Sample records for accelerator laboratory fnal

  1. A national laboratory funded by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. www.fnal.gov Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory February 2014

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    .fnal.gov Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory February 2014 Particle Physics: Benefits to Society From particle. The development and construction of particle accelerators, particle detectors and other research tools has led to many benefits to society. The invention of the World Wide Web, the use of particle accelerators

  2. Mu2e Production Target Remote Handling By: Michael R. Campbell, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 6308406495, mikecam@fnal.gov

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) shows the robot on it's floor rails. The robot frame is constructed of welded stainless steel tubing Laboratory, 6308406495, mikecam@fnal.gov System Layout Basic Robot Structure Upper ZAxis: Handles the Target Robot Window 12'6" 42'8" 11'8" Robot Base Frame Floor Rail Drive System Floor Rail Position Encoder

  3. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory August 2013 A national laboratory funded by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. www.fnal.gov

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    of Science of the Department of Energy. www.fnal.gov More than 4,200 scientists worldwide use Fermilab Math and Science Academy, Aurora Muons, Inc. Northern Illinois University, DeKalb Northwestern University, Boston Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams

  4. A national laboratory funded by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. www.fnal.gov Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory March 2013

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    -friendly "green" business practices, recycling programs and conservation efforts. Fermilab has earned. Fermilab has conducted an environmental monitoring program on site for more than 40 years. The laboratory

  5. Report on Accelerator Physics T. Sen, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510

    E-print Network

    Sen, Tanaji

    The VLHC can only become a reality if we design it the most cost effective way at every stage significantly before they can be considered to be of accelerator quality. The low field VLHC design using warm

  6. The FNAL injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The present FNAL H{sup -} injector has been operational since the 1970s and consists of two magnetron H{sup -} sources and two 750 keV Cockcroft-Walton Accelerators. In the upgrade, both slit-type magnetron sources will be replaced with circular aperture sources, and the Cockcroft-Waltons with a 200 MHz RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole). Operational experience at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) has shown that the upgraded source and RFQ will be more reliable, improve beam quality and require less manpower than the present system. The present FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) injector has been operational since 1978 and has been a reliable source of H{sup -} beams for the Fermilab program. At present there are two Cockcroft-Walton injectors, each with a magnetron H{sup -} source with a slit aperture. With these two sources in operation, the injector has a reliability of better than 97%. However, issues with maintenance, equipment obsolescence, increased beam quality demands and retirement of critical personnel, have made it more difficult for the continued reliable running of the H{sup -} injector. The recent past has also seen an increase in both downtime and source output issues. With these problems coming to the forefront, a new 750 keV injector is being built to replace the present system. The new system will be similar to the one at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) that has a similar magnetron source with a round aperture and a 200MHz RFQ. This combination has been shown to operate extremely reliably.

  7. Installation and commissioning of the new Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory H- Magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S., E-mail: bollinger@fnal.gov [Proton Source Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) 40 year old Cockcroft-Walton 750 keV injectors with slit aperture magnetron ion sources have been replaced with a circular aperture magnetron, Low Energy Beam Transport, Radio Frequency Quadrupole Accelerator, and Medium Energy Beam Transport, as part of the FNAL Proton Improvement Plan. The injector design is based on a similar system at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The installation, commissioning efforts, and source operations to date will be covered in this paper along with plans for additional changes to the original design to improve reliability by reducing extractor spark rates and arc current duty factor.

  8. Parameter degeneracies in FNAL-Homestake LBNE setup

    E-print Network

    Bora, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    LBNE (Longbaseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments) provide a powerful experimental setup to study sensitivities and exlcusion limits in neutrino oscillation parameter space. A longbaseline experiment is being planned, at USA, from FNAL (Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory) to an underground laboratory at Homestake in South Dakota, at an angle of 5.84 degrees from FNAL (at a distance of 1289 km). The prospect of a new beamline towards this location from FNAL, and a 300 Kiloton water Cerenkov detector at the site is in planning stage, for the studies of the neutrino physics program. The long baseline provides sufficient matter effects for neutrino travel, and a large detrecor will help towards better statistics. In this work, we present, upto what extent, the parameter degeneracies, present in oscillation parameter space, can be resolved, using this FNAL-LBNE setup.

  9. Parameter degeneracies in FNAL-Homestake LBNE setup

    E-print Network

    Kalpana Bora

    2011-11-30

    LBNE (Longbaseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments) provide a powerful experimental setup to study sensitivities and exlcusion limits in neutrino oscillation parameter space. A longbaseline experiment is being planned, at USA, from FNAL (Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory) to an underground laboratory at Homestake in South Dakota, at an angle of 5.84 degrees from FNAL (at a distance of 1289 km). The prospect of a new beamline towards this location from FNAL, and a 300 Kiloton water Cerenkov detector at the site is in planning stage, for the studies of the neutrino physics program. The long baseline provides sufficient matter effects for neutrino travel, and a large detrecor will help towards better statistics. In this work, we present, upto what extent, the parameter degeneracies, present in oscillation parameter space, can be resolved, using this FNAL-LBNE setup.

  10. 205:20130828.1126 Dust Accelerator Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    205:20130828.1126 Dust Accelerator Laboratory Through the Dust Accelerator Laboratory, LASP, and laboratory experiments. Our goal is to address basic physical and applied exploration questions, including Laboratory is home to world-class facilities, including the largest dust accelerator in the world

  11. Ion Source Development For The Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Box 500, Batavia, IL 60543 (United States)

    2011-09-26

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200 MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60 mA of H{sup -} beam current, 15 Hz rep-rate, 100 {mu}s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  12. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  13. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  14. FNAL system patching design

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Romero, Andy; Dawson, Troy; Sieh, Connie; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    FNAL has over 5000 PCs running either Linux or Windows software. Protecting these systems efficiently against the latest vulnerabilities that arise has prompted FNAL to take a more central approach to patching systems. Due to different levels of existing support infrastructures, the patching solution for linux systems differs from that of windows systems. In either case, systems are checked for vulnerabilities by Computer Security using the Nessus tool.

  15. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2014-04-15

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  16. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-25

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  17. The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    -program laboratory for photon science, astrophysics, and accelerator and particle physics research. Six scientists promises to be just as extraordinary. #12;Accelerator Physics Particle accelerators are the working engines#12;The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile linear accelerator

  18. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J. [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)] [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)] [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  19. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J.; Mann, I.

    2013-10-01

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  20. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Persis Drell, Director

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Research Division E. Colby LCLS Accelerator Systems Division A. Brachmann Instrumentation & Controls Accelerator Operations and Safety Division R. Erickson RF Accelerator Research & Engineering Division M. Fazio Department W. White LCLS Accelerator Systems Division A. Brachmann Synchrotron Radiation Material Division M

  1. Radiation Protection and Licensing FNAL Radiation Physics Team

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Radiation Protection and Licensing K. Vaziri, FNAL Radiation Physics Team Proton Accelerators, 2012 #12;January 13, 2012 Radiation Protection and Licensing 2 Radiation Protection and Licensing 1 5. Tritium control and ground-water protection 6. Radioactive component storage 7. Repair

  2. FNAL booster: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis Spentzouris; James Amundson

    2003-06-02

    We present measurements of transverse and longitudinal beam phase space evolution during the first two hundred turns of the FNAL Booster cycle. We discuss the experimental technique, which allowed us to obtain turn-by-turn measurements of the beam profile. The experimental results are compared with the prediction of the Synergia 3D space charge simulation code.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory's Accelerator Experimental Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    , notably material science, to further accelerator R&D objectives. We touch on some of this in the following users could benefit will take a longer look. We also include capabilities at two accelerators managed in an off-line development area. The two sources at ATLAS have been used in a number of SBIR collaborative

  4. Muon g-2 Experiment A national laboratory funded by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. www.fnal.gov

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    Muon g-2 Experiment A national laboratory funded by the Office of Science of the Department of muons, scientists at Fermilab hope to learn whether there are elementary particles beyond the ones we know. The experiment Muon g-2 (pronounced gee-minus-two) is an international collaboration between U

  5. Data acquisition for FNAL E665

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Green, M.C.; Kaufman, S.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Bartlett, J.F.; Melanson, H.L.; Petravick, D.; Michael, D.G.; McLeod, D.; Vidal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The data acquisition system for FNAL E665, an experiment to study deep inelastic muon scattering from nucleons and nuclei, is described. The system is built with the FNAL VAXONLINE and RSX DA building blocks. The structure, capabilities and limitations for data flow, control and monitoring are discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  6. * Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory FERMILAB-Conf-99/149

    E-print Network

    Sen, Tanaji

    V in a VLHC Booster Tunnel M. Derrick et al. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory P.0. Box 500, Batavia to do so, for United States Government Purposes. #12;AN ep COLLIDER WITH E,, = 1 TeV IN A VLHC BOOSTER The low field option for the VLHC includes a 3 TeV proton booster with a circumference of 34 km. We am

  7. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory FERMILAB-Pub-99/347

    E-print Network

    Sen, Tanaji

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory FERMILAB-Pub-99/347 Electrons in the VLHC tunnels: the e+ e to do so, for United States Government Purposes. #12;Electrons in the VLHC Tunnels: The e+ e- and ep and a 1 TeV ep collider in the tunnels of the low field VLHC. Approximate parameters for an Ecm = 6.0 Te

  8. Diffusive shock acceleration at laser driven shocks: studying cosmic-ray accelerators in the laboratory

    E-print Network

    Reville, B; Gregori, G

    2012-01-01

    The non-thermal particle spectra responsible for the emission from many astrophysical systems are thought to originate from shocks via a first order Fermi process otherwise known as diffusive shock acceleration. The same mechanism is also widely believed to be responsible for the production of high energy cosmic rays. With the growing interest in collisionless shock physics in laser produced plasmas, the possibility of reproducing and detecting shock acceleration in controlled laboratory experiments should be considered. The various experimental constraints that must be satisfied are reviewed. It is demonstrated that several currently operating laser facilities may fulfil the necessary criteria to confirm the occurrence of diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at laser produced shocks. Successful reproduction of Fermi acceleration in the laboratory could open a range of possibilities, providing insight into the complex plasma processes that occur near astrophysical sources of cosmic rays.

  9. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  10. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

  11. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility: research highlights and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2014-08-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has served as a user facility for accelerator science for over a quarter of a century. In fulfilling this mission, the ATF offers the unique combination of a high-brightness 80 MeV electron beam that is synchronized to a 1 TW picosecond CO2 laser. We unveil herein our plan to considerably expand the ATF's floor space with an upgrade of the electron beam's energy to 300 MeV and the CO2 laser's peak power to 100 TW. This upgrade will propel the ATF even further to the forefront of research on advanced accelerators and radiation sources, supporting the most innovative ideas in this field. We discuss emerging opportunities for scientific breakthroughs, including the following: plasma wakefield acceleration studies in research directions already active at the ATF; laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), where the longer laser wavelengths are expected to engender a proportional increase in the beam's charge while our linac will assure, for the first time, the opportunity to undertake detailed studies of seeding and staging of the LWFA; proton acceleration to the 100-200 MeV level, which is essential for medical applications; and others.

  13. Post-accelerator issues at the IsoSpin Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Nitschke, J.M. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    The workshop on ``Post-Accelerator Issues at the Isospin Laboratory`` was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from October 27--29, 1993. It was sponsored by the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the ISL Studies Group in the Nuclear Science Division. About forty scientists from around the world participated vigorously in this two and a half day workshop, (c.f. Agenda, Appendix D). Following various invited review talks from leading practitioners in the field on the first day, the workshop focussed around two working groups: (1) the Ion Source and Separators working group and (2) the Radio Frequency Quadrupoles and Linacs working group. The workshop closed with the two working groups summarizing and outlining the tasks for the future. This report documents the proceedings of the workshop and includes the invited review talks, the two summary talks from the working groups and individual contributions from the participants. It is a complete assemblage of state-of-the-art thinking on ion sources, low-{beta}, low(q/A) accelerating structures, e.g. linacs and RFQS, isobar separators, phase-space matching, cyclotrons, etc., as relevant to radioactive beam facilities and the IsoSpin Laboratory. We regret to say that while the fascinating topic of superconducting low-velocity accelerator structure was covered by Dr. K. Shepard during the workshop, we can only reproduce the copies of the transparencies of his talk in the Appendix, since no written manuscript was available at the time of publication of this report. The individual report have been catologed separately elsewhere.

  14. Felsenkeller shallow-underground accelerator laboratory for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Cowan, T. E.; Gohl, S.; Ilgner, C.; Junghans, A. R.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Rimarzig, B.; Reinicke, S.; Röder, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Stöckel, K.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-01

    Favored by the low background in underground laboratories, low-background accelerator-based experiments are an important tool to study nuclear reactions involving stable charged particles. This technique has been used for many years with great success at the 0.4 MV LUNA accelerator in the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, proteced from cosmic rays by 1400 m of rock. However, the nuclear reactions of helium and carbon burning and the neutron source reactions for the astrophysical s-process require higher beam energies than those available at LUNA. Also the study of solar fusion reactions necessitates new data at higher energies. As a result, in the present NuPECC long range plan for nuclear physics in Europe, the installation of one or more higher-energy underground accelerators is strongly recommended. An intercomparison exercise has been carried out using the same HPGe detector in a typical nuclear astrophysics setup at several sites, including the Dresden Felsenkeller underground laboratory. It was found that its rock overburden of 45m rock, together with an active veto against the remaining muon flux, reduces the background to a level that is similar to the deep underground scenario. Based on this finding, a used 5 MV pelletron tandem with 250 ?A upcharge current and external sputter ion source has been obtained and transported to Dresden. Work on an additional radio-frequency ion source on the high voltage terminal is underway. The project is now fully funded. The installation of the accelerator in the Felsenkeller is expected for the near future. The status of the project and the planned access possibilities for external users will be reported.

  15. Recent Developments at the Accelerator Laboratory in Jyvaeskylae

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (YFL) FI-40014 (Finland)

    2010-04-30

    Recent developments at the Accelerator Laboratory in Jyvaeskylae are described. In addition to the existing K = 130 a new cyclotron has been added. It is capable of producing of high current proton and deuteron beams at 30 and 15 MeV correspondingly. It should be fully operational in 2010. A new development in Jyvaeskylae is the growing commitment to astroparticle physics. Jyvaeskylae took the main scientific responsibility for a new cosmic-ray experiment EMMA and has joined the LAGUNA project working on the design of the next generation of very large volume detectors for underground observatories.

  16. Status of the accelerator facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. McCready; S. Thevuthasan; Weilin Jiang; I. L. Morgan J. L. Duggan

    1999-01-01

    An accelerator facility dedicated to ion beam materials analysis and modification has been completed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a United States Department of Energy collaborative scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA. The EMSL accelerator facility is based on a Model 9SDH-2 3.4 MV tandem ion accelerator manufactured by National Electrostatics

  17. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Scampoli, P.; von Bremen, K.; Weber, M.

    2013-07-01

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  18. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Scampoli, P. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland and Department of Physical Sciences, University Federico II, Via Cintia, I-60126 Napoli (Italy); Bremen, K. von [SWAN Isotopen AG, Inselspital, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  19. Fully coupled analysis of orbit response matrices at the FNAL Tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Sajaev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaslaev, V.; Valishev, V.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS); FNAL

    2008-01-01

    Optics measurements have played an important role in improving the performance of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) Tevatron collider. Initial optics measurements were performed using a small number of differential orbits, which allowed us to carry out the first round of optics corrections. However, because of insufficient accuracy, it was decided to apply the response matrix analysis method for further optics improvements. The response matrix program developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been expanded to include coupling - the essential feature required to describe the Tevatron optics. The results of the optics calibration are presented and compared to local beta function measurements. Tevatron is the largest proton-antiproton collider in the world. The commissioning of Tevatron Run II began in the spring of 2001 with the first luminosity seen in June. Since then, improving the linear optics model played an important role in the steady increase of luminosity. Until recently, the linear optics measurements were based on manual analysis of a few differential orbits, which neglected measurement inaccuracies, such as differences in beam position monitors (BPM) differential responses, BPM rolls, etc. This was a tedious procedure, which could not provide a full-scale optics determination; however, it did determine and correct major optics problems. To completely determine the linear model of Tevatron, we have applied a response matrix fitting method based on the analysis of many differential orbits. This method creates the redundancy in the data that allows us to get a much more detailed understanding of the machine.

  20. The scanning electron microscope as an accelerator for the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Randolph S.

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator ...

  1. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Ph.D. Fellowship for Minority Students

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Ph.D. Fellowship for Minority Students Equal Opportunity ___ ___ Master Graduation Date __________________ Major /Minor Date __________________ Major /Minor __________________ / ________________ #12;Internship / Work

  2. Accelerator issues and challenges at the IsoSpin Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The layout of an IsoSpin Laboratory as conceived presently and its current parametric specifications are shown, respectively. The generic features of such a facility are: large dynamic range (in energy, intensity, ion species (q/A), etc.), high intensity, high duty factor, required low beam emittances, high beam purity, operation under high radiation background (e.g., 60 kRad/hour at 1 meter from target) and almost zero tolerance for beam loss (required transmission efficiency of {approximately} 100%). This last feature demands almost perfect matching of beam phase space from the ion source into the post accelerator and from the post accelerator into the high energy linac, etc. The goals of the ISL are unquestionably ambitious and challenging, leaving aside the demanding issues of targetry and radiation shielding, which were not in the scope of this workshop. Nevertheless, through dedicated R&D effort and focussed workshops in the past including the present one, reasonably feasible technical solutions seem to be emerging so that the author is beginning to share an increasingly optimistic outlook on the realizability of the ISL in near future.

  3. Low energy {bar p} physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy {bar p} experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab {bar p} Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in {bar p} + p {yields} {bar {Lambda}} + {Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +} + p{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  4. Construction of Drift Chambers for Drell-Yan Measurement by SeaQuest at FNAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shigeki; Nagai, Kei; Miyasaka, Shou; Nakano, Kenichi; Shibata, Toshi-Aki

    The internal structure of the proton is one of the most vital topics in the present hadron physics. The SeaQuest experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in USA is a Drell-Yan experiment. It uses a 120 GeV proton beam. The aim of this experiment is to measure the asymmetry between bar{u} and bar{d} distributions in the proton. This experiment measures the cross sections of the Drell-Yan process in a proton–proton reaction and proton-deuteron reaction. The ratio between bar{u} and bar{d} distributions can be derived from the cross section ratio. The Drell-Yan process in proton–proton collisions is the reaction in which a quark in one proton and an antiquark in the other proton annihilate into a virtual photon and then it decays to a muon pair: q + bar{q} to ? * to ? + + ? - . This process is suited to the study of antiquarks in the proton. The physics run will start in spring 2013. We are constructing drift chambers for this physics run. In this paper, the structure and performance of the SeaQuest spectrometer and the status of the new chamber construction is described.

  5. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasmaa)

    E-print Network

    Ji, Hantao

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasmaa January 2014; accepted 20 February 2014; published online 7 May 2014) Bulk ion acceleration and particle-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY THE SUN ''Physics Department & Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY THE SUN R. P. Lin" ''Physics Department & Space Sciences Laboratory. INTRODUCTION The Sun is the most energetic particle accelerator in the solar system. In large solar flares energetic particle (SEP) events observed near 1 AU, but they, however, appear to be accelerated by shock

  7. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

  8. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

  9. Investigations of the output energy deviation and other parameters during commissioning of the four-rod radio frequency quadrupole at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.S.; et al.,

    2014-03-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Cockcroft-Walton based injector at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) has been replaced by a new beam line including a dimpled magnetron 35 keV source in combination with a 750 keV 4-rod Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The new injector is followed by the existing drift tube linac (DTL). Prior to installation, a test beam line was built which included the magnetron source and the 4-rod RFQ with a number of beam measurement instrumentation. The first beam test with the RFQ showed an output energy deviation greater than 2.5%. Other problems also showed up which led to investigations of the output energy, power consumption and transmission properties using RF simulations which were complemented with additional beam measurements. The sources of this deviation and the mechanical modifications of the RFQ to solve this matter will be presented in this paper. Meanwhile, the nominal output energy of 750 keV has been confirmed and the new injector with the 4-rod RFQ is in full operation.

  10. The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Randolph S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the South, 735 University Avenue, Sewanee TN 37383 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States); Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

  11. The Accelerator Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Thevuthasan; C. H. F. Peden; M. H. Engelhard; D. R. Baer; G. S. Herman; Y. Liang

    1997-01-01

    The EMSL, a new Department of Energy (DOE) user facility located at PNNL, will have several state-of-the-art systems, including an accelerator facility that can be used by scientists from around the world. The accelerator facility at EMSL consists of a model 9SDH-2 Pelletron 3.4 MV electrostatic tandem ion accelerator with three beam lines. These beam lines are dedicated to UHV

  12. Vacuum Systems Consensus Guideline for Department of Energy Accelerator Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Casey,R.; Haas, E.; Hseuh, H-C.; Kane, S.; Lessard, E.; Sharma, S.; Collins, J.; Toter, W. F.; Olis, D. R.; Pushka, D. R.; Ladd, P.; Jobe, R. K.

    2008-09-09

    Vacuum vessels, including evacuated chambers and insulated jacketed dewars, can pose a potential hazard to equipment and personnel from collapse, rupture due to back-fill pressurization, or implosion due to vacuum window failure. It is therefore important to design and operate vacuum systems in accordance with applicable and sound engineering principles. 10 CFR 851 defines requirements for pressure systems that also apply to vacuum vessels subject to back-fill pressurization. Such vacuum vessels are potentially subject to the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII (hereafter referred to as the 'Code'). However, the scope of the Code excludes vessels with internal or external operating pressure that do not exceed 15 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). Therefore, the requirements of the Code do not apply to vacuum systems provided that adequate pressure relief assures that the maximum internal pressure within the vacuum vessel is limited to less than 15 psig from all credible pressure sources, including failure scenarios. Vacuum vessels that cannot be protected from pressurization exceeding 15 psig are subject to the requirements of the Code. 10 CFR 851, Appendix A, Part 4, Pressure Safety, Section C addresses vacuum system requirements for such cases as follows: (c) When national consensus codes are not applicable (because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc.), contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local code. Measures must include the following: (1) Design drawings, sketches, and calculations must be reviewed and approved by a qualified independent design professional (i.e., professional engineer). Documented organizational peer review is acceptable. (2) Qualified personnel must be used to perform examinations and inspections of materials, in-process fabrications, non-destructive tests, and acceptance test. (3) Documentation, traceability, and accountability must be maintained for each unique pressure vessel or system, including descriptions of design, pressure conditions, testing, inspection, operation, repair, and maintenance. The purpose of this guideline is to establish a set of expectations and recommendations which will satisfy the requirements for vacuum vessels in general and particularly when an equivalent level of safety as required by 10 CFR 851 must be provided. It should be noted that these guidelines are not binding on DOE Accelerator Laboratories and that other approaches may be equally acceptable in addressing the Part 851 requirements.

  13. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Jialin, Xie; Kirk, H.G.; Malone, R.G.; Parsa, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Tsang, T.Y.F.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Zhang, R.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Bigio, I.; Kurnit, N.; Shimada, T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); McDonald, K.T.; Russel, D.P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA)); Jiang,

    1990-01-01

    Initial design parameters and early operational results of a 50 MeV high brightness electron linear accelerator are described. The system utilizes a radio frequency electron gun operating at a frequency of 2.856 GHz and a nominal output energy of 4.5 MeV followed by two, 2{pi}/3 mode, disc loaded, traveling wave accelerating sections. The gun cathode is photo excited with short (6 psec) laser pulses giving design peak currents of a few hundred amperes. The system will be utilized to carry out infra-red FEL studies and investigation of new high gradient accelerating structures.

  14. Outdoor weathering of PV modules — Effects of various climates and comparison with accelerated laboratory testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Herrmann; N. Bogdanski

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the degradation behavior of PV modules during long-term operation and developing realistic and effective procedures for accelerated testing that can simulate 25 years of operation requires a reliable database for outdoor weathering and for accelerated testing in the laboratory. To assess the effects of real-life weathering, we set up four test sites covering a wide range of climatic effects

  15. The Accelerator Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevuthasan, S.; Peden, C. H. F.; Engelhard, M. H.; Baer, D. R.; Herman, G. S.; Liang, Y.

    1997-03-01

    The EMSL, a new Department of Energy (DOE) user facility located at PNNL, will have several state-of-the-art systems, including an accelerator facility that can be used by scientists from around the world. The accelerator facility at EMSL consists of a model 9SDH-2 Pelletron 3.4 MV electrostatic tandem ion accelerator with three beam lines. These beam lines are dedicated to UHV ion scattering capabilities, implantation capabilities, and HV ion scattering capabilities, respectively. The end station attached to the UHV beam line has several electron spectroscopies such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in addition to the ion scattering capabilities. This end station will be interfaced with the EMSL transfer capability that allows a sample to be synthesized, processed, and characterized in several surface science UHV systems. We will discuss the accelerator facility and the capabilities along with some initial results. (Work supported by the DOE/ER/OHER)

  16. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Gallarado, J.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Ulc, S.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Biglio, I.; Kurnit, N.; McDonald, K.T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    Design and operation of a 50 MeV Electron Linear Accelerator utilizing a low emittance ({gamma} {var epsilon} = 5 to 10 mm-mrad) radio frequency gun operating at an output energy of 5 MeV and a charge of 1 nC is described. Design calculations and early radio frequency measurements and operational experience with the electron gun utilizing a dummy copper cathode in place of the proposed photocathode emitter are given. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Observation of ion acceleration and heating during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E

    2013-05-24

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region. PMID:23745892

  18. Development of an optical transition radiation detector for profile monitoring of antiproton and proton beams at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, V.E.; Lindenmeyer, C.W.; Tassotto, G.R.; /Fermilab; Lumpkin, A.H.; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) detectors are being developed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) as part of the collider Run II upgrade program and as part of the NuMI primary beam line. These detectors are designed to measure 150 GeV antiprotons as well as 120 GeV proton beams over a large range of intensities. Design and development of an OTR detector capable of measuring beam in both directions down to beam intensities of {approx}5e9 particles for nominal beam sizes are presented. Applications of these OTR detectors as an on-line emittance monitor for both antiproton transfers and reverse-injected protons, as a Tevatron injection profile monitor, and as a high-intensity beam profile monitor for NuMI are discussed. In addition, different types of OTR foils are being evaluated for operation over the intensity range of {approx}5e9 to 5e13 particles per pulse, and these are described.

  19. Laboratory and Field Testing of Precast Bridge Elements Used for Accelerated Construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vernon W. Wineland; F. Wayne Klaiber; Thomas P. Schoellen

    Black Hawk County (BHC) has developed a precast modified beam-in-slab bridge (PMBISB) system for use with accelerated construction. Individual components of the system have been tested in the Iowa State University Structural Laboratory, and the overall system was tested in the field. Using the BHC system, the bridge superstructure can be assembled in two days and the bridge opened to

  20. Status of the accelerator facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCready, D. E.; Thevuthasan, S.; Jiang, W.

    1999-06-01

    An accelerator facility dedicated to ion beam materials analysis and modification has been completed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a United States Department of Energy collaborative scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA. The EMSL accelerator facility is based on a Model 9SDH-2 3.4 MV tandem ion accelerator manufactured by National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, Middleton, WI), which includes RF plasma and sputter ion sources. Three beam lines were originally constructed with integral end stations for materials analysis and modification. Recently, the +30° beam line was extended to accommodate an NEC electrostatic microquad assembly, which provides focussed beam spots of 20 ?m or less on target. Efforts are currently underway to incorporate particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) capabilities in the microbeam line end station.

  1. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  2. Institutional Harold G. Kirk DOE Review of MAP (FNAL August 29-31, 2012) 1

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Institutional Logo Here Harold G. Kirk DOE Review of MAP (FNAL August 29-31, 2012) 1 The Front End Major Sub-systems Key Challenges Future R&D Activities Harold G. Kirk DOE Review of MAP (FNAL August 29-31, 2012) 2 #12;Institutional Logo Here Harold G. Kirk DOE Review of MAP (FNAL August 29-31, 2012) 3

  3. Fire protection review. Revisit No. 2. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, R.H.; Earley, M.W.; Merritt, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report summarizes findings of a fire protection review conducted during June 17 to 21, 24 to 28, 1985 and November 4 to 8, 1985 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois. The visit included: (1) tour of the facility; (2) water test; (3) review of records of testing and inspection of fire protection equipment; and (4) tests of selected fire protection equipment to verify equipment had been properly tested and inspected. Fermi established the programmatic importance of various buildings at this facility.

  4. LBNE Science Collaboration Meeting -FNAL July 15, 2009

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Hot Cells Study effects on materials · mechanical properties · thermal expansion (high precision dilatometer) · thermal/electrical conductivity · Oxidation (high temp. furnaces and precision scales) · de Horn Material Studies ­ NuMi Ni-plated Aluminum #12;LBNE Science Collaboration Meeting - FNAL July 15

  5. Fire protection review: revisit No. 2, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, R.H.; Earley, M.W.; Merritt, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    A fire protection survey was conducted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, on June 17 to 21, 24 to 28, 1985 and November 4 to 8, 1985 to review the facility fire protection program and to make recommendations. A number of improvements have been made in Laboratory fire protection systems since the Fire Protection review of 1977. These include the installation of automatic sprinklers in some of the Village Laboratories and several areas in Industrial Buildings. A new 5000 gpm pump has been provided at the Casey's Pond pumping station and new fire and industrial cooling water underground mains have been installed, which has improved the reliability of the overall underground system. There are a number of areas where loss potentials presently exceed $1,000,000. The major defects noted were the lack of redundant water supplies and the need for additional automatic sprinkler or halon protection for grouped electrical cables in the main accelerator, booster ring, antiproton ring facility, beam lines, target areas, including the B-O Experiment and the telephone equipment room in Wilson Hall.

  6. What's new with FASTBUS and what's it done in the particle accelerator laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Costrell, L. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Dawson, W.K. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility); Ponting, P.J. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Platner, E.D.; Paffrath, L. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Barsotti, E.J. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (

    1991-01-01

    The FASTBUS modular high-speed data acquisition and control system has been described in earlier papers. Implementations have since been made in accelerator laboratories world-wide resulting in clarifications, modifications and extensions. Of tremendous benefit to users have been FASTBUS Standard Routines. The availability of such standard software is unique for high speed bus systems and resulted from the involvement of hardware and software specialists in all aspects of the development. FASTBUS is the highest performance instrumentation and data acquisition bus in existence and its development was essential to handle the outputs of detectors used with high energy accelerators now in operation. It has been an important factor in recent experiments, including the Z{sup 0} measurements at CERN, Fermilab and SLAC. Also among numerous FASTBUS implementations are those for TPC systems at KEK and BNL. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Accelerators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Particle Data Group

    2002-01-01

    What is the purpose of particle accelerators? On this web page, part of a particle physics tutorial, students read that accelerators solve two problems. The accelerators provide an increase in momentum to produce particles of small wavelength, and the fast-moving particles can create new particles when smashed together. A photograph of the inside of a particle accelerator is provided. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  8. Acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Geoghegan

    1897-01-01

    IN NATURE, NO. 1415, p. 125, Prof. Lodge asserts that the subject of acceleration is at the root of the perennial debate between engineers and teachers of mechanics; and he urges clearness of idea and accuracy of speech on all who deal with the junior student. Towards this end I would suggest that the too common phrase ``acceleration of velocity''

  9. On the effect of accelerated winds on the wave growth through detailed laboratory measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Hernández, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    The possible influence of accelerated winds on air-water momentum fluxes is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide information corresponding to rather short non-dimensional fetch not previously reported. Wave evolution along the tank is determined through a series of wave gauges, and the wind-induced surface drift is obtained at one of the first measuring stations at the beginning of the tank. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Data from the constant high winds provided us with reference equilibrium conditions for at least 3 different wind speed. We, nevertheless, focus in the recordings while wind was being constantly accelerated expecting some contribution to the understanding of gustiness, the implied wind wave growth and the onset of surface drift. Wind-wave growth is observed to lag behind the wind stress signal, and furthermore, a two regime wind stress is noticed, apparently well correlated with a) the incipient growth and appearance of the first waves and b) the arrival of waves from the up-wind section of the tank. Results of non-dimensional wave energy as a function of non-dimensional fetch represent an extension of at least 2 decades shorter non-dimensional fetch to the wave growth curves typically found in the literature. The linear tendency of wave growth compares very well only when wind is reaching its maximum, while during the accelerated wind period a lower non-dimensional wave energy is found. Details on the onset of wind-induced surface drift at the beginning of the tank will be addressed within the context of accelerated wind conditions. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from ANUIES-ECOS M09-U01 project, CONACYT-187112 Estancia Sabática, and Institute Carnot, is greatly acknowledged.

  10. New Target Results from the FNAL Antiproton Source

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, S.; Bieniosek, F.; Anderson, K.; /Fermilab

    1992-01-01

    Nickel and compressed rhenium powder targets have been installed in the FNAL antiproton source target station. Ni was chosen for its high melting point energy and resistance to stress wave fractures. As well, compressed powdered rhenium segments were constrained by a thin-wall Ti jacket to insure resistance to stress fractures. The {bar p} yield of these new targets is compared with that of copper - the previous standard production target. The target depletion characteristics of nickel and rhenium for a beam intensity of 1.6 x 10{sup 12} protons per pulse are also presented.

  11. Proposed Casey`s Pond Improvement Project, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed Casey`s Pond Improvement Project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The improvement project would maximize the efficiency of the Fermilab Industrial Cooling Water (ICW) distribution system, which removes (via evaporation) the thermal load from experimental and other support equipment supporting the high energy physics program at Fermilab. The project would eliminate the risk of overheating during fixed target experiments, ensure that the Illinois Water Quality Standards are consistently achieved and provide needed additional water storage for fire protection. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  12. A new LabVIEW-based control system for the Naval Research Laboratory Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J. Jr.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knoll, C.; Kennedy, C. A.; Hubler, G. K. [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6670, Washington, District of Columbia 20375-5345 (United States)

    1999-06-10

    A new LabVIEW-based control system for the existing tandem accelerator and new AMS components has been implemented at the Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Through the use of Device Interfaces (DIs) distributed along a fiber optic network, virtually every component of the accelerator system can be controlled from any networked computer terminal as well as remotely via modem or the internet. This paper discusses the LabVIEW-based control software, including remote operation, automatic calculation of ion optical component parameters, beam optimization, and data logging and retrieval.

  13. Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m{sup 2} steady-state, 1 GW/m{sup 2} in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (10{sup 18} neutrons/m{sup 2} s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

  14. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  15. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  16. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. KALB; L. LUCKETT; K. MILLER; C. GOGOLAK; L. MILIAN

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In

  17. Ultra-trace analysis of (41)Ca in urine by accelerator mass spectrometry: an inter-laboratory comparison.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George S; Hillegonds, Darren J; Muzikar, Paul; Goehring, Brent

    2013-10-15

    A (41)Ca interlaboratory comparison between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Purdue Rare Isotope Laboratory (PRIME Lab) has been completed. Analysis of the ratios assayed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) shows that there is no statistically significant difference in the ratios. Further, Bayesian analysis shows that the uncertainties reported by both facilities are correct with the possibility of a slight under-estimation by one laboratory. Finally, the chemistry procedures used by the two facilities to produce CaF2 for the cesium sputter ion source are robust and don't yield any significant differences in the final result. PMID:24179312

  18. Earthquake Dynamics in Laboratory Model and Simulation - Accelerated Creep as Precursor of Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzemba, B.; Popov, V. L.; Starcevic, J.; Popov, M.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow earthquakes can be considered as a result of tribological instabilities, so called stick-slip behaviour [1,2], meaning that sudden slip occurs at already existing rupture zones. From a contact mechanics point of view it is clear, that no motion can arise completely sudden, the material will always creep in an existing contact in the load direction before breaking loose. If there is a measureable creep before the instability, this could serve as a precursor. To examine this theory in detail, we built up an elementary laboratory model with pronounced stick-slip behaviour. Different material pairings, such as steel-steel, steel-glass and marble-granite, were analysed at different driving force rates. The displacement was measured with a resolution of 8 nm. We were able to show that a measureable accelerated creep precedes the instability. Near the instability, this creep is sufficiently regular to serve as a basis for a highly accurate prediction of the onset of macroscopic slip [3]. In our model a prediction is possible within the last few percents of the preceding stick time. We are hopeful to extend this period. Furthermore, we showed that the slow creep as well as the fast slip can be described very well by the Dieterich-Ruina-friction law, if we include the contribution of local contact rigidity. The simulation meets the experimental curves over five orders of magnitude. This friction law was originally formulated for rocks [4,5] and takes into account the dependency of the coefficient of friction on the sliding velocity and on the contact history. The simulations using the Dieterich-Ruina-friction law back up the observation of a universal behaviour of the creep's acceleration. We are working on several extensions of our model to more dimensions in order to move closer towards representing a full three-dimensional continuum. The first step will be an extension to two degrees of freedom to analyse the interdependencies of the instabilities. We also plan to install a larger system which is capable of performing events of different spatial extent and magnitude. [1] Stick-Slip as a Mechanism for Earthquakes. Brace, W.F. und Byerlee, J.D. 1966, Science, Bd. 153, S. 990-992. [2] Detailed Studies of Frictional Sliding of Granite and Implications for the Earthquake Mechanism. Scholz, C. H., Molnar, P. und Johnson, T. 32, 1972, Journal of Geophysical Research, Bd. 77, S. 6392-6409. [3] Accelerated Creep as a Precursor of Friction Instability and Earthquake Prediction. Popov, V. L., et al. 2010, Physical Mesomechanics, Bd. 13, S. 283-291. [4] Modeling of Rock Friction, Part 1: Experimental Results and Constitutive Equations. Dieterich, J.H. B5, 1979, Journal of Geophysical Research, Bd. 84, S. 2161-2168. [5] State Instability and State Variable Friction Law. Ruina, A. B12, 1983, Journal of Geophysical Research, Bd. 88, S. 10359-10370.

  19. Data Plots from FNAL-E907: Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    There are approximately 40 data plots available to the public from E907. A proposal to upgrade the MIPP experiment (E-P-960) has been deferred. See the MIPP homepage at http://ppd.fnal.gov/experiments/e907/

  20. Laboratory testing of Ultra High Performance Concrete deck joints for use in accelerated bridge construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Robert Hartwell

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated bridge construction is one rapid renewal technique being investigated to address the needs of the United States' aging infrastructure under the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2). SHRP 2 Project R04 aimed to develop standards and codes for accelerated bridge construction through the construction of a demonstration bridge. Several design details were important the rapid renewal aspect of

  1. SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY 2575 SAND HILL ROAD MENLO PARK CALIFORNIA 94025 USA SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY · 2575 SAND HILL ROAD · MENLO PARK · CALIFORNIA · 94025 · USA.S. Agent) at 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 to act as a lawful U.S. agent on my behalf. From

  2. RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science Quantum Hadron Physics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Radiation Laboratory Advanced Meson Science Laboratory Radioactive Isotope Physics Laboratory Spin Isospin R&D Team Ion Source Team RILAC Team Cyclotron Team Beam Dynamics and Diagnostics Team Cryogenic Technology Team Infrastructure Management Team User Liaison and Industrial Cooperation Group RIBF User

  3. Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18 mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300 ?m). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices. PMID:25618819

  4. Performance of the accelerator driver of Jefferson Laboratory's free-electron laser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Bohn; S. Benson; G. Biallas; I. Campisi; D. Douglas; R. Evans; J. Fugitt; R. Hill; K. Jordan; G. Krafft; R. Li; L. Merminga; G. Neil; P. Piot; J. Preble; M. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; B. Yunn

    1999-01-01

    The driver for Jefferson Lab's kW-level infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a superconducting, recirculating accelerator that recovers about 75% of the electron-beam power and converts it to radiofrequency power. In achieving first lasing, the accelerator operated “straight-ahead” to deliver 38 MeV, 1.1 mA cw current through the wiggler for lasing at wavelengths in the vicinity of 5 ?m. Just prior

  5. What`s new with FASTBUS and what`s it done in the particle accelerator laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Costrell, L. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Dawson, W.K. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Ponting, P.J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Platner, E.D.; Paffrath, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Barsotti, E.J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Downing, R.W. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Ikeda, H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nelson, R.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kolpakov, I. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR); Gustavson, D.B.; Walz, H.W. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The FASTBUS modular high-speed data acquisition and control system has been described in earlier papers. Implementations have since been made in accelerator laboratories world-wide resulting in clarifications, modifications and extensions. Of tremendous benefit to users have been FASTBUS Standard Routines. The availability of such standard software is unique for high speed bus systems and resulted from the involvement of hardware and software specialists in all aspects of the development. FASTBUS is the highest performance instrumentation and data acquisition bus in existence and its development was essential to handle the outputs of detectors used with high energy accelerators now in operation. It has been an important factor in recent experiments, including the Z{sup 0} measurements at CERN, Fermilab and SLAC. Also among numerous FASTBUS implementations are those for TPC systems at KEK and BNL. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. The MIT Accelerator Laboratory for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Hahn, K.; Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved with this accelerator, and fluence and energy of the fusion products are accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON GUN FOR THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY*

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    954 DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON GUN FOR THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY AT BROOKHAVEN, New York 11973 and K. McDonald Princeton [Jniversity Abstract An electron gun utilizing a radio). Here we report on the de;$n of the electron gun which will provide r.f. bunches of up to 10 electrons

  8. Particle heating and acceleration during collisionless reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jongsoo

    2013-10-01

    Particle heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection is studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). For ion heating and acceleration, the role of the in-plane (Hall) electric field is emphasized. An in-plane electrostatic potential profile is established by electron acceleration near the X-point. The potential profile shows a well structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet that becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. The Hall electric field ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. After ions are accelerated, they are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region due to an effect called re-magnetization. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the electron diffusion region. Classical Ohmic dissipation based on the perpendicular Spitzer resistivity is too small to compensate for the energy loss by parallel heat conduction, indicating the presence of anomalous electron heating. Finally, a total energy inventory is calculated based on analysis of the Poynting, enthalpy, flow energy, and heat flux in the measured diffusion layer. More than half of the incoming magnetic energy is converted to particle energy during reconnection. Particle heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection is studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). For ion heating and acceleration, the role of the in-plane (Hall) electric field is emphasized. An in-plane electrostatic potential profile is established by electron acceleration near the X-point. The potential profile shows a well structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet that becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. The Hall electric field ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. After ions are accelerated, they are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region due to an effect called re-magnetization. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the electron diffusion region. Classical Ohmic dissipation based on the perpendicular Spitzer resistivity is too small to compensate for the energy loss by parallel heat conduction, indicating the presence of anomalous electron heating. Finally, a total energy inventory is calculated based on analysis of the Poynting, enthalpy, flow energy, and heat flux in the measured diffusion layer. More than half of the incoming magnetic energy is converted to particle energy during reconnection. The author thanks contributions from M. Yamada, H. Ji, J. Jara-Almonte, and C. E. Myers. This work is supported by DOE and NSF.

  9. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-01-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  10. Rapid Acceleration Leads to Rapid Weakening in Earthquake-Like Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-10-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  11. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We simulated the slip of a fault-patch during a large earthquake by rapidly loading an experimental, ring-shaped fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The flywheel abruptly delivers a finite amount of energy by spinning the fault-patch that spontaneously dissipates the energy without operator intervention. We conducted 42 experiments on Sierra White granite (SWG) samples, and 24 experiments on Kasota dolomite (KD) samples. Each experiment starts by spinning a 225 kg disk-shaped flywheel to a prescribed angular velocity. We refer to this experiment as an "earthquake-like slip-event" (ELSE). The strength-evolution in ELSE experiments is similar to the strength-evolution proposed for earthquake models and observed in stick-slip experiments. Further, we found that ELSE experiments are similar to earthquakes in at least three ways: (1) slip driven by the release of a finite amount of stored energy; (2) pattern of fault strength evolution; and (3) seismically observed values, such as average slip, peak-velocity and rise-time. By assuming that the measured slip, D, in ELSE experiments is equivalent to the average slip during an earthquake, we found that ELSE experiments (D = 0.003-4.6 m) correspond to earthquakes in moment-magnitude range of Mw = 4-8. In ELSE experiments, the critical-slip-distance, dc, has mean values of 2.7 cm and 1.2 cm for SWG and KD, that are much shorter than the 1-10 m in steady-state classical experiments in rotary shear systems. We attribute these dc values, to ELSE loading in which the fault-patch is abruptly loaded by impact with a spinning flywheel. Under this loading, the friction-velocity relations are strikingly different from those under steady-state loading on the same rock samples with the same shear system (Reches and Lockner, Nature, 2010). We further note that the slip acceleration in ELSE evolves systematically with fault strength and wear-rate, and that the dynamic weakening is restricted to the period of intense acceleration (up to 25 m/s2 during ~0.1 s). Thus, the weakening distance, dc, is reached within the initial acceleration spike. These observations are not unique, and similar weakening-acceleration associations were reported in stick-slip, rotary shear, and impact shear experiments. These studies greatly differ from each other in slip distance, normal stress, acceleration, and slip-velocities with the outstanding commonality of abrupt loading and intense acceleration. We propose that impact loading induces extremely high strain-rates that significantly increase rock brittleness, fracture tendency, and fragmentation. We envision that these processes intensify fault wear as manifested in ELSE experiments by extremely high initial wear-rates. This intense, early wear generates a layer of fine-grain gouge that reduces the fault strength by powder-lubrication. Our analysis indicates that rapid acceleration associated with earthquake rupture accelerates fault weakening and shortens the weakening-distance.

  12. CLAIRE - A Novel Nuclear Astrophysics Accelerator Facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela Leitner; Damon Todd; Paul Vetter; Matthaeus Leitner; Reina Maruyama; Kevin Nan Xu

    2006-01-01

    CLAIRE (Center for Low Energy Astrophysics and Interdisciplinary REsearch) is a proposed nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility to be built at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Its primary goal will be to measure cross sections relevant to stellar burning. In particular, our focus is to build a facility powerful enough to measure the ^3He(^4He, gamma)^7Be cross section near the Gamov peak.

  13. Near Term Prospects at FNAL and Project X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart

    2013-04-01

    Project X, a high-power proton accelerator facility, will support world-leading programs in long baseline neutrino physics, the physics of rare processes, and nuclear studies. It will be unique among accelerator facilities worldwide in its flexibility to support multiple physics programs simultaneously with MWclass beams at the intensity frontier. Project X is based on a 3 GeV continuous-wave superconducting H-linac. Further acceleration to 8 GeV, and injection into Fermilab's existing Recycler/Main Injector complex, will support long-baseline neutrino experiments. Project X will provide 1 MW beam power at 1 GeV, 3 MW beam power at 3 GeV and 2 MW beam power to a neutrino production target at 60-120 GeV. This talk will describe the Reference Design of Project X and the status of the R&D program.

  14. Laboratory Simulation of Chemical Interactions of Accelerated Ions with Dust and Ice Grains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Rössler

    1985-01-01

    The conditions of hot cosmic chemistry are simulated in laboratory experiments in order to obtain insight into the nature of chemical products and the reaction mechanisms of their formation. This paper reviews the methods of ion implantation, nuclear recoil in situ, nuclear recoil implantation, secondary knock-on processes and computer simulation of collision cascades. Carbon and nitrogen impact in frozen H2O,

  15. Telecommunications Service Request Submit to: Telecommunications MS 228, Fax: ext. 3405, Email: telecom@fnal.gov

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , Email: telecom@fnal.gov See Instructions for assistance completing this request. Please allow 2 weeks Designate INSTALLER USE ONLY TELECOM USE ONLY BELOW THIS LINE FOR FERMI / AT&T USE ONLY FERMILAB AT&T Order) type of phone. Work Desired: Telecom Form Last Revision 3/24/14 - acwiklik - available on webpage

  16. Further improvement in the precision of 233U measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Tumey, S J; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F; Buchholz, B A

    2008-02-04

    In response to sponsor interest in October 2005 we proposed two methods for enhancing the precision of {sup 233}U accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) capabilities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In a previous report we evaluated the first method and demonstrated that by increasing sample loading by a factor of four coupled with performing four replicates of each sample, we could achieve measurement precision of {approx}1%. Recent modifications to our system have enabled us to test the second proposed method. By changing our setup to normalize {sup 233}U ions counted in a gas ionization chamber to {sup 238}U measured as a current in an off-axis Faraday cup we were able to attain 1% precision without the need for replicate analysis. This method could be further refined to achieve 0.5% precision in samples of interest.

  17. Rapid estimation of lives of deficient superpave mixes and laboratory-based accelerated mix testing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Chandra Bahadur

    The engineers from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) often have to decide whether or not to accept non-conforming Superpave mixtures during construction. The first part of this study focused on estimating lives of deficient Superpave pavements incorporating nonconforming Superpave mixtures. These criteria were based on the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device (HWTD) test results and analysis. The second part of this study focused on developing accelerated mix testing models to considerably reduce test duration. To accomplish the first objective, nine fine-graded Superpave mixes of 12.5-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) with asphalt grade PG 64-22 from six administrative districts of KDOT were selected. Specimens were prepared at three different target air void levels Ndesign gyrations and four target simulated in-place density levels with the Superpave gyratory compactor. Average number of wheel passes to 20-mm rut depth, creep slope, stripping slope, and stripping inflection point in HWTD tests were recorded and then used in the statistical analysis. Results showed that, in general, higher simulated in-place density up to a certain limit of 91% to 93%, results in a higher number of wheel passes until 20-mm rut depth in HWTD tests. A Superpave mixture with very low air voids Ndesign (2%) level performed very poorly in the HWTD test. HWTD tests were also performed on six 12.5-mm NMAS mixtures with air voids Ndesign of 4% for six projects, simulated in-place density of 93%, two temperature levels and five load levels with binder grades of PG 64-22, PG 64-28, and PG 70-22. Field cores of 150-mm in diameter from three projects in three KDOT districts with 12.5-mm NMAS and asphalt grade of PG 64-22 were also obtained and tested in HWTD for model evaluation. HWTD test results indicated as expected. Statistical analysis was performed and accelerated mix testing models were developed to determine the effect of increased temperature and load on the duration of the HWTD test. Good consistency between predicted and observed test results was obtained when higher temperature and standard load level were used. Test duration of the HWTD can thus be reduced to two hours or less using accelerated mix testing (statistical) models.

  18. Test of a coaxial blade tuner at HTS FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Barbanotti, S.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab; Bosotti, A.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; /LASA, Segrate

    2011-03-01

    A coaxial blade tuner has been selected for the 1.3GHz SRF cavities of the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility. Results from tuner cold tests in the Fermilab Horizontal Test Stand are presented. Fermilab is constructing the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a facility for accelerator physics research and development. This facility will contain a total of six cryomodules, each containing eight 1.3 GHz nine-cell elliptical cavities. Each cavity will be equipped with a Slim Blade Tuner designed by INFN Milan. The blade tuner incorporates both a stepper motor and piezo actuators to allow for both slow and fast cavity tuning. The stepper motor allows the cavity frequency to be statically tuned over a range of 500 kHz with an accuracy of several Hz. The piezos provide up to 2 kHz of dynamic tuning for compensation of Lorentz force detuning and variations in the He bath pressure. The first eight blade tuners were built at INFN Milan, but the remainder are being manufactured commercially following the INFN design. To date, more than 40 of the commercial tuners have been delivered.

  19. Prediction and accelerated laboratory discovery of previously unknown 18-electron ABX compounds.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Romain; Zhang, Xiuwen; Hu, Linhua; Yu, Liping; Lin, Yuyuan; Sunde, Tor O L; Chon, Danbee; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Zunger, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Chemists and material scientists have often focused on the properties of previously reported compounds, but neglect numerous unreported but chemically plausible compounds that could have interesting properties. For example, the 18-valence electron ABX family of compounds features examples of topological insulators, thermoelectrics and piezoelectrics, but only 83 out of 483 of these possible compounds have been made. Using first-principles thermodynamics we examined the theoretical stability of the 400 unreported members and predict that 54 should be stable. Of those previously unreported 'missing' materials now predicted to be stable, 15 were grown in this study; X-ray studies agreed with the predicted crystal structure in all 15 cases. Among the predicted and characterized properties of the missing compounds are potential transparent conductors, thermoelectric materials and topological semimetals. This integrated process-prediction of functionality in unreported compounds followed by laboratory synthesis and characterization-could be a route to the systematic discovery of hitherto missing, realizable functional materials. PMID:25803469

  20. Corrosion behaviour of weathering steel in diluted Qinghai salt lake water in a laboratory accelerated test that involved cyclic wet\\/dry conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; W. Ke

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of CortenA weathering steel has been investigated using a laboratory accelerated test that involved cyclic wet\\/dry conditions in Qinghai salt lake water diluted 30 times. The characteristics of the rust layers on tested samples were observed by SEM and EPMA, analyzed by IRS and XRD, and studied by polarization and EIS measurements. The weight loss was almost

  1. Assembly and Test of SQ01b, a Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for the LHC Accelerator Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bartlett, S. E.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.H.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Feher, S.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lamm, M.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Sylvester, C.D.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Velev, G.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.

    2006-06-01

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) consists of four US laboratories (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC) collaborating with CERN to achieve a successful commissioning of the LHC and to develop the next generation of Interaction Region magnets. In 2004, a large aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet (SQ01) has been fabricated and tested at LBNL. The magnet utilized four subscale racetrack coils and was instrumented with strain gauges on the support structure and directly over the coil's turns. SQ01 exhibited training quenches in two of the four coils and reached a peak field in the conductor of 10.4 T at a current of 10.6 kA. After the test, the magnet was disassembled, inspected with pressure indicating films, and reassembled with minor modifications. A second test (SQ01b) was performed at FNAL and included training studies, strain gauge measurements and magnetic measurements. Magnet inspection, test results, and magnetic measurements are reported and discussed, and a comparison between strain gauge measurements and 3D finite element computations is presented

  2. Design of a Marx-Topology Modulator for FNAL Linac

    E-print Network

    Butler, T A; Kufer, M R; Pfeffer, H; Wolff, D

    2015-01-01

    The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) was formed in late 2011 to address important and necessary upgrades to the Proton Source machines (Injector line, Linac and Booster). The goal is to increase the proton flux by doubling the Booster beam cycle rate while maintaining the same intensity per cycle, the same uptime, and the same residual activation in the enclosure. For the Linac, the main focus within PIP is to address reliability. One of the main tasks is to replace the present hard-tube modulator used on the 200 MHz RF system. Plans to replace this high power system with a Marx-topology modulator, capable of providing the required waveform shaping to stabilize the accelerating gradient and compensate for beam loading, will be presented, along with development data from the prototype unit.

  3. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  4. Material Procurement Report for the FNAL pp Forward Detector's Toroids and Cos8 Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.; Morse, R.; Orosz, I.; Thomas, L.C.

    1980-10-27

    We outline the possibilities of starting construction of the {bar p}p forward detector toroids and cos{theta} dipole magnets described in CDP Note 64 as soon as possible using material that already exists on the FNAL site. Personal inspection of the steel supplies indicates that as much as 2000 tons of steel or over 50% of all the steel needed for the toroids is now available at the FNAL boneyard. Copper inventories indicate that there is enough copper on the FNAL site to construct both the toroid magnets and the cos{theta} dipole magnets. A construction schedule of one toroid in FY81, two toroids in FY82, and the final toroid in FY83 is shown to be feasible. Floor space and loading requirements for the IR Hall housing the forward detector are examined and finally, budgets for the initial FY8l phase and the completed project are given. The FY81 costs are $393K and to-completion costs are $1506K.

  5. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  6. Note: Recent achievements at the 60-MeV Linac for sub-picosecond terahertz radiation at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Changmook; Hong, Juho; Parc, Yongwoon; Ko, In Soo [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seonghoon; Park, Jaehun; Kang, Heung-Sik [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Daehun [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jaehyun [Department of Chemistry, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A femtosecond (fs) terahertz (THz) linac has been constructed to generate fs-THz radiation by using ultrashort electron beam at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory. To generate an ultrashort electron beam with 60-MeV energy, a chicane bunch compressor has been adopted. Simulation studies have been conducted to design the linac. In this note, recent achievements at 60-MeV linac are presented.

  7. On the possibility of laboratory shock wave studies of the equation of state of a material at gigabar pressures with beams of laser-accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of laboratory shock wave studies of the equation of state of a material with beams of laser-accelerated charged particles at pressures an order of magnitude higher than those reached in current experiments has been discussed. The possibility of the generation of a plane quasistationary shock wave with a pressure of several gigabars behind its front at the irradiation of a target by a laser beam with an energy of several kilojoules and an intensity of about 1017 W/cm2, which is accompanied by the generation of fast electrons with an average energy of 20-50 keV, has been justified.

  8. Recent experience in the fabrication and brazing of ceramic beam tubes for kicker magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, C.R.; Jensen, C.; Reilly, R.; Snee, D.; Wilson, J.H.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Ceramic beam tubes are utilized in numerous kicker magnets in different accelerator rings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Kovar flanges are brazed onto each beam tube end, since kovar and high alumina ceramic have similar expansion curves. The tube, kovar flange, end piece, and braze foil (titanium/incusil) alloy brazing material are stacked in the furnace and then brazed in the furnace at 1000 C. The ceramic specified is 99.8% Alumina, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a strong recrystallized high-alumina fabricated by slip casting. Recent experience at Fermilab with the fabrication and brazing of these tubes has brought to light numerous problems including tube breakage and cracking and also the difficulty of brazing the tube to produce a leak-tight joint. These problems may be due to the ceramic quality, voids in the ceramic, thinness of the wall, and micro-cracks in the ends which make it difficult to braze because it cannot fill tiny surface cracks which are caused by grain pullout during the cutting process. Solutions which are being investigated include lapping the ends of the tubes before brazing to eliminate the micro-cracks and also metallization of the tubes.

  9. R&E Networks Debugging End-to-End International Case Study on FNAL to DESY Throughput Issue

    E-print Network

    R&E Networks Debugging End-to-End International Problems Case Study on FNAL to DESY Throughput............................................................................................................................ 12 Executive Summary Network connectivity to an end user is typically viewed as an end-to-end service. When a network problem arises, a user will typically report the issue to his/her network provider

  10. Theory and Observations of Beam-beam effects at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510

    E-print Network

    Sen, Tanaji

    store on May 17th, 2003, (average initial luminosity = 4.49×1031 cm-2sec-1), the average bunch bunches of protons are injected and placed on the proton helix, anti-protons are injected four bunches at a time. After all bunches are injected, acceleration to top energy takes about 85 seconds. After reaching

  11. World Pendulum--A Distributed Remotely Controlled Laboratory (RCL) to Measure the Earth's Gravitational Acceleration Depending on Geographical Latitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grober, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H.-J.

    2007-01-01

    We suggest that different string pendulums are positioned at different locations on Earth and measure at each place the gravitational acceleration (accuracy [delta]g is approximately equal to 0.01 m s[superscript -2]). Each pendulum can be remotely controlled via the internet by a computer located somewhere on Earth. The theoretical part describes…

  12. Relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves: Evidence from correlated Cluster, Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft, and ground-based magnetometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Fung, Shing F.

    2011-07-01

    Simultaneous observations by Cluster and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft and Canadian Array for Real-Time Investigations of Magnetic Activity and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects magnetometer arrays during a sudden storm commencement on 25 September 2001 show evidence of relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves. The waves are driven by the quasiperiodic solar wind dynamical pressure fluctuations that continuously buffet the magnetosphere for ˜3 h. The compressional-mode ULF waves are identified by comparing the power of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations with the total magnetic field power. The radial distribution and azimuthal propagation of both toroidal and poloidal-mode ULF waves are derived from ground-based magnetometer data. The energetic electron fluxes measured by LANL show modulation of low-energy electrons and acceleration of high-energy electrons by the compressional poloidal-mode electric field oscillations. The energy threshold of accelerated electrons at the geosynchronous orbit is ˜0.4 MeV, which is roughly consistent with drift-resonant interaction of magnetospheric electrons with compressional-mode ULF waves.

  13. Proposal for Drell-Yan Measurements of Nucleon and Nuclear Structure with the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E.; /Abilene Christian U.; Arrinton, J.; Geesamn, D.F.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Reimer, P.E.; Potterveld, D.H.; /Argonne; Brown, C.N.; /Fermilab; Garvey, G.T.; Leitch, M.J.; /Los Alamos /Rutgers U. /Texas A-M /Valparaiso U.

    2001-04-01

    We propose measuring the fractional momentum (x) dependence of the ratio of the anti-down to anti-up quark distributions in the proton, {bar d}(x)/{bar u}(x), using proton induced Drell-Yan reactions at 120 GeV. Recent measurements by FNAL E866 unexpectedly show considerable x dependence in this ratio for x > 0.2. A lower energy primary proton beam from the Main Injector makes it possible to extend the E866 measurements to larger x with much higher precision. The apparatus will also be used with nuclear targets to measure parton energy loss and modifications to anti-quark distributions in nuclear targets at large x (x > 0.2).

  14. The FNAL e938 Experiment: The Mexican Contribution to the MINER{nu}A Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, J.; Castorena, J.; Higuera, A.; Gutierrez, M. R.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M. A.; Urrutia, Z. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Departamento de Fisica, Leon GTO, 37150 Mexico (Mexico); Zavala, G. [Universidad de Guanajuato, UCEA, Guanajuato GTO (Mexico); Morfin, J. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois (United States)

    2009-04-20

    The MINER{nu}A (Main INjector ExpeRiment for {nu}A) collaboration (http://minerva.fnal.gov//) is a neutrino scattering experiment which uses the NuMI beam-line at Fermilab. It seeks to measure low energy neutrino interactions both to support neutrino oscillation experiments and to study the strong dynamics of the nucleon and nucleus that affect these interactions. It is currently in its final prototyping stage and is preparing for full-scale construction. The first detector module was completed in early 2006 and it is planned to begin taking data in 2009. We present an overview of this experiment, emphasizing the Mexican contribution, and giving the potential physics results that this collaboration can contribute to the physics of neutrino.

  15. Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace – Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

    2010-10-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

  16. PV module degradation caused by thermomechanical stress: real impacts of outdoor weathering versus accelerated testing in the laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Herrmann; N. Bogdanski; F. Reil; M. Köhl; K.-A. Weiss; M. Assmus; M. Heck

    2010-01-01

    Temperature cycling tests are part of the IEC 61215 qualification testing of crystalline silicon (c-Si) PV modules for evaluating PV module degradation caused by the impact of thermo-mechanically induced stresses. The defined temperature gradient and the cycle time by far exceed the actual impact of natural weathering, however. As a contribution to comparisons between laboratory testing and natural weathering our

  17. Evaluation of a commercial system for CAMAC-based control of the Chalk River Laboratories tandem-accelerator-superconducting-cyclotron complexcomplex

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, B.F.; Caswell, D.J.; Slater, W.R. (TASCC Accelerators and Development, Nuclear Physics Branch, AECL Research, Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 (CA))

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses the control system of the Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) of AECL Research at its Chalk River Laboratories which is presently based on a PDP-11 computer and the IAS operating system. The estimated expense of a custom conversion of the system to a current, equivalent operating system is prohibitive. The authors have evaluated a commercial control package from VISTA Control Systems based on VAX microcomputers and the VMS operating system. Vsystem offers a modern, graphical operator interface, an extensive software toolkit for configuration of the system and a multi-feature data-logging capability, all of which far surpass the functionality of the present control system. However, the implementation of some familiar, practical features that TASCC operators find to be essential has proven to be challenging. The assessment of Vsystem, which is described in terms of presently perceived strengths and weaknesses, is, on balance, very positive.

  18. Power combiners/dividers for loop pickup and kicker arrays for FNAL stochastic cooling rings

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.K.; Nemetz, R.

    1985-05-01

    The anti-proton accumulator and debuncher at FNAL will use stochastic methods to ''cool'' the beam. Pairs of quarter-wavelength directional-coupler loops are used to detect and kick the beam. The loops are copper plates which are flush with the upper and lower wall of a rectangular beam pipe. The plates, when surrounded by a properly sized pocket, form a 100-ohm transmission-line directional coupler. As the beam passes, a signal which gives position and time information, is induced in the plates. But, because the signal levels are low (<.5 picowatts per pair), a power combiner (usually several primary combiners feeding a secondary combiner) is used to combine the outputs of many loops. Subsequently, the combined signal is amplified, filtered and then fed into a divider, (that is, a combiner operating in reverse). The divider distributes the signal into a different set of loops which modify (kick) the beam's position. Since the loop couplers are arranged linearly, in arrays of various lengths, combiners also provide a convenient method of reducing the number of vacuum feedthroughs and preamplifiers and their related costs in performance and dollars. In this note we describe various stripline combiner systems that add the outputs of 4, 8, 16 or 32 loops.

  19. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science: Steward of 10 World-Class National Laboratories

    E-print Network

    ..............................................................................9 Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC

  20. COVER: Part of the drift-tube linear accelerator designed and built by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL (see article on p.13). Photograph by Leroy N. Sanchez of LANL.

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Secretary inspected the $21-million front-end sys- tem designed#12;COVER: Part of the drift-tube linear accelerator designed and built by Los Alamos National facility that in 2006 will anchor the next generation of scientific discovery at Oak Ridge National

  1. Evaluation of automated RT-PCR to accelerate the laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Reid, Scott M; Grierson, Sylvia S; Ferris, Nigel P; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Alexandersen, Soren

    2003-02-01

    Automated fluorogenic (5' nuclease probe-based) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) procedures were evaluated for the diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) using suspensions of vesicular epithelium, heparinised or clotted blood, milk and oesophageal-pharyngeal fluid ('probang') samples from the United Kingdom (UK) 2001 epidemic and on sera from animals experimentally infected with the outbreak serotype O FMD virus strain. A MagNA Pure LC was initially programmed to automate the nucleic acid extraction and RT procedures with the PCR amplification carried out manually by fluorogenic assay in a GeneAmp 5700 Sequence Detection System. This allowed 32 samples to be tested by one person in a typical working day or 64 samples by two people within 10-12 h. The PCR amplification was later automated and a protocol developed for one person to complete a single test incorporating 96 RT-PCR results within 2 working days or for two people to do the same thing in around 12 h. The RT-PCR results were directly compared with those obtained by the routine diagnostic tests of ELISA and virus isolation in cell culture. The results on blood, probang and milk samples were in broad agreement between the three procedures but specific RT-PCR protocols for such material have to be fully optimised as perhaps have the positive-negative acceptance criteria. However, the automated RT-PCR achieved definitive diagnostic results (positive or negative) on supernatant fluids from first passage inoculated cell cultures and its sensitivity was greater than ELISA on suspensions of vesicular epithelium (ES) and at least equivalent to that of virus isolation in cell culture. The combined tests of ELISA, virus isolation in cell culture and RT-PCR might, therefore, only be required for confirmation of a first outbreak of FMD in a previously FMD-free country. Should a prolonged outbreak subsequently occur, then either ELISA plus RT-PCR or else RT-PCR alone could be used as the laboratory diagnostic tool(s). Either approach would eliminate the requirement for sample passage in cell culture and considerably advance the issue of laboratory diagnostic test results. PMID:12505626

  2. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  3. Accelerating the Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Through the Implementation of a Projectized and Delivery-Focused Organization - 13074

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Brian; Mellor, Russ; Michaluk, Craig [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research site in Canada that was commissioned in 1964 by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It covers a total area of approximately 4,375 hectares (10,800 acres) and includes the main campus site, the Waste Management Area (WMA) and outer areas of land identified as not used for or impacted by nuclear development or operations. The WL site employed up to 1100 staff. Site activities included the successful operation of a 60 MW organic liquid-cooled research reactor from 1965 to 1985, and various research programs including reactor safety research, small reactor development, fuel development, biophysics and radiation applications, as well as work under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at WL, and obtained government concurrence in 1998. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) was established in 2006 by the Canadian Government to remediate nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner, including the WL site. The NLLP is being implemented by AECL under the governance of a Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)/AECL Joint Oversight Committee (JOC). Significant progress has since been made, and the WL site currently holds the only Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) nuclear research site decommissioning license in Canada. The current decommissioning license is in place until the end of 2018. The present schedule planned for main campus decommissioning is 30 years (to 2037), followed by institutional control of the WMA until a National plan is implemented for the long-term management of nuclear waste. There is an impetus to advance work and complete decommissioning sooner. To accomplish this, AECL has added significant resources, reorganized and moved to a projectized environment. This presentation outlines changes made to the organization, the tools implemented to foster projectization, and the benefits and positive impacts on schedule and delivery. A revised organizational structure was implemented in two phases, starting 2011 April 1, to align WL staff with the common goal of decommissioning the site through the direction of the WL Decommissioning Project General Manager. On 2011 September 1, the second phase of the reorganization was implemented and WL Decommissioning staff was organized under five Divisions: Programs and Regulatory Compliance, General Site Services, Decommissioning Strategic Planning, Nuclear Facilities and Project Delivery. A new Mission, Vision and Objectives were developed for the project, and several productivity enhancements are being implemented. These include the use of an integrated and fully re-sourced Site Wide Schedule that is updated and reviewed at Plan-of-the-Week meetings, improved work distribution throughout the year, eliminating scheduling 'push' mentality, project scoreboards, work planning implementation, lean practices and various process improvement initiatives. A revised Strategic Plan is under development that reflects the improved project delivery capabilities. As a result of these initiatives, and a culture change towards a projectized approach, the decommissioning schedule will be advanced by approximately 10 years. (authors)

  4. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a broad computational accelerator physics

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a broad at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. #12;COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation

  5. Overview of the Muon Accelerator Front-End D. Stratakis, H. K. Sayed, J. S. Berg, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, U.S.A

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Overview of the Muon Accelerator Front-End D. Stratakis, H. K. Sayed, J. S. Berg, Brookhaven.S.A P. Snopok, Illinois Institute of Technology, IL, U.S.A. Abstract: A key challenge for muon accelerators is that the initial muon beam occupies a region in phase space that vastly exceeds the acceptance

  6. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (US)]|[Rush Univ., Chicago, IL (US)

    1993-06-01

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field.

  7. Design of a 100-400 MeV beam facility at FNAL and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A 100-400 MeV proton facility has been designed to utilize the Fermilab Linac beam for accelerator and accelerator-based research. The unique beamline design provides unparalleled flexibility in, yet independent control over, the intensity, phase-space characteristics, and momentum spread of beam delivered to the accompanying experimental area. Features of the facility include an energy range variable from 100-400 MeV (on a pulse-by-pulse basis), an emittance range of .1-6{pi}, intensity control of a few protons/pulse up to 4 x 10{sup 10} protons/pulse, and a momentum spread range of .3% - .05%. Laser diagnostic techniques will be used to provide a beam calibrated in energy to 10{sup {minus}4} and in momentum spread to 10{sup {minus}5}. Research and technical applications range from basic physics research, with an emphasis on advanced accelerator diagnostic development, to dosimetry and specific projects applicable to proton therapy, such as pulsed-beam scanning techniques. The proposed research program will be summarized.

  8. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-08-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  9. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  10. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  11. Plasma based charged-particle accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Bingham; J T Mendonça; P K Shukla

    2004-01-01

    Studies of charged-particle acceleration processes remain one of the most important areas of research in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas. In this paper, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high energy plasma accelerators. We will focus on the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic energies by plasma waves that are created by intense

  12. First charge breeding of a rare-isotope beam with the electron-beam ion trap of the ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Schwarz, S; Baumann, T M; Cooper, K; Kittimanapun, K; Rodriguez, A J; Sumithrarachchi, C; Williams, S J; Wittmer, W; Leitner, D; Bollen, G

    2014-02-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder is being brought into operation at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The EBIT is part of the ReA post-accelerator for reacceleration of rare isotopes, which are thermalized in a gas "stopping" cell after being produced at high energy by projectile fragmentation. The ReA EBIT has a distinctive design; it is characterized by a high-current electron gun and a two-field superconducting magnet to optimize the capture and charge-breeding efficiency of continuously injected singly charged ion beams. Following a brief overview of the reaccelerator system and the ReA EBIT, this paper presents the latest commissioning results, particularly, charge breeding and reacceleration of the highly charged rare isotopes, (76)Ga(24 +, 25 +). PMID:24593600

  13. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  14. Tandem electrostatic accelerators for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.C. [Yanch and W.B. Howard Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The development of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) into a viable therapeutic modality will depend, in part, on the availability of suitable neutron sources compatible with installation in a hospital environment. Low-energy accelerator-based intense neutron sources, using electrostatic or radio frequency quadrupole proton accelerators have been suggested for this purpose and are underdevelopment at several laboratories. New advances in tandem electrostatic accelerator technology now allow acceleration of the multi-milliampere proton beams required to produce therapeutic neutron fluxes for BNCT. The relatively compact size, low weight and high power efficiency of these machines make them particularly attractive for installation in a clinical or research facility. The authors will describe the limitations on ion beam current and available neutron flux from tandem accelerators relative to the requirements for BNCT research and therapy. Preliminary designs and shielding requirements for a tandern accelerator-based BNCT research facility will also be presented.

  15. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  16. Review of Activities using the Pulsed Neutron Facility and 2.5-GeV Electron Linac at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Yang, Sungchul; Kim, Eunae; Shvetshov, Valery; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Naik, Haladhara

    2011-12-01

    We report on activities using a pulsed neutron facility consisting of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator, and a 12 m time-of-flight path. It is possible to measure neutron total cross sections in the neutron energy range from 0.01 eV to a few hundred eV by using the neutron time-of-flight method; photo-neutron cross sections can also measure by using the bremsstrahlung from the electron linac. A 6LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 12.1 m. In this paper, we report total cross sections of Nb and also resonance parameters obtained using the SAMMY fitting program. The present results are compared with the previous experimental results and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VII. We also report on the mass-yield distribution of fission products in the 2.5-GeV bremsstrahlung-induced fission of natPb and 209Bi measured at the 2.5-GeV electron linac using a recoil catcher and an off-line ?-ray spectrometric technique.

  17. MUON ACCELERATION IN FFAG RINGS , Katharinenstr. 17, Berlin, Germany

    E-print Network

    Keil, Eberhard

    MUON ACCELERATION IN FFAG RINGS E. Keil , Katharinenstr. 17, Berlin, Germany A.M. Sessler , Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Compared to muon acceleration in re-circulating lin- ear accelerators, considered earlier, muon acceleration in FFAG rings holds the promise of having

  18. ACCELERATORS FOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS: FROM DIAGNOSTICS AND CONTROL TO DESIGN

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    accelerators at CERN. The overall system performance, i.e. the quality of particle beams being accelerated high-energy physics laboratory in the world. Here, a number of particle accelerators are connected in series to permit the acceleration of particles to unprecedented high energies to explore the nature

  19. Accelerator Design and R&D for the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, Nan

    2006-04-01

    Since the formation of the Global Design Effort in early 2005, substantial progress has been made on the ILC design and a coordinated international program of R&D has been launched. R&D projects address the entire accelerator from the electron and positron sources to the damping rings and bunch compressors, main linacs and beam delivery system. Test facilities at DESY, FNAL, KEK and SLAC support a wide variety of experiments and hardware development. New initiatives include the proposed final focus test facility at KEK (ATF2) and an instrumentation and IR test facility at SLAC (ESA) as well as experiments on existing machines around the world. The extensive R&D program on superconducting RF will be covered separately.

  20. Acceleration using total internal reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1991-06-07

    This report considers the use of a dielectric slab undergoing total internal reflection as an accelerating structure for charged particle beams. We examine the functional dependence of the electromagnetic fields above the surface of the dielectric for polarized incident waves. We present an experimental arrangement for testing the performance of the method, using apparatus under construction for the Grating Acceleration experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. UCLA Neptune Facility for Advanced Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Clayton, Christopher E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Joshi, Chandrashekhar [Neptune Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rosenzweig, James B.; Pellegrini, Claudio [Neptune Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    The Neptune Laboratory at UCLA is being used for exploring concepts useful for advanced accelerators. This facility hosts a TW-class CO2 laser system and a high-brightness photoinjector producing a 14 MeV electron beam. The goal for the laboratory is to carry out experiments on high-gradient acceleration of externally injected electrons in both laser-driven relativistic plasma waves and EM laser field in vacuum. Experiments on plasma beat-wave acceleration using a prebunched electron beam, a high-energy gain 10-{mu}m inverse free electron laser accelerator, longitudinal electron beam shaping and laser based light-sources are planned.

  2. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Devaney, Howard F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hake, Lewis W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  4. Acceleration Environment of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Kelly, Eric; Keller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment on the International Space Station has been accomplished by two accelerometer systems since 2001. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System records the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. Measurement of the vibratory/transient regime, comprised of vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances, has been accomplished by the Space Acceleration Measurement System-II. Until the arrival of the Columbus Orbital Facility and the Japanese Experiment Module, the location of these sensors, and therefore, the measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment, has been limited to within the United States Laboratory. Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a vibratory acceleration measurement system called the Microgravity Measurement Apparatus which will be deployed within the Japanese Experiment Module to make distributed measurements of the Japanese Experiment Module's vibratory acceleration environment. Two Space Acceleration Measurement System sensors from the United States Laboratory will be re-deployed to support vibratory acceleration data measurement within the Columbus Orbital Facility. The additional measurement opportunities resulting from the arrival of these new laboratories allows Principal Investigators with facilities located in these International Space Station research laboratories to obtain microgravity acceleration data in support of their sensitive experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project, at NASA Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland, Ohio, has supported acceleration measurement systems and the microgravity scientific community through the processing, characterization, distribution, and archival of the microgravity acceleration data obtained from the International Space Station acceleration measurement systems. This paper summarizes the PIMS capabilities available to the International Space Station scientific community, introduces plans for extending microgravity analysis results to the newly arrived scientific laboratories, and provides summary information for known microgravity environment disturbers.

  5. Electron cloud in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, Roberto; Demma, Theo

    2014-06-01

    Low energy electrons in accelerators are known to interact with the circulating beam, giving rise to the formation of a so-called e- cloud. Such e- cloud may induce detrimental effects on the accelerated beam quality and stability. Those effects have been observed in most accelerators of positively charged particles. A longstanding effort has been so far devoted to understand in detail the physical origin of such e- cloud, its build-up and its interaction with the circulating beam. We will first describe the origin and the basic features causing e- cloud formation in accelerators, then we review some of the theoretical work produced to simulate and analyze such phenomenon. In selected cases, theoretical expectations and experimental observations will be compared, to address the importance of benchmarking codes versus observations to reach the required predictive capability. To this scope, codes need realistic input parameters which correctly describe material and surface properties at the basis of such e- cloud formation and build-up. The experimental efforts, performed worldwide in many surface and material science laboratories, to measure such essential parameters will then be presented and critically reviewed. Finally, we will describe some of the e- cloud mitigation strategies adopted so far and draw some conclusions.

  6. A linear accelerator bunch length monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jessie, D.; Norum, E. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Saskatchewan Accelerator Lab.] [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Saskatchewan Accelerator Lab.

    1996-06-01

    A monitor has been developed that provides an indication of the bunching efficiency of the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory`s Linear Accelerator (Linac). By adjusting the prebuncher phase at the injector, a decrease in energy spread of 15% at the end of the linac was observed. With more rigorous optimization, it is believed that a reduction of 20% or greater in energy spread can be achieved.

  7. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  8. Accelerator validation of an FPGA SEU simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Johnson; Michael Caffrey; Paul Graham; Nathan Rollins; Michael Wirthlin

    2003-01-01

    An accelerator test was used to validate the performance of an FPGA single event upset (SEU) simulator. The Crocker Nuclear Laboratory cyclotron proton accelerator was used to irradiate the SLAAC1-V, a Xilinx Virtex FPGA board. We also used the SLAAC1-V as the platform for a configuration bitstream SEU simulator. The simulator was used to probe the \\

  9. Non-accelerator Particle Physics

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Non-accelerator Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics Research programs of: Prof. Martin that often connect particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology Some questions: - What particles of the neutrino? #12;The techniques: Laboratory experiments, in the style of particle physics · High energy

  10. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  11. Electrothermal accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Driga; M. W. Ingram; W. F. Weldon

    1989-01-01

    In electrothermal (ET) guns, the projectile acceleration is governed by gas dynamics as in explosively-driven guns. In a conventional gun, however, both the energy for heating and the material to be heated are contained in the solid propellant. Electrothermal launchers allow an external electric power supply to be used to provide the necessary energy; hence, lower atomic weight propellants may

  12. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  13. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  14. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Persis Drell, Director

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Organization Chart #12;X-ray Ops Controls & DAQ X-ray Eng. & Tech. Science,Research and Development Division, Deputy SSRL Directorate C-C Kao. ALD P. Pianetta, Deputy Photon Science Directorate C. Friend, ALD Division M. Wrona Human Resources L. Young Communications F. Khadem Science, Research & Development

  15. Stan Brodsky SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    , February 8, 2012 Atoms in Flight Press and Media : SLAC National Acc HOME RESEARCH SC Stan Brodsky 2 Goal and Media : SLAC National Acc HOME RESEARCH SC Stan Brodsky 3 Searching for the Ultimate Constituents.1 fm 1 MeV resolves 10-13 m = 100 fm 1 KeV resolves 10-10 m = 1 Angst 1 eV resolves 10-7 m = 1000 Angs

  16. CP AND CPT SYMMETRY TESTS FROM THE TWOPION DECAYS OF THE NEUTRAL KAON WITH THE FNAL E731

    E-print Network

    Fermilab

    . Details of the detector and its performance and the data analysis are given. The extensive Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and comparison with data are also presented. PACS number(s): 13.25.Es, 11.30.Er Present address: Princeton Combustion Research Laboratories, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852. #12; I

  17. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  18. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ?1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  19. BICEP's acceleration

    E-print Network

    Carlo R. Contaldi

    2014-07-24

    The recent BICEP2 detection of, what is claimed to be primordial $B$-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential $V(\\phi)$ for the first time - if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles $\\epsilon(N)$ as a function of $e$-fold $N$ and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum $P(k)$ and potential $V(\\phi)$. We find that the BICEP2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales $k\\sim 10^{-3}$ Mpc$^{-1}$. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power.

  20. Overview of Acceleration for a Neutrino Factory J. S. Berga

    E-print Network

    Berg, J. Scott

    1 Overview of Acceleration for a Neutrino Factory J. S. Berga , S. A. Kahna , and R. B. Palmera a Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11725 This paper is an overview of the acceleration issues, the choices of RF frequency, the injection and extraction for accelerator rings, and the cost considerations

  1. TRACKING ACCELERATOR SETTINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    D OTTAVIO,T.; FU, W.; OTTAVIO, D.P.

    2007-10-15

    Recording setting changes within an accelerator facility provides information that can be used to answer questions about when, why, and how changes were made to some accelerator system. This can be very useful during normal operations, but can also aid with security concerns and in detecting unusual software behavior. The Set History System (SHS) is a new client-server system developed at the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide these capabilities. The SHS has been operational for over two years and currently stores about IOOK settings per day into a commercial database management system. The SHS system consists of a server written in Java, client tools written in both Java and C++, and a web interface for querying the database of setting changes. The design of the SHS focuses on performance, portability, and a minimal impact on database resources. In this paper, we present an overview of the system design along with benchmark results showing the performance and reliability of the SHS over the last year.

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. PMID:18470926

  3. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  4. European underground laboratories: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino

    2005-09-01

    Underground laboratories are complementary to those where the research in fundamental physics is made using accelerators. This report focus on the logistic and on the background features of the most relevant laboratories in Europe, stressing also on the low background facilities available. In particular the report is focus on the laboratories involved in the new Europeean project ILIAS with the aim to support the European large infrastructures operating in the astroparticle physics sector.

  5. The Echo Sounding Rocket Payloads as a Laboratory in Space to Study the Dynamics of the Natural Aurora Acceleration Mechanism and Other Important Contributions John Winckler has Made to the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    It is with great honor that I have the opportunity to talk about some of the contributions Prof. John Winckler has made to space science and auroral physics in particular. John's interest in the aurora began on the first day of the IGY during a balloon flight designed to be the start of a campaign to do a latitudinal survey of the cosmic ray cut-off during the IGY. The detectors of this flight unexpectedly measured 50-100 keV x-rays produced by auroral electrons bombarding the top of the atmosphere. After retiring from teaching, John's interest in the dynamics of low-latitude aurora came full circle from its starting point during that first day of the IGY almost thirty years earlier. With ground photometers, cameras and stereoscopic TV, he made extensive observations of the pulsation phase of auroras during the peak of solar cycle 22. Although pulsating aurora had been studied for decades at auroral zone latitudes, John's work at sub-auroral latitudes discovered new phenomena and made observations of known phenomena in greater detail. The intent of this talk is primarily to consider Winckler's pioneering work with electron beam injections into the magnetosphere from sounding rockets. The motivation for this work initially was to map auroral field lines and to study large scale magnetospheric electric fields. The aspect of the work that I was most intimately involved in was the mechanism of neutralizing the rocket after it had injected nearly a coulomb of negative charge into space. It was initially argued that the beams would become unstable and therefore be destroyed and useless as probes of the magnetosphere. This was not the case, hence the neutralization mechanism became a significant study of the program. Although not realized at the time, it turns out that the beam injections at rocket altitude in essence became a laboratory in space in which many of the features of the aurora itself were reproduced. It is accepted that the electrons of a discrete aurora are accelerated by a potential structure one or two Re above the atmosphere. The requirement for field-aligned current demanded by the magnetic field reconfiguration in the Earth's tail during substorms is, presumably, the reason for this potential. Electrons that have interacted with this potential structure are known to contain signatures of ion cyclotron waves, perhaps a clue as to the source of the potential itself. Data will be shown from a recent rocket flight measuring both cold ionospheric electrons of field-aligned bursts and inverted V electrons originating from the tail which bear this signature. Data from the Echo rockets show very similar results. There is a need for return current to the electron-emitting payload if the beam is to escape. Ambient electrons are measured to be accelerated within a few tens of meters of the payload to carry this current. These electrons produce auroral light in collisions with residual neutral gas around the payload. Both the light and the neutralizing electrons fluctuate in intensity at heavy ion cyclotron frequencies.

  6. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  7. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  8. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-03-26

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The ion beam materials analysis laboratory at the environmental molecular sciences laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Thevuthasan; C. H. F Peden; M. H Engelhard; D. R Baer; G. S Herman; W. Jiang; Y. Liang; W. J Weber

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a Department of Energy (DOE) collaborative scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is completing an accelerator facility dedicated to ion beam modification and analysis of materials. This facility consists of a new 3.4MV tandem accelerator from National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC), two ion sources including an Alphatross source and a SNICS

  10. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  11. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  12. 2011 Dielectric Laser Acceleration Workshop (DLA2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermel, Peter; /MIT; Byer, Robert L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Colby, Eric R.; /SLAC; Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder; Dawson, Jay; /LLNL, Livermore; England, R.Joel; /SLAC; Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC; Qi, Ming-Hao; /Purdue U.; Yoder, Rodney B.; /Manhattanville Coll., Purchase

    2012-04-17

    The first ICFA Mini-workshop on Dielectric Laser Accelerators was held on September 15-16, 2011 at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We present the results of the Workshop, and discuss the main conclusions of the Accelerator Applications, Photonics, and Laser Technologies working groups. Over 50 participants from 4 countries participated, discussing the state of the art in photonic structures, laser science, and nanofabrication as it pertains to laser-driven particle acceleration in dielectric structures. Applications of this new and promising acceleration concept to discovery science and industrial, medical, and basic energy sciences were explored. The DLA community is presently focused on making demonstrations of high gradient acceleration and a compatible attosecond injector source - two critical steps towards realizing the potential of this technology.

  13. Construction and operation of a support facilities (Building 729) for operation/testing of a prototype accelerator/storage ring (XLS) and machine shop for the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Proposed action is to construct at BNL a 5,600-ft{sup 2} support building, install and operate a prototypic 200 MeV accelerator and a prototypic 700 MeV storage ring within, and to construct and operate a 15 kV substation to power the building. The accelerator and storage ring would comprise the x-ray lithography source or XLS.

  14. Construction and operation of a support facilities (Building 729) for operation/testing of a prototype accelerator/storage ring (XLS) and machine shop for the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Proposed action is to construct at BNL a 5,600-ft[sup 2] support building, install and operate a prototypic 200 MeV accelerator and a prototypic 700 MeV storage ring within, and to construct and operate a 15 kV substation to power the building. The accelerator and storage ring would comprise the x-ray lithography source or XLS.

  15. FXR accelerator cavity impedance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Avalle, C.A.

    1998-01-05

    One of the goals of the present Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator upgrade effort [1][2] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to reduce the cavity transverse impedance, since it has been shown that beam stability is significantly affected by this parameter [3]. Recently, we have evaluated various techniques and cell modifications to accomplish that, both through lab measurements and computer models. A spare cell, identical in every way to cells in the accelerator, was specially modified for the experiments. The impedance measurements were done without the beam, by applying twin-wire techniques. This report describes the results of these experiments and suggests possible cell modifications to improve their performance. The techniques and modifications which are suggested might also be applicable to AHF and DARHT-2 long-pulse accelerator development.

  16. FERMI ACCELERATION. DMITRY DOLGOPYAT

    E-print Network

    Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    FERMI ACCELERATION. DMITRY DOLGOPYAT Abstract. Fermi acceleration is a mechanism, first suggested, on average, be accelerated. Since then Fermi acceleration has been used to explain a number of natural phenomena and sev- eral simple mathematical models demonstrating Fermi acceleration have been proposed. We

  17. The Accelerating Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger [Stanford University

    2013-05-15

    From keV electrons in terrestrial aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a plutocratic proclivity to concentrate energy in a tiny minority of suprathermal particles. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have observed and that much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory and diverse astronomical locations. It will be argued that new mechanisms are required to account for recent observations of galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebulae and interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic media and some candidates will be discussed.

  18. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D. [comp.] [ed.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  19. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  20. Nonlocality of Accelerated Systems

    E-print Network

    Bahram Mashhoon

    2003-05-11

    The conceptual basis for the nonlocality of accelerated systems is presented. The nonlocal theory of accelerated observers and its consequences are briefly described. Nonlocal field equations are developed for the case of the electrodynamics of linearly accelerated systems.

  1. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W. [P.O. Box 463, Deep River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  2. Ion Induction Accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Barnard; Kazuhiko Horioka

    2011-01-01

    \\u000a The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality\\u000a between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction\\u000a accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion\\u000a induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10)

  3. Residual acceleration data analysis for Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    A two-level reduction plan is developed analytically with references to existing experimental data that can be used to develop accelerometer databases for postflight experiment analyses. Residual-acceleration data from previous experiments are studied with attention given to the differences in magnitude among the databases. First-level processing is based on the identification of instances in which tolerable acceleration levels are exceeded so that the time intervals requiring further scrutiny are found. Acceleration time histories including magnitude and orientation are utilized with frequency data for the second level of processing, and the data required for a given time window are reduced by means of data decimation. The identification and processing of limited windows of acceleration data facilitates the characterization of the acceleration environment. These characterizations are of use in the design, location, and utilization of low-gravity laboratory equipment.

  4. Lessons from the Bevatron Accelerator Demolition - 12191

    SciTech Connect

    Harkins, Joseph [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States); Cronin, Robert [CH2M HILL, Englewood, Colorado, 80112 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Bevatron accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is the first DOE accelerator to be demolished. While there are many lessons learned from its demolition, this paper focuses on the following lessons learned that may be useful for other D and D projects: bounding project scope to ensure success, hazards mapping for focused characterization and remediation, establishing radiological evaluation criteria, and forecasting activation products. With D and D of many DOE accelerators likely to occur in the near future, these lessons learned should be considered in planning those projects. These lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other D and D projects as well. (authors)

  5. National accelerated coated conductor initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Peterson, Dean E.

    2002-01-01

    The national Accelerated Coated Conductor Initiative (ACCI) is committed to assuring continued U.S. leadership in the development of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wire for electric power and other applications of national interest. Increased energy efficiency, power density, and power-to-weight ratio are just a few of the tangible benefits that will be possible if today's meter lengths of HTS wire based upon the compound yttrium-barium-copper-oxygen (YBCO) can be scaled up by U.S. industry to kilometer lengths. This paper presents an evaluation of the current state of the development of coated conductor technology and a vision for its future. The challenges that U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and their industrial and university partners face will be presented against the backdrop of the history of superconductivity program achievements. It is the purpose of this initiative to accelerate the development, commercialization, and application of high temperature superconductors through joint efforts among DOE laboratories, American industry, and universities, so that future challenges of the electric power industry can be met. Based on their advances in HTS coated conductor development in a program funded by the DOE's Office of Power Technologies, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories lead and support this effort by improving their own capabilities, including equipment, facilities, and technical expertise. Each laboratory has, in 2001, acquired new laboratory space, new capital equipment, and new personnel with the goal of working closely with U.S. companies to take technologies invented in the labs and demonstrated in 1-m lengths and transfer these technologies to the commercial sector. The present status of the performance of the second-generation YBCO wires will be described, and the future plans of the national laboratories will be presented. Opportunities for collaboration are discussed, as well. .

  6. Laboratory tests for single-event effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Buchner; D. McMorrow; J. Melinger; A. B. Camdbell

    1996-01-01

    Integrated circuits are currently tested at accelerators for their susceptibility to single-event effects (SEE's). However, because of the cost and limited accessibility associated with accelerator testing, there is considerable interest in developing alternate testing methods. Two laboratory techniques for measuring SEE, one involving a pulsed laser and the other 252Cf, are described in detail in this paper. The pulsed laser

  7. LABORATORY V MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    with a constant acceleration. · Calculate the motion of a particle with an acceleration of constant magnitude, the atomic structure of materials, and the quark structure of elementary particles. In this set of laboratory-carrying wires, and coils of wire. · Calculate the magnetic force on a charged particle moving in a uniform

  8. Covariant Uniform Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Yaakov Friedman; Tzvi Scarr

    2013-04-29

    We show that standard Relativistic Dynamics Equation F=dp/d\\tau is only partially covariant. To achieve full Lorentz covariance, we replace the four-force F by a rank 2 antisymmetric tensor acting on the four-velocity. By taking this tensor to be constant, we obtain a covariant definition of uniformly accelerated motion. We compute explicit solutions for uniformly accelerated motion which are divided into four types: null, linear, rotational, and general. For null acceleration, the worldline is cubic in the time. Linear acceleration covariantly extends 1D hyperbolic motion, while rotational acceleration covariantly extends pure rotational motion. We use Generalized Fermi-Walker transport to construct a uniformly accelerated family of inertial frames which are instantaneously comoving to a uniformly accelerated observer. We explain the connection between our approach and that of Mashhoon. We show that our solutions of uniformly accelerated motion have constant acceleration in the comoving frame. Assuming the Weak Hypothesis of Locality, we obtain local spacetime transformations from a uniformly accelerated frame K' to an inertial frame K. The spacetime transformations between two uniformly accelerated frames with the same acceleration are Lorentz. We compute the metric at an arbitrary point of a uniformly accelerated frame. We obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system K' to an inertial frame K. We derive the general formula for the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We obtain a formula for the angular velocity of a uniformly accelerated object. Every rest point of K' is uniformly accelerated, and its acceleration is a function of the observer's acceleration and its position. We obtain an interpretation of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation as an acceleration transformation from K' to K.

  9. I. ACCELERATION A. Introduction

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    I. ACCELERATION A. Introduction Following cooling and initial bunch compression, the beams must be rapidly accelerated. The acceleration needed for a Higgs collider is probably the most conventional part undertaken. A sequence of linacs would work, but would be expensive. Some form of circulating acceleration

  10. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  11. Acceleration without Horizons

    E-print Network

    Alaric Doria; Gerardo Munoz

    2015-02-18

    We derive the metric of an accelerating observer moving with non-constant proper acceleration in flat spacetime. With the exception of a limiting case representing a Rindler observer, there are no horizons. In our solution, observers can accelerate to any desired terminal speed $v_{\\infty} accelerating observer is completely determined by the distance of closest approach and terminal velocity or, equivalently, by an acceleration parameter and terminal velocity.

  12. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  13. Fluid particle accelerations in fully developed turbulence.

    PubMed

    La Porta, A; Voth, G A; Crawford, A M; Alexander, J; Bodenschatz, E

    2001-02-22

    The motion of fluid particles as they are pushed along erratic trajectories by fluctuating pressure gradients is fundamental to transport and mixing in turbulence. It is essential in cloud formation and atmospheric transport, processes in stirred chemical reactors and combustion systems, and in the industrial production of nanoparticles. The concept of particle trajectories has been used successfully to describe mixing and transport in turbulence, but issues of fundamental importance remain unresolved. One such issue is the Heisenberg-Yaglom prediction of fluid particle accelerations, based on the 1941 scaling theory of Kolmogorov. Here we report acceleration measurements using a detector adapted from high-energy physics to track particles in a laboratory water flow at Reynolds numbers up to 63,000. We find that, within experimental errors, Kolmogorov scaling of the acceleration variance is attained at high Reynolds numbers. Our data indicate that the acceleration is an extremely intermittent variable--particles are observed with accelerations of up to 1,500 times the acceleration of gravity (equivalent to 40 times the root mean square acceleration). We find that the acceleration data reflect the anisotropy of the large-scale flow at all Reynolds numbers studied. PMID:11234005

  14. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.A. III

    1997-06-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development.

  15. Technologies for Advanced Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.A.; Kamin, G.; Hanks, R.; Sharp, W.; Duncan, G.; Sangster, C.; Ahle, L.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Autrey, D.; Halaxa, E; Williams, C.

    2000-04-20

    To harness fusion energy is one of today's greatest technological challenges, and one well worth pursuing. Success in the development of fusion power would result in a virtually inexhaustible source of energy. The fusion reaction, the process that powers the sun and the stars, can be duplicated on Earth. However, to date these fusion processes have been the products of large-scale experimental efforts. They have yet to achieve fusion in a manner that is cost effective and efficient enough to be applied in a commercial reactor. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been centrally involved in the Nation's inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program for over 25 years. Much of the focus of the LLNL ICF Program has been the well-known effort to develop high power, short wavelength laser drivers to create the conditions necessary for the fusion process. But the ICF Program has also been investigating, in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the potential of heavy-ion accelerators as possible drivers. The objectives of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project described in this report have been to develop some of the enabling technologies necessary for this type of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) driver. In particular, to apply adaptive control to the problem of tailored acceleration and steering of a pulsed ion beam.

  16. Reduction of Effective Acceleration to Microgravity Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Acceleration due to earth's gravity causes buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation in solutions. In addition. pressure gradients occur as a function of the height within a liquid column. Hence gravity effects both equilbria conditions and phase transitions as a result of hydrostatic pressure gradients. The affect of gravity on the rate of heat and man transfer in solutal processes can be particularly important in polymer processing due to the high sensitivity of polymeric materials to processing conditions. The term microgravity has been coined to describe an environment in which the affects of gravitational acceleration am greatly reduced. It may seem odd to talk in term of reducing the effects of gravitational acceleration since gravitational attraction is a basic property of matter. However, die presence of gravity on in situ processing or measurements can be negated by achieving conditions in which the laboratory, or more specifically the container of the experimental materials, a subjected to the same acceleration as the materials themselves. With regard to the laboratory reference frame, there is virtually no force on the experimental solutions. This is difficult to achieve but can be done. A short review of Newtonian physics provides an explanation on both how processes we affected by gravity and how microgravity conditions are achieved. The fact that fluids deform when subject to a force bid solids do not indicates that solids have a structure able to exert an opposing force that negates an externally applied force. Liquids deform when a force is applied, indicating that a liquid structure cannot completely negate an applied force. Just how easily a liquid resists deformation is related to its viscosity. Spaceflight provides an environment in which the laboratory reference frame i.e. the spacecraft and all the equipment therein an experiencing virtually identical forces. There is no solid foundation underneath such a laboratory, so the laboratory accelerates according to the force of gravity as do the experimental fluids within the lab. Hence, the magnitude of the form excited by the laboratory on the experimental solutions within are greatly reduced. When compared with a laboratory on the ground and averaged over time, the fluids in a spaceflight laboratory experience approximately a 10 (sup -6)decrease in acceleration relative to their laboratory reference frame hence the term microgravity.

  17. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  18. Accelerated leach test development program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  20. Beam trapping in a modified betatron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanakos, C. A.; Dialetis, D.; Marsh, S. J.; Len, L. K.; Smith, T.

    1991-09-01

    Experimental results on the trapping of the beam in the Naval Research Laboratory modified betatron accelerator are reported. These results are in good agreement with a revised model of resistive trapping (see Sprangle and Kapetanakos, 1986). It is indicated that the wall resistivity is responsible for the inward spiral motion of the beam after injection.

  1. The Front End Fermi National Accelerator Lab

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    The Front End MAP Review Fermi National Accelerator Lab August 24-26, 2010 Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;August 2426, 2010 MAP ReviewFront End Harold G. Kirk 2 Outline Define Front End Major Sub-systems Key Challenges Milestones #12;August 2426, 2010 MAP

  2. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility; and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options: the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase 2 study are described in the present report.

  3. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods for predicting life of solar cell encapsulants to Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology for the encapsulation task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An important principle is that encapsulants should be tested in a total array system allowing realistic interaction of components. Therefore, micromodule test specimens were fabricated with a variety of encapsulants, substrates, and types of circuitry. One common failure mode was corrosion of circuitry and solar cell metallization due to moisture penetration. Another was darkening and/or opacification of encapsulant. A test program plan was proposed. It includes multicondition accelerated exposure. Another method was hyperaccelerated photochemical exposure using a solar concentrator. It simulates 20 year of sunlight exposure in a short period of one to two weeks. The study was beneficial in identifying some cost effective encapsulants and array designs.

  4. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered by Chen et al where the driver, instead of being a laser, is a whistler wave known as the magnetowave plasma accelerator. The application to electron--positron plasmas that are found around pulsars is studied in the paper by Shukla, and to muon acceleration by Peano et al. Electron wakefield experiments are now concentrating on control and optimisation of high-quality beams that can be used as drivers for novel radiation sources. Studies by Thomas et al show that filamentation has a deleterious effect on the production of high quality mono-energetic electron beams and is caused by non-optimal choice of focusing geometry and/or electron density. It is crucial to match the focusing with the right plasma parameters and new types of plasma channels are being developed, such as the magnetically controlled plasma waveguide reported by Froula et al. The magnetic field provides a pressure profile shaping the channel to match the guiding conditions of the incident laser, resulting in predicted electron energies of 3GeV. In the forced laser-wakefield experiment Fang et al show that pump depletion reduces or inhibits the acceleration of electrons. One of the earlier laser acceleration concepts known as the beat wave may be revived due to the work by Kalmykov et al who report on all-optical control of nonlinear focusing of laser beams, allowing for stable propagation over several Rayleigh lengths with pre-injected electrons accelerated beyond 100 MeV. With the increasing number of petawatt lasers, attention is being focused on different acceleration regimes such as stochastic acceleration by counterpropagating laser pulses, the relativistic mirror, or the snow-plough effect leading to single-step acceleration reported by Mendonca. During wakefield acceleration the leading edge of the pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake while the trailing edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency up-shift. This is commonly known as photon deceleration and acceleration and is the result of a modulational instability. Simula

  5. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  6. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: ohira@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan)

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  7. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project currently being designed by the international collaboration GDE (`global design effort'). If the ILC will be built, about 18,000 SRF cavities need to be manufactured worldwide within about five years. The industrialization of SRF accelerator technology is analyzed and reviewed in this article in view of the main accelerator projects of the last two to three decades.

  8. Design and analysis of experimental performance of the Los Alamos HIBAF facility accelerator using the INEX computer model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce E. Carlsten; Lloyd M. Young; Michael E. Jones; Lester E. Thode; Alexander H. Lumpkin; Donald W. Feldman; Renee B. Feldman; Barbara Blind; M. Jean Browman; Patrick G. O'Shea

    1991-01-01

    The authors review the accelerator design of the high brightness accelerator free electron laser (FEL) (HIBAF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory and analyze its performance. HIBAF is the first high-brightness high-current (several hundred amperes) accelerator built using a photoelectric injector. The authors discuss the design philosophy and the integrated numerical experiment (INEX) design tool, and describe the accelerator components. Currently,

  9. Design and analysis of experimental performance of the Los Alamos HIBAF facility accelerator using the INEX computer model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce E. Carlsten; Lloyd M. Young; Michael E. Jones; Lester E. Thode; Alexander H. Lumpkin; Donald W. Feldman; Renee B. Feldman; Barbara Blind; M. Jean Browman; Patrick G. O'Shea

    1991-01-01

    The authors review the accelerator design of the high brightness accelerator free electron laser (FEL) (HIBAF) at Los Alamos National laboratory and analyze its performance. HIBAF is the first high-brightness high-current (several hundred amperes) accelerator build using a photoelectric injector. The authors discuss the design philosophy and the integrated numerical experiment (INEX) design tool, and describe the accelerator components. Currently,

  10. Debris and micrometeorite impact measurements in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resnick, J.; Grun, J.; Crawford, J.; Burris, R.; Manka, C. K.; Ford, J. L.; Ripin, B. H.

    1992-01-01

    A method was developed to simulate space debris in the laboratory. This method, which is an outgrowth of research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), uses laser ablation to accelerate material. Using this method, single 60 micron aluminum spheres were accelerated to 15 km/sec and larger 500 micron aluminum spheres were accelerated to 2 km/sec. Also, many small (less than 10 micron diameter) irregularly shaped particles were accelerated to speeds of 100 km/sec.

  11. International X-Band Linear Collider Accelerator Structure R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    For more than fifteen years before the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) decision in August, 2004, there were intensive R&D activities and broad international collaboration among the groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL, LLNL and other labs for the room temperature X-Band accelerator structures. The goal was to provide an optimized design of the main linac structure for the NLC (Next Linear Collider) or GLC (Global Linear Collider). There have been two major challenges in developing X-band accelerator structures for the linear colliders. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. More than thirty X-band accelerator structures with various RF parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 1989. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this talk including the structure design, manufacturing techniques, high power performance, and other structure related issues. Also, the new progress in collaborating with the CLIC, high gradient structures and X-Band structure applications for RF deflectors and others are briefly introduced.

  12. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... pg=stereotactic) . top of page How does the equipment work? View larger with caption The linear accelerator ...

  13. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  14. Acceleration of Gravity 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    This lab is a Level 2 inquiry activity that should be taught after students understand acceleration but before they learn the equations for calculating the acceleration of a body dropped from a certain height. After this activity, students should understa

  15. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  16. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  17. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  18. Force, mass and acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phil Dalrymple; Richard Griffiths

    2005-01-01

    Force, mass and acceleration are everyday words but often used inaccurately. Force is a physical influence, which when applied to an object causes it to accelerate in the direction from which it was applied. Mass is the amount of matter in an object and is expressed in kilograms. Acceleration is the rate of change of velocity of an object in

  19. Multistage induction mass accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Burgess; M. Cowan

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to discuss considerations which define the design and performance of a multistage, coaxial induction mass accelerator operating at high magnetic energy density. A review is presented of the magnetohydrodynamic computational model required to design, in detail, a high energy density, coaxial, magnetic induction mass accelerator. Attention is given to the derivation of the accelerator

  20. Direction of Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Spaulding, Clearbrook-Gonvick Public School, Clearbrook Minnesota, based on an original activity from Physics Principles and Problems (1995) page 75.

    In this short lab, students observe the movement of an air bubble in a small level, attached to a toy truck, as it is moved from a stop, to a steady speed and back to a stop. This gives a visual to the concepts positive acceleration, zero acceleration and negative acceleration.

  1. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  2. Acceleration-Induced Nonlocality

    E-print Network

    Bahram Mashhoon

    2003-01-17

    The standard relativistic theory of accelerated reference frames in Minkowski spacetime is described. The measurements of accelerated observers are considered and the limitations of the standard theory, based on the hypothesis of locality, are pointed out. The physical principles of the nonlocal theory of accelerated observers are presented. The implications of the nonlocal theory are briefly discussed.

  3. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  4. SLAC DOE Review April 2-4, 2002 1 Accelerator Research Department B

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    SLAC DOE Review April 2-4, 2002 1 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics Laser Experimental Physics Laboratory #12;SLAC DOE Review April 2-4, 2002 2 Accelerator Research Department B DeptFluence[TW/cm2] #12;SLAC DOE Review April 2-4, 2002 3 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics

  5. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan M. M. Todd; C. C. Paulson; M. A. Peacock; M. F. Reusch

    1995-01-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models

  6. Collider-Accelerator Department Overview Derek I. Lowenstein

    E-print Network

    -NE) · Booster · NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NASA, $5.5M/year, incl. $2M for Medical and Biology Departments Engineers/Professional 144 114 23 5 2 Designers/Technicians 196 155 32 6 3 Admin./Clerical 24 21 2 1 0 support ~13 FTEs are purchased as Laboratory assigned trades. #12;4 Collider Accelerator Department

  7. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  8. Entanglement of Accelerating Particles

    E-print Network

    W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

    2007-09-03

    We study how the entanglement of a maximally entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair are uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced, and the entanglements of different bipartite systems may change with the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement between accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, for scalar particles, no entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed.

  9. Self-accelerating Warped Braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; /Fermilab; Park, Minjoon; /UC, Davis; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Braneworld models with induced gravity have the potential to replace dark energy as the explanation for the current accelerating expansion of the Universe. The original model of Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) demonstrated the existence of a ''self-accelerating'' branch of background solutions, but suffered from the presence of ghosts. We present a new large class of braneworld models which generalize the DGP model. Our models have negative curvature in the bulk, allow a second brane, and have general brane tensions and localized curvature terms. We exhibit three different kinds of ghosts, associated to the graviton zero mode, the radion, and the longitudinal components of massive graviton modes. The latter two species occur in the DGP model, for negative and positive brane tension respectively. In our models, we find that the two kinds of DGP ghosts are tightly correlated with each other, but are not always linked to the feature of self-acceleration. Our models are a promising laboratory for understanding the origins and physical meaning of braneworld ghosts, and perhaps for eliminating them altogether.

  10. Accelerator Technology Program. Status report, April-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.; Schriber, S.O. (comps.)

    1986-09-01

    This report presents highlights of major projects in the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Radio-frequency and microwave technology are dealt with. The p-bar gravity experiment, accelerator theory and simulation activities, the Proton Storage Ring, and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test accelerator are discussed. Activities on the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, the BEAR (Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket) project, beam dynamics, the National Bureau of Standards racetrack microtron, and the University of Illinois racetrack microtron are covered. Papers published by AT-Division personnel during this reporting period are listed.

  11. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  12. Accelerations in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, J H

    1925-01-01

    This work on accelerometry was done at McCook Field for the purpose of continuing the work done by other investigators and obtaining the accelerations which occur when a high-speed pursuit airplane is subjected to the more common maneuvers. The accelerations obtained in suddenly pulling out of a dive with well-balanced elevators are shown to be within 3 or 4 per cent of the theoretically possible accelerations. The maximum acceleration which a pilot can withstand depends upon the length of time the acceleration is continued. It is shown that he experiences no difficulty under the instantaneous accelerations as high as 7.8 G., but when under accelerations in excess of 4.5 G., continued for several seconds, he quickly loses his faculties.

  13. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  14. Environmental Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Information is provided regarding the Association of Environmental Laboratories which consists of environmental analysts concerned with the quality of laboratories charged with providing information in the field of environmental measurements. Included is a list of charter members and a statement of the goals of the organization. (MLB)

  15. Teaching and Research with Accelerators at Tarleton State University

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel K. [Department of Engineering and Physisc, Box T-390, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, 76402 (United States)

    2009-03-10

    Tarleton State University students began performing both research and laboratory experiments using accelerators in 1998 through visitation programs at the University of North Texas, US Army Research Laboratory, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Carderock. In 2003, Tarleton outfitted its new science building with a 1 MV pelletron that was donated by the California Institution of Technology. The accelerator has been upgraded and supports a wide range of classes for both the Physics program and the ABET accredited Engineering Physics program as well as supplying undergraduate research opportunities on campus. A discussion of various laboratory activities and research projects performed by Tarleton students will be presented.

  16. Accelerator archeology-the resurrection of the Stanford Mark III electron linac at Duke

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. O'Shea; F. Carter; C. Dickey; N. Hower; V. N. Litvinenko; R. Sachtschale; G. Swift; P. Wang; Y. Wu; J. M. J. Madey

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the Mark III accelerator at the Stanford High Energy Physics Laboratory was used as the prototype test-bed for the SLAC two-mile accelerator. In the mid 1980s, the accelerator was dismantled and a large part of it was transported to the Duke University Free-Electron Laser Laboratory to form the basis of the injector for the 1-GeV Duke

  17. Accelerator Archeology - The Resurrection of the Stanford MARKIII Electron Linac at Duke

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. O'Shea; F. Carter; C. Dickey; N. Hower; V. N. Litvinenko; R. Sachtschale; G. Swift; P. Wang; Y. Wu; J. M. J. Madey

    1996-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the Mark III accelerator at the Stanford High Energy Physics Laboratory was used as the prototype test-bed for the SLAC Two-Mile accelerator. In the mid 1980s the accelerator was dismantled and a large part of it was transported to the Duke University Free-Electron Laser Laboratory to form the basis of the injector for the 1-GeV Duke

  18. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  19. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  20. Paleomagnetics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

  1. Eulerian measurements of horizontal accelerations in shoaling gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgar, Steve; Guza, R. T.; Freilich, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory and field measurements of suspended sediment in the nearshore suggest that fluid accelerations are an important factor in sediment transport by oscillatory waves. Here, Eulerian accelerations of the cross-shore velocity are calculated from measurements of velocity obtained by an array of bottom-mounted electromagnetic flow meters spanning a natural surf zone. Large shoreward accelerations of brief duration are associated with the steep front faces of both near-breaking and breaking waves. Weaker offshore accelerations of longer duration occur during passage of the more gently sloped rear faces. The acceleration field is thus strongly skewed in the shoreward direction. Power spectra and bispectra indicate, as expected, that statistics of the acceleration field are significantly influenced by high-frequency motions but are rather insensitive to surf beat.

  2. eavy Ion Accelerator Technology: Eighth International Conference. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 8th International Conference on Heavy Ion Accelerator Technology, held at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA, in October, 1998. The opening session was dedicated to the memory of the late Ray Herb of the University of Wisconsin and National Electrostatics Corporation of the USA. Many aspects of research and developments in superconducting ion accelerators and ECR ion sources were discussed. Specific topics included voltage limitations of electrostatic accelerators, tandem accelerators, electrical stress, accelerator control linac boosters, beam extraction systems, accelerator mass spectroscopy and fission fragments. Several applications were reviewed including the technology needed for beams of exotic, radioactive nuclei. There were 58 papers presented at the conference, out of which 18 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  3. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  4. Leaky Fermi accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kushal; Gelfreich, Vassili; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for a sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e., one that has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multicomponent accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multicomponent case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory: Chemistry Department

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the Brookhaven National Laboratory presents its chemistry research dealing primarily with imaging and neuroscience, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Within each category, users can find instructive text and supportive images about the specific projects and the leading researchers. Visitors can learn about the Beamline U7A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the Laser-Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF), the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Facility, and other exceptional research facilities. The website features histories of the chemistry department and of the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  6. Spin, Acceleration and Gravity

    E-print Network

    Donato Bini; Christian Cherubini; Bahram Mashhoon

    2004-06-14

    The massless field perturbations of the accelerating Minkowski and Schwarzschild spacetimes are studied. The results are extended to the propagation of the Proca field in Rindler spacetime. We examine critically the possibility of existence of a general spin-acceleration coupling in complete analogy with the well-known spin-rotation coupling. We argue that such a direct coupling between spin and linear acceleration does not exist.

  7. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  8. BROOKHAVEN LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ............................................. 6 Child Care Options.................................................. 7 Parent's Rights, and surrogate parents seeking to support each child's unique needs. 4. Learning is a process that is guided soBROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Child Development Center Parent Handbook Revised 2009

  9. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests This section provides ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  10. Hydromechanics Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Kriebel

    The Hydromechanics Laboratory supports midshipmen education, as well as midshipmen, faculty and staff research, in the areas of naval architecture and ocean engineering. The laboratory facilities include a large towing tank (380-ft long, 26- ft wide, and 16-ft deep), a small towing tank (120-ft long, 8-ft wide, and 5-ft deep), a coastal engineering wave basin (52-ft long, 48-ft wide, and

  11. Upgrade of Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab; Huning, M.; /DESY; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; /Rochester U.; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-05-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector laboratory is a 16 MeV electron accelerator dedicated to beam dynamics and advanced accelerator physics studies. FNPL will soon be capable of operating at {approx} 40 MeV, after the installation of a high gradient TESLA cavity. In this paper we present the foreseen design for the upgraded facility along with its performance. We discuss the possibilities of using of FNPL as an injector for the superconducting module and test facility (SM&TF).

  12. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  13. Accelerator Control Middle Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.

    2004-09-15

    This paper reviews an efficient implementation of the software ''middle layer'' that resides between high-level accelerator control applications and the low-level accelerator control system. The middle layer software is written in MATLAB and includes links to the EPICS Channel Access Library. Functionally, the middle layer syntax closely parallels the Family/Index naming scheme used in many accelerator simulation codes and uses the same convention to communicate with both the online machine and the accelerator model. Hence, machine control, machine simulation and data analysis tools are integrated into a single, easy-to-use software package.

  14. Accelerators and Nobel Laureates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kullander, Sven

    This online article written by Sven Kullander at the Nobel e-Museum discusses the importance of particle accelerators to physics in a historical context. After studying their basic operatation, users can then learn about the many accelerator inventions and their assistance in various discoveries such as x-rays and electrons. The website provides links to descriptions of the many Nobel Prize winners who have utilized accelerators in their important work. Users can view images of the large accelerators from all over the world including the United Kingdom, Sweden, and the United State.

  15. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  16. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  17. Visgraf Laboratory IMPA Visgraf Laboratory IMPA

    E-print Network

    1 Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA CNMAC 99 CNMAC 99 jonas@impa.br @impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.br www.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf

  18. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  19. The EMMA Accelerator, a Diagnostic Systems Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, A.; Berg, J.; Bliss, N. Cox, G.; Dufau, M.; Gallagher, A.; Hill, C.; Jones, J.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Muratori, B.; Oates, A.; Shepherd B.; Smith, R.; Hock, K.; Holder, D.; Ibison, M., Kirkman I.; Borrell, R.; Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M.

    2011-09-04

    The 'EMMA' Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (ns-FFAG) international project is currently being commissioned at Daresbury Laboratory, UK. This accelerator has been equipped with a number of diagnostic systems to facilitate this. These systems include a novel time-domain-multiplexing BPM system, moveable screen systems, a time-of-flight instrument, Faraday cups, and injection/extraction tomography sections to analyze the single bunch beams. An upgrade still to implement includes the installation of wall current monitors. This paper gives an overview of these systems and shows some data and results from the diagnostics that have contributed to the successful demonstration of a serpentine acceleration by this novel accelerator.

  20. Reduction of Acceleration to Effectively Microgravity Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton

    2000-01-01

    Pressure gradients, i.e. pressure head, and buoyancy driven convection can be greatly decreased in experimental systems by acceleration of the laboratory reference frame at a rate consistent with the acceleration due to gravity. This may be done in a number of ways, the best known of which is the use of orbiting spacecraft. Other techniques include the use of aircraft following an appropriate parabolic trajectory or drop towers. The result is an experimental condition in which fluids experience virtually no outside forces relative to the laboratory reference frame. Such conditions are appropriate for the study of processes with diffusion dominated heat and/or mass Under, the study of phase transitions in the absence of pressure gradients, the study of solutal or thermal capillary convection, or containerless processes. Ways of achieving these conditions and complexities that arise in performing experiments in this environment are discussed.

  1. Shock experiments with magnetically accelerated flyer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Wright, Sandra; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Presura, Radu

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical phenomena. Modelling these phenomena in the laboratory yields additional information to improve both simulations and the interpretation of astrophysical observations. Scaled experiments using magnetically accelerated flyers impacting on low density foam targets have been proposed for the Z machine at the Sandia National Laboratories (R.P. Drake, Phys. Plasmas 2002). Carrying out such experiments on smaller machines like the UNR pulsed power generator Zebra reduces the costs significantly and thus enables a broader scan of experimental parameters. Our experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility study the flyer acceleration (reaching flyer velocities of up to 5 km/s) and the impact of the flyers on transparent targets with low sound speeds in order to create shock waves. Optical diagnostics are used to study the interaction of the flyers with the transparent target.

  2. Acceleration Worksheet 8/24/2011 ACCELERATION WORKSHEET

    E-print Network

    Davis, H. Floyd

    Acceleration Worksheet 8/24/2011 ACCELERATION WORKSHEET College of Arts and Sciences Name _____________ TO _____________ month/year month/year II. I meet the requirements for acceleration under [fill out either a) or b;Acceleration Worksheet 8/24/2011 Acceleration 2011-2012 Courses of Study The faculty of the college desires

  3. 25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-print Network

    in later sections. In the Tables, luminosity is stated in units of cm-2s-1. Integrated luminosity.A. Edwards (DESY) and M.J. Syphers (FNAL). 25.1. Luminosity This article provides background for the High-Energy the distribution at the source, by the time the beam reaches high energy, the normal form is a useful approximation

  4. Homopolar current source for mass accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Vitkovitsky; R. D. Ford; D. Jenkins; W. H. Lupton

    1982-01-01

    In order to establish the criteria and options for efficient and compact homopolar generator designs for laboratory studies of mass accelerators, brush contact performance and current step-up techniques have been studied. Contact studies at speeds up to 0.40 km\\/sec were performed at current densities of up to 3.0 kA\\/sq cm. A current step-up transformer was tested to demonstrate current amplification

  5. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  6. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  7. S-band accelerating structures for the PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heung-Soo; Park, Young Jung; Joo, Young-Do; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Kim, Sang-Hee; Park, Soung-Soo; Hwang, Woon Ha; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Kwang-woo; Ko, In-Soo; Oh, Kyoung-Min; Noh, Sung-Joo; Bak, Yong Hwan; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    One hundred seventy-two accelerating structures are required for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray free-electron laser's (PAL-XFEL's) 10-GeV main linear accelerator. So far, we have purchased 80 structures from Mitsubishi Heavy Industry (MHI), which have quasi-symmetric couplers in the accelerating structure to reduce the quadruple and the sextuple components of the electric field in the coupling cavity. High-power tests have been conducted for the first structure of the MHI structure, and Research Instruments (RI) has developed a 3-m long accelerating structure that has an operating frequency of 2856 MHz and in/out couplers of quasi-symmetric racetrack shape for the PAL-XFEL linear accelerator. This structure also has been tested by PAL and RI in the Pohang accelerator laboratory (PAL) to check the maximum available electric field gradient. We will describe the test results of these structures and the current status for the fabrication of the other accelerating structures in this paper.

  8. Semiconductor acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyanagi, Katsumichi; Kobayashi, Mitsuo; Goto, Tomoaki

    1996-09-01

    This paper reports a practical semiconductor acceleration sensor especially suited for automotive air bag systems. The acceleration sensor includes four beams arranged in a swastika structure. Two piezoresistors are formed on each beam. These eight piezoresistors constitute a Wheatstone bridge. The swastika structure of the sensing elements, an upper glass plate and a lower glass plate exhibit the squeeze film effect which enhances air dumping, by which the constituent silicon is prevented from breakdown. The present acceleration sensor has the following features. The acceleration force component perpendicular to the sensing direction can be cancelled. The cross-axis sensitivity is less than 3 percent. And, the erroneous offset caused by the differences between the thermal expansion coefficients of the constituent materials can be canceled. The high aspect ratio configuration realized by plasma etching facilitates reducing the dimensions and improving the sensitivity of the acceleration sensor. The present acceleration sensor is 3.9 mm by 3.9 mm in area and 1.2 mm in thickness. The present acceleration sensor can measure from -50 to +50 G with sensitivity of 0.275 mV/G and with non-linearity of less than 1 percent. The acceleration sensor withstands shock of 3000 G.

  9. Accelerating Research with

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Phil

    -for- use basis. Software and data are hosted on remote computers "in the cloud," and users connect throughAccelerating Academic Research with Cloud Computing Published: September 2014 For the latest information, please see www.microsoft.com/education #12;Accelerating Academic Research with Cloud Computing

  10. Electromagnetic mass accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavel V. Kasyanenko; Vasily A. Efremov; Sergey A. Kharitonov

    2010-01-01

    The powerful power supplies system (up to 3 - 4 GW in impulse) was developed for the electromagnetic mass accelerator. Unique blocks of repeated switching rated on high currents (up to 1.2MA and voltage up to 5KV) are considered. In this paper various designs of the mass accelerator system and its power supplies are described.

  11. Exploring acceleration through vectors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This in class worksheet is designed to get students to think about and manipulate different accelerations in their head. Students work together with written descriptions of velocity and acceleration and draw the vectors in part one, and then turn that around in part two where they write descriptions of a car's motion based on the vector pictures they are given.

  12. J-PARC Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Yoshishige [J-PARC Center High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and Japan Atomic Energy Organization (JAEA) Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2008-02-21

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is under construction in Tokai site. The linac beam commissioning started last fall, while the beam commissioning of the 3-GeV Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) will start this fall. The status of the J-PARC accelerator is reported with emphasis on the technical development accomplished for the J-PARC.

  13. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  14. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  15. Acceleration of Gravity 2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    This lab is between a Level 2 and Level 3 inquiry activity in that it should be assigned after students understand acceleration but before they learn about the acceleration gravity. Because there are many sources of error when using a pendulum, students c

  16. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  17. ACCELERATOR RESEARCH STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    P.G. O'Shea, M. Reiser, V. L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, I. Haber, R. Kishek

    2004-01-23

    ACCELERATOR RESEARCH STUDIES Task A: Study of the Physics of Space-Charge Dominated Beams for Advanced Accelerator Applications Task B: Studies of High-Power Gyroklystrons and Application to Linear Colliders Task C: Theory and Simulation of the Physics Space-Charge Dominated Beams Annual Report for the Period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004

  18. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) ?Gal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) ?Gal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  19. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  20. Symmetry Restoration By Acceleration

    E-print Network

    P. Castorina; M. Finocchiaro

    2012-07-16

    The restoration of spontaneous symmetry breaking for a scalar field theory for an accelerated observer is discussed by the one-loop effective potential calculation and by considering the effective potential for composite operators. Above a critical acceleration, corresponding to the critical restoration temperature,T_c, for a Minkowski observer by Unruh relation, i.e. a_c/2\\pi=T_c, the symmetry is restored. This result confirms other recent calculations in effective field theories that symmetry restoration can occur for an observer with an acceleration larger than some critical value. From the physical point of view, a constant acceleration is locally equivalent to a gravitational field and the critical acceleration to restore the spontaneous symmetry breaking corresponds to a huge gravitational effect which, therefore, prevents boson condensation.

  1. Collinear wake field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Chen, P.; Wilson, P.B.

    1985-04-01

    In the Voss-Weiland scheme of wake field acceleration a high current, ring-shaped driving bunch is used to accelerate a low current beam following along on axis. In such a structure, the transformer ratio, i.e., the ratio of maximum voltage that can be gained by the on-axis beam and the voltage lost by the driving beam, can be large. In contrast, it has been observed that for an arrangement in which driving and driven bunches follow the same path, and where the current distribution of both bunches is gaussian, the transformer ratio is not normally greater than two. This paper explores some of the possibilities and limitations of a collinear acceleration scheme. In addition to its application to wake field acceleration in structures, this study is also of interest for the understanding of the plasma wake field accelerator. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  3. Portable radiography using linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    There are numerous instances where the availability of a portable high-energy radiography machine that could be transported to the inspection site with relative ease would save time, money, and make radiography of permanent installations, such as bridges, possible. One such machine, the Minac built by Schoenberg Radiation Inc., is commercially available. It operates at 9.3 GHz, has an electron energy on target of 3.5 MeV, and an output dose rate of 100 R/min. A second portable accelerator, recently completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, operates at 2.998 GHz, has electron energies on target of 6, 8, and 10 MeV, and an output dose rate of 800 R/min at 8 MeV. This paper discusses the need for and applications of portable accelerators for radiography. Physical characteristics and beam parameters of both machines are examined in detail. Problems of operating at higher frequencies to further minimize size and weight are discussed.

  4. Computational studies and optimization of wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, Frank S.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Mori, Warren B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Martins, Samuel F.; Katsouleas, Tom; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Fawley, William M.; Huang, Chengkun; Wang, Xiadong; Cowan, Ben; Decyk, Victor K.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nakamura, Kei; Paul, Kevin; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Silva, Luis O.; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, C.G.R.; Tzoufras, Michael; Antonsen, Tom; Vieira, Jorge; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-06-16

    Laser- and particle beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times higher than radio-frequency accelerators, offering compactness and ultrafast bunches to extend the frontiers of high energy physics and to enable laboratory-scale radiation sources. Large-scale kinetic simulations provide essential understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability and show and predict the physics behind recent demonstration of narrow energy spread bunches. Benchmarking between codes is establishing validity of the models used and, by testing new reduced models, is extending the reach of simulations to cover upcoming meter-scale multi-GeV experiments. This includes new models that exploit Lorentz boosted simulation frames to speed calculations. Simulations of experiments showed that recently demonstrated plasma gradient injection of electrons can be used as an injector to increase beam quality by orders of magnitude. Simulations are now also modeling accelerator stages of tens of GeV, staging of modules, and new positron sources to design next-generation experiments and to use in applications in high energy physics and light sources.

  5. EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -1- EE 448 Preface 2/26/2007 Laboratory Introduction #12;EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -2- I. INTRODUCTION The electric machinery laboratory provides students with the opportunity to examine and experiment with different types

  6. Development of a sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Verbeke; K. N. Leung; J. Vujic

    2000-01-01

    Sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generators are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for applications ranging from neutron radiography to boron neutron capture therapy and neutron activation analysis. The new generation of high-output neutron generators is based on the D–T fusion reaction, producing 14.1-MeV neutrons. The main components of the neutron tube — the ion source, the accelerator and the target

  7. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System for the International Space Station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Rice; James C. Fox; William G. Lange; Robert W. Dietrich; W. O. Wagar

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is a high resolution and wide dynamic range dual sensor-based accelerometry instrumentation system to be installed within the International Space Station's (ISS) US Laboratory Module. The MAMS instrument will provide highly accurate acceleration measurement data over the nano-g to milli-g range characterizing the Lab Module environment in the frequency spectrum from 10-4 Hz to

  8. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Bohn; J. R. Delayen; W. L. Kennedy; G. L. Nichols; C. T. Roche; L. Sagalovsky; P. M. Markovitch; K. W. Shepard; G. P. Zinkhann

    1991-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory now has two groups working on the application of RF superconductivity to particle accelerators. In the Physics Division, work in RFSC began in 1971 and led to the first superconducting heavy-ion accelerator (ATLAS). Recently, work has focused on the upgrade of the facility by replacing the existing tandem injector by a new positive ion injector comprised of

  9. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  10. Appalachian Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

  11. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  12. Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10

    E-print Network

    Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a DC Servo 10.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to position the gears, we will use the state space model of the DC servo introduced in the laboratory 3 (refer to [1

  13. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  14. The MESA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Aulenbacher, Kurt [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannnes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz (Germany)

    2013-11-07

    The MESA accelerator will operate for particle and nuclear physics experiments in two different modes. A first option is conventional c.w. acceleration yielding 150-200MeV spin-polarized external beam. Second, MESA will be operated as a superconducting multi-turn energy recovery linac (ERL), opening the opportunity to perform experiments with a windowless target with beam current of up to 10 mA. The perspectives for innovative experiments with such a machine are discussed together with a sketch of the accelerator physics issues that have to be solved.

  15. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  16. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2014-12-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles to derive more accurate HF electron flux spectra.

  17. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Collective effects of intense ion

    E-print Network

    . Davidson, A. B. Sefkow, B. C. Lyons, J. S. Pennington Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA #12: acceleration (1/2) Acceleration and focusing by a self fields in beams. V.I. Veksler, Ya.B. Fainberg, Budker, Tajima and Dawson, PRL 43, 267 (1979). Beam -plasma wake field accelerator P. Chen et al, PRL 54, 693

  18. Status report on the positive ion injector (PII) for ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Zinkann; N. Added; P. Billquist; J. Bogaty; B. Clifft; P. Markovich; D. Phillips; P. Strickhorn; K. W. Shepard

    1991-01-01

    The Positive Ion Injector (PII) is part of the Uranuim upgrade for ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper will include a technical discussion of the Positive Ion Injector (PII) accelerator with its superconducting, niobium, very low-velocity accelerating structures. It will also discuss the current construction schedule of PII, and review an upgrade of the fast- tuning system. 10

  19. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  20. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2014-07-16

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  1. Acceleration of Logarithmic Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. G.; Ford, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we shall give a characterization of all monotonically decreasing sequence of positive terms, whose sum converge and then introduce a Transformation which can be used to accelerate the convergence of a large class of logarithmically convergent series.

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  4. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (comps.)

    1982-05-01

    This report covers the activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the first 6 months of calendar 1981. We discuss the Division's major projects, which reflect a variety of applications and sponsors. The varied technologies concerned with the Proton Storage ring are concerned with the Proton Storage Ring are continuing and are discussed in detail. For the racetrack microtron (RTM) project, the major effort has been the design and construction of the demonstration RTM. Our development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. Frequent contacts from other laboratories have revealed a wide acceptance of the RFQ principle in solving low-velocity acceleration problems. In recent work on heavy ion fusion we have developed ideas for funneling beams from RFQ linacs; the funneling process is explained. To test as many aspects as possible of a fully integrated low-energy portion of a Pion generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) Accelerator, a prototype accelerator was designed to take advantage of several pieces of existing accelerator hardware. The important principles to be tested in this prototype accelerator are detailed. Our prototype gyrocon has been extensively tested and modified; we discuss results from our investigations. Our work with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is reviewed in this report.

  5. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. Motion with Constant Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Russell Herman

    The purpose of this experiment is to track the motion for an air cart on a sloped track to fall a distance x with constant acceleration a = g sinq. You will verify that the distance and velocity along the incline are given by the parabola x = xo + vo t +1/2at2 and the line v = vo +at. Finally, you will determine the acceleration due to gravity.

  7. An active particle accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.

    1991-01-01

    Although a static charge is difficult to maintain on macroscopic particles, it is straightforward to construct a small object with a regularly oscillating electric dipole moment. For objects of a given size, one may then construct an accelerator by appropriately matching the frequency and separations of an external array of electrodes to this size. Physically feasible size ranges, an accelerator design, and possible applications of such systems are discussed. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  8. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  9. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  10. Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

  11. Increased laser-accelerated proton energies via direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons in microcone targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Flippo, K. A.; Bussmann, M.; Gall, B.; Lockard, T.; Geissel, M.; Offermann, D. T.; Schollmeier, M.; Sentoku, Y.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-05-01

    We present experimental results showing a laser-accelerated proton beam maximum energy cutoff of 67.5 MeV, with more than 5 × 106 protons per MeV at that energy, using flat-top hollow microcone targets. This result was obtained with a modest laser energy of ˜80 J, on the high-contrast Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2D particle-in-cell simulations, we attribute the source of these enhanced proton energies to direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons along the inner cone wall surface, where the laser light wave accelerates electrons just outside the surface critical density, in a potential well created by a shift of the electrostatic field maximum with respect to that of the magnetic field maximum. Simulations show that for an increasing acceleration length, the continuous loading of electrons into the accelerating phase of the laser field yields an increase in high-energy electrons.

  12. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory Recent MAP Reviews Front End Recommendations Front apply to the Front End: · Perform a global optimization of the cooling channel parameters to maximize accelerating system, including at least beam loading effects, by a front to end simulation. · Study if the 300

  13. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  14. High current electron linacs (advanced test accelerator/experimental test accelerator)

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1984-04-30

    The high current induction accelerator development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is described. The ATA facility is designed for 10 kA peak currents, 50 nsec pulse lengths and 50 MeV energies. At this time, half of the design current has been accelerated through the entire machine to particle energies of about 45 MeV. Current problem areas and operational experience to date will be discussed. Several key technical areas required development for the ATA machine; this report will survey these developments. The control of transverse beam instabilities required an accelerating cavity design with very low Q. Electron sources capable of 10 kA operation at high rep rates were developed using a plasma sparkboard approach. The pulse power systems on ATA, using the same type of spark gap switches as ETA, have exhibited excellent operational reliability.

  15. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  16. Physically Based Rendering Intersection Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Physically Based Rendering (600.657) Intersection Acceleration #12;Intersection Testing Accelerated partitions: Group objects into clusters Cluster volumes may overlap #12;Uniform (Voxel) Grid Acceleration Acceleration · Trace rays through grid cells ­ Fast ­ Incremental A B C D E F Only check primitives

  17. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  18. Period measurement by accelerating observers

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-07-04

    We consider the problem of the period measurement in the case of the following scenarios: stationary source of successive light signals and accelerating receiver, stationary receiver and accelerating source of successive light signals and stationary machine gun that fires successive bullets received by an accelerating receiver. The accelerated motion is the hyperbolic one.

  19. Solar Flares and particle acceleration

    E-print Network

    Solar Flares and particle acceleration Eduard Kontar School of Physics and Astronomy University and accelerated particles #12;Solar flares and accelerated particles From Emslie et al., 2004, 2005 Free magnetic Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI is designed to investigate particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares

  20. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  1. Materials for Accelerator Technologies Beyond the Niobium Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Lance; Larbalestier, David; Ghosh, Arup; Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Three niobium-based materials make up the entire present portfolio of superconducting technology for accelerators: Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet wires and pure niobium for RF cavities. Because these materials are at a high level of maturity, limits imposed by the boundaries of their superconductivity constrain the energy reach of accelerators to several TeV. We sketch here a plan for targeted development of emerging higher field and higher temperature superconductors that could enable accelerators at significantly higher energies. Niobium-based superconductors are the crucial enablers of present accelerators. The Nb-Ti LHC dipole and quadrupole wires, with transition temperature T{sub c} of 9 K and upper critical field H{sub c2} of 15 T, represent the highest form of superconductor strand art: massive, quarter-ton conductor billets are drawn from 300 mm diameter to {approx}1 mm as a single, multi-kilometer-long piece, while retaining uniformity of the several thousand Nb-Ti filaments to within 5% at the scale of a few micrometers. Strands are twisted into fully transposed cables with virtually no loss, preserving a carefully tuned nanostructure that generates the high flux-pinning forces and high current densities to enable high magnetic fields. Nb{sub 3}Sn, with twice the T{sub c} and H{sub c2}, is now approaching this level of conductor art, where over the last 5 years the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the Next European Dipole (NED) program have demonstrated that Nb{sub 3}Sn can be made into 4 meter long quadrupoles with 12 T fields and 250 T/m gradients. Linear accelerators at TJNAF, ORNL (SNS), and under construction for the European XFEL exploit niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology, with gradients at {approx}20 MV/m. Tremendous research and development is underway to realize high-power goals for Project X at FNAL and for a possible ILC at 35 MV/m gradients. Despite these impressive achievements, the very maturity of these niobium-based technologies makes them incapable of additional leaps from the several-TeV scale. Nb-Ti is already nearly perfect and operates at the limit of the superconducting phase. Further perfection of Nb cavities and Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets might provide 50 % growth in energy, based on proof-of-principle demonstrations that approach theoretical limits, e.g. 52 MV/m gradient in re-entrant Nb cavities and 18 T dipoles made from Nb3Sn strand. However, operation close to superconducting margins is risky, and cost tradeoffs to execute such a high degrees of perfection are likely to be negative.

  2. Photon acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trines, R. M. G. M.

    2007-07-01

    If the index of a refraction of a dispersive medium, such as a plasma, changes in time, it can be used to change the frequency of light propagating through the medium. This effect is called photon acceleration. It has been predicted in both theory and simulations, and also been demonstrated experimentally for the case of moving ionization fronts in gases (the so-called ionization blueshift) as well as for laser-driven wakefields. Here, we present studies of photon acceleration in laser-driven plasma wakefields. The unique spectral characteristics of this process will be discussed, to distinguish it from e.g. photon acceleration by ionization fronts, frequency domain interferometry or self-phase modulation. The dynamics of the photons in laser-wakefield interaction are studied through both regular particle-in-cell and wave-kinetic simulations. The latter approach provides a powerful, versatile, and easy-to-use method to track the propagation of individual spectral components, providing new insight into the physics of laser-plasma interaction. Theory, simulations and experimental results will be brought together to provide a full understanding of the dynamics of a laser pulse in its own wakefield. Even though the wave-kinetic approach mentioned above has mainly been developed for the description of laser-plasma interaction, it can be applied to a much wider range of fast wave-slow wave interaction processes: Langmuir waves-ion acoustic waves, drift waves-zonal flow, Rossby waves-zonal flow, or even photons-gravitational waves. Several recent results in these areas will be shown, often with surprising results.

  3. Fermi acceleration in astrophysical jets

    E-print Network

    Frank M. Rieger; Valenti Bosch-Ramon; Peter Duffy

    2006-10-05

    We consider the acceleration of energetic particles by Fermi processes (i.e., diffusive shock acceleration, second order Fermi acceleration, and gradual shear acceleration) in relativistic astrophysical jets, with particular attention given to recent progress in the field of viscous shear acceleration. We analyze the associated acceleration timescales and the resulting particle distributions, and discuss the relevance of these processes for the acceleration of charged particles in the jets of AGNs, GRBs and microquasars, showing that multi-component powerlaw-type particle distributions are likely to occur.

  4. Issues regarding acceleration in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cline, D.B.; Gabella, W.E. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-01

    Both self-acceleration and laser-acoustic acceleration in crystals are considered. The conduction electrons in the crystal are treated as a plasma and are the medium through which the acceleration takes place. Self-acceleration is the possible acceleration of part of a bunch due to plasma oscillations driven by the leading part. Laser- acoustic acceleration uses a laser in quasi-resonance with an acoustic wave to pump up the plasma oscillation to accelerate a beam. Self-driven schemes though experimentally simple seem problematic because single bunch densities must be large.

  5. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  6. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  7. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Polosky, Marc A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  8. A laboratory support framework based on a networked knowledge representation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cédric Boey; Vincent Raman; Marc Jaumain; Frédéric Robert

    We present a computer-based environment (or framework) called AUTONOMY specifically targeted to support and accelerate individual student learning during laboratory sessions. This environment result s from several years of analysis of electronics labor atories at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Applied Scien ce Faculty. This framework basically allows the student to simultaneously: • follow the laboratory protocol, • browse several

  9. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  10. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  11. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B. [Franklin Scientific Services (work performed while Mr. Franklin was employed by Defence Research Establishment Atlantic); Barry, P.J. [Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, P.O. Box 1012, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Z7 (CANADA)

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. The Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex of LNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A. [INFN Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    Heavy ion beams are delivered at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro by the accelerator complex Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE. The Tandem XTU is a Van de Graaff accelerator normally operated at terminal voltages of up to about 15 MV. The Tandem accelerator can be operated in stand-alone mode or as an injector for the linac booster ALPI. The linear accelerator ALPI is built of superconducting resonant cavities and consists of a low-beta branch, particularly important for the acceleration of the heavier mass ions, a medium-beta branch, and a high-beta branch. ALPI can be operated also with the PIAVE injector that consists of a superconducting linac and an ECR source. The PIAVE source was mainly used for the acceleration of intense noble gas beams but most recently also a first metallic beam was delivered to the users. The accelerator complex delivers beams of ions from protons to gold in three experimental areas on 11 different beam lines. A rich scientific activity is ongoing at the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex, beam time being shared between nuclear physics research and applied and interdisciplinary physics research. An overview of the present status and perspectives of the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE complex and its physics program is given in the present paper.

  13. Load Schedule Coordination for a Large Linear Accelerator: An Operation Powerplay Concept

    E-print Network

    Johnson, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    -power from Federal power projects, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Los Alamos, New Mexico. With this variation, only the portion of LANL's total load requirement for the Linear Accelerator at the Meson Physics Facility is targeted...

  14. New results on searches for new physics beyond the standard model in the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. V., E-mail: alexei.popov@ihep.r [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-15

    The latest results obtained from searches for particles and phenomena beyond the Standard Model (new physics) in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA] on the basis of a statistical sample corresponding to an accumulated luminosity of 1 to 3 fb{sup -1} in 2008 are considered.

  15. Acceleration Disturbances onboard of Geodetic Precision Space Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Jakob, Flury; Schlicht, Anja

    Bartlomiej Oszczak, b@dgps.pl University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland, Olsztyn, Poland Olga Maciejczyk, omaciejczyk@gmail.com Poland In this paper there is presented the study on the parameters of the ASG-EUPOS real-time RTK service NAWGEO such as: accuracy, availability, integrity and continuity. Author's model is used for tests. These parameters enable determination of the quality of received information and practical applications of the service. Paper includes also the subject related to the NAWGEO service and algorithms used in determination of mentioned parameters. The results of accuracy and precision analyses and study on availability demonstrated that NAWGEO service enables a user a position determination with a few centimeters accuracy with high probability in any moment of time.

  16. Collider Accelerator Department/ SNS Ring Systems BROOKHA VEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    -QA-IO. ASTM-A240-89B ASTM-A380-88 ASTM-A480/480M ASTM-E498-90 BNL Seller Quality Assurance Analyzer in the Tracer Probe Mode- Method A Spec.SNS Ring Systems-OO11 Page2 of7 #12;ASTM-A700-8l Standard Practices for Packaging, Marking, and Loading Methods for SteelProductsfor Domestic Shipment ASTM-A249/249M

  17. THE ACCELERATOR TUBE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME AT DARESBURY LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    - nium to ceramic were soon established. However a harder alloy of titanium which had a better resis to thermal expansion imba- lance and a more reliable method of welding to the end electrode was developed the prototype titanium-glass tube described at the 1973 SNEAP Conference [2]. The resistors are metal oxide

  18. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Física, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S., E-mail: win_unac@hotmail.com, E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br, E-mail: winfried.zimdahl@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Grupo de Física Teórica, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km 60, Campus de São Mateus, CEP 29932-540, São Mateus, Espírito Santo (Brazil)

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ?CDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  19. Medical uses of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of particle accelerators have either potential or already demonstrated uses in connection with medically-related research, diagnosis, and treatment. For cancer radiotherapy, nuclear particles including protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and negative pi mesons have advantages compared to conventional radiations in terms of dose localization and/or biological effectiveness. Clinical evaluations of these particles are underway at a number of institutions. Accelerator-produced radionuclides are in widespread use for research and routine diagnostic purposes. Elemental analysis techniques with charged particles and neutrons are being applied to bone, blood, and other tissues. Finally, low-dose medical imaging can be accomplished with accelerated protons and heavy ions. The status and future of these programs are discussed.

  20. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  1. The munich accelerator for fission fragments (MAFF)

    SciTech Connect

    Kester, Oliver; Habs, Dietrich; Gross, Martin; Sieber, Thomas; Bongers, Henning; Kolbe, Alfred; Maier, Hans Juergen; Thirolf, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Egidy, Till von; Koester, Ulli; Steichele, Erich; Kienle, Paul; Koerner, Hans Joachim [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schempp, Alwin [J. W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Ratzinger, Ulrich [GSI, Postfach 110552, 64220 Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-04-26

    An accelerator (MAFF) for the new Munich high flux reactor FRM-II is under design in order to deliver intense beams of very neutron-rich fission fragments of up to 10{sup 12} particles per second with final energies between 3.7 and 5.9 MeV/u to perform experiments for the production of heavy elements. To obtain an efficient acceleration in a short LINAC, charge breeding of the 1{sup +}-ion beam from the reactor to a q/A{>=}0.16 is required. New measurements with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) have shown that the requirements for a low duty cycle LINAC (10%) can be fulfilled by the ECRIS. To reach a high flexibility in the final energy with a small number of structures, new kinds of IH-structures are under development at the Munich tandem laboratory.

  2. Residual activation of thin accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Rakhno, E.I.; /North Central Coll.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A method to calculate residual activation of thin accelerator components is presented. A model for residual dose estimation for thick objects made of arbitrary composite materials for arbitrary irradiation and cooling times is employed in this study. A scaling procedure is described to apply the model to thin objects with linear dimensions less than a fraction of a nuclear interaction length. The scaling has been performed for various materials and corresponding factors have been determined for objects of certain shapes (slab, solid and hollow cylinder) which are important from practical standpoint and can serve as models for beam pipes, magnets and collimators. Both contact residual dose and dose attenuation in air outside the objects were considered. A comparison between calculations and measurements performed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a 120 GeV proton beam is presented.

  3. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  4. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  5. Transient electromagnetic modeling of the ZR accelerator water convolute and stack.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehr, Jane Marie; Elizondo-Decanini, Juan Manuel; Turner, C. David; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Bohnhoff, William J.; Pointon, Timothy David; Pasik, Michael Francis; Johnson, William Arthur; Savage, Mark Edward

    2005-06-01

    The ZR accelerator is a refurbishment of Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator [1]. The ZR accelerator components were designed using electrostatic and circuit modeling tools. Transient electromagnetic modeling has played a complementary role in the analysis of ZR components [2]. In this paper we describe a 3D transient electromagnetic analysis of the ZR water convolute and stack using edge-based finite element techniques.

  6. Laser driven ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, P.

    2007-07-01

    The different acceleration mechanisms of ion acceleration from a foil irradiated by a short-pulse laser are briefly discussed, i.e., the backward and forward ion acceleration from the front side, the forward ion acceleration from the rear side, and the shock acceleration inside the target itself. A particular attention is then given to the forward ion acceleration from the rear side, as it appears presently as the most efficient mechanism. Fast electrons are first created at the front side of a thin foil by the laser-plasma interaction, then propagate through the target and build a charge separation field at the rear side. The corresponding electric field ionizes atoms and accelerates ions. The paradigm for the plasma expansion is the self-similar quasi-neutral expansion of an isothermal semi-infinite plasma into a vacuum that is first presented together with the resultant energy spectrum. The analysis of the conditions of validity of the quasi-neutrality assumption enables to determine the structure of the ion front and the maximum ion velocity as a function of time. Various effects are then discussed which may modify the ion spectrum with respect to the simple model : (i) Electron cooling (finite plasma slab case) : the thermal electron energy is progressively converted into the kinetic energy of the ions. The ion spectrum now converges when time goes to infinity in contrast with the isothermal semi-infinite plasma case. (ii) Two-phase model : a refined model is presented, where the electron temperature first rises together with the laser pulse intensity, and then decreases adiabatically while the energy is transferred to the ions. (iii) Two-temperature electron distribution function : as expected, the high energy part of the spectrum is governed by the hot electron component (iv) Existence of a finite initial ion density gradient : a wave breaking of the ion flow occurs after a finite time, with the formation of an ion front. When electron cooling is taken into account, and when the initial ion density scale length lss is larger than a few percent of the total plasma slab width, the final maximum ion velocity decreases with lss. (v) Multispecies ions: optimisation of the target structure can lead to the acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic light ions (especially protons).

  7. A Smoother Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Chapman

    2009-03-01

    Some may argue that gifted children have many education options, but these options do not always help gifted students learn science. Unfortunately, gifted students often do not reach their full academic potential--they are frequently less motivated to succeed because they are not being academically challenged in regular classrooms (McCoach and Siegle 2003). To counter these problems, a strong option for educating gifted students is acceleration. This article describes the challenges that more and more gifted students face when accelerating, particularly when skipping an entire academic year. Strategies to lessen their intensity and duration and, ultimately, help gifted students to succeed are also included.

  8. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  9. An accelerator technology legacy

    SciTech Connect

    Heighway, E.A.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerator technology has been a major beneficiary of the investment made over the last decade. It is the intention of this paper to provide the reader with a glimpse of the broad nature of those advances. Development has been on a broad front and this paper can highlight only a few of those. Two spin-off applications will be outlined -- a concept for a compact, active, beam probe for solar body exploration and the concept for an accelerator-driven transmutation system for energy production.

  10. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  11. Photocathodes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Gray, E.R.; Giles, P.M.; Springer, R.W.; Loebs, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Some electron accelerator applications require bursts of short pulses at high microscopic repetition rates and high peak brightness. A photocathode, illuminated by a mode-locked laser, is well suited to filling this need. The intrinsic brightness of a photoemitter beam is high; experiments are under way at Los Alamos to study the brightness of short bunches with high space charge after acceleration. A laser-illuminated Cs/sub 3/Sb photoemitter is located in the first rf cavity of an injector linac. Diagnostics include a pepper-pot emittance analyzer, a magnetic spectrometer, and a streak camera.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF A PLASMA WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR USING MULTIPLE ELECTRON BUNCHES

    E-print Network

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF A PLASMA WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR USING MULTIPLE ELECTRON BUNCHES E. Kallos, T bunches in order to drive a plasma wave. The experiments were performed at the Accelerator Test Facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory where 5 8 equidistant bunches with a spacing that was varied between 100 250 m

  13. Design of accelerated corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Eriksson; Bo Carlsson; I. O. Wallinder

    2001-01-01

    Two new accelerated laboratory corrosion tests for electronic components in automotive applications have been developed, based on the use of metallic copper as a meter for corrosivity. The accelerated tests are designed so that they reproduce the same kind of corrosion effects as observed with exposure of copper in real vehicle environments. The test cycle that best simulates the corrosion

  14. On the g/2 Acceleration of a Pulse in a Vertical Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Theodore; van Wyngaarden, Willem; Cary, Arthur; Mottmann, John

    2013-01-01

    We have frequently enhanced our department's laboratory experiment involving standing transverse waves in a taut horizontal cord. In addition to the standard experiment, students in these labs investigate the surprising concept that the acceleration of a pulse in a chain hanging vertically is a constant and is equal to half the acceleration

  15. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerating Structure as a Source of Terahertz Coherent Cerenkov Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Cook; J. B. Rosenzweig; M. C. Thompson; H. Badakov; G. Travish; R. Tikhoplav; O. B. Williams; R. J. England

    2006-01-01

    We discuss future experimental work proposed to study the performance of a cylindrical dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a coherent Cerenkov radiation source at the Neptune laboratory at UCLA. The Cerenkov wakefield acceleration experiment carried out recently by UCLA\\/SLAC\\/USC, using the ultrashort and high charge beam (Q = 3 nC, sigmaz = 20 micron) at the SLAC FFTB, demonstrated electromagnetic

  16. Accelerating Shock Waves in a Laser-produced Density Gradient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romain Teyssier; Dmitri Ryutov; Bruce Remington

    2000-01-01

    We study the possibility of creating decreasing density gradients under laboratory conditions using high-energy lasers. The idea is to study the propagation of shock waves in such laser-produced ``atmospheres'' in order to test theories on shock acceleration and shock front stability. We investigate theoretically two experimental designs that could address this question. We consider first the case of a discrete,

  17. PLASMA WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION EXPERIMENTS USING TWO SUBPICOSECOND ELECTRON BUNCHES*

    E-print Network

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    PLASMA WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION EXPERIMENTS USING TWO SUBPICOSECOND ELECTRON BUNCHES* P. Muggli,#,1 W, USA 3 Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA Abstract Two subpicosecond electron bunches (PWFA) model indicates the net wakefield produced by the bunches will depend on their relative charge

  18. Acceleration feedback control for a flexible manipulator arm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul T. Kotnik; Stephen Yurkovich; U. Ozguner

    1988-01-01

    The authors report laboratory results for a single-link flexible manipulator arm in which three separate control strategies are compared and contrasted: compensation using classical root locus techniques with endpoint position feedback, a full state feedback observer-based design, and compensation using endpoint acceleration feedback. The last technique, using accelerometer feedback, has received little attention to date. The presented results indicate great

  19. An Accelerator Instrumentation and Control System Using CAMAC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Klaisner; J. M. Jr. Stephenson

    1971-01-01

    The 8 GeV Booster Synchrotron, presently under construction at the National Accelerator Laboratory, is controlled by a computer based system, which has been implemented using the CAMAC Standard for data handling systems. The design philosophy and the hardware for the control system are described.

  20. Accelerating Cancer Research Using Semantics-Driven Technology James Brenton

    E-print Network

    Jeavons, Peter

    Accelerating Cancer Research Using Semantics-Driven Technology James Brenton , Jim Davies , Jeremy Gibbons , and Steve Harris Cambridge Research Institute, Cancer Research UK Oxford University Computing Laboratory Abstract We are embarking on a project to increase the rate of progress in clinical cancer

  1. GeV plasma accelerators driven in waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, S.M.; Brunetti, E.; Esarey, E.; Gallacher, J.G.; Geddes,C.G.R.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Jaroszynski, D.A.; Kamperidis, C.; Kneip, S.; Krushelnick, K.; Leemans, W.P.; Mangles, S.P.D.; Murphy, C.D.; Nagler,B.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, K.; Norreys, P.A.; Panasenko, D.; Rowlands-Rees, T.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Trines, R.

    2007-11-01

    During the last few years laser-driven plasma acceleratorshave been shown to generate quasi-monoenergetic electron beams withenergies up to several hundred MeV. Extending the output energy oflaser-driven plasma accelerators to the GeV range requires operation atplasma densities an order of magnitude lower, i.e. 1018 cm-3, andincreasing the distance over which acceleration is maintained from a fewmillimetres to a few tens of millimetres. One approach for achieving thisis to guide the driving laser pulse in the plasma channel formed in agas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We present transverseinterferometric measurements of the evolution of the plasma channelformed and compare these measurements with models of the capillarydischarge. We describe in detail experiments performed at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory inwhich plasma accelerators were driven within this type of waveguide togenerate quasimonoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1GeV.

  2. Virtual Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-04-27

    The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

  3. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  4. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  5. European particle accelerator conference

    SciTech Connect

    Tazzari, S.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following topics: The LEP project, Superconducting RF cavities for accelerator application, Commissioning of super-ACO, Pulsed high-power beams, RF Power sources, Astrid, A storage ring for ions and electrons, Linear collider studies in Europe.

  6. Acceleration and Mass

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    Although this lab is not an inquiry activity, it is very important in learning about acceleration and mass. It is a deeply held misconception among students that objects of different masses fall at different rates. Simply explaining that this is not true

  7. Photon acceleration in vacuum

    E-print Network

    J. T. Mendonca; M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; G. Brodin

    2006-08-16

    A new process associated with the nonlinear optical properties of the electromagnetic vacuum, as predicted by quantum electrodynamics, is described. This can be called photon acceleration in vacuum, and corresponds to the frequency shift that takes place when a given test photon interacts with an intense beam of background radiation.

  8. Plasma based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.G.

    1987-05-05

    A plasma medium can support a variety of wave motions which may be useful for accelerating charged particles. For highly relativistic beams the longitudinal electrostatic wave is most suitable and may be driven by laser or by particle beams. The basic principles, limitations and prospects for these devices are discussed.

  9. ACCELERATED CONSTRUCTION IN IOWA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Abu-Hawash; Norman L. McDonald; James S. Nelson

    2007-01-01

    Recent transportation legislation has emphasized the need for increasing safety and reducing congestion in the construction zone and has provided incentive funding to help state DOTs achieve these goals. One proven strategy is to shorten the construction duration by utilizing prefabricated elements. The Innovative Bridge Research and Construction program gave Iowa the opportunity to demonstrate construction acceleration on two projects,

  10. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  11. Inductive Plasma Accelerator (IPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Slough, John

    2005-10-01

    The Inductive Plasma Accelerator (IPA) is a plasma accelerator/interaction experiment currently under constuction at MSNW. The accelerator will be capable of launching a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid having a mass of up to 0.2 mg with a diameter no larger than about 10 cm. In addition, the accelerator will be designed to attain plasma/plasmoid velocities up to 300 km/s while maintaining high uniformity and purity. Two IPAs will be arranged on a test bed to perform FRC merging experiments. In addition, an interaction chamber will be constucted to produce and implode a plasma liner for enhanced compression experiments on the merged FRCs thus providing the first experimental test of the plasma liner fusion concept. 2D MHD simulations show expected densities of > 10^22 m-3 with ion temperatures in excess of 800 eV for the merging FRCs. The status of design and construction of the experiment and additional simulation results will be presented

  12. Electrodynamics of accelerated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, John Christian

    The standard theory for accelerated observers relies on the premise that measurements can be made instantaneously or, equivalently, over a time interval where the change in the observer's velocity is negligible i.e. the hypothesis of locality. This theory provides good agreement with experiment for most cases. However, for very large accelerations this local theory should diverge from experimental results. This work considers measurements of frequency where the velocity of the observer appreciably changes during the time of the measurement. This is done through a numerical Fourier analysis of a pulse of electromagnetic radiation. When this is done, the frequency spectra seen by these accelerated observers have a much more complex structure than under the standard theory. Also, in this work, the phenomenon of helicity-rotation coupling is considered and some of the observation consequences of the coupling of the spin of the particle with the rotation of a gravitational source will be examined. Although at present most experiments can not produce accelerations large enough to diverge from the standard theory, recent advances in laser technology, such as Chirped Pulse Amplification, may soon allow the non-standard theory to be tested. It is in expectation of this that this work has been done.

  13. Accelerator and transport line survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are introduced and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations. Various approaches to smoothing used at major laboratories are discussed. 47 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. [Accelerated titration design].

    PubMed

    Minami, H

    2000-09-01

    To reduce the number of patients treated at low and biologically inactive doses in phase I trials of anticancer agents, attempts to decrease the number of patients per dose level and to conduct a larger dose escalation have been made. Among them, accelerated titration designs were proposed and evaluated by simulation; designs 2 and 4 were reported to be acceptable (J Natl Cancer Inst 89: 1138-1147, 1997). Both designs 2 and 4 included only one patient per cohort during the initial accelerated phase. Dosage steps for the accelerated phase were defined using the modified Fibonacci method for design 2 and 100% escalation for design 4, respectively. The accelerated phase continued until one patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity or two patients experienced grade 2 toxicities. Dose escalation was conducted based on the information from the first course in design 2 and from the first three courses in design 4. In the simulation, both designs successfully reduced the total number of patients and the number of undertreated patients without increasing the number of overtreated patients. However, the safety of design 4 was assured as long as all patients received three courses of chemotherapy, which is unusual in phase I studies in Japan. Decision-making on dose escalation based on the information on toxicity in three courses might be cumbersome. Therefore, in Japan, design 2 would be recommended among the proposed accelerated designs. The performance of the design should be investigated by applying it to actual phase I studies and by evaluating the number of undertreated and overtreated patients. PMID:11016010

  15. Preliminary description of the ground test accelerator cryogenic cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of the Neutral Particle Beam Program supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office. The GTA is a full-sized test facility to evaluate the feasibility of using a negative ion accelerator to produce a neutral particle beam (NPB). The NPB would ultimately be used outside the earth's atmosphere as a target discriminator or as a directed energy weapon. The operation of the GTA at cryogenic temperature is advantageous for two reasons: first, the decrease of temperature caused a corresponding decrease in the rf heating of the copper in the various units of the accelerator, and second, at the lower temperature the decrease in the thermal expansion coefficient also provides greater thermal stability and consequently, better operating stability for the accelerator. This paper discusses the cryogenic cooling system needed to achieve these advantages. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Dust Accelerators And Their Applications In High-Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Wang Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H846, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Although much effort has been devoted to getting rid of the dust nuisance, there are instances where a controlled use of dust can be beneficial. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  17. Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ticos, Catakin M [NILPRP, ROMANIA

    2010-01-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  18. Constellation Acceleration Study December 18, 2008

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    Constellation Acceleration Study Report December 18, 2008 #12;Constellation Acceleration Study ........................................................................................................... 31 #12;Constellation Acceleration Study Report 12/18/08 Executive Summary In 2004, the White House

  19. A review of accelerator concepts for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Toepfer, A.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) is a facility under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for conducting explosively-driven hydrodynamic experiments. The major diagnostic tool at AHF will be a radiography accelerator having radiation output capable of penetrating very dense dynamic objects on multiple viewing axes with multiple pulses on each axis, each pulse having a time resolution capable of freezing object motion ({approx}50-ns) and achieving a spatial resolution {approx}1 mm at the object. Three accelerator technologies are being considered for AHF by the DOE national laboratories at Los Alamos (LANL), Livermore (LLNL), and Sandia (SNL). Two of these are electron accelerators that will produce intense x-ray pulses from a converter target yielding a dose {approx}1,000--2,000 Rads {at} 1 meter. LLNL has proposed a 16--20 MeV, 3--6 kA linear induction accelerator (LIA) driven by FET-switched modulators driving metglas loaded cavities. SNL has proposed a 12-MeV, 40-kA Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerator based on HERMES III pulsed power technology. The third option is a 25--50-GeV proton accelerator capable of {approx}10{sup 13} protons/pulse proposed by LANL. This paper will review the current status of the three accelerator concepts for AHF.

  20. Principles of Charged Particle Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This learning resources comprise a healthy introduction to charged particle acceleration. The site, by Stanley Humphries, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at University of New Mexico, amounts to an online textbook (.pdf) introducing the theory of charged particle acceleration. The book's fifteen chapters (with bibliography) summarize "the principles underlying all particle accelerators" and provide "a reference collection of equations and material essential to accelerator development and beam applications."

  1. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-print Network

    Yves A. Gallant

    2002-01-15

    I review the current status of Fermi acceleration theory at relativistic shocks. I first discuss the relativistic shock jump conditions, then describe the non-relativistic Fermi mechanism and the differences introduced by relativistic flows. I present numerical calculations of the accelerated particle spectrum, and examine the maximum energy attainable by this process. I briefly consider the minimum energy for Fermi acceleration, and a possible electron pre-acceleration mechanism.

  2. Calibration of rotational acceleration for the rotarod test of rodent motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, Martin; Cameron, Andy; Metten, Pamela; Crabbe, John C.; Wahlsten, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The latency of mice and rats to fall from the accelerating rotarod can differ markedly between laboratories using the same brand of rod as well as between studies using different kinds of rods. These discrepancies can arise from different rod diameters, surface textures, test protocols, or laboratory environmental factors beyond the test itself, but it is also possible that the actual acceleration rates of the different rods do not correspond to the nominal rates set on the devices. This paper describes a simple method to measure acceleration rate of the rotarod and to set the rate to a desired value for any brand of rod. PMID:19041892

  3. I Investigation of Pellet Acceleration

    E-print Network

    I Investigation of Pellet Acceleration by an Arc heated Gas Gun An Interim Report INVESTIGATION OP PELLET ACCELERATION BY AN ARC HEATED GAS GUN* An Interim Report on the Investigations carried above those obtained so far. An experimental setup designed for a study of acceleration of 3 mm0 pellets

  4. Microwave techniques for diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Leong, A S

    1993-01-01

    Microwaves (MWs) were first introduced as a method of fixation just over 20 years ago. In recent years their use has extended far beyond that of a safe, clean and rapid method of fixation of tissue blocks and large specimens, including brains. MWs accelerate the action of cross-linking fixatives and can greatly accelerate the various stages of tissue processing to produce a paraffin block in 30 min. An extensive range of ultrafast MW-stimulated special stains has been developed, and immunohistochemical procedures can be completed in 20 min by employing MWs. Cellular antigens are distinctly better preserved in tissues fixed by MWs than by conventional cross-linking fixatives. Also, the cytomorphology of cryostat sections irradiated in Wolman's solution is clearly improved. MWs can similarly be applied for fixation and staining of preparations for transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and they also greatly accelerate polymerisation of resins. In the current climate of cost containment, this wide range of applications makes the MW oven an invaluable addition to the diagnostic laboratory. PMID:8287207

  5. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data were combined with one-dimensional conservation relations to yield information on the energy deposition ratio in a parallel-plate accelerator, where the downstream flow was confined to a constant area channel. Approximately 70% of the total input power was detected in the exhaust flow, of which only about 20% appeared as directed kinetic energy, thus implying that a downstream expansion to convert chamber enthalpy into kinetic energy must be an important aspect of conventional high power MPD arcs. Spectroscopic experiments on a quasi-steady MPD argon accelerator verified the presence of A(III) and the absence of A(I), and indicated an azimuthal structure in the jet related to the mass injection locations. Measurements of pressure in the arc chamber and impact pressure in the exhaust jet using a piezocrystal backed by a Plexiglas rod were in good agreement with the electromagnetic thrust model.

  6. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  7. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jachim, Stephen P. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  8. Review of ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1990-06-01

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

  9. Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.

    2004-10-25

    The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K{sup +} beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25{micro} C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designed to produce a 2{micro}s rectangular 1 Ampere C{sub s}{sup +} beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K{sup +}, was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1mm radius spot at a distance of 10m. Almost all subsequent work and the present concept have invoked multiple beams. For HEDP the major differences are that the focal distance can be centimeters instead of meters, provided strong-enough lenses exist and they do, thereby allowing much higher transverse and longitudinal emittances than driver concepts, and focusing parallel small beams is easier than one big beam.

  10. D-2 acceleration characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Hans; Bluemel, U.

    1994-07-01

    During the second German Spacelab Mission D-2, extensive onboard measurements of the residual acceleration were performed. The payload was equipped with accelerometer packages distributed over the entire Spacelab module. The microgravity measurement assembly (MMA) was the core system comprising fixed mounted as well as mobile sensor packages. Additional autonomous accelerometer systems were mounted within the payload elements MEDEA and Werkstofflabor. On-board video recording has been performed to correlate the measured accelerations to mission events. The D-2 microgravity characterization program also included numerical calculations to predict low frequency effects due to atmospheric drag, tidal force, and spacecraft rotation. Results of characteristic quiet mission phases show that the microgravity level is essentially below the requirements defined for the space station. Other results of some other mission phases revealed that a wealth can be done by improving payload design and operation to improve the microgravity quality of Spacelab missions.

  11. NEW ACCELERATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    But a glance at the Livingston chart, Fig. 1, of accelerator particle energy as a function of time shows that the energy has steadily, exponentially, increased. Equally significant is the fact that this increase is the envelope of diverse technologies. If one is to stay on, or even near, the Livingston curve in future years then new acceleration techniques need to be developed. What are the new acceleration methods? In these two lectures I would like to sketch some of these new ideas. I am well aware that they will probably not result in high energy accelerators within this or the next decade, but conversely, it is likely that these ideas will form the basis for the accelerators of the next century. Anyway, the ideas are stimulating and suffice to show that accelerator physicists are not just 'engineers', but genuine scientists deserving to be welcomed into the company of high energy physicists. I believe that outsiders will find this field surprisingly fertile and, certainly fun. To put it more personally, I very much enjoy working in this field and lecturing on it. There are a number of review articles which should be consulted for references to the original literature. In addition there are three books on the subject. Given this material, I feel free to not completely reference the material in the remainder of this article; consultation of the review articles and books will be adequate as an introduction to the literature for references abound (hundreds are given). At last, by way of introduction, I should like to quote from the end of Ref. 2 for I think the remarks made there are most germane. Remember that the talk was addressed to accelerator physicists: 'Finally, it is often said, I think by physicists who are not well-informed, that accelerator builders have used up their capital and now are bereft of ideas, and as a result, high energy physics will eventually--rather soon, in fact--come to a halt. After all, one can't build too many machines greater than 27 km, and soon one will run out of space or money (almost surely money before space). This argument seems terribly wrong to me, and worse than that possibly destructive, for it will have a serious effect if it causes, as it well might, young people to elect to go into fields other than high energy physics. The proper response, I believe, is to point--in considerable detail--to some of the new concepts which show by example that we are far from being out of new ideas. Some of these concepts shall, in my view, be, or lead to, the 'stocks in trade' of the next century, and thus they will allow high energy physics to be as exciting then as it is now. It is our job to make it all happen.

  12. Plasma wave accelerator. II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, W.; Joshi, C.; Dawson, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    It was shown that the insertion of a cross magnetic field prevents the particles from getting out of phase with the electric field of the plasma wave in the beat wave accelerator scheme. Thus, using a CO/sub 2/ laser, n/sub c//n/sub e/ = (..omega../sub 0//..omega../sub p/)/sup 2/ approx. 35, and a 300 kG magnetic field, electrons can be (in principle) accelerated to 100 GeV in 2 meters. For comparison without the magnetic field, the same energies may be obtained in a n/sub c//n/sub e/ approx. 10/sup 5/ plasma over a distance of 100 meters.

  13. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  14. A laser accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Colson; S. K. Ride

    1979-01-01

    We show that a laser can efficiently accelerate charged particles if a magnetic field is introduced to improve the coupling\\u000a between the particle and the wave. Solving the relativistic equations of motion for an electron in a uniform magnetic field\\u000a and superposed, circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, we find that in energy-position phase space an electron traces\\u000a out a curtate cycloid:

  15. Transient cosmic acceleration

    E-print Network

    J. S. Alcaniz

    2009-11-05

    We explore cosmological consequences of two quintessence models in which the current cosmic acceleration is a transient phenomenon. We argue that one of them (in which the EoS parameter switches from freezing to thawing regimes) may reconcile the slight preference of observational data for freezing potentials with the impossibility of defining observables in String/M-theory due to the existence of a cosmological event horizon in asymptotically de Sitter universes.

  16. Progress of RIBF accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Kamigaito, O.

    2012-12-01

    In order to greatly expand scientific opportunities with radioactive isotope (RI) beams, RIKEN has constructed a new heavy-ion accelerator facility, called "RI Beam Factory (RIBF)." Three new ring cyclotrons with K-values of 570 MeV, 980 MeV, and 2600 MeV, respectively, boost the energies of the output beams from the existing K540-MeV ring cyclotron up to 440 MeV/u for light ions and 345 MeV/u for very heavy ions. These energetic heavy-ion beams are converted into intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams via projectile fragmentation of stable isotopes or in-flight fission of uranium isotopes by a superconducting fragment separator, BigRIPS. The three ring cyclotrons were commissioned in 2006, and RI beams from uranium were first obtained in 2007. The beam intensities and available ion species are increasing at RIBF, owing to the continuous efforts that have been made since the first beam. So far, we have accelerated deuteron, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum, calcium, zinc, krypton, xenon, and uranium beams with the superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC). The extracted beam intensities reached 1000 pnA for the helium and oxygen beams, and the calcium beam intensity exceeded 400 pnA recently. The intensities of the xenon and uranium beams are also increasing; they reached 24 and 3.6 pnA, respectively. This paper illustrates the construction, commissioning, and various improvements carried out for the RIBF accelerators, as well as the present accelerator performance.

  17. Frontiers of accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1992-08-01

    New technology has permitted significant performance improvements of established instrumentation techniques including beam position and profile monitoring. Fundamentally new profile monitor strategies are required for the next generation of accelerators, especially linear colliders (LC). Beams in these machines may be three orders of magnitude smaller than typical beams in present colliders. In this paper we review both the present performance levels achieved by conventional systems and present some new ideas for future colliders.

  18. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a ``multi-track`` simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  19. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a multi-track'' simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  20. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  1. Transient cosmic acceleration

    E-print Network

    Alcaniz, J S

    2009-01-01

    We explore cosmological consequences of two quintessence models in which the current cosmic acceleration is a transient phenomenon. We argue that one of them (in which the EoS parameter switches from freezing to thawing regimes) may reconcile the slight preference of observational data for freezing potentials with the impossibility of defining observables in String/M-theory due to the existence of a cosmological event horizon in asymptotically de Sitter universes.

  2. Whence particle acceleration

    E-print Network

    Medvedev, M V

    2009-01-01

    We discuss how the electrons in relativistic GRB shocks can reach near-equipartition in energy with the protons. We emphasize the non-Fermi origin of such acceleration. We argue that the dynamics of the electrons in the foreshock region and at the shock front plays an important role. We also demonstrate that PIC simulations can directly probe this physics in the regimes relevant to GRBs.

  3. The Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab; Zisman, Mike; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-08-01

    Multi-TeV Muon Colliders and high intensity Neutrino Factories have captured the imagination of the particle physics community. These new types of facility both require an advanced muon source capable of producing O(10{sup 21}) muons per year. The muons must be captured within bunches, and their phase space manipulated so that they fit within the acceptance of an accelerator. In a Neutrino Factory (NF), muons from this 'front end' are accelerated to a few GeV or a few tens of GeV, and then injected into a storage ring with long straight sections. Muon decays in the straight sections produce an intense neutrino beam. In a Muon Collider (MC) the muons must be cooled by a factor O(10{sup 6}) to produce beams that are sufficiently bright to give high luminosity in the collider. Bunches of positive and negative muons are then accelerated to high energy, and injected in opposite directions into a collider ring in which they collide at one or more interaction points. Over the last decade our understanding of the concepts and technologies needed for Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories has advanced, and it is now believed that, within a few years, with a well focused R&D effort (i) a Neutrino Factory could be proposed, and (ii) enough could be known about the technologies needed for a Muon Collider to assess the feasibility and cost of this new type of facility, and to make a detailed plan for the remaining R&D. Although these next NF and MC steps are achievable, they are also ambitious, and will require an efficient and dedicated organization to accomplish the desired goals with limited resources. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has recently been created to propose and execute this R&D program.

  4. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the “multiple segment Viterbi” (MSV) algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call “sparse rescaling”. These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches. PMID:22039361

  5. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A

  6. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route - an example of technology transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Martin

    1989-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A

  7. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  8. "DIANA" - A New, Deep-Underground Accelerator Facility for Astrophysics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Leitner, D.; Lemut, A.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

    2009-05-28

    The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility 1.4 km below ground. DIANA is part of the US proposal DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) to establish a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory in the former gold mine of Homestake in South Dakota, USA. DIANA would consist of two high-current accelerators, a 30 to 400 kV variable, high-voltage platform, and a second, dynamitron accelerator with a voltage range of 350 kV to 3 MV. As a unique feature, both accelerators are planned to be equipped with either high-current microwave ion sources or multi-charged ECR ion sources producing ions from protons to oxygen. Electrostatic quadrupole transport elements will be incorporated in the dynamitron high voltage column. Compared to current astrophysics facilities, DIANA could increase the available beam densities on target by magnitudes: up to 100 mA on the low energy accelerator and several mA on the high energy accelerator. An integral part of the DIANA project is the development of a high-density super-sonic gas-jet target which can handle these anticipated beam powers. The paper will explain the main components of the DIANA accelerators and their beam transport lines and will discuss related technical challenges.

  9. Acceleration in Linear and Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellington, S. H.; Docherty, W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a simple accelerometer and explains its use in demonstrating acceleration, deceleration, constant speed, measurement of acceleration, acceleration and the inclined plane and angular and radial acceleration. (GS)

  10. Auditory localization under sustained +Gz acceleration.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W T; Bolia, R S; Tripp, L D

    2001-01-01

    The ability to localize a virtual sound source in the horizontal plane was evaluated under varying levels of sustained (+Gz) acceleration. Participants were required to judge the locations of spatialized noise bursts in the horizontal plane (elevation 0 degrees) during exposure to 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 4.0, 5.5, and 7.0 +Gz. The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Dynamic Environment Simulator, a three-axis centrifuge. No significant increases in localization error were found between 1.0 and 5.5 +Gz; however, a significant increase did occur at the 7.0 +Gz level. In addition, the percentage of front/back confusions did not vary as a function of +Gz level. Collectively, these results indicate that the ability to localize virtual sound sources is well maintained at various levels of sustained acceleration. Actual or potential applications include the incorporation of spatial audio displays into the human-computer interface for vehicles that are operated in acceleration environments. PMID:11592670

  11. Accelerators for Discovery Science and Security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, A. M. M.; Bluem, H. P.; Jarvis, J. D.; Park, J. H.; Rathke, J. W.; Schultheiss, T. J.

    2015-05-01

    Several Advanced Energy Systems (AES) accelerator projects that span applications in Discovery Science and Security are described. The design and performance of the IR and THz free electron laser (FEL) at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin that is now an operating user facility for physical chemistry research in molecular and cluster spectroscopy as well as surface science, is highlighted. The device was designed to meet challenging specifications, including a final energy adjustable in the range of 15-50 MeV, low longitudinal emittance (<50 keV-psec) and transverse emittance (<20 ? mm-mrad), at more than 200 pC bunch charge with a micropulse repetition rate of 1 GHz and a macropulse length of up to 15 ?s. Secondly, we will describe an ongoing effort to develop an ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) source that is scheduled for completion in 2015 with prototype testing taking place at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). This tabletop X-band system will find application in time-resolved chemical imaging and as a resource for drug-cell interaction analysis. A third active area at AES is accelerators for security applications where we will cover some top-level aspects of THz and X-ray systems that are under development and in testing for stand-off and portal detection.

  12. Switching system for the FXR accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpetti, R.D.; Parkinson, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A switching system has been designed for a 20 MeV flash x-ray linear induction accelerator which is being built at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The switching system fans out a single command pulse and amplifies it to obtain the voltage necessary for reliable, low-jitter triggering of the accelerator components. This system consists of two major subsystems: (1) the Blumlein Charging Subsystem which first triggers thirteen Marx generators, and then charges 54 water-filled Blumleins, and (2) the Blumlein Triggering Subsystem which triggers the already-charged Blumleins to produce a 90 nanosecond, 400 kV pulse in each of 54 ferrite-loaded accelerator modules. The first subsystem consists of charged high voltage cabling with two parallel switch gaps either of which will trigger the Marx generators. The major components of the second subsystem are three stages of switch gaps along with the necessary high voltage cabling. Two parallel first stage switch gaps trigger thirteen second stage gaps, which in turn trigger 54 third stage Blumlein switch gaps synchronous with the passage of the electron beam pulse. These spark gaps are operated at a voltage of 150 to 350 kV with a 1/3 hertz repetition rate. Varying the cable lengths creates the actual delay times in the triggering of each component. Redundancy is built into the system to insure the high reliability which is essential for the flash radiography application.

  13. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  14. Autonomous dynamic displacement estimation from data fusion of acceleration and intermittent displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhee; Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the importance of displacement measurement of structural responses in the field of structural health monitoring, this paper presents an autonomous algorithm for dynamic displacement estimation from acceleration integration fused with displacement data intermittently measured. The presented acceleration integration algorithm of multi-rate Kalman filtering distinguishes itself from the past study in the literature by explicitly considering acceleration measurement bias. Furthermore, the algorithm is formulated by unique state definition of integration errors and error dynamics system modeling. To showcase performance of the algorithm, a series of laboratory dynamic experiments for measuring structural responses of acceleration and displacement are conducted. Improved results are demonstrated through comparison between the proposed and past study.

  15. Operational and design aspects of accelerators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Seidel, Mike

    2015-03-01

    Originally, the typical particle accelerators as well as their associated beam transport equipment were designed for particle and nuclear physics research and applications in isotope production. In the past few decades, such accelerators and related equipment have also been applied for medical use. This can be in the original physics laboratory environment, but for the past 20 years also in hospital-based or purely clinical environments for particle therapy. The most important specific requirements of accelerators for radiation therapy with protons or ions will be discussed. The focus will be on accelerator design, operational, and formal aspects. We will discuss the special requirements to reach a high reliability for patient treatments as well as an accurate delivery of the dose at the correct position in the patient using modern techniques like pencil beam scanning. It will be shown that the technical requirements, safety aspects, and required reliability of the accelerated beam differ substantially from those in a nuclear physics laboratory. It will be shown that this difference has significant implications on the safety and interlock systems. The operation of such a medical facility should be possible by nonaccelerator specialists at different operating sites (treatment rooms). The organization and role of the control and interlock systems can be considered as being the most crucially important issue, and therefore a special, dedicated design is absolutely necessary in a facility providing particle therapy.

  16. BotEC: Spacecraft Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barb Tewksbury

    Question Suppose someone offered you a ride to the nearest star in a new spacecraft that could travel at half the speed of light, or about 150,000 km/second. In order to reach such a cruising speed, you and the spacecraft must accelerate from a standstill to half the speed of light. Acceleration means uncomfortable (and maybe even fatal!) "g" forces, that pressed-into-the-seat feeling you get when a car or airplane accelerates. More than 3 g's of acceleration are tough to take for very long, so your spacecraft's engines are designed to accelerate you at not more than 29 meters/second/second (3 times the acceleration due to gravity at the Earth's surface). How long will it take you and your spacecraft to accelerate to half light speed?

  17. Acceleration of magnetized plasma rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1982-11-16

    One scheme is considered, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focussing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force F/sub a/ = kappa U/sub m//R (kappa < 1) increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  18. 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Clancy, Ted

    Systems #12;5MIT Lincoln Laboratory Space Surveillance Example Research Areas Asteroid Detection Bio and Decision Support (Secure ­ Countermeasure Resistant) Space Control Air and Missile Defense Technology · About the Laboratory ­ Overview ­ Research Areas ­ Demographics · The MQP program ­ Logistics

  19. Studies of Multipactor in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Structures: Comparison of Simulation Results with Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    In this paper new results of numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures are presented. The results are compared with experimental data obtained during recent studies of such structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs, LLC. Good agreement between the theory and experiment was observed for the structures with larger inner diameter, however the structures with smaller inner diameter demonstrated a discrepancy between the two. Possible reasons for such discrepancy are discussed.

  20. Free-electron laser results from the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Miller, J.L.; Weir, J.T.; Chong, Y.P.; Chambers, F.; Deis, G.A.; Paul, A.C.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Hallbach, K.

    1988-10-01

    PALADIN is a 10.6-..mu..m FEL amplifier experiment operating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Advanced Test Accelerator, an induction linear accelerator designed to produce a 45-MeV, 10-kA electron beam. With a 15-m long wiggler, PALADIN demonstrated 27 dB of exponential gain from a 14-kW input signal. With a 5-MW input signal, the amplifier saturated after 10 dB of gain. The exponentially growing signal in the unsaturated amplifier was clearly seen to be gain guided by the electron beam. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Overview of Laser-Plasma Acceleration Programs in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-11-04

    With many high power laser systems ranging from a few TW to multi-100 TW installed in some laboratories in Asia, significant progress on laser-driven wakefield acceleration of electrons has been achieved. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from tens of MeV to nearly GeV has been demonstrated. Several programs for ion/proton acceleration aiming at potential medical applications are running or planned based upon their significant theoretical and numerical findings. There are quite a few collaborations existing among Asian research groups.

  2. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  3. An expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Searfus, R.M.; Hernandez, J.E.

    1989-01-12

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  4. THE 13TH ADVANCED ACCELERATOR CONCEPTS WORKSHOP (AAC'8)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley; Schroder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric

    2008-07-15

    The Thirteenth Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) was held from July 27 to August 2, 2008 at the Chaminade Conference Center in Santa Cruz, California, USA, organized by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley. There were unprecedented levels of interest in the 2008 AAC Workshop, and participation was by invitation, with 215 workshop attendees, including 58 students. Reflecting the world-wide growth of the advanced accelerator community, there was significant international participation, with participants from twelve countries attending.

  5. Accelerating structure design and fabrication for KIPT and PAL XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Mi; He, Xiang; Pei, Shi-Lun; Na, Bin; Chi, Yun-Long

    2015-05-01

    ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) and the National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics Technology” (NSC KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine) jointly propose to design and build a 100 MeV/100 kW linear accelerator which will be used to drive the neutron source subcritical assembly. The linac has almost finished assembly in KIPT by a team from the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP, Beijing, China). The design and measurement result of the accelerating system of the linac will be described in this paper.

  6. Tevatron Run II Series at the Enrico Fermi Laboratory (USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Moore

    2002-01-01

    The Run II Tevatron series at the Enrico Fermi Laboratory was started in March 2001. Numerous improvements to the accelerator complex were made in order to ensure operation of the proton–antiproton Tevatron accelerator with peak luminosity (2–4)·1032 cm–2·sec–1 and to obtain a total luminosity above 5 fb–1 before the LHC physical program starts. The current status of the Run II

  7. Radiative shocks: New results for laboratory astrophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Vinci; M. Koenig; A. Benuzzi-Mounaix; N. Ozaki; A. Ravasio; L. Boireau; C. Michaut; S. Bouquet; S. Atzeni; A. Schiavi; O. Peyrusse

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the Laboratory Astrophysics, we present new radiative shocks experiments performed using the LULI2000 facility. A strong shock is driven in a multi-layered solid target (CH-Ti-CH) which accelerates into a gas cell (˜ 60 km\\/s) filled with Xenon at low pressure (0.1 - 0.3 bar) and produces a radiative supercritical shock [4, 8]. A low power laser

  8. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-04-21

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment.

  9. Low energy demonstration accelerator technical area 53

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The resulting Record of Decision (ROD) determined that over the next three years the DOE would follow a dual-track acquisition strategy that assures tritium production for the nuclear weapon stockpile in a rapid, cost effective, and safe manner. Under this strategy the DOE will further investigate and compare two options for producing tritium: (1) purchase of an existing commercial light-water reactor or irradiation services with an option to purchase the reactor for conversion to a defense facility; and (2) design, build, and test critical components of a system for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The final decision to select the primary production option will be made by the Secretary of Energy in the October 1998 time frame. The alternative not chosen as the primary production method, if feasible, would be developed as a back-up tritium supply source. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end low-energy section of the accelerator, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. The following issues were evaluated for the proposed action: utility demands, air, human health, environmental restoration, waste management, transportation, water, threatened and endangered species, wetlands, cultural resources, and environmental justice.

  10. Accelerator driven assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Balderas; M. Cappiello; C. E. Cummings; R. Davidson

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposal to build a pulsed neutron source for simulating nuclear-weapons effects. A point design for the pulsed neutron facility was initiated early in FY94 after hosting a Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) panel review and after subsequently visiting several potential clients and users. The technical and facility designs contained herein fulfill the

  11. Particle Acceleration by MHD Turbulence

    E-print Network

    Jungyeon Cho; A. Lazarian

    2005-10-21

    Recent advances in understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence call for revisions in the picture of particle acceleration. We make use of the recently established scaling of slow and fast MHD modes in strong and weak MHD turbulence to provide a systematic study of particle acceleration in magnetic pressure (low-$\\beta$) and gaseous pressure (high-$\\beta$) dominated plasmas. We consider the acceleration by large scale compressions in both slow and fast particle diffusion limits. We compare the results with the acceleration rate that arises from resonance scattering and Transit-Time Damping (TTD). We establish that fast modes accelerate particles more efficiently than slow modes. We find that particle acceleration by pitch-angle scattering and TTD dominates acceleration by slow or fast modes when the spatial diffusion rate is small. When the rate of spatial diffusion of particles is high, we establish an enhancement of the efficiency of particle acceleration by slow and fast modes in weak turbulence. We show that highly supersonic turbulence is an efficient agent for particle acceleration. We find that even incompressible turbulence can accelerate particles on the scales comparable with the particle mean free path.

  12. Laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-05-15

    This review article highlights the tremendous evolution of the research on laser plasma accelerators which has, in record time, led to the production of high quality electron beams at the GeV level, using compact laser systems. I will describe the path we followed to explore different injection schemes and I will present the most significant breakthrough which allowed us to generate stable, high peak current and high quality electron beams, with control of the charge, of the relative energy spread and of the electron energy.

  13. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is funded by the Office of Science for the United States Department of Energy (DoE) with strong support from the City of Newport News, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the United States Congress. As a user facility for scientists worldwide, its primary mission is to conduct basic research of the atomâ??s nucleus at the quark level. The page features information of different scientific programs, public connections and information on the Jefferson Lab in its working form.

  14. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  15. Kinematics: Speed, Velocity & Acceleration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The following resource is a NFL sponsored, National Science Foundation funded program intended to teach students about scientific concepts by using the popular sport of Football. Each lesson is accompanied by an informative and fast paced video. In this lesson, students will explore kinematics on the playing field. NSF-funded scientists Tony Schmitz from the University of Florida and John Ziegert of Clemson University explain how the kinematic concepts of position, velocity and acceleration can be used to define how a running back moves.

  16. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  17. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Birx; L. L. Reginato

    1984-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that

  18. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  19. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  20. Effects of acceleration on gait measures in three horse gaits.

    PubMed

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Zarski, Lila; Aerts, Peter; Clayton, Hilary

    2015-05-01

    Animals switch gaits according to locomotor speed. In terrestrial locomotion, gaits have been defined according to footfall patterns or differences in center of mass (COM) motion, which characterizes mechanisms that are more general and more predictive than footfall patterns. This has generated different variables designed primarily to evaluate steady-speed locomotion, which is easier to standardize in laboratory conditions. However, in the ecology of an animal, steady-state conditions are rare and the ability to accelerate, decelerate and turn is essential. Currently, there are no data available that have tested whether COM variables can be used in accelerative or decelerative conditions. This study used a data set of kinematics and kinetics of horses using three gaits (walk, trot, canter) to evaluate the effects of acceleration (both positive and negative) on commonly used gait descriptors. The goal was to identify variables that distinguish between gaits both at steady state and during acceleration/deceleration. These variables will either be unaffected by acceleration or affected by it in a predictable way. Congruity, phase shift and COM velocity angle did not distinguish between gaits when the dataset included trials in unsteady conditions. Work (positive and negative) and energy recovery distinguished between gaits and showed a clear relationship with acceleration. Hodographs are interesting graphical representations to study COM mechanics, but they are descriptive rather than quantitative. Force angle, collision angle and collision fraction showed a U-shaped relationship with acceleration and seem promising tools for future research in unsteady conditions. PMID:25767145

  1. Empirical evidence for acceleration-dependent amplification factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Site-specific amplification factors, Fa and Fv, used in current U.S. building codes decrease with increasing base acceleration level as implied by the Loma Prieta earthquake at 0.1g and extrapolated using numerical models and laboratory results. The Northridge earthquake recordings of 17 January 1994 and subsequent geotechnical data permit empirical estimates of amplification at base acceleration levels up to 0.5g. Distance measures and normalization procedures used to infer amplification ratios from soil-rock pairs in predetermined azimuth-distance bins significantly influence the dependence of amplification estimates on base acceleration. Factors inferred using a hypocentral distance norm do not show a statistically significant dependence on base acceleration. Factors inferred using norms implied by the attenuation functions of Abrahamson and Silva show a statistically significant decrease with increasing base acceleration. The decrease is statistically more significant for stiff clay and sandy soil (site class D) sites than for stiffer sites underlain by gravely soils and soft rock (site class C). The decrease in amplification with increasing base acceleration is more pronounced for the short-period amplification factor, Fa, than for the midperiod factor, Fv.

  2. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  3. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  4. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  5. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  6. Nb3Sn accelerator magnet development around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Lamm

    2003-06-23

    During the past 30 years superconducting magnet systems have enabled accelerators to achieve energies and luminosities that would have been impractical if not impossible with resistive magnets. By far, NbTi has been the preferred conductor for this application because of its ductility and insensitivity of Jc to mechanical strain. This is despite the fact that Nb{sub 3}Sn has a more favorable Jc vs. B dependence and can operate at much higher temperatures. Unfortunately, NbTi conductor is reaching the limit of it usefulness for high field applications. Despite incremental increases in Jc and operation at superfluid temperatures, magnets are limited to approximately a 10 T field. Improvements in conductor performance combined with future requirements for accelerator magnets to have bore fields greater than 10 T or operate in areas of large beam-induced heat loads now make Nb{sub 3}Sn look attractive. Thus, laboratories in several countries are actively engaged in programs to develop Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets for future accelerator applications. A summary of this important research activity is presented along with a brief history of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnet development and a discussion of requirements for future accelerator magnets.

  7. Testbeam and laboratory test results of irradiated 3D CMS pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubna, Mayur; Alagoz, Enver; Cervantes, Mayra; Krzywda, Alex; Arndt, Kirk; Obertino, Margherita; Solano, Ada; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Menace, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Rivera, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Andresen, Jeff; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boscardin, Maurizio; Marie Brom, Jean; Brosius, Richard; Chramowicz, John; Cumalat, John; Dinardo, Mauro; Dini, Paolo; Jensen, Frank; Kumar, Ashish; Kwan, Simon; Lei, C. M.; Povoli, Marco; Prosser, Alan; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Perera, Lalith; Shipsey, Ian; Tan, Ping; Tentindo, Silvia; Terzo, Stefano; Tran, Nhan; Wagner, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    The CMS silicon pixel detector is the tracking device closest to the LHC p-p collisions, which precisely reconstructs the charged particle trajectories. The planar technology used in the current innermost layer of the pixel detector will reach the design limit for radiation hardness at the end of Phase I upgrade and will need to be replaced before the Phase II upgrade in 2020. Due to its unprecedented performance in harsh radiation environments, 3D silicon technology is under consideration as a possible replacement of planar technology for the High Luminosity-LHC or HL-LHC. 3D silicon detectors are fabricated by the Deep Reactive-Ion-Etching (DRIE) technique which allows p- and n-type electrodes to be processed through the silicon substrate as opposed to being implanted through the silicon surface. The 3D CMS pixel devices presented in this paper were processed at FBK. They were bump bonded to the current CMS pixel readout chip, tested in the laboratory, and testbeams carried out at FNAL with the proton beam of 120 GeV/c. In this paper we present the laboratory and beam test results for the irradiated 3D CMS pixel devices.

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  9. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, October 1, 1987--March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification -- both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  10. A Summary of the Quasi-Steady Acceleration Environment on-Board STS-94 (MSL-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin M.; Nati, Maurizio; Touboul, Pierre; Schuette, Andreas; Sablon, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The continuous free-fall state of a low Earth orbit experienced by NASA's Orbiters results in a unique reduced gravity environment. While microgravity science experiments are conducted in this reduced gravity environment, various accelerometer systems measure and record the microgravity acceleration environment for real-time and post-flight correlation with microgravity science data. This overall microgravity acceleration environment is comprised of quasi-steady, oscillatory, and transient contributions. The First Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) payload was dedicated to experiments studying various microgravity science disciplines, including combustion, fluid physics, and materials processing. In support of the MSL-1 payload, two systems capable of measuring the quasi-steady acceleration environment were flown: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA) system's Accelerometre Spatiale Triaxiale most evident in the quasi-steady acceleration regime. Utilizing such quasi-steady events, a comparison and summary of the quasi-steady acceleration environment for STS-94 will be presented

  11. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  12. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  13. Accelerator Technology for the Mankind

    E-print Network

    Sultansoy, S

    2006-01-01

    Particle accelerators technology is one of the generic technologies which is locomotive of the development in almost all fields of science and technology. According to the U.S. Department of Energy: "Accelerators underpin every activity of the Office of Science and, increasingly, of the entire scientific enterprise. From biology to medicine, from materials to metallurgy, from elementary particles to the cosmos, accelerators provide the microscopic information that forms the basis for scientific understanding and applications. The combination of ground and satellite based observatories and particle accelerators will advance our understanding of our world, our galaxy, our universe, and ourselves." Because of this, accelerator technology should become widespread all over the world. Existing situation shows that a large portion of the world, namely the South and Mid-East, is poor on the accelerator technology. UNESCO has recognized this deficit and started SESAME project in Mid-East, namely Jordan. Turkic Acceler...

  14. International Aspects of Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The development of particle accelerators -- an activity that started about 1930 and is still on-going -- is very much an international activity. There have been international contributions to this development all along the way. The result is remarkably effective accelerators, for many different activities, spread throughout the world. Because many don't appreciate this story and, furthermore, that it is very much worthy of explicit recognition, this session and this talk have been organized. In the talk, a survey will be made of the start of accelerators: electrostatic machines, cyclotrons, betatrons, linacs, synchrotrons, and colliders. Then a brief survey will be given of the more important contributions to particle accelerators. For each of these concepts we shall discuss the physics behind the concept, the origin of the concept, and the places where development and implementation took place. Some of the various applications of accelerators will then be presented. Finally we shall show, in broad terms, the present distribution of particle accelerators.

  15. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  16. Acceleration in de Sitter spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Ion I. Cotaescu

    2015-02-23

    We propose a definition of uniform accelerated frames in de Sitter spacetimes applying the Nachtmann method of introducing coordinates using suitable point-dependent isometries. In order to recover the well-known Rindler approach in the flat limit, we require the transformation between the static frame and the accelerated one to depend continuously on acceleration, obtaining thus the natural generalization of the Rindler transformation to the de Sitter spacetimes of any dimensions.

  17. Coherent Acceleration of Material Wavepackets

    E-print Network

    Farhan Saif; Pierre Meystre

    2006-08-16

    We study the quantum dynamics of a material wavepacket bouncing off a modulated atomic mirror in the presence of a gravitational field. We find the occurrence of coherent accelerated dynamics for atoms. The acceleration takes place for certain initial phase space data and within specific windows of modulation strengths. The realization of the proposed acceleration scheme is within the range of present day experimental possibilities.

  18. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  19. Coherent Acceleration of Material Wavepackets

    E-print Network

    Saif, F; Saif, Farhan; Meystre, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a material wavepacket bouncing off a modulated atomic mirror in the presence of a gravitational field. We find the occurrence of coherent accelerated dynamics for atoms. The acceleration takes place for certain initial phase space data and within specific windows of modulation strengths. The realization of the proposed acceleration scheme is within the range of present day experimental possibilities.

  20. Progress in advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-08-01

    A review is given of recent progress in this field, drawing heavily upon material presented at the Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts, The Abbey, June 12--18, 1994. Attention is addressed to (1) plasma based concepts, (2) photo-cathodes, (3) radio frequency sources and Two-Beam Accelerators, (4) near and far-field schemes (including collective accelerators), (5) beam handling and conditioning, and (6) exotic collider concepts (such as photon colliders and muon colliders).

  1. Length measurement in accelerated systems

    E-print Network

    Bahram Mashhoon; Uwe Muench

    2002-06-27

    We investigate the limitations of length measurements by accelerated observers in Minkowski spacetime brought about via the hypothesis of locality, namely, the assumption that an accelerated observer at each instant is equivalent to an otherwise identical momentarily comoving inertial observer. We find that consistency can be achieved only in a rather limited neighborhood around the observer with linear dimensions that are negligibly small compared to the characteristic acceleration length of the observer.

  2. Basic concepts in plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Robert

    2006-03-15

    In this article, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high-energy plasma accelerators. With the development of compact short pulse high-brightness lasers and electron and positron beams, new areas of studies for laser/particle beam-matter interactions is opening up. A number of methods are being pursued vigorously to achieve ultra-high-acceleration gradients. These include the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) mechanism which uses conventional long pulse ( approximately 100 ps) modest intensity lasers (I approximately 10(14)-10(16) W cm(-2)), the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) which uses the new breed of compact high-brightness lasers (<1 ps) and intensities >10(18) W cm(-2), self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SMLWFA) concept which combines elements of stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) and electron acceleration by nonlinear plasma waves excited by relativistic electron and positron bunches the plasma wakefield accelerator. In the ultra-high intensity regime, laser/particle beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear and relativistic, leading to new phenomenon such as the plasma wakefield excitation for particle acceleration, relativistic self-focusing and guiding of laser beams, high-harmonic generation, acceleration of electrons, positrons, protons and photons. Fields greater than 1 GV cm(-1) have been generated with monoenergetic particle beams accelerated to about 100 MeV in millimetre distances recorded. Plasma wakefields driven by both electron and positron beams at the Stanford linear accelerator centre (SLAC) facility have accelerated the tail of the beams. PMID:16483948

  3. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-print Network

    in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer state feedback controller for endpoint position control in the face of flexibility effects for a flexible joint mounted on the SRV-02DC servomotor. For this, we will use the state space model

  4. NDCX-II, A New Induction Linear Accelerator for Warm Dense Matter Research

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Bieniosek, F.; Kwan, J.; Logan, G.; Waldron, W.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Sharp, B.; Gilson, E.; Davidson, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), is currently constructing a new induction linear accelerator, called Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment NDCX-II. The accelerator design makes effective use of existing components from LLNL's decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), especially induction cells and Blumlein voltage sources that have been transferred to LBNL. We have developed an aggressive acceleration 'schedule' that compresses the emitted ion pulse from 500 ns to 1 ns in just 15 meters. In the nominal design concept, 30 nC of Li{sup +} are accelerated to 3.5 MeV and allowed to drift-compress to a peak current of about 30 A. That beam will be utilized for warm dense matter experiments investigating the interaction of ion beams with matter at high temperature and pressure. Construction of the accelerator will be complete within a period of approximately two and a half years and will provide a worldwide unique opportunity for ion-driven warm dense matter experiments as well as research related to novel beam manipulations for heavy ion fusion drivers.

  5. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  6. Acceleration and the fifth dimension

    E-print Network

    Culetu, Hristu

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between accelerated motion and a noncompact 5th dimension is proposed. The curvature invariants and the stress energy tensor in the bulk depend only on the 5th dimension $w$ and vanish asymptotically while the proper acceleration of a static observer is proportional to $1/w$. The brane (located at $w = w_{0}$) metric is conformally flat (of AdS type) with $\\Lambda = -3/w_{0}^{2}$ and the invariant acceleration $a = \\sqrt{a^{b}a_{b}} = 1/w_{0}$. Therefore, we assume that a hyperbolic observer with the rest-system acceleration $a$ is embedded in the 5th dimension at $w_{0} = 1/a$.

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF A PROTOTYPE COARSE PARTICLE CONCENTRATOR FOR INHALATION TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES. (R825270)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the development and laboratory characterization of a prototype slit nozzle virtual impactor that can be used to concentrate coarse particles. A variety of physical design and flow parameters were evaluated including different acceleration and collection sli...

  8. Energy Release, Acceleration, and Escape of Solar Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Ireland, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Young, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are prodigious producers of energetic particles, and thus a rich laboratory for studying particle acceleration. The acceleration occurs through the release of magnetic energy, a significant fraction of which can go into the acceleration of particles. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) certainly produce shocks that both accelerate particles and provide a mechanism for escape into the interplanetary medium (IP). What is less well understood is whether accelerated particles produced from the flare reconnection process escape, and if so, how these same particles are related to solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in-situ. Energetic electron SEPs have been shown to be correlated with Type III radio bursts, hard X-ray emission, and EUV jets, making a very strong case for the connection between acceleration at the flare and escape along open magnetic field lines. Because there has not been a clear signature of ion escape, as is the case with the Type III radio emission for electrons, sorting out the avenues of escape for accelerated flare ions and the possible origin of the impulsive SEPs continues to be a major challenge. The key to building a clear picture of particle escape relies on the ability to map signatures of escape such as EUV jets at the Sun and to follow the progression of these escape signatures as they evolve in time. Furthermore, nuclear ?-ray emissions provide critical context relating ion acceleration to that of escape. With the advent observations from Fermi as well as RHESSI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the challenge of ion escape from the Sun can now be addressed. We present a preliminary study of the relationship of EUV jets with nuclear ?-ray emission and Type III radio observations and discuss the implications for possible magnetic topologies that allow for ion escape from deep inside the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  9. Lepton accelerators and radiation sources: R and D investment at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Hart, M.; Hastings, J.; Johnson, E.; Krinsky, S.; Palmer, R.; Yu, L.H.

    1997-03-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has shown its determination to remain at the forefront of accelerator based science through its continued investment in long range accelerator R and D. The laboratory has a broad program in accelerator technology development including projects such as high {Tc} magnets at RHIC, Siberian Snakes at the AGS, brightness upgrades on the NSLS storage ring, and spallation source R and D in several departments. This report focuses on a segment of the overall program: the lepton accelerator and coherent radiation source R and D at the laboratory. These efforts are aimed at (1) development of high brightness electron beams, (2) novel acceleration techniques, (3) seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL) development, and (4) R and D for a muon collider. To pursue these objectives, BNL ha over the past decade introduced new organizational arrangements. The BNL Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) is an interdepartmental unit dedicated to promoting R and D which, cannot be readily conducted within the programs of operating facilities. The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is managed by CAP and NSLS as a user facility dedicated to accelerator and beam physics problems of interest to both the High Energy Physics and Basic Energy Sciences programs of the DOE. Capitalizing on these efforts, the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) was established by the NSLS to facilitate coordinated development of sources and experiments to produce and utilize coherent sub-picosecond synchrotron radiation. This White Paper describes the programs being pursued at CAP, ATF and SDL aimed at advancing basic knowledge of lepton accelerators and picosecond radiation sources.

  10. LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of conservation. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Apply that you will be doing these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. The purpose

  11. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  12. The Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research Underground - CASPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2014-03-01

    An accelerator laboratory (CASPAR) to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is being constructed by a collaboration lead by South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The study of alpha induced reactions of astrophysical interest in a quasi-background free environment is the goal of the laboratory. Specifically, neutron producing reactions for the s-process will be investigated. This process is responsible for the nucleosynthesis of half of the the elements heavier than iron. An outline of CASPAR, its timeline and scientific goals will be presented.

  13. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  14. The Radiological Research Accelerator THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-print Network

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility #12;84 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR transformation of an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEP2D) using single doses of 150 keV/µm 4 made using single doses (0.6 Gy) of 5.9-MeV neutrons given at various intervals after mitotic shake

  15. Neutron Transport Methods for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas Tsoulfanidis; Elmer Lewis

    2005-02-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop computational methods that will enable more effective analysis of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The work is centered at the University of Missouri at Rolla, with a subcontract at Northwestern University, and close cooperation with the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The work has fallen into three categories. First, the treatment of the source for neutrons originating from the spallation target which drives the neutronics calculations of the ADS. Second, the generalization of the nodal variational method to treat the R-Z geometry configurations frequently needed for scoping calculations in Accelerator Driven Systems. Third, the treatment of void regions within variational nodal methods as needed to treat the accelerator beam tube.

  16. Accelerator technology program. Status report, July-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A. (comp.)

    1984-05-01

    Major projects of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division are discussed, covering activities that occurred during the last six months of calendar 1982. The first sections report highlights in beam dynamics, accelerator inertial fusion, radio-frequency structure development, the racetrack microtron, CERN high-energy physics experiment NA-12, and high-flux radiographic linac study. Next we report on selected proton Storage Ring activities that have made significant progress during this reporting period, followed by an update on the free electron laser. The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility work is discussed next, then progress on the klystron development project and on the gyrocon project. The activities of the newly formed Theory and Simulation Group are outlined. The last section covers activities concerning the accelerator test stand for the neutral particle beam program.

  17. Structural system identification in time domain using measured acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo Sung; Park, Seung-Keun; Shin, Soobong; Lee, Hae Sung

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a system identification scheme in time domain to estimate stiffness and damping parameters of a structure using measured acceleration. An error function is defined as the time integral of the least-squared errors between measured accelerations and calculated accelerations by a numerical model of a structure. To alleviate the ill-posedness of SI problems a regularization technique is employed and a new regularization function for the time-domain SI is proposed. The regularization factor is determined by the geometric mean scheme. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by a numerical simulation study on a two-span truss bridge and by an experimental laboratory study on a three-story shear building model.

  18. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  19. Industrial Hygiene and Safety Controls at a 1.5?MeV Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. X. KORTSHA

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses radiological safety measures built into a 1.5?MeV electron beam accelerator at the General Motors Research Laboratories. The accelerator is used to study the interaction of electrons with plastic materials. The safety features described represent the type of precautions taken over and above legal requirements and include the results of experience gained in other installations.

  20. Pulsed electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurements of the power deposited in the anode of a multimegawatt MPD accelerator using thermocouples attached to a thin shell anode reveal a dramatic decrease in the fractional anode power from 50% at 200 KW input power to less than 10% at 20 MW power. The corresponding local power flux peak at a value of 10,000 W/sq cm at the lip of the anode exhaust orifice, a distribution traced to a corresponding peak in the local current density at the anode. A comparison of voltage-current characteristics and spectral photographs of the MPD discharge using quartz, boron nitride and plexiglas insulators with various mass injection configurations led to the identification of different voltage modes and regions of ablation free operation. The technique of piezoelectric impact pressure measurement in the MPD exhaust flow was refined to account for the effects due to probe yaw angle.

  1. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Eric R.; Hogan, Mark J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  2. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present universities and national laboratories. In Italy these may include INFN Frascati and the University of Pisa, in the United States SLAC, LBNL, BNL and several universities, in France IN2P3, LAPP, and Grenoble, in Russia BINP, in Poland Krakow University, and in the UK the Cockcroft Institute. The construction time for this collider is a total of about four years. The new tunnel can be bored in about a year. The new accelerator components can be built and installed in about 4 years. The shipping of components from PEP-II at SLAC to Italy will take about a year. A new linac and damping ring complex for the injector for the rings can be built in about three years. The commissioning of this new accelerator will take about a year including the new electron and positron sources, new linac, new damping ring, new beam transport lines, two new collider rings and the Interaction Region. The new particle physics detector can be commissioned simultaneously with the accelerator. Once beam collisions start for particle physics, the luminosity will increase with time, likely reaching full design specifications after about two to three years of operation. After construction, the operation of the collider will be the responsibility of the Italian INFN governmental agency. The intent is to run this accelerator about ten months each year with about one month for accelerator turn-on and nine months for colliding beams. The collider will need to operate for about 10 years to provide the required 50 ab{sup -1} requested by the detector collaboration. Both beams as anticipated in this collider will have properties that are excellent for use as sources for synchrotron radiation (SR). The expected photon properties are comparable to those of PETRA-3 or NSLS-II. The beam lines and user facilities needed to carry out this SR program are being investigated.

  3. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ghosh; A. Jain; J. Muratore; B. Parker; W. Sampson; P. Wanderer; E. Willen

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being

  4. A multi-purpose computing center: FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Fermilab Computing Center is described with a special emphasis given to the scientific computing systems and the data storage and archiving systems. The scope and focus of this paper is the Fermilab scientific computing facility. It does not cover, or does not cover very well, related issues such as data Grids, cloud computing and storage, commercial storage, data integrity, authorization, access rates, and novel storage technologies. These are all important considerations in discussing data centers and should be kept in mind when one explores issues related to computing centers and long-term data storage.

  5. Coherent instabilities at the FNAL Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.; Burov, A.; Pellico, W.; Yang, X.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents results of experimental and theoretical investigations of transverse beam stability at injection to Fermilab Booster and discusses a novel scheme for transition crossing allowing to avoid the longitudinal emittance growth related to the transition. At reduced chromaticity a multibunch high order head-tail mode develops with growth time of 12 turns at fractional part of tune close to zero. An estimate of the growth rate based on known sources of impedance results in significantly smaller value and cannot explain observed instability growth rate.

  6. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  7. Steering algorithms for a small recirculating heavy-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Hemandez, G.W.

    1997-11-07

    Beam-steering algorithms are proposed for a small recirculating induction accelerator being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The principal problem is that the transverse position and velocity of the beam must be inferred from capacitive position monitors, and this determination is complicated by the limited probe resolution and by the lattice errors within steering modules. The fluid/envelope code CIRCE is used to evaluate these algorithms.

  8. Saturn: A large area X-ray simulation accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. D. Bloomquist; R. W. Stinnett; D. H. McDaniel; J. R. Lee; A. W. Sharpe; J. A. Halbleib; L. G. Schlitt; P. W. Spence; P. Corcoran

    1987-01-01

    Saturn is the result of a major metamorphosis of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I) from an ICF research facility to the large-area X-ray source of the Simulation Technology Laboratory (STL) project. Renamed Saturn, for its unique multiple-ring diode design, the facility is designed to take advantage of the numerous advances in pulsed power technology. Saturn will include significant upgrades

  9. TRACY: A tool for accelerator design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Hiroshi

    1988-06-01

    A simulation code TRACY has been developed for accelerator design and analysis. The code can be used for lattice design work simulation of magnet misalignments, closed orbit calculations and corrections, undulator calculations and particle tracking. TRACY has been used extensively for single particle simulations for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source now under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in Toyota Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Part of the US Department of Transportation investigation of Toyota sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) involved analysis of the throttle control software, JPL Laboratory for Reliable Software applied several techniques including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software; A handful of logic models were build, Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found; The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  11. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kroll, N. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  12. Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Pardo; F. G. Kondev; S. Kondrashev; C. Nair; T. Palchan; R. Scott; D. Seweryniak; R. Vondrasek; M. Paul; P. Collon; C. Deibel; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti; J. Berg; J. Fonnesbeck; G. Imel

    2013-01-01

    A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highlycharged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

  13. Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Deibel, C.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Fonnesbeck, J.; Imel, G.

    2013-01-01

    A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

  14. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Tungsten Lorentz Force Accelerator Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.

    2004-01-01

    The Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using the VPS process to form anode and cathode sections for a Lorentz force accelerator made from tungsten. Lorentz force accelerators are an attractive form of electric propulsion that provides continuous, high-efficiency propulsion at useful power levels for such applications as orbit transfers or deep space missions. The VPS process is used to deposit refractory metals such as tungsten onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. Because tungsten is reactive at high temperatures, it is thermally sprayed in an inert environment where the plasma gun melts and deposits the molten metal powder onto a mandrel. A three-axis robot inside the chamber controls the motion of the plasma spray torch. A graphite mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions for the inside surface of the anode or cathode of the accelerator. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with the VPS forming of Lorentz force accelerator components.

  15. Cosmic Acceleration from Elementary Interactions

    E-print Network

    R. Aldrovandi; R. R. Cuzinatto; L. G. Medeiros

    2005-12-22

    It is possible to generate an accelerated period of expansion from reasonable potentials acting between the universe particle constituents. The pressure of primordial nucleons interacting via a simple nuclear potential is obtained via Mayer's cluster expansion technique. The attractive part of the potential engenders a negative pressure and may therefore be responsible for the cosmic acceleration.

  16. Polarization of Dielectrics by Acceleration

    E-print Network

    L. A. Melnikovsky

    2006-08-23

    We argue that acceleration induces electric polarization in usual dielectrics. Both accelerations in superfluid participate in the medium polarization. Excitations contribution to the polarization is calculated at low temperatures. Estimates of the effect show order of magnitude agreement with recent experimental results on electric effect of superflow.

  17. Trends in electron accelerator applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P Kapitza; Yu. M Tsipenyuk

    1998-01-01

    The development of electron accelerators has led over the last decades to technologies that permit to build machines of great energies and power. For energies up to 30–40 MeV research and practical applications are numerous and they are considered in some detail. Medical and radiological uses, nondestructive testing, injectors to larger accelerators, storage rings and free electron lasers are typical

  18. Status of the ATLAS accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, J.; Benaroya, R.; Bogaty, J.; Bollinger, L. M.; Clifft, B. E.; Den Hartog, P.; Johnson, K. W.; Kutschera, W.; Markovich, P.; Nixon, J. M.; Pardo, R. C.; Shepard, K. W.; Zinkann, G.

    1986-05-01

    The construction of the ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linear accelerator is complete. The first beam acceleration occurred on March 22, 1985. The first experiment with the ATLAS linac took place during the week of October 7, 1985. The project was completed on time and within budget. Initial system performance has met our expectations.

  19. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-print Network

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  20. Acceleration: Still an Option for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinbokel, Annette

    2002-01-01

    In response to an article (Hany, 2001) discouraging the practice of acceleration through grade skipping for gifted students, this article defends acceleration as one option for gifted students, describes use of acceleration in Germany including early school entrance, individual grade skipping, acceleration in one subject, and acceleration in…