA generally prohibits the performance of longshore work by alien crewmembers, however the...

  6. 76 FR 58540 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 581, Contribution Operations Report; Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Performance System (TPS) which evaluates the employer-related or tax functions of the UI program. The... measuring the performance and effectiveness of states' UI tax operations. Using ETA 581 data, the TPS... report is the only vehicle for collection of information required under the TPS program. If ETA 581...

  7. USING MM5V3 WITH ETA ANALYSES FOR AIR-QUALITY MODELING AT THE EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts have been underway since MM5v3 was released in July 1999 to set up air-quality simulations using Eta analyses as background fields. Our previous simulations used a one-way quadruple-nested set of domains with horizontal grid spacing of 108, 36, 12 and 4 km. With Eta a...

  8. Cautionary Note on Reporting Eta-Squared Values from Multifactor ANOVA Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Charles A.; Block, Richard A.; Aguinis, Herman

    2004-01-01

    The authors provide a cautionary note on reporting accurate eta-squared values from multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. They reinforce the distinction between classical and partial eta-squared as measures of strength of association. They provide examples from articles published in premier psychology journals in which the authors…

  9. A new class of simplified phorbol ester analogues: synthesis and binding to PKC and eta PKC-C1B (eta PKC-CRD2).

    PubMed

    Wender, P A; Kirschberg, T A; Williams, P D; Bastiaans, H M; Irie, K

    1999-10-01

    [formula: see text] A unique class of simplified phorbol ester analogues is described for the first time. A highly efficient retro-annelation sequence was developed in order to remove the five-membered ring from the phorbol diterpene core, allowing access to BCD ring analogues of the phorbol esters. The binding of these analogues to protein kinase C (PKC) and the truncated peptide eta PKC-C1B (eta PKC-CRD2) is also reported. PMID:10825954

  10. On Decays of B Mesons to a Strange Meson and an Eta or Eta' Meson at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschauer, James Francis

    2009-01-01

    We describe studies of the decays of B mesons to final states ηK*(892), ηK*0(S-wave), ηK*2(1430), and η'K based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collier at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We measure branching fractions and charge asymmetries for the decays B → ηK*, where K* indicates a spin 0, 1, or 2 Kπ system, making first observations of decays to final states ηK0*0(S-wave), ηK+*0 (S-wave), and ηK0*2(1430). We measure the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C for the decays B0 → η'K0, observing CP violation in a charmless B decay with 5σ significance considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties.