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1

Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary  

SciTech Connect

On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

NONE

1995-03-01

2

Issues in Differential Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Differential response (DR), also referred to as alternative response (AR), family assessment response (FAR), or multiple track response, was developed to incorporate family-centered, strengths-based practices into child protective services (CPS), primarily by diverting lower risk families into an assessment track rather than requiring the…

Hughes, Ronald C.; Rycus, Judith S.; Saunders-Adams, Stacey M.; Hughes, Laura K.; Hughes, Kelli N.

2013-01-01

3

College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

Fowler, Samantha R.

2009-01-01

4

Discussion of Issues in Differential Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors responded to nine commentaries by 17 contributors to their article, "Issues in Differential Response." The authors found that a majority of the respondents agreed with the major conclusions of "Issues in Differential Response." However, there were varying degrees of disagreement regarding the…

Hughes, Ronald C.; Rycus, Judith S.

2013-01-01

5

Temporal Issues of Animate Response.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Due to increased capacities of personal workstations, graphical user interfaces become capable of offering natural human computer interaction. This results in animate response, i.e., natural transitions from one state into another. It is recognized that f...

A. A. M. Kuijk

1989-01-01

6

Conceptual Issues in Response-Time Modeling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two different traditions of response-time (RT) modeling are reviewed: the tradition of distinct models for RTs and responses, and the tradition of model integration in which RTs are incorporated in response models or the other way around. Several conceptual issues underlying both traditions are made explicit and analyzed for their consequences. We…

van der Linden, Wim J.

2009-01-01

7

Developing a placebo-controlled trial in surgery: Issues of design, acceptability and feasibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Surgical placebos are controversial. This in-depth study explored the design, acceptability, and feasibility issues relevant\\u000a to designing a surgical placebo-controlled trial for the evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic\\u000a lavage for the management of people with osteoarthritis of the knee in the UK.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Two surgeon focus groups at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic surgeons and one

MK Campbell; VA Entwistle; BH Cuthbertson; ZC Skea; AG Sutherland; AM McDonald; JD Norrie; RV Carlson; S Bridgman

2011-01-01

8

Invited Commentary on "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ronald Hughes and his colleagues have written a groundbreaking article on child welfare's use of differential response. Their research addresses the matter from a "lessons learned" and "ways to improve" approach. Our comments focused on three key issues: (1) the importance of evidence-based practice; (2) the recognition…

Vaughan-Eden, Viola; Vandervort, Frank E.

2013-01-01

9

Some Issues in Free Response Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes an investigation of applications and issues in free response (FR) testing during 1989. It draws on ideas from the results of the National Educational Longitudinal Study 1988 (NELS:88) field test, a seminar series at the Educational Testing Service (ETS), working papers prepared for several FR testing applications, and…

Pollack, Judith M.

10

Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

1999-03-01

11

Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute materials and the components of the substitute materials, as well as the automotive parts constructed from the new materials. This report documents a set of analyses that attempt to identify potential barriers--economic, infrastructure, and public acceptance barriers--to the materials substitution in New Generation Vehicles. The analyses rely on hypothetical vehicle market penetration scenarios and material composition. The approach is comprehensive, examining issues ranging from materials availability to their eventual disposition and its effect on the automobile recycling industry, and from supporting industries' capacity to the public acceptability of these vehicles. The analyses focus on two likely substitute materials, aluminum and glass-reinforced polymer composites.

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.E.; Rubin, J.D.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.

1999-03-01

12

Thinking Differentially: A Response to Issues in Differential Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a response to the document by Hughes et al. in this issue that offers a critique of the status of differential response (DR). We find the document to be helpful in intent, but do not find that it reflects scientifically sound methods, and contains many mischaracterizations of the status, impetus, research, and evaluation of DR to date. We…

Fluke, John D.; Merkel-Holguin, Lisa; Schene, Patricia

2013-01-01

13

Becoming Baby-Friendly: overcoming the issue of accepting free formula.  

PubMed

Although, in the current financial climate, paying for formula is a difficult step for US hospitals, demystifying the process helps. Actual formula costs may be lower than perceived costs because agreements with formula companies may list unnecessary or unused products and services. Fair market value is difficult to define, but by contacting other hospitals with Baby-Friendly status, those costs can be determined. While we do not recommend that other institutions forge ahead on the track to Baby-Friendly designation without considering the formula issue, we would encourage them to apply for the certificate of intent and begin work, even if it is not immediately clear how the hospital will pay for formula. Each of the Ten Steps takes the hospital along an important course, is never wasted effort, and increases the number of breastfeeding mothers (thereby reducing formula costs). Demonstrating a willingness to invest time and energy for the benefit of patients and the institution as a whole is valuable when requesting support for formula payment. Hospital administrators, who may make the final decision regarding formula payment, will be more willing to listen to breastfeeding advocates if they have already accomplished significant goals within the institution and have collected supporting data. The authors conclude that although for BMC not accepting free formula was the most difficult barrier to overcome on the path to Baby-Friendly designation, it was not insurmountable, and we hope other institutions will be helped by learning how we dealt with this problem. PMID:11155598

Merewood, A; Philipp, B L

2000-11-01

14

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance  

PubMed Central

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n = 18), we used a ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids play a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG, and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula, and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well-being in the social environment.

Hsu, David T; Sanford, Benjamin J; Meyers, Kortni K; Love, Tiffany M; Hazlett, Kathleen E; Wang, Heng; Ni, Lisong; Walker, Sara J; Mickey, Brian J; Korycinski, Steven T; Koeppe, Robert A; Crocker, Jennifer K; Langenecker, Scott A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

2013-01-01

15

Radiation response issues for infrared detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

Kalma, Arne H.

1990-01-01

16

42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter into a construction project agreement? 137.285 Section...required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter into a construction project agreement? Yes, under...

2013-10-01

17

On the choice of acceptance radius in free-response observer performance studies  

PubMed Central

Objectives Choosing an acceptance radius or proximity criterion is necessary to analyse free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) observer performance data. This is currently subjective, with little guidance in the literature about what is an appropriate acceptance radius. We evaluated varying acceptance radii in a nodule detection task in chest radiography and suggest guidelines for determining an acceptance radius. Methods 80 chest radiographs were chosen, half of which contained nodules. We determined each nodule's centre. 21 radiologists read the images. We created acceptance radii bins of <5 pixels, <10 pixels, <20 pixels and onwards up to <200 and 200+ pixels. We counted lesion localisations in each bin and visually compared marks with the borders of nodules. Results Most reader marks were tightly clustered around nodule centres, with tighter clustering for smaller than for larger nodules. At least 70% of readers' marks were placed within <10 pixels for small nodules, <20 pixels for medium nodules and <30 pixels for large nodules. Of 72 inspected marks that were less than 50 pixels from the centre of a nodule, only 1 fell outside the border of a nodule. Conclusion The acceptance radius should be based on the larger nodule sizes. For our data, an acceptance radius of 50 pixels would have captured all but 2 reader marks within the borders of a nodule, while excluding only 1 true-positive mark. The choice of an acceptance radius for FROC analysis of observer performance studies should be based on the size of larger abnormalities.

Haygood, T M; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C; Li, S; Marom, E M; McEntee, M F; Itani, M; Evanoff, M; Chakraborty, D

2013-01-01

18

Presenting Global Warming and Evolution as Public Health Issues to Encourage Acceptance of Scientific Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although evidence supporting anthropogenic global warming and evolution by natural selection is considerable, the public does not embrace these concepts. The current study explores the hypothesis that individuals will become more receptive to scientific viewpoints if evidence for evolution and implications of global warming are presented as issues

Stover, Shawn K.; McArthur, Laurence B.; Mabry, Michelle L.

2013-01-01

19

Acceptance of Mass Customization of Apparel: Merchandising Issues Associated With Preference for Product, Process, and Place  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of our research was to examine apparel merchandising issues associated with mass customization. A questionnaire was developed to explore preferences for mass customization product, process, and place that have the potential of affecting success of a mass customization program. The questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 131 college students. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests,

Seung-Eun Lee; Grace I. Kunz; Ann Marie Fiore; J. R. Campbell

2002-01-01

20

Team obstetrics and the nurse-midwife. Issues in patient acceptance.  

PubMed

In this discussion we have presented findings from a study of patient acceptance of a nurse-midwife. The significance of the initial encounter for patient acceptance has been interpreted in terms of a primacy effect. The negative effect of the obstetrician's presence during initial encounters between patient and nurse-midwife has been discussed in terms of expectation theory. The theory leads us to predict that the patient's perceptions of competence of the nurse-midwife were more favorable when the obstetrician was absent from the initial encounter than when he was present. Finally we have interpreted the overall ease of communication between the nurse-midwife and patients as a result of mutual participation, and complementary rather than crossed interactions. This ease of communication is a major factor accounting for the general enthusiasm of patients for the nurse-midwife in the provision of office care. The importance of interpersonal relationships between health professionals and patients for effective patient care cannot be overstated. Romano has stressed the importance of the doctor-patient relationship in obstetrics and gynecology because of the many anxieties and concerns of women concerning their health problems. Hopefully, our findings will encourage physicians to explore the role of mid-level health professionals and particularly nurse-midwives in enhancing the overall quality of health care for women. PMID:1049128

1976-09-01

21

Consumer response to novel agri-food technologies: Implications for predicting consumer acceptance of emerging food technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of consumer acceptance of food technologies, and their applications, needs to be addressed early in technology development. However, whether extensive assessment of consumer acceptance is necessary for all food-related technologies a priori is uncertain. A review of studies of seven foodrelated technologies associated with different levels of public acceptance suggests that those characterised as being ‘bioactive’ raise particular

L. J. Frewer; K. Bergmann; M. Brennan; R. Lion; R. Meertens; G. Rowe; M. Siegrist; C. Vereijken

2011-01-01

22

[The acceptance of personal responsibility as a criterion in assigning health care benefits. An empirical study].  

PubMed

In order to accomplish broad acceptance of priority setting in healthcare, a public debate seems essential, in particular, including the preferences of the general public. In Germany, objections to public involvement are to some extent based on the perception that individuals have an inherent personal bias and cannot represent interests other than their own. The following excerpt from a more comprehensive study reports on the acceptance of personal responsibility as a criterion for prioritizing. A mixed-methods design is used for combining a qualitative interview study and a quantitative survey representative of the German public. Both the interview study and the survey demonstrate that behavior that is harmful to one's health is generally accepted as a criterion for posteriorizing patients, mostly regardless of self interest. In addition, the interview study shows reasons for acceptance or refusal of the self-inflicted behavior criterion. PMID:20853086

Diederich, A; Schreier, M

2010-09-01

23

Responding to "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes's article represents an important effort to critically examine the foundation of thought and empirical evidence associated with the rise in prominence of differential response (DR) within child welfare systems throughout the United States. The insights and criticisms offered are an important…

Perry, Robin Ernest

2013-01-01

24

Social Issues and Education: Challenge and Responsibility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social responsibility is a difficult but essential aspect of being a professional educator. The contributors to this volume hope that the social policy debate within the education profession will be encouraged. The book provides practical assistance for educators in developing curriculum and instruction programs that foster creativity and critical…

Molnar, Alex, Ed.

25

Increasing the Frequency of Sharing, Encouraging and Accepting Responsibility through Explicit Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the belief that explicit teaching of social skills to young students will better prepare them for future academic and social endeavors, this action research project evaluated the impact of a program for increasing the incidence of appropriate social skills, specifically: sharing, encouraging, and accepting responsibility among young…

Close, Jill; Kreitzer, Julie

26

Focus Issue: External and Internal Regulators of Immune Responses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Innate Immunity (http://www.sciencemag.org/special/immunity), highlights the effects of viral and bacterial components on host cells, signaling pathways involved in regulating innate immune responses, and factors that modulate the functions of dendritic cells, which are required for effective adaptive immunity.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2010-01-19

27

Focus Issue--Tailoring the Immune Response  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recent advances have led to increasing sophistication in our ability to manipulate the immune response to prevent or treat disease. Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a viable therapeutic approach against both cancer and autoimmune disease. Rituximab, the first monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for cancer therapy, appears to achieve its therapeutic effects through a combination of mechanisms that may include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-mediated cell lysis, and the direct stimulation of apoptotic signaling pathways in target cells. Moreover, an increased understanding of the factors that govern immune tolerance has poised us on the brink of further breakthroughs in the immunotherapy of cancer and autoimmune disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that lead to T cell anergy may allow us to promote or overcome tolerance as appropriate in the therapy of autimmune disease and cancer. Activation of toll-like receptor pathways in dendritic cells is one approach that may help break tumor tolerance and thereby enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer dendritic cell vaccines.

Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV)

2004-07-13

28

Religious beliefs or physicians' behavior: what makes a patient more prone to accept a physician to address his/her spiritual issues?  

PubMed

The present study aims to understand the relation between religious beliefs, physicians' behavior and patients' opinions regarding "Spirituality, religiosity and health (S/R)" issues, and what makes a patient more prone to accept a physician to address his/her spiritual issues. A cross-sectional study was carried out in outpatients from a tertiary hospital, and a path analysis was used to examine the direct and indirect relationships between the variables. For the final analysis, 300 outpatients were evaluated. Most patients would like their doctors to address S/R issues but did not feel comfortable to ask them. In contrast, they reported most doctors have never addressed S/R issues, and they believe doctors are not prepared to address these issues. The path analysis revealed that patients' previous experiences with their doctors may be as important as their religious/spiritual beliefs in proneness to accept a physician to address his/her spiritual issues. PMID:23420277

Banin, Luciana Burgugi; Suzart, Nadielle Brandani; Guimarães, Fernando Augusto Garcia; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G; de Jesus, Marcos Antonio Santos; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

2014-06-01

29

Accepting leadership responsibility: preparing yourself to lead honestly, humanely, and effectively.  

PubMed

Many who enter management are ready and willing to accept the benefits of their positions, but not all are readily accepting of the full responsibilities of leadership. All too frequently, modern leadership appears self-serving, with the needs and desires of the leaders taking precedence over the needs of the followers and even the needs of the clients or customers. True leadership, however, should primarily benefit the followers rather than the leader. Leaders lead and followers follow for essentially the same reason, fulfillment of needs, so leaders and followers are fundamentally little different from each other. Every manager at every level has organizational superiors, so every leader is a follower as well. A true leader among managers is one who subordinates personal needs to the organization's needs, places employees well above self in importance, models appropriate behavior for employees, and functions as a facilitator in the employees' continuing efforts to get the necessary work done efficiently and effectively. PMID:14672447

McConnell, Charles R

2003-01-01

30

Issues of Control and Responsibility in Workers' Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issues of responsibility for health and control of factors influencing health are discussed with regard to workplace health programs. The role of each of the parties involved—workers, unions, management, and the government-can best be understood in relation to the interests they hold in workers' health. A matrix is presented which divides influences on workers' health according to the degree

Kathryn L. Green

1988-01-01

31

AGING AND TOXIC RESPONSE: ISSUES RELEVANT TO RISK ASSESSMENT (FINAL)  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has released a final report entitled, Aging and Toxic Response: Issues Relevant to Risk Assessment . This document contributes to the Agency's efforts to better understand the physiology of aging in order to protect the health of older persons, and identifies several d...

32

Mothers' and Fathers' Responsive Problem Solving with Early Adolescents: Do Gender, Shyness, and Social Acceptance Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the extent to which youths' (n = 231) shyness and social acceptance in preadolescence were associated with parents' responsive problem solving 1 year later after controlling for initial levels of parents' problem solving. Teachers (n = 176) completed assessments of youths' shyness and social acceptance, and parents (n = 231 married…

Miller, Scott R.; Brody, Gene H.; Murry, Velma M.

2010-01-01

33

Mothers’ and Fathers’ Responsive Problem Solving with Early Adolescents: Do Gender, Shyness, and Social Acceptance Make a Difference?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed the extent to which youths’ (n = 231) shyness and social acceptance in preadolescence were associated with parents’ responsive problem solving 1 year later\\u000a after controlling for initial levels of parents’ problem solving. Teachers (n = 176) completed assessments of youths’ shyness and social acceptance, and parents (n = 231 married pairs) completed assessments of their responsive problem solving with the child. For shy daughters,

Scott R. Miller; Gene H. Brody; Velma M. Murry

2010-01-01

34

Physiological and psychophysical responses in handling maximum acceptable weights under different footwear--floor friction conditions.  

PubMed

A study on combined manual materials-handling tasks performed on floors under three friction levels was conducted. Eight male subjects participated in the study. The maximum acceptable weight of handling, including lifting, carrying for 3m, lowering, and walking 3m back at twice per minute was determined. The subject then performed the same tasks for 10 min. Heart rate, Vo2, energy efficiency, perceived sense of slip, and rating of perceived exertion for whole body strain were measured. The results showed that the effects of friction level on the maximum acceptable weights of handling, perceived sense of slip, Vo2, and energy efficiency were statistically significant (pacceptable weights of handling increased from 8.15 to 9.34 kg. The energy efficiency on the low friction condition (12.58 kg/L/min) was significantly lower than those of the medium (15.73 kg/L/min) and high (15.38 kg/L/min) friction conditions. The perceived sense of slip was the highest (5.44) on the low-friction condition, followed by the medium-friction condition (3.58), and last the high-friction condition (1.84). The implication of this study was that friction level should be regarded as one of the major environmental factors in designing MMH tasks as it affected both physiological and psychophysical responses of the subjects. Low-friction footwear-floor interface should be avoided as it resulted in not only high scores of perceived sense of slip but also in low-energy efficiency utilized in the body. PMID:17010302

Li, Kai Way; Yu, Rui-feng; Han, Xiao L

2007-05-01

35

[People with stomas - issues and responses in critical periods].  

PubMed

People with stomas who have either been cured of cancer or are living with cancer have achieved good interrelationships among the three issues of"establishing self-care","dealing with stoma complications", and"accepting stomas", and they are maintaining stable physical and mental states.However, self-care may become difficult due to stoma complications and adverse events caused by chemotherapy and radiation therapy in the cancer treatment period, and in advanced phases of cancer serious stoma complications may occur due to deterioration of general condition and advancing cancer. Therefore, there is a risk that those stable physical and mental states will collapse.In order to deal with this critical state, in the cancer treatment period, stoma skin care is used for handling skin problems around the stoma, and for adverse events such as hand-and-foot syndrome, braces that are easy to operate are chosen from among various types of stoma braces in order to cover impediments.During advanced phases of cancer, care is conducted with the main priority placed on physical stability in order to ensure that the three major complications of stoma varicose veins, stoma prolapse, and parastomal hernia do not worsen and significantly affect general condition and daily life.Stoma outpatient treatment that provides lifelong support for such issues, and the existence of skin- and excretion-care certified nurses who provided highly specialized selfcare support, are extremely important for cancer survivors with stomas. PMID:24423946

Aoki, Kazue; Ishiguro, Miho

2014-01-01

36

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB...release of a Statement of Financial Accounting Standards by the...

2010-10-01

37

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB...release of a Statement of Financial Accounting Standards by the...

2009-10-01

38

Novel sodium hypochlorite cleanser shows clinical response and excellent acceptability in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.  

PubMed

The intermittent use of dilute sodium hypochlorite "bleach baths" has shown efficacy as adjunctive therapy for atopic dermatitis (AD). This feasibility study evaluated the clinical response and patient acceptability of treatment with a cleansing body wash containing sodium hypochlorite in children with AD. This was a 12-week open-label feasibility study of 18 children with AD conducted in a pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic between May 2011 and July 2012. Children with moderate to severe AD, defined as an Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) score of at least 3 on a 5-point scale, who were age 6 months and older and had lesional cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus at baseline were included. Patients were instructed to wash 3 days/week for 12 weeks with the sodium hypochlorite-containing cleansing body wash. During the study period, patient's individualized topical and systemic treatment regimens were continued. Clinical response to treatment was measured using an IGA score and the percentage of body surface area (BSA) affected. Parents were also administered a retrospective questionnaire evaluating acceptability of the product. There was a statistically significant reduction in IGA score at all time points, with an overall mean reduction from baseline to final measurement using the last observation carried forward in all patients of 1.0 (p = 0.001, n = 18). Similarly the mean reduction of BSA affected was 14.8% (p = 0.005, n = 18). Parents reported that the body wash was significantly easier to use than traditional bleach baths (p < 0.001). The significant reductions in clinical disease severity scores with use of this formulation are encouraging. PMID:23617366

Ryan, Caitriona; Shaw, Richard E; Cockerell, Clay J; Hand, Shari; Ghali, Fred E

2013-01-01

39

Focus Issue: Keeping the Immune Response in Check  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When exploring control of a biological system such as the inflammatory response, we often think first of mechanisms that promote activation of the system. But just as important are the signals that that modulate and terminate these processes. Unchecked recruitment and infiltration of leukocytes into tissues and the unrestrained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can lead to tissue damage and even cancer. This issue of Science’s STKE highlights studies that enhance our understanding of how pro-inflammatory signals are switched on, and--equally important--how they are switched off.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV)

2007-05-01

40

When Is It Acceptable to Make Prescriptive Statements in Educational Research Articles? Commentary on the Special Issue Papers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The commentary considers when it is acceptable to make prescriptive statements in educational research articles. It begins with a consensus view, agreeing with the analysis offered by Marley and Levin (Educational Psychology Review, 2011), that experimental evidence is necessary. Other forms of evidence are considered (e.g., observational,…

Yussen, Steven R.

2011-01-01

41

Beyond the Transboundary River: Issues of Riparian Responsibilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The issues of riparian countries sharing transboundary waters spans decades, and has been greatly strengthened by its collaboration with partner agencies. International cooperation on shared water resources is critical, especially in water scarce regions experiencing the impacts of over-consumption and pollution. Where, river basins are transboundary, this requires regular and structured consultation, coordination and cooperation among all states sharing the catchment. Rapid and unsustainable development of river basins and their wetlands has led to the disruption of natural hydrological cycles. In many cases this has resulted in greater frequency and severity of flooding, drought and pollution. Appropriate transnational planning, protection and allocation of water to wetlands are essential to avoid disaster and enable these ecosystems to continue to provide important goods and services to local communities. Integrated river basin management takes into account policies and measures for the multifunctional use of rivers on a catchment scale and associated institutional changes. The implementation of these involves a number of steps such as definition of aim, construction of conceptual model, selection of variables, comparison with selection criteria, database assessment, and indicator selection division of tasks and responsibilities for river basin management with regard to the development of indicators, data collection, and their application in decision-making. This work presents issues pertaining to the pressure to the river, the state of the river ecosystem, the impact to goods and services provided by the river, and the societal response.

Parhi, P. K.; Sankhua, R. N.

2013-11-01

42

Individualism, acceptance and differentiation as attitude traits in the public's response to vaccination  

PubMed Central

The attitude of the general public to vaccination was evaluated through a survey conducted on a representative sample of the Israeli population (n = 2,018), in which interviewees were requested to express their standpoints regarding five different vaccination programs. These included: pandemic influenza vaccination, seasonal influenza vaccination, travel vaccines, Human Papilloma Virus vaccine and childhood vaccinations. Analysis of the responses reveal three major attitude traits: a) acceptance, characterized by the opinion that targets should be vaccinated; b) individualism, characterized by the opinion that vaccination should be left to personal choice; and c) differentiation, characterized by the tendency to express different attitudes when addressing different vaccination programs. Interestingly, direct opposition to vaccination was found to be a minor attitude trait in this survey. Groups within the population could be defined according to their tendency to assume these different attitudes as Acceptors, Judicious-acceptors, Differentiators, Soft-individualists, and Hard-individualists. These groups expressed different standpoints on all five vaccination programs as well as on other health recommendations, such as screening for early detection of cancer. Attitude traits could be also correlated, to a certain extent, with actual compliance with vaccination programs. Interestingly, attitudes to vaccination were not correlated with social profiles related to income or education, although younger individuals exhibited higher degrees of individualism and differentiation. Taken together, all this is in accordance with the current social settings, underlining the individual's tendency for critical evaluation and self-stirring. This should be taken into consideration by health authorities involved in vaccination programs.

Velan, Baruch; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Ziv, Arnona; Yagar, Yaakov; Kaplan, Giora

2012-01-01

43

The year 2000 issue: International action and national responsibilities  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will examine international aspects of the Year 2000 (Y2K) issue, in terms of how various countries are managing the problem and how international organizations are involved in that process. The paper notes that while international cooperation is essential in dealing with part of the problem, it is at the national level that preventive measures are undertaken and emergency services provided. Most NATO and OECD states have recognized that by now it will not be possible to find and fix all problems in software and embedded chips. Their focus, therefore, is shifting to the planning of contingency measures, that is, what to do when disruptions occur so that the physical safety of persons is protected, damage to physical assets is minimized (e.g., extensive networks of energy supplies and telecommunications), and resources for the common good are protected (e.g., water supplies). Not only is this conference timely, but the experience of various sectors can be shared to enable cross-sector comparisons to be made, for example, there might be lessons from within air transportation that might be applicable to the energy industry. In addition, while most countries have tended to focus on their national situation, this conference brings together persons from more than 25 countries, thus enabling further comparisons to be made on how other countries are pursing contingency plans. It is within this cross-sector and multinational context that international action and national responsibilities of aspects of the Y2K issue will be discussed. This presentation is in four sections. The first examines what is at risk and categorizes the kinds of disruptions likely to occur. The second presents an approach from which to understand how different countries are trying to manage the Year 2000 issue. This approach is based on a three-step process adopted by the US and other OECD countries, the most dependent on computer and electronic processing systems and large information networks. The steps are: (1) awareness and perception of the problem; (2) technical preventive measures; and (3) contingency action and consequence management. The same steps are used to examine the Y2K efforts of non-OECD countries. This presentation does not advocate a right or wrong way to deal with the issue, but uses the approach as a framework in which to understand what factors might be significant with regard to managing Year 2000 disruptions, especially at the international level. The third part of the presentation will examine the efforts of some of the relevant international governmental organizations and their activities regarding the Year 2000 issue. These organizations include the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). Understanding how these international organizations function illustrates not only their role but also their limits in dealing with Y2K issues. Member states of these organizations are ultimately responsible for dealing with the Y2K issues at the national level. This includes cooperation among national and regional or local governmental authorities and emergency services, which at the end of the day--and on the day and the day after--will be responsible for dealing with Y2K disruptions. The fourth section will explore other measures, both non-governmental and governmental, urging states to pay more attention and which might include new processes to manage disruptions. For example, some industries lobby their foreign ministries to urge other states to undertake Y2K remediation. New international collaboration regarding the safety of nuclear weapons and associated early warning systems is being established which in future may yield to positive developments in political relations. This type of example is applicable to other sectors and illustrates some of the positive outcomes or lessons learned from the Y2K issue. On an assumption that there are these positive aspects, the term ''Y2K issue'' rather than ''Y2K problem'' is o

Bosch, O

1999-07-21

44

Identification of response and timing issues at permanent European broadband stations from automated data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To tackle the ever increasing amount of available broadband seismic data from European network providers for routine analysis, manual data processing and retrieval of certain observables (e.g. dispersive traveltimes, polarisation parameters) needs to be replaced by automated processing tools. We developed an automated routine to measure inter-station phase velocity curves of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves by pairwise cross-correlating seismograms from all available permanent stations in Central and Northern Europe. Making use of path-specific reference models based on CRUST2.0, only three parameters that control the acceptable bandwidth of a given observation are required for our automated routine to identify and pick acceptable dispersion curves. As the measurements are based on the phase difference of the waveforms at two stations, the measurements are 2? ambiguous and we select the solution that is in general closest to our reference curve. While applying this routine to the entire dataset, we observe at some stations systematic deviations from the expected measurement which may not be related to wave propagation effects. These include timing and response information issues, of the latter most prominently polarity switches. As we compare wavefields that propagate in both directions between two stations, both these effects lead to distinct deviative patterns in the measurements. A polarity problem at one station, for example, leads to dispersion measurements that are offset from the reference curve with a ? offset instead of the expected 2?. Timing issues on the other hand lead to symmetric deviations (for the two propagation directions) that are in general smaller than ?. Statistical analysis of our measurements against the expected dispersion curves from our reference models allows us to construct a map of anomalous stations in Europe. Furthermore, we have also indications that some instruments may not only have phase but also amplitude issues.

Weidle, Christian; Soomro, Riaz Ahmed; Cristiano, Luigia; Meier, Thomas

2013-04-01

45

IMPROVING WILLINGNESS-TO-ACCEPT RESPONSES USING ALTERNATE FORMS OF COMPENSATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this project is to design a pilot survey to investigate why surveys that ask willingness-to-accept compensation questions so often yield unreliable data and whether respondents would find alternate modes of compensation (specifically, public goods) more acceptab...

46

Promoting Social Acceptance of Children with Learning Disabilities: An Educational Responsibility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite recognition that children with learning disabilities frequently lack social competence and peer acceptance, the focus of both diagnosis and remediation continues to be almost exclusively academic. To truly serve this population, it is necessary to attend to their social and emotional needs as well as their academic progress. (Author/VW)

Osman, Betty B.

1987-01-01

47

Boundary Issues in Counseling: Multiple Roles and Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dual or multiple relationships may be one of the most controversial of all issues in counseling. The nature of these kinds of relationships, the current thinking on the topic, and the diversity of opinions and perspectives touching this issue are explored in this book. The introduction provides an overview of dual relationships, followed by…

Herlihy, Barbara; Corey, Gerald

48

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the inter...

E. Koch M. A. Piette

2007-01-01

49

Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system have received more attention at the federal level in the past 2 years than in the past three decades combined. The importance of the mental health issue is also being recognized at the state level. A number of factors have contributed to this change. They include: growing recognition…

Cocozza, Joseph J.; Skowyra, Kathleen R.

2000-01-01

50

Corporate social responsibility: issues for human resource development professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent human resource development (HRD) scholarship has called for greater focus on social responsibility and ecological sustainability. The purpose of this article is to explore the engagement of HRD professionals in corporate social responsibility (CSR), examining one central question: how do HRD professionals perceive their roles and challenges in implementing CSR in organizations that claim CSR to be a key

Tara Fenwick; Laura Bierema

2008-01-01

51

Shoulder-specific disability measures showed acceptable construct validity and responsiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo compare the construct validity and responsiveness of the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), Croft Index, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) for patients with adhesive capsulitis and to compare these with pain on a visual analog scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, and the problem-elicitation technique.

Margaret P. Staples; Andrew Forbes; Sally Green; Rachelle Buchbinder

2010-01-01

52

LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2  

SciTech Connect

This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

Schwartz, W W

2009-11-19

53

Physical activity and health: dose-response issues.  

PubMed

The depth of our current knowledge of the dose-response gradient for physical activity and health is highly variable across the different health parameters. To the extent that the existing literature allows conclusions, it appears that (a) most health parameters are related to the amount of habitual physical activity in a graded fashion; (b) intensity of physical activity may be independently related, in a graded fashion, to some health parameters but unrelated to others; and (c) for some variables, the dose-response relationship is linear but, in other cases, is curvilinear. At present, these conclusions must be considered tentative, and most experts agree that further elucidation of dose-response relationships should be a major thrust of future research on physical activity and health. PMID:8775587

Pate, R R

1995-12-01

54

Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

2009-01-01

55

Acceptance and utilisation of the Incident Command System in first response and allied disciplines: an Ohio study.  

PubMed

In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, an effort was made to establish a common and uniform command structure for use by the nation's first responder organisations, as well as those disciplines generally expected to assist first responders during a major incident or disaster. The result was the issuance of the National Incident Management System1 or NIMS by the US Department of Homeland Security in 2004. Included in the NIMS document was an embracing of the Incident Command System or ICS, long utilised in the fire service for the effective management of emergency response. The NIMS doctrine also identified certain allied disciplines that needed to adopt this new system for responding to major events. Some of these disciplines included specialised first response units, such as, bomb squads and hazardous materials teams. Other partner disciplines not usually associated with emergency response to include public health and public works were also included. This study will attempt to look at a single component of NIMS, specifically the Incident Command System, and measure its acceptance and utilisation by first responder organisations and selected allied disciplines in the state of Ohio. This is particularly important at this time since the US government is being forced to reduce budgets significantly and determine which laudable policies and programmes will be cut. PMID:22130340

Decker, Russell J

2011-10-01

56

Young Children's Affective Responses to Acceptance and Rejection from Peers: A Computer-Based Task Sensitive to Variation in Temperamental Shyness and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents a novel task examining young children's affective responses to evaluative feedback--specifically, social acceptance and rejection--from peers. We aimed to determine (1) whether young children report their affective responses to hypothetical peer evaluation predictably and consistently, and (2) whether young children's responses

Howarth, Grace Z.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Perez-Edgar, Koraly

2013-01-01

57

The Awakening Cortisol Response: Methodological Issues and Significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The awakening cortisol response (ACR) is a discrete and distinctive part of the cortisol circadian cycle. In healthy adults salivary free cortisol concentrations increase by between 50 and 160% in the first 30 min immediately post-awakening (approximate average increase of 9 nmol\\/l, range 4 - 15 nmol\\/l, estimated to be equivalent to about three secretory episodes). However there are no

A. Clow; L. Thorn; P. Evans; F. Hucklebridge

2004-01-01

58

Issues That Drive Near-Earth Object Mitigation Responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Find them early: The most important aspect for the mitigation of hazardous near-Earth objects (NEOs) is to find them early enough so that an appropriate and timely response can be carried out. Although about 84% of the near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) larger than one kilometer had been found by mid-2009, only about 5% of the NEAs 140 meters and larger that

D. K. Yeomans; A. Chamberlin; S. Chesley; P. W. Chodas

2009-01-01

59

Alternative responses to child protective services: emerging issues and concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem: Increased calls to “do something” about child protective services (CPS) have resulted in proposals or new “paradigms” for services to at-risk or abusive families. These new paradigms call for the reform or revamping of CPS through the development of a community-based alternative response to some reports of child abuse and\\/or neglect.Method: This article reports on outcomes for 1,263 “low”

Diana J English; Tom Wingard; David Marshall; Matt Orme; Anna Orme

2000-01-01

60

Legal Issues Regarding the Use of Volunteer Health Personnel in Response Efforts: Frequently Asked Questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the response to Hurricane Katrina, volunteer health professionals (VHPs) from around the country have offered to provide medical assistance in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Many are responding through organized governmental and private sector response efforts and others arrive spontaneously. The participation of VHPs in the response efforts gives rise to several legal and regulatory issues. The Center

61

Perceived Responsibility in Decision-Making in Ethical Death Issues: The Professional Socialization of Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The educational socialization process into the professional role of nurse is examined in light of two related processes: first, the hierarchy of responsibility in decision making in salient ethical issues concerning death and dying, and second, the attitude structure of nursing students and professionals toward these same ethical issues. (Author)

Shulz, Alfred; Cox, Scott C.

1978-01-01

62

Response to Key Issues Raised in the Post-14 Mathematics Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a detailed response to the issues raised by the Post-14 Mathematics Inquiry in the UK. It aims to debate some of the central issues in mathematics teaching in the UK, including recruitment and retention of mathematics teachers, the curriculum content, national assessment, teaching resources (including ICT) and national strategies…

Burghes, David; Hindle, Mike

2004-01-01

63

Statistical Issues in Social Allocation Models of Intelligence: A Review and a Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a response to Shockley (1971) which summarizes the original Light and Smith work; outlines Shockley's criticisms; responds to the statistical issues; and concludes with the methodological implications of the disagreement. (VW)

Light, Richard J.; Smith, Paul V.

1971-01-01

64

Issues That Drive Near-Earth Object Mitigation Responses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Find them early: The most important aspect for the mitigation of hazardous near-Earth objects (NEOs) is to find them early enough so that an appropriate and timely response can be carried out. Although about 84% of the near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) larger than one kilometer had been found by mid-2009, only about 5% of the NEAs 140 meters and larger that could cause regional devastation had been found. Because of their fewer numbers, comets represent only ~1% of the asteroid threat in the Earth’s neighborhood. Improve impact predictions: The vast majority of true impactors will reach very high probabilities of impact after their second apparition and that is usually within a few years of discovery. Simulations suggest that radar astrometry increases the average Earth encounter predictability from 80 to 400 years and increases the impact warning time an average of up to 4 years. In addition, radar imaging can often resolve the shapes of NEOs down to the few meter level. For NEOs that have been identified as potential threats, the radiometric tracking of a rendezvous spacecraft, coupled with spacecraft imaging of the NEO, could be used to dramatically improve the asteroid’s ephemeris. Ongoing activities to improve the orbit determination and ephemeris prediction process for NEOs include efforts to de-bias reference star positions and the modeling of the small asteroid accelerations introduced by the asymmetric re-radiation of sunlight (i.e., Yarkovsky effect). Study risk mitigation responses: For the deflection of hazardous NEOs on direct impacting trajectories, relatively mature techniques include the kinetic energy impacts by spacecraft for relatively small (< 300 meters) NEOs and either stand-off or surface nuclear explosions for the larger, but far less numerous, NEO impactors. For both cases, the ejecta blown back as a result of the collision or explosion would introduce a momentum enhancement that would be expected to augment the momentum delivered by the crater forming mechanism itself. Studies need to be carried out to understand this momentum enhancement factor since it can vary by more than an order of magnitude depending upon the NEO’s structure and composition. For the few percent of simulated Earth impactors that pass closely by the Earth prior to impact, the gravitational attraction between the threatening NEO and a nearby thrusting spacecraft (gravity tractor) could be used to drag the NEO out of harms way. For example, near-Earth asteroid Apophis has a small chance of passing through a 610-meter “keyhole” during its dramatic Earth close approach to within 0.1 lunar distances on April 13, 2029 - a keyhole passage that would then allow it to return seven years later for an Earth impact on April 13, 2036. A gravity tractor could be employed in the early 2020’s to ensure that Apophis would not enter this tiny keyhole. However, the Apophis situation, where a very close Earth approach a few years prior to a potential impact offers a tremendous amount of leverage for a deflection, is not typical. In the near term, the most likely scenarios would include impacts by relatively small NEOs with little or no warning so that plans for rapid evacuations also need to be considered.

Yeomans, D. K.; Chamberlin, A.; Chesley, S.; Chodas, P. W.

2009-12-01

65

First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012  

PubMed Central

Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be integrated as an additional tool into the response.

Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

2013-01-01

66

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating

Ed Koch; Mary Ann Piette

2007-01-01

67

Young Children's Affective Responses to Acceptance and Rejection From Peers: A Computer-based Task Sensitive to Variation in Temperamental Shyness and Gender  

PubMed Central

This study presents a novel task examining young children’s affective responses to evaluative feedback—specifically, social acceptance and rejection—from peers. We aimed to determine (1) whether young children report their affective responses to hypothetical peer evaluation predictably and consistently, and (2) whether young children’s responses to peer evaluation vary as a function of temperamental shyness and gender. Four- to seven-year-old children (N = 48) sorted pictures of unknown, similar-aged children into those with whom they wished or did not wish to play. Computerized peer evaluation later noted whether the pictured children were interested in a future playdate with participants. Participants then rated their affective responses to each acceptance or rejection event. Children were happy when accepted by children with whom they wanted to play, and disappointed when these children rejected them. Highly shy boys showed a wider range of responses to acceptance and rejection based on initial social interest, and may be particularly sensitive to both positive and negative evaluation. Overall, the playdate task captures individual differences in affective responses to evaluative peer feedback and is potentially amenable to future applications in research with young children, including pairings with psychophysiological measures.

Howarth, Grace Z.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Perez-Edgar, Koraly

2013-01-01

68

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10

69

Introduction to the Special Issue on the U.S. Response to the Fukushima Accident  

SciTech Connect

Provides an introduction to the May 2012 issue of Health Physics, based on a special session at the 2011 Health Physics Society (HPS) annual meeting that focused on the United States' radiological response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This introduction outlines the papers in this important issue and describes the activities of the U.S. response participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations. Observations are provided and the stage is set for the articles in this issue which document many of the activities undertaken during the Fukushima accident and which describe challenges faced and valuable lessons learned.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01

70

Critical Issues in State-Local Fiscal Policy: Sorting Out State and Local Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States is undergoing a transition as state governments reclaim responsibilities that the federal government had assumed earlier in the century. Sorting out which governmental body should take charge of various services is the subject of this report. It focuses on two critical issues in the relationship between state and local…

National Conference of State Legislatures, Denver, CO.

71

Black churches and HIV/AIDS: factors influencing congregations’ responsiveness to social issues.  

PubMed

The ambivalent response of many black churches to current social issues has caused some scholars to question the centrality of black churches within African-American communities. Using a nationally representative sample of black congregations, this study engages the debate about the institutional centrality of black churches by focusing on their response to HIV/AIDS. Although many congregational studies treat black churches as a monolithic whole, this analysis identifies heterogeneity among black churches that shapes their responsiveness to social issues. Contrary to prior claims, a congregation's liberal-conservative ideological orientation does not significantly affect its likelihood of having an HIV/AIDS program. Beyond assessing churches’ internal characteristics, this study uses institutional theory to analyze churches as open systems that can be influenced by their surrounding environment. It demonstrates that externally engaged congregations are significantly more likely to have a program. These results indicate that black churches maintain institutional centrality by engaging their external environment. PMID:22148134

Fulton, Brad R

2011-01-01

72

Errant corporations, diffuse responsibilities, and the environment: ethical issues in the Orica case study.  

PubMed

The papers in this volume deal with various aspects of the HCB legacy at the Orica plant at Botany. Whether explicitly or implicitly, they are concerned with questions of ethics; with the just distribution of burdens and benefits; with just processes for disposing of dangerous industrial waste; and with a just custodianship of the Botany environment. These ethical issues illustrate the difficulty of securing corporate accountability, and the elusiveness of responsibility within organisations. This paper reflects on some of the issues for ethics raised by the Orica case and their significance for corporate ethics. PMID:18762363

Grace, Damian

2009-04-01

73

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents' response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions, and identify some of the issues influencing residents' perspectives and behaviour. All rural and most urban residents have an accurate knowledge of Katla, the proposed warning system and emergency response plan. Urban residents perceived the emergency response plan to be appropriate. In comparison, rural residents did not perceive the emergency response plan as appropriate. Rural residents stated that they would personally assess the situation before deciding on a course of action independent of the proposed plan. Livelihood connections and inherited knowledge affect rural residents' ability and willingness to comply with the recommended procedures. Factors such as hazard knowledge, sense of community and attachment to place indicate that rural residents are more resilient to volcanic hazards. Based on our findings we recommend that emergency management agencies consider issues such as personal responsibility, neighbourliness and community involvement and cooperation, to develop and implement more appropriate volcanic risk mitigation strategies. In light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, we provide a brief discussion on the 2010 emergency response. Although our findings are Iceland-specific, our recommendations may be applied internationally to other volcanic and disaster-prone regions.

Bird, Deanne K.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Dominey-Howes, Dale

2011-11-01

74

Task force St. Bernard: operational issues and medical management of a National Guard disaster response operation.  

PubMed

After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States on 29 August 2005, it became obvious that the country was facing an enormous national emergency. With local resources overwhelmed, governors across the US responded by deploying thousands of National Guard soldiers and airmen. The National Guard has responded to domestic disasters due to natural hazards since its inception, but an event with the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina was unprecedented. The deployment of >900 Army National Guard soldiers to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana in the aftermath of the Hurricane was studied to present some of the operational issues involved with providing medical support for this type of operation. In doing so, the authors attempt to address some of the larger issues of how the National Guard can be incorporated into domestic disaster response efforts. A number of unforeseen issues with regards to medical operations, medical supply, communication, preventive medicine, legal issues, and interactions with civilians were encountered and are reviewed. A better understanding of the National Guard and how it can be utilized more effectively in future disaster response operations can be developed. PMID:18087915

Bonnett, Carl J; Schock, Tony R; McVaney, Kevin E; Colwell, Christopher B; Depass, Christopher

2007-01-01

75

Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.  

PubMed

E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices. PMID:18162284

Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

2009-01-01

76

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents’ response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigates residents’ knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all\\u000a rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted\\u000a in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions,\\u000a and identify some of the issues influencing

Deanne K. Bird; Guðrún Gísladóttir; Dale Dominey-Howes

77

Mood state, issue involvement, and argument strength on responses to persuasive appeals.  

PubMed

This study investigated the effects of mood state, issue involvement, and argument strength on responses to persuasive appeals. Through an unrelated second study paradigm, 144 introductory psychology students were randomly assigned to High or Low Issue Involvement, Happy or Sad Mood Inductions, and Strong or Weak Argument conditions. Attitudes, measured on 9-point Likert-type scales, and cognitive responses, measured through a thought listing, were assessed. On attitudes, people in the Happy Induction condition were equally persuaded by Strong and Weak Arguments, whereas people in the Sad Induction condition were persuaded by Strong, but not Weak, Arguments. Involvement had no effect. On the thought-listing measures, people in the Happy Induction condition showed modest elaboration. A stronger pattern of effects, consistent with high elaboration, was noted on the thought listings of people in the Sad Induction condition and who were in the High Involvement group. Interestingly, people in the Sad Induction condition who were in the Low Involvement group showed mood-congruency on thoughts. The data suggest that the effects of mood state are not moderated by the effects of issue Involvement on this measure of attitudes but that there may be some moderation on measures of elaboration. Implications and directions for research are discussed. PMID:18232427

Sinclair, Robert C; Lovsin, Tanya K; Moore, Sean E

2007-12-01

78

The glial response to intracerebrally delivered therapies for neurodegenerative disorders: is this a critical issue?  

PubMed Central

The role of glial cells in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) is now well established (as is discussed in other reviews in this special issue of Frontiers in Neuropharmacology). What is less clear is whether there are changes in these same cells in terms of their behavior and function in response to invasive experimental therapeutic interventions for these diseases. This has, and will continue to become more of an issue as we enter a new era of novel treatments which require the agent to be directly placed/infused into the CNS such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), cell transplants, gene therapies and growth factor infusions. To date, all of these treatments have produced variable outcomes and the reasons for this have been widely debated but the host astrocytic and/or microglial response induced by such invasively delivered agents has not been discussed in any detail. In this review, we have attempted to summarize the limited published data on this, in particular we discuss the small number of human post-mortem studies reported in this field. By so doing, we hope to provide a better description and understanding of the extent and nature of both the astrocytic and microglial response, which in turn could lead to modifications in the way these therapeutic interventions are delivered.

Cicchetti, Francesca; Barker, Roger A.

2014-01-01

79

View of socioscientific issues among educators: The willingness of teachers to accept SSI into the classroom and the reasoning underyling those beliefs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Socioscientific issues (SSI) are potentially controversial topics, which can be examined using a social and a scientific perspective. The inclusion of these topics in elementary and secondary classrooms has caused a number of conflicts over the past century. In the present study, I explore the willingness of teachers to include three SSI: evolution, stem cell research, and global climate change in the science curricula. Participants included 221 educators currently employed in K-12 schools. Teachers have the greatest impact on classroom instruction, regardless of state curricula. I found most educators willing to include the three previously named SSI in the curricula, but support was not an indication of a pro-science perspective. Teachers modestly preferred the inclusion of scientific perspectives over alternative ideas, but this support was not universal. Potentially important demographic factors were collected; participants from rural populations, Evangelicals, frequent church attendees, Republicans, and conservatives were found to be less receptive to science-supported ideas. A similarly lower level of support was found among those teachers who did not teach secondary science and those who had taken fewer science courses while in college. Interestingly, a possible correlation between the aforementioned demographic factors and chosen teaching position was identified. I identified a perceived low level of support for the science underlying the selected SSI as one possible explanation for the lack of emphasis on empirically supported concepts. Similarly, the majority of educators were willing to support legislation which formally encouraged the idea of "balanced" coverage. I found the lack of support for scientific ideas and the reasoning quality supporting these views surprisingly low. Educators consider SSI using very different lenses. It was these lenses, and not empirical evidence, which had the greatest impact on decision making. For some participants these frames of reasoning seemed so engrained that they were unwilling to even contemplate the validity of opposing viewpoints.

Parr, John Carlos

80

Unresolved Issues in Scientific Sexology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of unresolved issues in sexologyresearch and practice are reviewed. Penile volumeassessment of sexual arousal has consistently provedmore sensitive than penile circumference assessment andrequires much shorter exposure to the erotic stimulieliciting the arousal, reducing the subjects' ability tomodify their responses. Failure to acknowledge this hasallowed acceptance of evidence based on penile circumference assessment that behavioraltreatments such as directed masturbation

Nathaniel McConaghy

1999-01-01

81

43 CFR 3200.8 - What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications pending on August 8, 2005?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Geothermal Resource Leasing § 3200.8 What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications...

2013-10-01

82

42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...must assume all Federal responsibilities under the NEPA of 1969 [42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. ] and the National Historic Preservation Act [16 U.S.C. 470 et seq. ] and related provisions of law that would apply if the Secretary were to...

2012-10-01

83

Newspaper Subscribers' Response to Accident Photographs: The Acceptance Level Compared to Demographics, Death Anxiety, Fear of Death, and State Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One hundred and one subjects responded to a questionnaire examining newspaper readers' response to news photographs depicting accidents. Each questionnaire contained four different accident scene photographs, with cutline information stating that the individual in the photograph either had died or was not seriously hurt. Each photograph was…

Roche, James M.

84

Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo  

PubMed Central

Background Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. Method An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. Results A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. Conclusions This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change.

2014-01-01

85

Maori responsiveness in health and medical research: key issues for researchers (part 1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction Application for contestable government-research funding and ethical approval requires researchers to outline how their intended research project contributes to Maori development or advancement. Methods and Results When formulating their research proposals, the key issues for researchers are research utility, defining Maori, informed consent, confidentiality, issues with human tissues and genetic material, participant remuneration and recognition (koha), intellectual property, and

Andrew Sporle; Jonathan Koea

86

Nuclear Power as an Ethical Issue: Utilitarian Ethics and Egalitarian Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the philosophical debate over the issue of nuclear power. Discussed are the utilitarian nature of the justification of nuclear power and the utilitarian approaches to the issue of nuclear power, the strengths and weaknesses of this approach, and utilitarian versus egalitarian ethics. (KR)

Hadjilambrinos, Constantine

1990-01-01

87

REORIENTING FAMILY SERVICES: THE PROFESSIONAL RESPONSE TO SUDDEN UNEXPECTED DEATHS IN INFANCY - ISSUES AND PROTOCOLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses key service and support issues faced by families who have experienced a sudden unexplained death of an infant (SUDI), the majority of which are from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), within an environment of increasing social inequality and poor service coordination. The issues include: changes in the social and economic environments of SUDI families; the forensic focus

David Tipene-Leach; Sally Abel; Carole Everard; Riripeti Haretuku

88

A Disability Studies Response to JTE's Themed Issue on Diversity and Disability in Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a recent themed issue of "Journal of Teacher Education" ("JTE" 63.4) about issues of disability, diversity, and teacher education, guest editors Marleen Pugach, Linda Blanton, and Lani Florian (2012) invite readers to participate in "honest, difficult, and much needed dialogue across the many diversity constituencies in teacher education" (p.…

Collins, Kathleen M.

2013-01-01

89

Positive Emotional Responses to Hybridised Writing about a Socio-Scientific Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to understand better the role of affect in learning about socio-scientific issues (SSI), this study investigated Year 12 students' emotional arousal as they participated in an online writing-to-learn science project about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. Students wrote a series of hybridised scientific narratives, or BioStories,…

Tomas, Louisa; Ritchie, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

90

RESPONSE TO ISSUES AND DATA SUBMISSIONS ON THE CARCINOGENICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)  

EPA Science Inventory

The scientific debate over the potential carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. his document reviews the issues considered by the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addendum to the Health Assessmen...

91

Do Ethical Judgments Depend on the Type of Response Scale? Comparing Acceptability versus Unacceptability Judgments in the Case of Life-Ending Procedures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using Functional Measurement (Anderson, 2008), Frileux, Lelievre, Munoz Sastre, Mullet, and Sorum (2003) examined the joint impact of several key factors on lay people's judgments of the acceptability of physicians' interventions to end patients' lives. The level of acceptability was high, and the information integration rule that best described…

Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Gonzalez, Charlene; Lhermitte, Astrid; Sorum, Paul C.; Mullet, Etienne

2010-01-01

92

A resource-based-view of the socially responsible firm: Stakeholder interdependence, ethical awareness, and issue responsiveness as strategic assets  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the resource-based view of the firm has made significant headway in explaining differences in interfirm performance. However, this perspective has not considered the social and ethical dimensions of organizational resources. This paper seeks to provide such an integration. Using Kuhn's three stage model of adaptive behavior, the resource worthiness of stakeholder management, business ethics, and issues management

Reginald A. Litz

1996-01-01

93

Internet Censorship Issues for Teacher-Librarians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes and critiques emerging issues about Internet access in schools and school libraries. Discusses software products for filtering and rating expressive content on the Internet, reader-response-theory implications for filtering and rating Internet content, ambiguities, and the role of school librarians and acceptable-use policies. (AEF)

Schrader, Alvin

1999-01-01

94

Responses to Issues Raised about Validity, Bias, and Fairness in High-Stakes Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We are pleased that our article prompted this series of four commentaries and that we have this opportunity to respond. We address each in turn. Duckworth and Kaufman and Agars discussed, respectively, two broad issues concerning the validity of selection systems, namely, the expansion of the predictor domain to include noncognitive predictors of…

Sackett, Paul R.; Borneman, Matthew J.; Connelly, Brian S.

2009-01-01

95

Faculty Response to Ethical Issues at an American University in the Middle-East  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The objective of this study is to get feedback on faculty perception of ethical issues related to teaching, scholarship and service at a relatively new American-style university in the Middle-East. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire involving 21 scenarios with multiple choice answers was developed and distributed to all faculty…

Tabsh, Sami W.; El Kadi, Hany A.; Abdelfatah, Akmal S.

2012-01-01

96

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for the 1990s and Beyond. Trends and Issues Paper No. 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this trends and issues paper is to advance the search for creative solutions to the difficulties experienced by minority students and to draw attention to what teachers need to know and do in order to work effectively with a culturally heterogeneous population. Attention is given to the schooling of minority students in general,…

Villegas, Ana Maria

97

Issues-Centered Education Misread: A Response to Grant and Tzetzo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Debates points raised by S. G. Grant and Kathryn Tzetzo in their critique of the authors'"Handbook on Teaching Social Education," particularly claims that the book gives mixed messages to teachers regarding content, teaching methods, and the definition of issues-centered education, and that it leaves related questions unanswered. (DSK)

Evans, Ronald W.; Saxe, David Warren

1998-01-01

98

Educational Responses to Issues of Self-Esteem and Trust in Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine the effectiveness of past and existing programs in meeting the needs of homeless children, this study examined current research on problems facing homeless students and reviewed programs developed to meet the students' needs. Organizations dealing with issues of homelessness were contacted, and available sources in print were…

Root, Elaine H.

99

Student conceptualizations of the nature of science in response to a socioscientific issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates student conceptualizations of the nature of science (NOS) and how students interpret and evaluate conflicting evidence regarding a socioscientific issue. Eighty?four high school students participated in the study by reading contradictory reports about the status of global warming and responding to questions designed to elicit ideas pertinent to the research goals. A subsample of 30 students was

Troy D. Sadler; F. William Chambers; Dana L. Zeidler

2004-01-01

100

Issue involvement can increase or decrease persuasion by enhancing message-relevant cognitive responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments with 96 undergraduates tested the hypothesis that high issue involvement enhances thinking about the content of a persuasive communication. Exp I varied involvement and the direction of a message (pro- or counterattitudinal). Increasing involvement enhanced persuasion for the proattitudinal but reduced persuasion for the counterattitudinal advocacy. Exp II again varied involvement, but both messages took a counterattitudinal position.

Richard E. Petty; John T. Cacioppo

1979-01-01

101

Acceptable Practices in Maintaining Personnel Files.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Determining acceptable practices in maintaining personnel files is a pertinent issue for school personnel administrators today. Recognizing this, the Georgia Association of School Personnel Administrators accepted the study of this topic as a committee assignment from the American Association of School Personnel Administrators. A survey instrument…

American Association of School Personnel Administrators, Seven Hills, OH.

102

Fitting Item Response Theory Models to Two Personality Inventories: Issues and Insights.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared the fit of several Item Response Theory (IRT) models to two personality assessment instruments using data from 13,059 individuals responding to one instrument and 1,770 individuals responding to the other. Two- and three-parameter logistic models fit some scales reasonably well, but not others, and the graded response model generally did…

Chernyshenko, Oleksandr S.; Stark, Stephen; Chan, Kim-Yin; Drasgow, Fritz; Williams, Bruce

2001-01-01

103

Child Maltreatment in Remote Aboriginal Communities and the Northern Territory Emergency Response: A Complex Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty years after the 1967 Referendum and 10 years after the Bringing Them Home inquiry published its report into the Stolen Generations, in June 2007 the Howard Federal Government launched an Emergency Response intervention in the Northern Territory, having recognised the urgent need to reduce the incidence of child maltreatment in remote Aboriginal communities. This intervention was developed in response

Sally V. Hunter

2008-01-01

104

The Universities' Responsibilities to Society: International Perspectives. Issues in Higher Education Series. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three broad subthemes were addressed in a conference focusing on the responsibilities of universities. These were anticipating change relative to university development, the international knowledge enterprise, and academic freedom and university autonomy as prerequisite for the university meeting its responsibilities. Following an introduction,…

Neave, Guy, Ed.

105

Issues at the interface between ecology and toxicology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although facing many similar problems, there are differences between ecology and toxicology in the nature and aspect of some issues. Scientific challenges relate to the fundamentals of toxicology and ecology. For dose and response, the metrics of dose and response, methods for extrapolation from lab to field, generally accepted definitions of adverse effects (including definitions for health and categorization of

Lynn S McCarty

2002-01-01

106

JPRS Report, Environmental Issues, Japan: Response Strategies for Global Warming Studied.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the proceedings carried out between January and June 1989 by the subgroups of the Advisory Committee on Climate change whose aim was to assess the environmental impacts and to evaluate response strategies. This follows the first inter...

1990-01-01

107

Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

108

Reexamining Traditional Issues in Survey Research: Just How Evil Is the Anathema of Low Response Rate?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to determine the extent to which the results of an employment survey of graduates of a teacher preparation program would have been affected by changes in response rate. At the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, a followup of teacher education program graduates is conducted annually. A total of 284 graduates of the 1992…

Clark, Sheldon B.; Boser, Judith A.

109

Economic Preferences or Attitude Expressions?: An Analysis of Dollar Responses to Public Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants in contingent valuation surveys and jurors setting punitive damages in civil trials provide answers denominated in dollars. These answers are better understood as expressions of attitudes than as indications of economic preferences. Well-established characteristics of attitudes and of the core process of affective valuation explain several robust features of dollar responses: high correlations with other measures of attractiveness or

Daniel Kahneman; Ilana Ritov; David A Schkade

1999-01-01

110

Models of Response to Intervention in the Northwest Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2009--No. 079  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Response to intervention (RTI) is a framework for providing interventions and services at increasing levels of intensity until students succeed. The framework helps teachers and schools provide instruction and interventions matched to student needs, monitor progress frequently to guide decisions about changes in instruction or goals, and apply…

Stepanek, Jennifer; Peixotto, Kit

2009-01-01

111

Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

2002-01-01

112

A Critical Appraisal of Issues in Differential Response: Moving the Field Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reaction article highlights areas of agreement and disagreement with the study conducted by Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes on the current state of research and practice in differential response (DR). Overall, we agree with several of the arguments put forth by Hughes et al. regarding the limitations of DR research and the…

Winokur, Marc A.; Gabel, George

2013-01-01

113

Teacher Perceptions of Issues Related to Implementation of Response to Intervention in the Regular Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several school districts in a southern US state use a three-tiered Response to Intervention (RtI) model to supplemental core reading instruction and positively impact student achievement, the model appears to have had nominal impact. The theoretical foundation for this study is anchored in a constructivist approach to education. Three…

Bissell, Erica K.

2012-01-01

114

Generating a taxonomy of regulatory responses to emerging issues in biomedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the biomedical field, calls for the generation of new regulations or for the amendment of existing regulations often follow\\u000a the emergence of apparently new research practices (such as embryonic stem cell research), clinical practices (such as facial\\u000a transplantation) and entities (such as Avian Influenza\\/’Bird Flu’). Calls for regulatory responses also arise as a result\\u000a of controversies which bring to

Wendy Lipworth

2005-01-01

115

Acceptability of fissure sealants from the child's perspective.  

PubMed

Aim To seek children's opinions about the acceptability of resin fissure sealant placement.Study design Service evaluation using a child-centred questionnaire issued to a prospective sample of consecutive hospital patients.Method Questionnaires were issued to children, aged 3 to 16 years, immediately after resin fissure sealant placement in the Paediatric Dentistry Department in Sheffield. Participants used a three-point faces scale for positive, neutral and negative responses, arranged as a Likert scale with minimal text, to rate their treatment experiences and satisfaction with the dental visit.Results Two hundred questionnaires were returned. Overall, 96% (n = 191) recorded a positive or neutral response for the ease at which they coped with the procedure, with most children positive about having fissure sealants placed again (66%; n = 132). Further analysis demonstrated that children who had fissure sealants on a previous occasion found them easier than those having them for the first time (p <0.05, chi-squared test). Almost half of all participants where ambivalent about the taste and feeling (46%; n = 92 and 55%; n = 110 respectively). The vast majority of children were satisfied with the explanations provided by their operator.Conclusion Most participants found having resin fissure sealants placed an overall acceptable procedure, with patient acceptance improving with increased treatment experience. PMID:25012350

Morgan, A G; Madahar, A K; Deery, C

2014-07-11

116

Summary of: Acceptability of fissure sealants from the child's perspective.  

PubMed

Aim To seek children's opinions about the acceptability of resin fissure sealant placement.Study design Service evaluation using a child-centred questionnaire issued to a prospective sample of consecutive hospital patients.Method Questionnaires were issued to children, aged 3 to 16 years, immediately after resin fissure sealant placement in the Paediatric Dentistry Department in Sheffield. Participants used a three-point faces scale for positive, neutral and negative responses, arranged as a Likert scale with minimal text, to rate their treatment experiences and satisfaction with the dental visit.Results Two hundred questionnaires were returned. Overall, 96% (n = 191) recorded a positive or neutral response for the ease at which they coped with the procedure, with most children positive about having fissure sealants placed again (66%; n = 132). Further analysis demonstrated that children who had fissure sealants on a previous occasion found them easier than those having them for the first time (p <0.05, chi-squared test). Almost half of all participants where ambivalent about the taste and feeling (46%; n = 92 and 55%; n = 110 respectively). The vast majority of children were satisfied with the explanations provided by their operator.Conclusion Most participants found having resin fissure sealants placed an overall acceptable procedure, with patient acceptance improving with increased treatment experience. PMID:25012331

Evans, Dafydd

2014-07-11

117

LIMS user acceptance testing.  

PubMed

Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) play a key role in the pharmaceutical industry. Thorough and accurate validation of such systems is critical and is a regulatory requirement. LIMS user acceptance testing is one aspect of this testing and enables the user to make a decision to accept or reject implementation of the system. This paper discusses key elements in facilitating the development and execution of a LIMS User Acceptance Test Plan (UATP). PMID:14660299

Klein, Corbett S

2003-01-01

118

Accepting the T3D  

SciTech Connect

In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

1994-10-01

119

26 CFR 301.6110-6 - Written determinations issued in response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...written determinations issued before July 5, 1967. (B) Background file documents relating...written determinations issued before July 5, 1967. General written determinations issued before July 5, 1967 shall not be subject to...

2013-04-01

120

Public Acceptance of Management Actions and Judgments of Responsibility for the Wolves of the Southern Greater Yellowstone Area: Report to Grand Teton National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction Wolves of Grand Teton National Park and the Greater Yellowstone Area Gray wolves (Canis lupus) appeared in Grand Teton National Park (GRTE) in October of 1998, two years after being reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Since that time, five packs have been within the GRTE borders - Gros Ventre Pack, Nez Perce Pack, Yellowstone Delta Pack, Teton Pack, and Green River Pack (Table 1). Wolves in the Greater Yellowstone Area are increasing and spreading out geographically (USFWS and others, 2004). This dispersion was demonstrated recently by the death of a 2-year-old female wolf from the Swan Lake pack on I-70 in Colorado (June 7, 2004; http://mountain-prairie.USFWS.gov/pressrel /04-43.htm). The organization of wolf packs in the GYA is dynamic and highly structured. In 2003, for example, a wolf from the Teton Pack joined with the Green River Pack, and several young wolves left the Teton Pack and moved south (USFWS and others, 2004). Pack size (averaging five to ten members) is dependent on hunting efficiency, which depends on prey size, type, and density. Each pack defends home ranges of several hundred square miles. The social structure of the pack is based on a breeding pair (an alpha male and female). Other wolves in the pack can be categorized as betas (males and/or females second in rank to the alphas), subordinates, pups, and occasional omegas (outcasts). Because generally only the alpha pair breeds, subordinate wolves of reproductive age must disperse from their packs and form new associations in order to breed. (http://www.nps.gov/grte/wolf/biolo.htm). The reintroduced wolves are classified by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as "nonessential experimental" under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act. The recovery criteria for the GYA wolves were met in 2002 for removing the wolves from the Endangered Species List (30 or more breeding pairs). Currently, the USFWS manages wolf populations in the GYA until delisting occurs. After delisting, state Fish and Wildlife Services in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming will be responsible for managing wolves. Each state must submit a wolf management plan to the USFWS which then must be approved before management shifts occur. As of this writing, the process of delisting the wolves in the state of Wyoming is ongoing. However, the reclassification of wolves nationwide was completed on April 1, 2003. Wolves outside of YNP changed in status from endangered to threatened. The wolves classified in the experimental nonessential population did not change in status (USFWS and others, 2004). This classification of experimental nonessential population allows for flexibility in management decisions concerning the wolves (Smith and others, 2004). For example, control actions in the GYA included trapping and radio-collaring four wolves; intensive monitoring; increasing riders on grazing allotments; harassing wolves with rubber bullets, cracker shells, and lights; moving livestock to different pastures; and issuing four shoot on-sight permits. When non-lethal control methods were not effective, wolves were killed in an attempt to prevent further livestock depredations (USFWS and others, 2004; Table 1). At the same time that wolf numbers are rising, human population statistics in the GRTE area are also rising. The population of Teton County, Wyoming in 1990 was just over 11,000 people; today that number has increased to approximately 19,000 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2005). park visitation for GRTE has been substantial over the last several years with an average visitation of 2.5 million visitors (NPS, 2004a). Furthermore, land ownership surrounding GRTE and the establishment of grazing rights within park boundaries are problem areas for wolf-human interactions due to livestock depredation. With increasing numbers of visitors, residents, and livestock it is reasonable to assume that conflicts are going to increase also. In 1950, GRTE was expanded to in

Taylor, Jonathan G.; Johnson, S. Shea; Shelby, Lori B.

2005-01-01

121

What Is Acceptable Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The acceptable failure probability of technical structures and systems is studied in the paper. The problem is approached from two points of view: the personal and the societal point of view. The different view points of acceptable risk lead to different ...

J. K. Vrijling J. F. M. Wessels W. van Hengel R. J. Houben

1993-01-01

122

Research Lasers and Air Traffic Safety: Issues, Concerns and Responsibilities of the Research Community  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of outdoor use of lasers relative to air traffic has become a diverse and dynamic topic. During the past several decades, the use of lasers in outdoor research activities have increased significantly. Increases in the outdoor use of lasers and increases in air traffic densities have changed the levels of risk involved. To date there have been no documented incidents of air traffic interference from research lasers; however, incidents involving display lasers have shown a marked increase. As a result of the national response to these incidents, new concerns over lasers have arisen. Through the efforts of the SAE G-10T Laser Safety Hazards Subcommittee and the ANSI Z136.6 development committee, potential detrimental effects to air traffic beyond the traditional eye damage concerns have been identified. An increased emphasis from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Center for Devices and Radiological Hazards (CDRH), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) along with increased concern by the public have resulted in focused scrutiny of potential hazards presented by lasers. The research community needs to rethink the traditional methods of risk evaluation and application of protective measures. The best current approach to assure adequate protection of air traffic is the application of viable hazard and risk analysis and the use of validated protective measures. Standards making efforts and regulatory development must be supported by the research community to assure that reasonable measures are developed. Without input, standards and regulations can be developed that are not compatible with the needs of the research community. Finally, support is needed for the continued development and validation of protective measures.

Nessler, Phillip J., Jr.

1998-01-01

123

Stream macroinvertebrate response models for bioassessment metrics: addressing the issue of spatial scale.  

PubMed

We developed independent predictive disturbance models for a full regional data set and four individual ecoregions (Full Region vs. Individual Ecoregion models) to evaluate effects of spatial scale on the assessment of human landscape modification, on predicted response of stream biota, and the effect of other possible confounding factors, such as watershed size and elevation, on model performance. We selected macroinvertebrate sampling sites for model development (n = 591) and validation (n = 467) that met strict screening criteria from four proximal ecoregions in the northeastern U.S.: North Central Appalachians, Ridge and Valley, Northeastern Highlands, and Northern Piedmont. Models were developed using boosted regression tree (BRT) techniques for four macroinvertebrate metrics; results were compared among ecoregions and metrics. Comparing within a region but across the four macroinvertebrate metrics, the average richness of tolerant taxa (RichTOL) had the highest R(2) for BRT models. Across the four metrics, final BRT models had between four and seven explanatory variables and always included a variable related to urbanization (e.g., population density, percent urban, or percent manmade channels), and either a measure of hydrologic runoff (e.g., minimum April, average December, or maximum monthly runoff) and(or) a natural landscape factor (e.g., riparian slope, precipitation, and elevation), or a measure of riparian disturbance. Contrary to our expectations, Full Region models explained nearly as much variance in the macroinvertebrate data as Individual Ecoregion models, and taking into account watershed size or elevation did not appear to improve model performance. As a result, it may be advantageous for bioassessment programs to develop large regional models as a preliminary assessment of overall disturbance conditions as long as the range in natural landscape variability is not excessive. PMID:24675770

Waite, Ian R; Kennen, Jonathan G; May, Jason T; Brown, Larry R; Cuffney, Thomas F; Jones, Kimberly A; Orlando, James L

2014-01-01

124

ICU nurses' acceptance of electronic health records  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' acceptance of electronic health records (EHR) technology and examine the relationship between EHR design, implementation factors, and nurse acceptance. Design The authors analyzed data from two cross-sectional survey questionnaires distributed to nurses working in four ICUs at a northeastern US regional medical center, 3?months and 12?months after EHR implementation. Measurements Survey items were drawn from established instruments used to measure EHR acceptance and usability, and the usefulness of three EHR functionalities, specifically computerized provider order entry (CPOE), the electronic medication administration record (eMAR), and a nursing documentation flowsheet. Results On average, ICU nurses were more accepting of the EHR at 12?months as compared to 3?months. They also perceived the EHR as being more usable and both CPOE and eMAR as being more useful. Multivariate hierarchical modeling indicated that EHR usability and CPOE usefulness predicted EHR acceptance at both 3 and 12?months. At 3?months postimplementation, eMAR usefulness predicted EHR acceptance, but its effect disappeared at 12?months. Nursing flowsheet usefulness predicted EHR acceptance but only at 12?months. Conclusion As the push toward implementation of EHR technology continues, more hospitals will face issues related to acceptance of EHR technology by staff caring for critically ill patients. This research suggests that factors related to technology design have strong effects on acceptance, even 1?year following the EHR implementation.

Cartmill, Randi; Blosky, Mary Ann; Brown, Roger; Hackenberg, Matthew; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Norfolk, Evan; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Walker, James M

2011-01-01

125

"That's Not Fair!"--Using RET to Address the Issue of Fairness in Classroom Guidance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If school counselors give a typical Rational Emotive Therapy disputative response to the issue of fairness, students are not helped to develop a more reasonable and rational view on this issue. Describes discussion led by counselor emphasizing choice, acceptance, and the irrationality of the belief that the world is unfair. (LSR)

Kelly, Forrest R., Jr.

1996-01-01

126

Feasibility and Consequences of Response to Intervention: Examination of the Issues and Scientific Evidence as a Model for the Identification of Individuals with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a response to the thoughtful paper presented by Gerber in this issue and at the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities Responsiveness-to-Intervention Symposium in Kansas City with guidance from five major questions posed by the organizers of the symposium. Gerber's paper provides interesting perspectives regarding…

Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

2005-01-01

127

Acceptance procedures: Microfilm printer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Acceptance tests were made for a special order automatic additive color microfilm printer. Tests include film capacity, film transport, resolution, illumination uniformity, exposure range checks, and color cuing considerations.

Lockwood, H. E.

1973-01-01

128

USGS to accept private funds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the federal government's largest earth science research agency, is now authorized to accept contributions from private sources and to collaborate with such sources in projects that support the agency's scientific research and its development of technology and data systems.Before the USGS can accept outside contributions, however, the proposed project must be deemed to be in the public interest and must be deemed compatible with the basic USGS mission. Among the responsibilities of the USGS, are assessing the nation's land, water, energy, and mineral resources and developing methods to define and mitigate hazards associated with earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and landslides. Details on criteria and procedures for making contributions and entering into collaborative projects are outlined in the June 2 Federal Register.

129

Affective Issues in Learning Technologies: Emotional Responses to Technology and Technology's Role in Supporting Socio-Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on some of the author's research studies over the past thirty years and places these in a wider context to reflect on research into affective issues in learning technologies over this period, and to consider whether and how the issues uncovered by research have changed as technologies have developed over time. Three issues are…

Jones, Ann

2010-01-01

130

Perfectionism and Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper argues that there is both a positive and a negative form of perfectionism, and that they can be differentiated in terms of acceptance. The basic argument is that there is nothing unhealthy or dysfunctional about the striving for perfection as such—perfectionism, however, becomes dysfunctional when this striving for perfection turns into a demand for perfection, defined as

Lars-Gunnar Lundh

2004-01-01

131

Why was Relativity Accepted?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

Brush, S. G.

132

'The buck stops here': accepting responsibility for learning and actions after graduation from a problem-based learning nursing education curriculum.  

PubMed

Despite the increased attention that problem-based learning has received as an appropriate pedagogical technique for educating adults for professional practice, reports that evaluate the process are rare and usually relate to professions other than nursing. A study was undertaken in order to discover the graduates' own perceptions of a problem-based learning programme and its effectiveness in preparing them for the reality of their chosen profession. Twelve practising graduate nurses who had completed the programme were interviewed according to the ethnographic method. Three categories were identified from the data: 'and all of a sudden...', which describes the transition from PBL student to staff nurse; 'not an unthinking assistant', where the characteristics that the PBL graduates believe make them different from traditionally trained nurses are described; and 'the buck stops here', which describes the sense of personal responsibility that the graduates experience in terms of their learning and actions. PMID:9637330

Biley, F C; Smith, K L

1998-05-01

133

OnlineTED.com - a novel web-based audience response system for higher education. A pilot study to evaluate user acceptance  

PubMed Central

Background and aim: Audience response (AR) systems are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education. However, high costs and complexity of conventional AR systems often limit their use. Here we present a novel AR system that is platform independent and does not require hardware clickers or additional software to be installed. Methods and results: “OnlineTED” was developed at Technische Universität München (TUM) based on Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) with a My Structured Query Language (MySQL)-database as server- and Javascript as client-side programming languages. “OnlineTED” enables lecturers to create and manage question sets online and start polls in-class via a web-browser. Students can participate in the polls with any internet-enabled device (smartphones, tablet-PCs or laptops). A paper-based survey was conducted with undergraduate medical students and lecturers at TUM to compare "OnlineTED" with conventional AR systems using clickers. "OnlineTED" received above-average evaluation results by both students and lecturers at TUM and was seen on par or superior to conventional AR systems. The survey results indicated that up to 80% of students at TUM own an internet-enabled device (smartphone or tablet-PC) for participation in web-based AR technologies. Summary and Conclusion: “OnlineTED” is a novel web-based and platform-independent AR system for higher education that was well received by students and lecturers. As a non-commercial alternative to conventional AR systems it may foster interactive teaching in undergraduate education, in particular with large audiences.

Kuhbeck, Felizian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

2014-01-01

134

Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

Ward, Russell A.

1980-01-01

135

Fair Play: Accepting Responsibility for Student Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Equity in education relies on equal access to learning experiences and fair play during those experiences. Too often policy makers, voters and even some educators define equity only in terms of equal access. Equity is less about the same treatment for all and more about holding everyone to the same high standards and high expectations. All…

Karns, Michelle S.; Parker, Dennis R.

2007-01-01

136

Pulling the heartstrings, arguing the case: a narrative response to the issue of moral agency in moral distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper it is argued that moral distress is an emotional response to an ethical dilemma, and that to date, the literature has largely failed to address the fundamental questions that need to be answered in response to this emotional response. Firstly, does moral distress accurately identify a wrong being done to patients? Secondly, if it does, can nurses

Aileen Walsh

2010-01-01

137

Acceptance of Internet Banking Systems among Young Managers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to determine acceptance of internet banking system among potential young users, specifically future young managers. The relationships and the effects of computer self-efficacy (CSE) and extended technology acceptance model (TAM) on the behavioural intention (BI) to use internet banking system were examined. Measurement of CSE, TAM and BI were adapted from previous studies. However construct for TAM has been extended by adding a new variable which is perceived credibility (PC). A survey through questionnaire was conducted to determine the acceptance level of CSE, TAM and BI. Data were obtained from 275 Technology Management students, who are pursuing their undergraduate studies in a Malaysia's public university. The confirmatory factor analysis performed has identified four variables as determinant factors of internet banking acceptance. The first variable is computer self-efficacy (CSE), and another three variables from TAM constructs which are perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PE) and perceived credibility (PC). The finding of this study indicated that CSE has a positive effect on PU and PE of the Internet banking systems. Respondents' CSE was positively affecting their PC of the systems, indicating that the higher the ability of one in computer skills, the higher the security and privacy issues of PC will be concerned. The multiple regression analysis indicated that only two construct of TAM; PU and PC were significantly associated with BI. It was found that the future managers' CSE indirectly affects their BI to use the internet banking systems through PU and PC of TAM. TAM was found to have direct effects on respondents' BI to use the systems. Both CSE and the PU and PC of TAM were good predictors in understanding individual responses to information technology. The role of PE of the original TAM to predict the attitude of users towards the use of information technology systems was surprisingly insignificant.

Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; M, Yeow S.; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad

2013-06-01

138

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...Promissory notes and postdated credit instruments are not acceptable...Irrevocable commercial letters of credit issued by a...

2013-07-01

139

Key Issues for User Acceptance of FPGA Design Tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is hardly a field in the EDA community where latest research activities and real use of tools is so divergent as in the case of synthesis for FPGAs. Latest research work for FPGA synthesis and also available tools are quickly proceeding towards the third level of synthesis, behavioral synthesis. On the other hand, the majority of FPGA designs is

Albrecht Ditzinger; Ralph Remme

1996-01-01

140

[On the acceptability of xenografts].  

PubMed

Transplantation represents a major advance in modern medicine with a major impact on the interactions between individuals and society. The numbers of patients undergoing organ transplantation increased steadily over the years and around 250,000 individuals are living nowadays in Europe with a transplanted organ. On the other hand, the numbers of cadaveric (brain-dead) donors used for organ transplantation remains stable, at around 5,000 each year, and the numbers of transplantation from living donors only slowly increase in Europe. Therefore, a gap is growing between the numbers of patients in need of a transplant and the numbers of organs available for transplantation. About 45,000 patients are currently on renal transplant waiting lists in Europe and, depending on the countries considered, 15 to 30 % of candidates for liver or heart transplantation die before a life-saving transplant becomes available to them. There is therefore an urgent need to implement innovative research and to take full advantage of recent biotechnological advances to explore new avenues in xenotransplantation, and to simultaneously address the ethical, societal and public health issues related to organ replacement. Much progresses have been accomplished in the understanding of xenograft rejection processes that include hyperacute, acute vascular and cellular rejection mechanisms. Strategies to promote xenograft survival that are currently under evaluation include genetic engineering of donor pigs, adapted immunosuppressive treatments and tolerance induction. Also, the psychological acceptance has been evaluated. PMID:15745706

Séveno, Céline; Fellous, Michèle; Ashton-Chess, Joanna; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Vanhove, Bernard

2005-03-01

141

The Factorial Invariance of Responses by Males and Females to a Multidimensional Self-Concept Instrument: Substantive and Methodological Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this study are to examine the factorial invariance of responses by preadolescent males and females to a multidimensional self-concept instrument, and to demonstrate the use of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Sets of responses by 500 males and by 500 females were each randomly divided in half to form four groups (M1, M2, F1, and…

Marsh, Herbert W.

142

Public acceptance and USCEA  

SciTech Connect

Public opinion plays a critical role in ensuring the future of nuclear energy. After the events at Three Mile Island in 1979, and more recently the Chernobyl accident, worldwide antinuclear movements surged upward. As a result, the global nuclear industry was compelled to institute education programs aimed at allaying public apprehension surrounding nuclear power. The US Council for Energy Awareness strives to disseminate information on nuclear issues in an effort to educate the public and thus create a foundation of support for this important energy option. The US Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA) is the national communications and information organization for the US commercial nuclear power industry. The organization provides a national voice for an industry whose issues are not always well understood by the public or by policy makers. It performs many functions for member companies, and offers information to the public. Included in the primary functions USCEA conducts on behalf of the nuclear industry are advertising, public and media relations, technical programs, and conferences. Worldwide, its membership is approximately 400, and includes utilities, vendors, consultants, universities, and other organizations with an interest in nuclear power.

Not Available

1993-01-01

143

Lions in the Path of Stability and Security: Oman's Response to Pressing Issues in the Middle East.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Scholars and intelligence experts have identified numerous factors that contribute to instability and insecurity in the Middle East. These factors range from large youth populations to Islamic extremism. This thesis examines responses adopted by the Sulta...

J. C. Howk

2008-01-01

144

Linguistic Models of FO Use, Physiological Models of FO Control, and the Issue of "Mean Response Time."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluates "mean response time" (MRT), a method used in previous studies to relate physiological evidence (recordings of electromyographic activity in the cricothyroid and sternohyoid) to acoustic evidence (fundamental frequency). (Author/VWL)

Herman, Rebecca; Beckman, Mary; Honda, Kiyoshi

1999-01-01

145

Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

Progressive Architecture, 1974

1974-01-01

146

SPS technical issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technical issues which would either seriously impact or potentially negate the integrity of a solar power satellite program are enumerated. Issues are identified not only relating to the question of engineering feasibility, but also to the equally important areas of environmental and social acceptability and, especially, economic viability. Specific information required for resolution of the issues was developed and a planned overall approach for resolution was identified. Results of these analyses show that 60% of the technical issues can be resolved with analysis only; 10% require only ground testing for resolution; and the remaining 30% require space experiments or demonstrations for resolution. The results also show that 85% resolution of the issues may be accomplished prior to development of a protoype.

Guttman, C. H.

1980-01-01

147

Selected College Students' Knowledge and Perceptions of Biotechnology Issues Reported in the Mass Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Agricultural communications students (n=330) were surveyed to determine their knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnology issues reported in the mass media. Although students achieved only 30% correct responses, 84% perceived their knowledge level to be average to high. Most were somewhat accepting of genetic modification for plants but less…

Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.; Dunsford, Deborah W.

2002-01-01

148

Features of State Response to Intervention Initiatives in Northeast and Islands Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2009-No. 083  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach to instruction, assessment, and intervention that enables early identification of students who are experiencing academic or behavioral difficulties. The jurisdictions served by the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands expressed interest in a study of whether and how state education…

Bocala, Candice; Mello, Daniel; Reedy, Kristin; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

2009-01-01

149

Dear Friends, This issue of the Monitor focuses on the Responsible Media Messages piece of the Teen Pregnancy Puzzle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our guest writers present responses to this media culture that address individuals and families. MOAPPP Board member, Mala Thao, brings us an account of a wonderful project focused on girls developing positive media messages; David Walsh, Ph.D., founder of the National Institute on Media and the Family, writes about concrete steps parents can take to create \\

Brigid Riley; Sally W. Pillsbury; Michael D. Resnick; Deborah Watts; Noya Woodrich; Nance Alexander; Steve Fillbrandt; Briana Franzmeier; Jerry Gallivan; Elizabeth Grant; Walter C. Gray; Bettina Hoye; Qamar Ibrahim; Rachel Johnson; Heather Kilgore; Anne McInerney; Dana O'Connor; Chris Reif; Charles Crutchfield; Bob Diamond; M. D. Robbin Frazier; Yusef Mgeni; Nancy Nelson

2006-01-01

150

Validation and acceptance of synthetic infrared imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the use of an image query database (IQ-DB) tool as a means of implementing a validation strategy for synthetic long-wave infrared images of sea clutter. Specifically it was required to determine the validity of the synthetic imagery for use in developing and testing automatic target detection algorithms. The strategy adopted for exploiting synthetic imagery is outlined and the key issues of validation and acceptance are discussed in detail. A wide range of image metrics has been developed to achieve pre-defined validation criteria. A number of these metrics, which include post processing algorithms, are presented. Furthermore, the IQ-DB provides a robust mechanism for configuration management and control of the large volume of data used. The implementation of the IQ-DB is reviewed in terms of its cardinal point specification and its central role in synthetic imagery validation and EOSS progressive acceptance.

Smith, Moira I.; Bernhardt, Mark; Angell, Christopher R.; Hickman, Duncan; Whitehead, Philip; Patel, Dilip

2004-08-01

151

Acceptance of tinnitus: validation of the tinnitus acceptance questionnaire.  

PubMed

The concept of acceptance has recently received growing attention within tinnitus research due to the fact that tinnitus acceptance is one of the major targets of psychotherapeutic treatments. Accordingly, acceptance-based treatments will most likely be increasingly offered to tinnitus patients and assessments of acceptance-related behaviours will thus be needed. The current study investigated the factorial structure of the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ) and the role of tinnitus acceptance as mediating link between sound perception (i.e. subjective loudness of tinnitus) and tinnitus distress. In total, 424 patients with chronic tinnitus completed the TAQ and validated measures of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression online. Confirmatory factor analysis provided support to a good fit of the data to the hypothesised bifactor model (root-mean-square-error of approximation = .065; Comparative Fit Index = .974; Tucker-Lewis Index = .958; standardised root mean square residual = .032). In addition, mediation analysis, using a non-parametric joint coefficient approach, revealed that tinnitus-specific acceptance partially mediated the relation between subjective tinnitus loudness and tinnitus distress (path ab = 5.96; 95% CI: 4.49, 7.69). In a multiple mediator model, tinnitus acceptance had a significantly stronger indirect effect than anxiety. The results confirm the factorial structure of the TAQ and suggest the importance of a general acceptance factor that contributes important unique variance beyond that of the first-order factors activity engagement and tinnitus suppression. Tinnitus acceptance as measured with the TAQ is proposed to be a key construct in tinnitus research and should be further implemented into treatment concepts to reduce tinnitus distress. PMID:23627873

Weise, Cornelia; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Hesser, Hugo; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Andersson, Gerhard

2013-06-01

152

Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria.

Craig, D.K. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Davis, J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Lee, L. (Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Lein, P. (Dames and Moore, West Valley, NY (United States). West Valley Demonstration Project); Omberg, S. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Iso

1992-01-01

153

Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M & 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria.

Craig, D.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Davis, J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Lee, L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lein, P. [Dames and Moore, West Valley, NY (United States). West Valley Demonstration Project; Omberg, S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1992-09-01

154

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of the local public, we put some effort in informing interested people, media, politicians on all l

Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

2009-04-01

155

[Taking the responsibility of a 'knowledge' one only has access during mental health consultations: stakes of an ethical issue].  

PubMed

Everyone has a certain knowledge of what psychologically constitutes him/her. Part of the therapist's ethical approach is to help this knowledge come to conscience. Apart from the analytical process, within one or a few therapeutic sessions, is the person consulting able to have access to a minimal knowledge about him-herself? Using this knowledge to guide certain aspects of his-her life, calls upon an ethics of responsibility on the part of the person consulting. To have this knowledge emerge demands on the therapists' part, a concept of the human being that takes into account subjective dimensions of the person. PMID:17111060

Colombel, Bernadette

2006-01-01

156

Dissolution test acceptance sampling plans.  

PubMed

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) general monograph provides a standard for dissolution compliance with the requirements as stated in the individual USP monograph for a tablet or capsule dosage form. The acceptance rules recommended by USP have important roles in the quality control process. The USP rules and their modifications are often used as an industrial lot release sampling plan, where a lot is accepted when the tablets or capsules sampled are accepted as proof of compliance with the requirement. In this paper, the operating characteristics of the USP acceptance rules are reviewed and compared to a selected modification. The operating characteristics curves show that the USP acceptance rules are sensitive to the true mean dissolution and do not reject a lot or batch that has a large percentage of tablets that dissolve with less than the dissolution specification. PMID:7581426

Tsong, Y; Hammerstrom, T; Lin, K; Ong, T E

1995-07-01

157

The Dependency Paradox in Close Relationships: Accepting Dependence Promotes Independence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using multiple methods, this investigation tested the hypothesis that a close relationship partner's acceptance of dependence when needed (e.g., sensitive responsiveness to distress cues) is associated with less dependence, more autonomous functioning, and more self-sufficiency (as opposed to more dependence) on the part of the supported individual. In two studies, measures of acceptance of dependency needs and independent functioning were

Brooke C. Feeney

2007-01-01

158

Ethical issues in organ transplantation.  

PubMed

Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate and ethically acceptable ways of utilizing the recent advances of stem cell transplantation from adult versus fetal donors, tissue engineering and the use of organs from animals or xenotransplantation. Data provided in support of the concept that clinical organ and tissue transplantation can be more beneficial and life saving if everyone involved in the process, including physicians and medical institutions, respect and consider the best interests of the patients, as well as honor the ethical, moral and religious values of society and are not tempted to seek personal fame or financial rewards. PMID:12566971

Abouna, George M

2003-01-01

159

Modeling of User Acceptance of Consumer E-Commerce Website  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As the consumer e-commerce market grows intensively competitive, the capability of a website to capture consumers and to be\\u000a accepted has been recognized as a critical issue. The user acceptance of a website not only brings immediate business opportunities,\\u000a it also casts great impact on future return and loyalty buildup of the consumer. This paper is intended to explore the

Rui Chen

2005-01-01

160

Press Releases Issued by Supplements Industry Organisations and Non-Industry Organisations in Response to Publication of Clinical Research Findings: A Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background Dietary supplement use is increasing despite lack of evidence of benefits, or evidence of harm. Press releases issued by the supplements industry might contribute to this situation by using ‘spin’ (strategies to hype or denigrate findings) to distort the results of clinical studies. We assessed press releases issued in response to publication of clinical studies on dietary supplements. Methods and Findings We analyzed 47 supplements industry press releases and 91 non-industry press releases and news stories, generated in response to 46 clinical studies of dietary supplements published between 1/1/2005 and 5/31/2013. The primary outcome was ‘spin’ content and direction. We also assessed disposition towards use of dietary supplements, reporting of study information, and dissemination of industry press releases. More supplements industry press releases (100%) contained ‘spin’ than non-industry media documents (55%, P<0.001). Hyping ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting benefit of supplements (median ‘spin’ score 3.3, 95% CI 1.0–5.5 vs 0.5, 0–1.0; P<0.001). Denigratory ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting no effect (6.0, 5.0–7.0 vs 0, 0–0; P<0.001) or harm (6.0, 5.5–7.5 vs 0, 0–0.5; P<0.001) from a supplement. Industry press releases advocated supplement use in response to >90% of studies that reported no benefit, or harm, of the supplement. Industry press releases less frequently reported study outcomes, sample size, and estimates of effect size than non-industry media documents (all P<0.001), particularly for studies that reported no benefit of supplements. Industry press releases were referenced by 148 news stories on the websites of 6 organizations that inform manufacturers, retailers and consumers of supplements. Conclusions Dietary supplements industry press releases issued in response to clinical research findings are characterized by ‘spin’ that hypes results that are favourable to supplement use and denigrates results that are not.

Wang, Michael T. M.; Gamble, Greg; Bolland, Mark J.; Grey, Andrew

2014-01-01

161

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-06-01

162

The California breast density information group: a collaborative response to the issues of breast density, breast cancer risk, and breast density notification legislation.  

PubMed

In anticipation of breast density notification legislation in the state of California, which would require notification of women with heterogeneously and extremely dense breast tissue, a working group of breast imagers and breast cancer risk specialists was formed to provide a common response framework. The California Breast Density Information Group identified key elements and implications of the law, researching scientific evidence needed to develop a robust response. In particular, issues of risk associated with dense breast tissue, masking of cancers by dense tissue on mammograms, and the efficacy, benefits, and harms of supplementary screening tests were studied and consensus reached. National guidelines and peer-reviewed published literature were used to recommend that women with dense breast tissue at screening mammography follow supplemental screening guidelines based on breast cancer risk assessment. The goal of developing educational materials for referring clinicians and patients was reached with the construction of an easily accessible Web site that contains information about breast density, breast cancer risk assessment, and supplementary imaging. This multi-institutional, multidisciplinary approach may be useful for organizations to frame responses as similar legislation is passed across the United States. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24023072

Price, Elissa R; Hargreaves, Jonathan; Lipson, Jafi A; Sickles, Edward A; Brenner, R James; Lindfors, Karen K; Joe, Bonnie N; Leung, Jessica W T; Feig, Stephen A; Bassett, Lawrence W; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Daniel, Bruce L; Kurian, Allison W; Love, Elyse; Ryan, Lauren; Walgenbach, Donna D; Ikeda, Debra M

2013-12-01

163

L-286, Acceptance Test Record.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, '200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction'. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision...

B. C. Harmon

2000-01-01

164

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14

165

Problems & Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists selected resources that help think about problems and issues and how they affect society in the areas of human health, social issues, and environmental issues. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources, with age levels and appropriate disciplines usually indicated. Suggests sample class…

Online-Offline, 2000

2000-01-01

166

Early Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Acceptance  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Our goal was to evaluate the effects of breastfeeding and dietary experiences on acceptance of a fruit and a green vegetable by 4- to 8-month-old infants. METHODS Forty-five infants, 44% of whom were breastfed, were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 treatment groups. One group was fed green beans, and the other was fed green beans and then peaches at the same time of day for 8 consecutive days. Acceptance of both foods, as determined by a variety of measures, was assessed before and after the home-exposure period. RESULTS During the initial exposure, infants ate more calories from peaches than from green beans. Breastfed infants showed greater liking of peaches, as did their mothers, who ate more fruits in general than did mothers who formula fed. Although formula-feeding mothers ate more green beans, there was no difference in their infants’ acceptance of this vegetable. For breastfed and formula-fed infants, repeated dietary exposure to green beans, with or without peaches, resulted in greater consumption of green beans (56.8 vs 93.6 g). Only infants who experienced green beans with peaches displayed fewer facial expressions of distaste during feeding. Mothers were apparently unaware of these changes in acceptance. CONCLUSIONS Breastfeeding confers an advantage in initial acceptance of a food, but only if mothers eat the food regularly. Once weaned, infants who receive repeated dietary exposure to a food eat more of it and may learn to like its flavor. However, because infants innately display facial expressions of distaste in response to certain flavors, caregivers may hesitate to continue offering these foods. Mothers should be encouraged to provide their infants with repeated opportunities to taste fruits and vegetables and should focus not only on their infants’ facial expressions but also on their willingness to continue feeding.

Forestell, Catherine A.; Mennella, Julie A.

2008-01-01

167

Emerging Environmental Issues.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging environmental issues are issues that may someday be of concern but that have not yet been generally recognized. A review of such issues that have occurred over the last 50 years reveals that many of them have erupted rather suddenly (e.g., stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain). However, some issues were recognized long ago by the scientific community (e.g., land degradation, overconsumption of freshwater), but for economic or other reasons governments have refused to act. The authors of this study were commissioned by the United Nations Environment Program and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment to carry out a global survey of emerging environmental issues, using the responses received to questionnaires that were sent to scientists, managers, and policy makers around the world. It had been hoped that a short list of priority issues could be identified but the number of issues was very long. However, the issues could be divided into four major classes: 1) Transformations of old issues; continually evolving, and in most cases broadening, in response to increasing scientific and technological knowledge and to changing socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental conditions. 2) Policy issues, the long-term environmental consequences of which may already be of concern. 3) Accidents waiting to happen, for example, chemical time bombs. 4) Surprises in the nonlinear responses of ecosystems to new and different stresses, as well as in the nature of socioeconomic drivers of environmental change. In a subsequent study, the authors applied the lessons learned in the global study to an examination of emerging environmental issues in the province of Ontario, Canada.

Munn, Ted; Timmerman, Peter; Whyte, Anne

2000-07-01

168

Special Issue: In Google's Broad Wake: Taking Responsibility for Shaping the Global Digital Library. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Number 250  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"ARL" is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). "ARL" reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff and users; higher…

Johnson, Richard K.

2007-01-01

169

Gender Differences in the Perception and Acceptance of Online Games  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the proliferation of online games, understanding users' intention to play online games has become a new issue for academics and practitioners. Prior studies have investigated the factors affecting behavioural intention to play online games. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the gender differences in the acceptance of…

Wang, Hsiu-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Shun

2008-01-01

170

Email consultations in health care: 2--acceptability and safe application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Email may have an important role in augmenting and facilitating communication between patients and healthcare professionals. 1 In this article we summarise the evidence describing public and professional attitudes to using email in routine clinical care and explore issues relating to ensuring such use is safe. Specifically, we aim to answer three questions: x How acceptable is email consulting to

Josip Car; Aziz Sheikh

2004-01-01

171

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): An Overview for Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) offers school counsellors a practical and meaningful approach to helping students deal with a range of issues. This is achieved through encouraging psychological flexibility through the application of six key principles. This article describes our introduction to ACT, ACT's application to children and…

Bowden, Tim; Bowden, Sandra

2012-01-01

172

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin's theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that…

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-01-01

173

Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-01-01

174

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: Issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-06-01

175

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-01-01

176

Regulatory perspectives on acceptability testing of dosage forms in children.  

PubMed

Current knowledge about the age-appropriateness of different dosage forms is still fragmented or limited. Applicants are asked to demonstrate that the target age group(s) can manage the dosage form or propose an alternative strategy. However, questions remain about how far the applicant must go and what percentage of patients must find the strategy 'acceptable'. The aim of this overview is to provide an update on current thinking and understanding of the problem, and discuss issues relating to the acceptability testing. This overview should be considered as means to start a wider discussion which hopefully will result in a harmonised, globally acceptable approach for confirmation of the acceptability in the future. PMID:24704104

Kozarewicz, Piotr

2014-08-01

177

Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids  

SciTech Connect

The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

1982-04-01

178

Gender Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Coordinators' Notebook" focuses on gender issues in early childhood. The first article, "Both Halves of the Sky: Gender Socialization in the Early Years," focuses on the arguments that have led to an international call for increased participation of girls in education, an introduction to studies which map young children's…

Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

1997-01-01

179

Acceptance of Others (Number Form).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the instrumentation to assess the effectiveness of the Schools Without Failure (SWF) program in 10 elementary schools in the New Castle, Pa. School District, the Acceptance of Others (Number Form) was prepared to determine pupil's attitudes toward classmates. Given a list of all class members, pupils are asked to circle a number from 1…

Masters, James R.; Laverty, Grace E.

180

Mindfulness and self-acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present article will focus on the cognitive theory of mindfulness and its importance in achieving unconditional self-acceptance. The goal of the mindful perspective is to increase cognitive flexibility and to thereby increase behavioral flexibility and the ability to adapt to one’s current environment in a meaningful manner. Empirical evidence spanning four decades attests to the beneficial effects of a

Shelley H. Carson; Ellen J. Langer

2006-01-01

181

Dissolution test acceptance sampling plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) general monograph provides a standard for dissolution compliance with the requirements as stated in the individual USP monograph for a tablet or capsule dosage form. The acceptance rules recommended by USP have important roles in the quality control process. The USP rules and their modifications are often used as an industrial lot release sampling plan, where

Yi Tsong; Thomas Hammerstrom; Karl Lin; Ting Eng Ong

1995-01-01

182

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the introductory article to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Instead of each article herein reviewing the basics of ACT, this article contains that review. This article provides a description of where ACT fits within the larger category of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT):…

Twohig, Michael P.

2012-01-01

183

12 CFR 615.5550 - Bankers' acceptances.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bankers' acceptances. 615.5550 Section 615.5550...OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Bankers' Acceptances § 615.5550 Bankers' acceptances. Banks for cooperatives may...

2010-01-01

184

12 CFR 615.5550 - Bankers' acceptances.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false Bankers' acceptances. 615.5550 Section 615.5550...OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Bankers' Acceptances § 615.5550 Bankers' acceptances. Banks for cooperatives may...

2009-01-01

185

Plagiarism issues for higher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Academic institutions are finding they have to operate under a pro-active anti-plagiarism policy, where plagiarism is actively sought out as a serious breach of acceptable academic behaviour. This paper considers the reasons that institutions need such a policy and the issues they should be aware of when implementing one.

Fintan Culwin; Thomas Lancaster

2001-01-01

186

Ethical issues in transplant surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of organ transplantation spans 50 years and issues regarding what is ethically acceptable in clinical practice have arisen. In the early days, many pioneers were criticized for offering the hope of prolonging the life of very ill patients when effective clinical transplantation was not established. Barnard (Cape Town, South Africa) did the first heart transplant in 1967 and

Phil Dyer; Keith Rigg

2006-01-01

187

Current issues in adolescent immunization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the December 2006 Fondation Mérieux International Scientific Symposium, the current state of adolescent immunization is reviewed with a focus on the policy and programmatic issues that impact the acceptability, initiation, and successful implementation. Key questions are identified with proposed strategies to help achieve successful adolescent immunization programs. The role of current vaccines targeted to adolescents, such as those

Loretta Brabin; David P. Greenberg; Luc Hessel; Randall Hyer; Bernard Ivanoff; Pierre Van Damme

2008-01-01

188

Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

Borja, Rhea R.

2005-01-01

189

Measuring Willingness to Accept for GM Food by Characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Korean consumers' willingness to accept (WTA) for GM food are studied in this paper. This study compares hypothetical and nonhypothetical responses to choice experiment questions. We test for hypothetical bias in a choice experiment involving GM rice with differing characteristic attributes and multinomial logit model is applied to predict the estimated results. In general, hypothetical responses predicted higher probabilities of

Kim Tae-Kyun; Lee Hyun-Ji; Hong Na-Kyoung

2011-01-01

190

Acceptance and meanings of wheelchair use in senior stroke survivors.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of the lived experience of senior stroke survivors who used prescribed wheelchairs in their homes and communities. The study involved semistructured, in-depth interviews that were conducted with 10 participants, ages 70 to 80 years old, who had used a wheelchair for a mean of 5.6 years. A constant comparative inductive method of analysis was performed. Three different categories of acceptance of wheelchair use were identified; reluctant acceptance, grateful acceptance, and internal acceptance. Increased mobility, varied social response, and loss of some valued roles were common to all three wheelchair acceptance categories. Aspects of level of burden, freedom, and spontaneity varied in degree among the three acceptance categories. As the wheelchair provided opportunity for increased continuity in the lives of these stroke survivors, it appeared to be accepted more fully and viewed more positively. Prestroke lifestyle and values need to be carefully considered in order to maximize acceptance of wheelchair use among senior stroke survivors. PMID:15068158

Barker, Donna J; Reid, Denise; Cott, Cheryl

2004-01-01

191

Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear energy is attracting renewed interest of public and policy makers due to his potential role in long term strategies aiming to reduce the risk of global warming and in a more general, to carry out sustainable policies, however, any project of nuclear nature arise concerns about the risks associated with the release of radioactivity during accident conditions, radioactive waste disposal and nuclear weapons proliferation. Then in light of the likeliness for a new nuclear project in Mexico, is necessary to design a strategy to improve the social acceptance of nuclear power. This concern is been boarding since the environmental and economic point of view. The information that can change the perception of nuclear energy towards increase public acceptance, should be an honest debate about the benefits of nuclear energy, of course there are questions and they have to be answered, but in a realistic and scientific way: So thinking in Mexico as a first step it is important to communicate to the government entities and political parties that nuclear energy is a proven asset that it is emission free and safe. Of course besides the guarantee of a proven technology, clean and safe relies the economic fact, and in Mexico this could be the most important aspect to communicate to key people in government. Based in the Laguna Verde survey it is clear that we have to find the adequate means to distribute the real information concerning nuclear technology to the public, because the results shows that Mexican people does not have complete information about nuclear energy, but public can support it when they have enough information. From the IAEA study we can say that in Mexico public acceptance of nuclear energy it s not so bad, is the highest percentage of acceptance of nuclear technology for health, considering benefits to the environment Mexican opposition to build new plants is the second less percentage, and generally speaking 60% of the people accept somehow nuclear energy. Also we can say that in Mexico there are few nuclear information centers one is located at Laguna Verde power plant, and there is other one at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). So if we want to improve public acceptance in Mexico we should design a well defined strategy to communicate nuclear issues to the public. This strategy should point out many aspects of nuclear power as discussed before. In addition, recent economic studies performed at ININ, indicate that, nuclear energy is currently is price competitive with other sources based on fossil fuels. This facts are currently under discussion with government entities, and now acceptance of government entities is increasing. Even there was a public announce of Mexican government in the sense that Mexico is considering the nuclear option as a part of its energy strategy for the near future. (authors)

Ramirez-Sanchez, Jose R.; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, H. Javier [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico, Toluca km 36.5, Ocoyoacac Estado De Mexico (Mexico)

2006-07-01

192

Engaging Actively with Issues in the Responsible Conduct of Science: Lessons from International Efforts Are Relevant for Undergraduate Education in the United States  

PubMed Central

Numerous studies are demonstrating that engaging undergraduate students in original research can improve their achievement in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and increase the likelihood that some of them will decide to pursue careers in these disciplines. Associated with this increased prominence of research in the undergraduate curriculum are greater expectations from funders, colleges, and universities that faculty mentors will help those students, along with their graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, develop an understanding and sense of personal and collective obligation for responsible conduct of science (RCS). This Feature describes an ongoing National Research Council (NRC) project and a recent report about educating faculty members in culturally diverse settings (Middle East/North Africa and Asia) to employ active-learning strategies to engage their students and colleagues deeply in issues related to RCS. The NRC report describes the first phase of this project, which took place in Aqaba and Amman, Jordan, in September 2012 and April 2013, respectively. Here we highlight the findings from that report and our subsequent experience with a similar interactive institute in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Our work provides insights and perspectives for faculty members in the United States as they engage undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, to help them better understand the intricacies of and connections among various components of RCS. Further, our experiences can provide insights for those who may wish to establish “train-the-trainer” programs at their home institutions.

Clements, John D.; Connell, Nancy D.; Dirks, Clarissa; El-Faham, Mohamed; Hay, Alastair; Heitman, Elizabeth; Stith, James H.; Bond, Enriqueta C.; Colwell, Rita R.; Anestidou, Lida; Husbands, Jo L.; Labov, Jay B.

2013-01-01

193

Family Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... Self Advocacy Transitions Treatment Options Biomedical Treatments Nonmedical Interventions Related Approaches Evaluating Options Family Issues Stress Siblings Community Inclusion Autism and Faith Future Planning Government Benefits and Special Needs Trusts Letter of ...

194

Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma  

SciTech Connect

This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

Peterson, T.

1995-12-01

195

Stochastic Multicriteria Acceptability Analysis (SMAA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA) is a family of methods for aiding multicriteria group decision making\\u000a in problems with uncertain, imprecise or partially missing information. These methods are based on exploring the weight space\\u000a in order to describe the preferences that make each alternative the most preferred one, or that would give a certain rank\\u000a for a specific alternative. The

Risto Lahdelma; Pekka Salminen

196

Making Agents Acceptable to People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because ever more powerful intelligent agents will interact with people in increasingly sophisticated and important ways,\\u000a greater attention must be given to the technical and social aspects of how to make agents acceptable to people [4], p. 51]. The technical challenge is to devise a computational structure that guarantees that from the technical standpoint\\u000a all is under control. We want

Jeffrey M. Bradshaw; Patrick Beautement; Maggie R. Breedy; Larry Bunch; Sergey V. Drakunov; Paul J. Feltovich; Robert R. Hoffman; Renia Jeffers; Matthew Johnson; Shriniwas Kulkarnt; James Lott; Anil K. Raj; Niranjan Suri; Andrzej Uszok

197

Assessing Mindfulness and Experiential Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The Guest House, a poem by Rumi (translated by Barks & Moyne, 1997) that has been utilized in mindfulness-based therapeutic approaches (e.g.,\\u000a Roemer & Orsillo, 2002; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002), conveys the essence of mindfulnessandexperiential acceptance.\\u000a Such a “stance” stands in sharp contrast to the approach that many of us take toward our thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations,\\u000a particularly

Jennifer Block-Lerner; Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault; Matthew T. Tull

198

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?  

PubMed Central

Background An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision of adequate palliative/end-of-life (P/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P/EOL care often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits social program aimed at informal P/EOL caregivers - operates as a public health response in sustaining informal caregivers providing P/EOL care, and whether or not it adequately addresses known aspects of caregiver burden that are addressed within the population health promotion (PHP) model. Methods As part of a national evaluation of Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit, 57 telephone interviews were conducted with Canadian informal P/EOL caregivers in 5 different provinces, pertaining to the strengths and weaknesses of the CCB and the general caregiving experience. Interview data was coded with Nvivo software and emerging themes were identified by the research team, with such findings published elsewhere. The purpose of the present analysis was identified after comparing the findings to the literature specific to caregiver burden and public health, after which data was analyzed using the PHP model as a guiding framework. Results Informal caregivers spoke to several of the determinants of health outlined in the PHP model that are implicated in their burden experience: gender, income and social status, working conditions, health and social services, social support network, and personal health practises and coping strategies. They recognized the need for improving the CCB to better address these determinants. Conclusions This study, from the perspective of family caregivers, demonstrates that the CCB is not living up to its full potential in sustaining informal P/EOL caregivers. Effort is required to transform the CCB so that it may fulfill the potential it holds for serving as one public health response to caregiver burden that forms part of a healthy public policy that addresses the determinants of this burden.

2011-01-01

199

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

200

Issues and approaches for using equipment reliability alert levels  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work accomplished to identify issues and approaches to establish alert levels for component reliability. Reliability alert levels are established on standby component counts of success and failure, where equipment demands are monitored and counted to ascertain if assumptions about acceptable reliability are likely to be correct. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the detection responses and false alarm rates of several alert level systems. The detection responses were obtained in response to a specified reliability degradation. Two of the alert systems were demonstrated with actual failure data on the Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) for five plants. Burden and risk measures of effectiveness were developed to compare different alert level schemes having different detection responses and false alarm rates. 7 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

Lofgren, E.V.; Gregory, S.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1991-06-01

201

Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

Wang, Zhihuan

202

77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...Certificate of Authority issued by the Treasury to Western Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to...

2012-01-05

203

75 FR 61246 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Darwin National Assurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Darwin National Assurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service...issued under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to the following company: Darwin National Assurance Company (NAIC 16624). Business...

2010-10-04

204

Information Communication Technologies in the Classroom: Expanding TAM to Examine Instructor Acceptance and Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies show that use of computer-based information communication technologies (ICTs) can have positive impacts on student motivation and learning. The present study examines the issue of ICT adoption in the classroom by expanding the Technology Acceptance Model to identify factors that contribute to teacher acceptance and use of these…

Huntington, Heidi; Worrell, Tracy

2013-01-01

205

Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

2010-01-01

206

Workforce Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of four papers presented during a symposium on work force issues moderated by Jan DeJong at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Rethinking the Ties that Bind: An Exploratory Study of Employee Development in Utilities in Canada and the United States" (Michael Aherne, David Barron) reports…

1996

207

EMERGING ISSUES  

EPA Science Inventory

In order to better fulfill its mission under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement for the restoration and maintenance of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem GLNPO has funded strategic or emerging issues of basin-wide importance: ...

208

Addressing Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

Schoebel, Susan

1991-01-01

209

Factors of accepting pain management decision support systems by nurse anesthetists  

PubMed Central

Background Pain management is a critical but complex issue for the relief of acute pain, particularly for postoperative pain and severe pain in cancer patients. It also plays important roles in promoting quality of care. The introduction of pain management decision support systems (PM-DSS) is considered a potential solution for addressing the complex problems encountered in pain management. This study aims to investigate factors affecting acceptance of PM-DSS from a nurse anesthetist perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data from nurse anesthetists in a case hospital. A total of 113 questionnaires were distributed, and 101 complete copies were returned, indicating a valid response rate of 89.3%. Collected data were analyzed by structure equation modeling using the partial least square tool. Results The results show that perceived information quality (?=.451, p<.001), computer self-efficacy (?=.315, p<.01), and organizational structure (?=.210, p<.05), both significantly impact nurse anesthetists’ perceived usefulness of PM-DSS. Information quality (?=.267, p<.05) significantly impacts nurse anesthetists’ perceptions of PM-DSS ease of use. Furthermore, both perceived ease of use (?=.436, p<.001, R2=.487) and perceived usefulness (?=.443, p<.001, R2=.646) significantly affected nurse anesthetists’ PM-DSS acceptance (R2=.640). Thus, the critical role of information quality in the development of clinical decision support system is demonstrated. Conclusions The findings of this study enable hospital managers to understand the important considerations for nurse anesthetists in accepting PM-DSS, particularly for the issues related to the improvement of information quality, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. In addition, the results also provide useful suggestions for designers and implementers of PM-DSS in improving system development.

2013-01-01

210

Child sexual abuse: victim age, victim gender, and observer gender as factors contributing to attributions of responsibility 1 1 Submitted for publication November 26, 1997; final revision received April 7, 1998; accepted April 10, 1998  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of victim age, victim gender, and observer gender on the tendency to attribute responsibility for extrafamilial child sexual abuse to the victim and the nonoffending parents.Method: A 2 (Victim Age) × 2 (Victim Gender) × 2 (Observer Gender) between-subjects design was employed. Undergraduate students (N = 145) read a

Sudie Back; Hilary M. Lips

1998-01-01

211

Environmental Issues are Controversial Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The extensive social-scientific interest and continuing relevance of environmental study assure its immediate and long-range importance in the social studies. But the crisis atmosphere surrounding this issue threatens a thoughtful, systematic approach to the subject, and poses the danger of a careless rush to activity. As social studies educators,…

Hepburn, Mary Allaire

212

Computer acceptance of older adults.  

PubMed

Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

2012-01-01

213

Theoretical Issues  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

Marc Vanderhaeghen

2007-04-01

214

DISPOSABLE CANISTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to provide the bases for defining the preclosure limits on radioactive material releases from radioactive waste forms to be received in disposable canisters at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, this calculation will provide the basis for criteria to be included in a forthcoming revision of the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) that limits releases in terms of non-isotope-specific canister release dose-equivalent source terms. These criteria will be developed for the Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) standard canister, the Multicanister Overpack (MCO), the naval spent fuel canister, the High-Level Waste (HLW) canister, the plutonium can-in-canister, and the large Multipurpose Canister (MPC). The shippers of such canisters will be required to demonstrate that they meet these criteria before the canisters are accepted at the MGR. The Quality Assurance program is applicable to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of DSNF and is performed using procedure AP-3.124, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to procedure QAP-2-0, Control of Activities, which has been superseded by AP-2.21Q, Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to the requirements of DOE/RW/0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 2000). This work is also prepared in accordance with the development plan titled Design Basis Event Analyses on DOE SNF and Plutonium Can-In-Canister Waste Forms (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This calculation contains no electronic data applicable to any electronic data management system.

R.J. Garrett

2001-07-30

215

Radioactive waste acceptance team and generator interface yields successful implementation of waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project has developed a successful Low Level Waste Shipping Program in compliance with the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325, Revision 1. This shipping program is responsible for the successful disposal of more than 4 million cubic feet of Low Level Waste over the past decade. The success of the Fernald Low Level Waste Shipping Program is due to the generator program staff working closely with the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program Team to achieve win/win situations. The teamwork is the direct result of dedicated, proactive professionals working together toward a common objective: the safe disposition of low level radioactive waste. The growth and development of this program has many lessons learned to share with the low level waste generating community. The recognition of reciprocal interests enables consistently high annual volumes of Fernald waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site without incident. The large volumes successfully disposed serve testimony to the success of the program which is equally important to all Nevada Test Site and Fernald stakeholders. The Fernald approach to success is currently being shared with other low-level waste generators through DOE-NV sponsored outreach programs. This paper introduces examples of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation contributions to the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program outreach initiatives. These practices are applicable to other low level waste disposal programs whether federal, commercial, domestic or international.

Rowe, J.G. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Griffin, W.A.; Rast, D.M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01

216

An Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy for Individuals With Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to clinical observations and research findings that individuals with generalized anxiety disorder are reactive to their internal experiences, avoid and suppress painful emotions, thoughts, and sensations, and limit their involvement in meaningful activities, an Acceptance Based Behavioral Therapy (ABBT) was developed to specifically target these responses. ABBT incorporates acceptance and mindfulness strategies with more traditional behavior therapy techniques.

Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton; Susan M. Orsillo; Lizabeth Roemer

217

Ethical issues in organ and tissue transplantation.  

PubMed

Clinical organ transplantation provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues, which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate and ethically acceptable ways of utilizing the recent advances of stem cell transplantation from adult versus fetal donors, tissue engineering and the use of organs from animals or xenotransplantation. It is emphasized that clinical organ and tissue transplantation can be more beneficial and life saving if everyone involved in the process, including physicians and medical institutions, respect and consider the best interests of the patients, as well as honor the ethical, moral and religious values of society. PMID:15859919

Abouna, George M

2003-12-01

218

Acceptability of Treatments for Cheating in the College Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focused on various treatments for addressing incidents of academic dishonesty (cheating) by college students. College students rated the acceptability of different responses by college faculty to a case description of a college student who engaged in cheating during an examination. The findings revealed that students found some methods…

Carter, Stacy L.; Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra Maria

2006-01-01

219

Surface moisture measurement system acceptance testing work plan  

SciTech Connect

This work plan addresses testing of the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The purpose of this plan is to define the scope of work, identify organizational responsibilities, describe test control requirements, and provide estimated costs and schedule associated with acceptance testing.

Ritter, G.A.

1996-01-01

220

A study of users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biometric authentication methods are being increasingly used for many types of applications. Since such methods necessitate humans to interact with a device, effective implementation requires consideration of the perceptions and responses of end users. Towards this goal, we present in this paper a modality-independent evaluation methodology to study users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems. It is based on the

Mohamad El-Abed; Romain Giot; Baptiste Hemery; Christophe Rosenberger

2010-01-01

221

Energetic Device Qualification and Lot Acceptance Test Requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aerospace and defense communities have required a variety of tests for qualification and lot acceptance of energetic devices. Many of these test requirements have been developed through the years as a response to past failures. Most of these tests were developed when the firing systems contained large mechanical components and the energetic devices used a hot wire initiating mechanism.

Barry T. Neyer

222

Investigation and study on debris flow risk perception and acceptable risk criteria in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Debris flow disaster mitigation is one of important issues to be addressed in Taiwan. Past studies in this field have been focused mainly on topics related to potential assessment and susceptibility characterizations. Some valuable research results have been completed. Application of risk management in debris flow disaster mitigation has gradually become an emerging topic, as an effective and comprehensive strategy on disaster management is still been sought for. One of the key elements in risk management is the establishment of rational risk acceptance criteria. Various factors have to be taken into account and whether the set of criteria can be operable is of great concern. The purpose of this study is to provide useful information for the establishment of acceptance criteria. First, the 39 debris flow events that claims death tolls for the past 20 years are compiled. The information is used to develop a questionnaire containing six questions for the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster which would cause death and the death tolls in single debris flow event. The questionnaire is sent to general public, local government officer, and rescue members for a survey. In total, 681 effective samples is obtained. The response of each question is identified as 5 scales which is later transferred into scores using a triangular function. Through the application of fuzzy performance theory, the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster and its corresponding number of fatalities (N) is calculated. The risk perception results are plotted in the form of log-log F-N curves where F is the frequency of N or more fatalities. The results indicate that the tolerability criterion is 10-2 while the F-N curve shows a minus-one trend. Compared with the F-N curve for slope stability in Hong Kong, the curve trend is similar but the tolerability criterion is one order higher. It indicates the tolerability of fatal debris flow event in Taiwan in higher that the fatal slope stability event in Hong Kong. The acceptability criteria are about 3x10-4 while the F-N curves also shows a minus-one trend. There is about 1 to 2 orders discrepancy between tolerability and acceptability F-N curves. The resulting F-N curves are useful reference for debris flow management by taking hardware and software approaches to reduce risk level.

Liu, Chia-Nan; Chen, Jie-Ru

2014-05-01

223

Student Acceptance and Expectation of Sexual Assault  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male and female students’ attitudes regarding the acceptance and expectation of sexual assault were examined. Participants also completed Burt’s (1980) Rape Myth Acceptance ( RMA) Scale. Acceptance of sexual aggression can lead to the exoneration of the perpetrator, whereas expectations of sexual aggression can lead to victim blaming. A feminist perspective of rape, with a focus on sexual socialization, indicates

Marian M. Morry; Erica Winkler

2001-01-01

224

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

2011-01-01

225

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01

226

Border Security: Consular Identification Cards Accepted within United States, but Consistent Federal Guidance Needed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several state and local government agencies and financial institutions accept consular identification (CID) cards, which are issued by foreign governments to their citizens living abroad. Mexico issued more than 2.2 million CID cards in 2002-2003 and Guat...

2004-01-01

227

Traffic Calming: A Social Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Substantial urban growth fueled by a strong economy often results in heavy traffic thus making streets less hospitable. Traffic calming is one response to the pervasiveness of the automobile. The issues concern built environments and involve multiple actors reflecting different interests. The issues are rarely technical and involve combinations of…

Crouse, David W.

2004-01-01

228

Public acceptance of urban rotorcraft operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though tiltrotor operations from city center to city center could greatly shorten travel times over moderate ranges, public opposition to intense urban rotorcraft activity has kept this possibility from being realized. One significant factor in this opposition is rotorcraft noise. Over the last 25 years, NASA has explored the subjective response to rotorcraft noise and developed low noise design concepts and noise abatement flight procedures. While low noise designs can be applied for future rotorcraft, this is not an effective near-term means of reducing rotorcraft noise, because of the costs associated with replacement of helicopter rotor blades. Recent noise abatement research, which has been focusing on the development of tools and techniques to facilitate the design of quieter flight procedures for existing vehicles, has much more immediate application. While very little subjective response work has occurred recently, prior work at NASA in this area from the 1970s and 1980s is discussed. Lastly, thoughts on future research areas that might help improve the public acceptance of rotorcraft will be described.

Marcolini, Michael A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Posey, Joe W.

2001-05-01

229

Pipeline issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

Eisley, Joe T.

1990-01-01

230

Aggressiveness of Cancer Care Near the End of Life: Is It a Quality-of-Care Issue?  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to review the literature and update analyses pertaining to the aggressiveness of cancer care near the end of life. Specifically, we will discuss trends and factors responsible for chemotherapy overuse very near death and underutilization of hospice services. Whether the concept of overly aggressive treatment represents a quality-of-care issue that is acceptable to all involved stakeholders is an open question.

Earle, Craig C.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Souza, Jeffrey M.; Neville, Bridget A.; Weeks, Jane C.; Ayanian, John Z.

2008-01-01

231

Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Processes  

SciTech Connect

On February 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLW/MLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLW/MLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified dispos al process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

Shrader, T. A.; Macbeth, P. J.

2002-02-26

232

Orbital debris issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

Kessler, D. J.

233

Acceptability of Potential Rectal Microbicide Delivery Systems for HIV Prevention: A Randomized Crossover Trial  

PubMed Central

We assessed the acceptability of three of over-the-counter products representative of potential rectal microbicide (RM) delivery systems. From 2009 to 2010, 117 HIV-uninfected males (79 %) and females (21 %) who engage in receptive anal intercourse participated in a 6-week randomized crossover acceptability trial. Participants received each of three products (enema, lubricant-filled applicator, suppository) every 2 weeks in a randomized sequence. CASI and T-ACASI scales assessed product acceptability via Likert responses. Factor analysis was used to identify underlying factors measured by each scale. Random effects models were fit to examine age and gender effects on product acceptability. Three underlying factors were identified: Satisfaction with Product Use, Sexual Pleasure, and Ease of Product Use. For acceptability, the applicator ranked highest; however, differences between product acceptability scores were greatest among females and younger participants. These findings indicate that RM delivery systems impact their acceptability and should be considered early in RM development to enhance potential use.

Gorbach, Pamina M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Hess, Kristen; Murphy, Ryan; Saunders, Terry; Brown, Joelle; Anton, Peter A.; Cranston, Ross D.

2012-01-01

234

[Acceptance and safety of vaccines].  

PubMed

As a result of decreasing willingness to be vaccinated some diseases, which seemingly had been eradicated, may reappear. One example for this is the increase of measles cases in the United Kingdom since the 1990s after a decrease of immunization rate in response to a subsequently discredited publication suggesting a link between the triple measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and autism. As the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases decreases, vaccine safety dominates personal risk-benefit analysis. To deal with such concerns this review discusses pre- and post-licensing procedures controlling vaccine safety, taking HPV vaccination as well as vaccination against rotavirus as examples. PMID:19353475

Bartz, H; von Knebel-Döberitz, M

2009-04-01

235

Consumer acceptance of genetically modified potaoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Slow consumer acceptance has inhibited the market for genetically modified (GM) potato products. Logistic growth functions\\u000a were used to model market development patterns for three comparable products — diet sodas, frozen potatoes and microwave ovens.\\u000a Predictions of GMpotato acceptance were based on averages for the comparable products. The model predicts that consumer acceptance\\u000a will be in the introduction stage of

Joseph F. Guenthner

2002-01-01

236

Development of Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The world of competitive sports has its own unique subculture which at times works towards covering up psychological problems faced by athletes with injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an “Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale (AIPAS)” to screen athletes for serious psychological problems resulting from injury. [Subjects] A total of 189 subjects responded to the survey, of which 168 (mean age= 19.93?years; average number of days unable to participate in sports= 71.84 days, SD = 88.01 days) valid responses were subjected to analysis. [Methods] A provisional version of the AIPAS was created from question items based on face-to-face subject interviews and content validity testing by specialists. In order to test criterion-related validity of the AIPAS, subjects were asked to complete indices that would serve as an external criterion. For this purpose, indices that measure athletic rehabilitation dedication and time perspective were designed. [Results] Item analysis of the provisional AIPAS was conducted to confirm the discrimination of each item. Exploratory factor analysis identified “Self-motivation” and “Focus on the Present” as two factors of the provisional scale. Confirmatory factor analysis supported these results. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. Since ?=0.81, the reliability of the scale was confirmed. A significant correlation was found between AIPAS and external indices, indicating criterion-related validity. [Conclusion] AIPAS is a reliable and valid scale composed of two subscales.

Tatsumi, Tomonori

2013-01-01

237

Locus of Control and Social Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To further validate the locus of control (LOC) construct and to counterbalance the present tendency in LOC literature to downgrade the external LOC personality, the relationship between LOC and social acceptance or popularity was examined. It was hypothesized that a relationship exists between LOC and social acceptance; and secondly, that a high…

Stein, Emily

238

Customer acceptance of internet banking in Estonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study technology acceptance of internet banking in Estonia, an emerging east European economy. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The present paper modifies the technology acceptance model and applies it to bank customers in Estonia, because Estonia, a country with a developing economy, has focused on internet banking as an important distribution channel. Findings –

Kent Eriksson; Katri Kerem; Daniel Nilsson

2005-01-01

239

Four therapeutic diets: adherence and acceptability.  

PubMed

Many health conditions are treated, at least in part, by therapeutic diets. Although the success of any intervention depends on its acceptability to the patient, the acceptability of therapeutic diets and factors that influence it have been largely neglected in nutrition research. A working definition of acceptability is proposed and an examination and summary are provided of available data on the acceptability of common diet regimens used for medical conditions. The goal is to suggest ways to improve the success of therapeutic diets. The proposed working definition of "acceptability" refers to the user's judgment of the advantages and disadvantages of a therapeutic diet-in relation to palatability, costs, and effects on eating behaviour and health-that influence the likelihood of adherence. Very low-calorie, reduced-fat omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets all achieve acceptability among the majority of users in studies of up to one year, in terms of attrition and adherence rates and results of questionnaires assessing eating behaviours. Longer studies are fewer, but they suggest that vegetarian, vegan, and reduced-fat diets are acceptable, as indicated by sustained changes in nutrient intake. Few studies of this length have been published for very low-calorie or low-carbohydrate diets. Long-term studies of adherence and acceptability of these and other therapeutic diets are warranted. PMID:21144137

Berkow, Susan E; Barnard, Neal; Eckart, Jill; Katcher, Heather

2010-01-01

240

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01

241

Heavy Metal, Religiosity, and Suicide Acceptability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on data taken from the General Social Survey that found a link between "heavy metal" rock fanship and suicide acceptability. Finds that relationship becomes nonsignificant once level of religiosity is controlled. Heavy metal fans are low in religiosity, which contributes to greater suicide acceptability. (Author/JDM)

Stack, Steven

1998-01-01

242

Specifying, Buying and Accepting a Flight Simulator.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The process of specifying, buying and accepting a flight simulator by an airline is described. Special emphasis is put on the acceptance of the simulator and the specific role of the engineering pilot. Some examples of the contributions of the engineering...

J. M. Vansliedrecht M. L. Wijnheijmer R. P. A. M. Teunissen

1989-01-01

243

Acceptance and Use of Mobile Payments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study applies the Technology Acceptance Model to examine factors such as perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use on consumer willingness to use mobile payment services. This study also includes exploratory research on external factors – convenience, security, new technology – that affect mobile payment acceptance and use. The results show that although awareness of mobile payment services is

Dennis Viehland; Roslyn Siu Yoong Leong

2007-01-01

244

Explaining Consumer Acceptance of Online Digital Music  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to explain consumer acceptance of online digital music. The extended technology acceptance model (TAM), incorporated with user's perception of enjoyment and risks and moral intensity, was tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and assessed and modified by structural equation model (SEM). The findings indicate that perceived ease of use is positively related to perceived usefulness and perceived

Chun-Hsiung Liaoa; Chung-Wang Tsou; Yu-Chi Kao

245

Hanford Site liquid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the waste acceptance criteria for liquid waste managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). These waste acceptance criteria address the various requirements to operate a facility in compliance with applicable environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This document also addresses the sitewide miscellaneous streams program.

LUECK, K.J.

1999-09-11

246

Issues in selection of DTwP-based combination vaccines.  

PubMed

This study examines regulatory, supply, acceptance and financing issues of combinations based on diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (whole cell) vaccines (DTwP). These combination vaccines are currently produced in Europe mostly for export. Future regulatory oversight issues could have an impact on their availability. Before use of acellular pertussis-containing vaccines, the number of doses of DTwP vaccines offered in response to United Nations agency procurement tenders far exceeded the projected demand. Current demand and supply are converging. Most of that supply comes from developing country manufacturers, a potential new source of combination vaccines as well. The expected development and use of DTwP-based combination vaccines raises antigen allocation issues that could further affect supply. These combination vaccines have strong programmatic advantages, but pose complex selection issues involving disease burden, presentation, and availability of long-term financing. Vaccine price is not the major driving factor. A model examining important selection factors for regional country groupings provides predictions that have been validated by decisions on use of DTwP-based combination vaccines. This model may be useful in providing long-term uptake projections for other combination vaccines. PMID:12639487

Milstien, Julie; Munira, Syarifah Liza; McKinney, Susan Loretan

2003-04-01

247

Kanyakumari district accepts family planning.  

PubMed

The people of Kanyakumari District known for their die-hard conservatism, finally seem to have taken to family planning as a way of life. This is borne out by the overwhelming support extended by them to the tubectomy camp organized by the District Family Planning Bureau, Kanyakumari, from 22nd to 27th February 1972. The target of 300 operations set for the camp was exceeded by 99. This is a significant achievement considering the fact that the district consists of only 9 Panchayat Unions covering a vast coastal area with a population of over 1/2 lakhs which is mainly engaged in the fishing industry and is generally not in favor of family planning. The camp provided free food and transport facilities to the patient and the person attending her and a monetary incentive of Rs. 30 per case, besides post-operational care which included periodical home visits by the staff of the Public Health Center for over 3 months. Administration of Vitamin A solution and immunisation of the children of the acceptors and their neighbors constituted an additional feature of this campaign. The effort made by the staff of the Family Planning Department, the Maternity Assistants of the Headquarters Hospital, Nagercoil, where the camp was held, and the Field Publicity Department of the Government of India, were responsible for the success of this campaign. PMID:12332926

1972-04-01

248

[Definition of acceptable operator exposure levels (AOELs) to pesticides].  

PubMed

A guidance document entitled "Recommended method for the establishment of Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels" has been prepared within the EU 5th Framework program. The paper describes the main outcomes of the project and the issues that apply particularly to agricultural workers and bystanders and the difficulties in developing an agreed uniform approach. The scientific basis of the process is discussed, to be used by the European Commission and Member States when making decision about the inclusion of an active substance in Annex 1 of Directive 91/414/EEC. PMID:14582259

Maroni, M; Tiramani, M; Fait, A; Iversen, B; Colosio, C

2003-01-01

249

Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight  

SciTech Connect

This one of NASA`s sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1997-04-30

250

Parent's Acceptance of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Behavior and Communication Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to examine what parents find as acceptable treatment options for children with behavior problems in a communication disorders population. Parents' acceptability of seven treatment options, including positive reinforcement, time-out, response cost, spanking, overcorrection, differential attention, and medication were…

Boothe, Jennifer L.; Borrego, Joaquin

2004-01-01

251

Acceptance of Spousal Death: The Factor of Time in Bereaved Older Adults' Search for Meaning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Response to the death of a spouse was examined by focusing on acceptance, which was conceptualized as both a process and an outcome. Grounded theory was applied to analyze the experience of 15 bereaved Hong Kong Chinese older adults. The main theme that emerged was time. Acceptance of spousal death was found to be related to the search for meaning…

Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Chan, Cecilia L. W.

2011-01-01

252

Acceptance test procedure for the MO-293 (1722) 10-wide mobile office  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection System functions as required by project criteria. The test results will be issued as an acceptance test report after all the testing is complete. This facility is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. An appendix is provided as a checklist of activities to be performed by the fire alarm system installer to ensure proper installation and operation.

Wallace, S.C.

1994-12-28

253

Acceptability of pesticide impacts on the environment: what do United Kingdom stakeholders and the public value?  

PubMed

EU Directive 91/414/EEC requires there to be no unacceptable effects on the environment from the use of pesticides. This paper reports the views of direct stakeholder groups and results from an opinion survey of more than 2000 members of the general public on what in practice should constitute acceptable and unacceptable effects of pesticides. Stakeholders in focus groups were concerned with the potential effects of pesticides on animal and plant population viability and micro-organism function but recognized that a trade-off exists between the potential economic advantages of responsible pesticide use and the potential disadvantages of individual poisoning events. The public opinion survey showed that although pesticides are widely used in homes and gardens, their use on farm crops remains of concern to the public. Concerns are greatest on issues of human health and food quality but potential environmental effects are also an issue for a substantial number of people, particularly if attractive species could be affected. PMID:16261541

Crane, Mark; Norton, Andrew; Leaman, John; Chalak, Ali; Bailey, Alistair; Yoxon, Mark; Smith, Jim; Fenlon, John

2006-01-01

254

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21

255

A Response to Nassaji's "Towards Integrating Forum-Focused Instruction and Communicative Interaction in the Second Language Classroom" in Light of Issues Related to Focus on Form.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues in response to Nassaji (1999) that although the article contains useful suggestions for communicative activities, it is vulnerable to serious criticism in terms of an incoherent theoretical justification, a failure to provide a promised discussion of relevant empirical evidence, and an unmotivated restriction on the nature of the tasks…

Sheen, Ronald

2000-01-01

256

Access to Physicians' Services for Medicare Beneficiaries. ASPE Issue Brief.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This issue brief summarizes recent trends in: a) the degree to which physicians accept new Medicare and privately insured patients; and b) Medicare beneficiaries access to care before and after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act.

2013-01-01

257

Hedonic responses to flavor and their implications for food acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flavor preferences largely develop during the first years of life when children are exposed to the available food supply. Consequently, certain flavors are expected to appear at certain concentrations for a food to be well liked in a given society. However, consumers also have individual preferences based on factors such as age, health and food neophobia. The abundant food supply

H. Tuorila

1996-01-01

258

36 CFR 219.4 - Identification and consideration of issues.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...that may address an issue; (ii) Statutory...other entities and the social and cultural values related to an issue. (2) The responsible...which addressing the issue relates to or provides...grasslands to contribute to social and economic...

2010-07-01

259

A Positive View of Peer Acceptance in Aggressive Youth: Risk for Future Peer Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses longitudinal data to determine whether a positive view of perceived peer acceptance is a risk factor for continued aggression and social rejection for aggressive children. Results indicate that perceived peer acceptance did not predict aggression. However, children who reported higher levels of perceived peer acceptance received lower actual…

Hughes, Jan N.; Cavell, Timothy A.; Prasad-Gaur, Archna

2001-01-01

260

Acceptance of waste for disposal in the potential United States repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the process for the acceptance of waste into the waste management system (WMS) with a focus on the detailed requirements identified from the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document. Also described is the recent dialogue between OCRWM and the Office of Environmental Management to resolve issues, including the appropriate interpretation and application of regulatory and system requirements to DOE-owned spent fuel. Some information is provided on the design of the repository system to aid the reader in understanding how waste that is accepted into the WMS is received and emplaced in the repository.

Stahl, D. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Svinicki, K. [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-07-01

261

Monoliths: special issue in a new package.  

PubMed

Regular special issues concerning monoliths have always been a stronghold of the Journal of Separation Science. Typically, we issued a call for papers, collected and processed the submitted manuscripts, and all of them were then printed in a single issue of the journal. This approach worked to a certain limit quite acceptably but there was always a longer waiting time between the early submissions and publication. This is why we decided to do it this year differently. I claimed in my 2013 New Years Editorial: "We are living in the electronic era! Why not to make an advantage of that?" And we do. As a result, all manuscript submitted for publication in the special issue Monoliths have already been published in regular issues as soon as they were accepted. The first page of these papers includes a footnote: "This paper is included in the virtual special issue Monoliths available at the Journal of Separation Science website." All papers published with this footnote were collected in a virtual special issue accessible through the internet. This concept ruled out possible delays in publication of contributions submitted early. Since we did not have any real "special issue", there was no need for any hard deadline for submission. We just collected manuscripts submitted for the special issue Monoliths published from January to July 2013 and included them in the virtual special issue. This new approach worked very well and we published 22 excellent papers that are included in the issue available now at this website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1615-9314/homepage/virtual_special_issue__monoliths.htm. PMID:23939823

Svec, Frantisek

2013-08-01

262

Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C).

Barnes, G.A.

1996-04-23

263

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01

264

Acceptance Test Plan for the Bench Test Equipment Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment S169, Revision A.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The test plan outlines the acceptance testing including sequence of testing, responsibilities, and scope of tests for the bench test equipment for the ultraviolet spectrometer experiment. The BTE is classified as mission support equipment. (Author)

S. D. Baran

1971-01-01

265

Perspectives: Societal Issues in Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When students investigate local issues in science class, they gain research and critical-thinking skills while improving their attitudes toward science. However, since many societal issues are controversial, it is important to create a safe and risk-free classroom climate where students can discuss their ideas, personal needs, experiences, and responsibilities. This article discribes some strategies that will help students to use science to make personal and societal decisions.

Brown, Patrick L.; Abell, Sandra K.

2009-04-01

266

Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Waste Management Center; McCurley, R.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Institute

1997-12-31

267

Foundational issues in evolution education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a great need for effective evolution education. This paper reviews some of the evidence that demonstrates that need and analyzes some of the foundational semantic, epistemological, and philosophical issues involved. This analysis is used to provide a functional understanding of the distinction between science and non-science. Special emphasis is placed the scientific meaning of the terms theory, hypothesis, fact, proof, evidence, and truth, focusing on the difference between religious belief and acceptance of a scientific theory. Science is viewed as theologically neutral and as not mutually exclusive from religion. Finally, a number of practical recommendations to the classroom biology teacher are presented.

Smith, Mike U.; Siegel, Harvey; McInerney, Joseph D.

1995-01-01

268

PACS: acceptance test, quality control, warranty, and maintenance continuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As PACS gain greater acceptance and use in medical facilities the question of life cycle management must be addressed in terms that relate to the common business practices for medical information system and medical devices. The issues in life cycle management of such a system are relatively new to the industry. Increased use of PACS within the medical community requires that standardized life cycle management practices by developed and implemented. This paper develops a new of life cycle issues as cyclic and related events that are not only manageable, but also predictable in terms, of, frequency, duration data content, data exchange, potential outcomes, staffing requirement, documentation, and staff interaction. This view is presented as a continuum that begins at the acceptance testing of a PACS and continues throughout its life cycle. The continuum incorporates the required relationship between quality control testing and maintenance actions during warranty period and the maintenance years. Interrelated cyclic events are described that bind these processes together and provide a basis for long-term proactive management of PACS in a medical environment.

Romlein, John R.; Norton, Gary S.; Lyche, David K.; Richardson, Ronald R.

1999-07-01

269

Establishing Minimum Flow Requirements Based on Benthic Vegetation: What are Some Issues Related to Identifying Quantity of Inflow and Tools Used to Quantify Ecosystem Response?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Establishing minimum flow requirements in aquatic ecosystems is one way to stipulate controls on water withdrawals in a watershed. The basis of the determination is to identify the amount of flow needed to sustain a threshold ecological function. To develop minimum flow criteria an understanding of ecological response in relation to flow is essential. Several steps are needed including: (1) identification of important resources and ecological functions, (2) compilation of available information, (3) determination of historical conditions, (4) establishment of technical relationships between inflow and resources, and (5) identification of numeric criteria that reflect the threshold at which resources are harmed. The process is interdisciplinary requiring the integration of hydrologic and ecologic principles with quantitative assessments. The tools used quantify the ecological response and key questions related to how the quantity of flow influences the ecosystem are examined by comparing minimum flow determination in two different aquatic systems in South Florida. Each system is characterized by substantial hydrologic alteration. The first, the Caloosahatchee River is a riverine system, located on the southwest coast of Florida. The second, the Everglades- Florida Bay ecotone, is a wetland mangrove ecosystem, located on the southern tip of the Florida peninsula. In both cases freshwater submerged aquatic vegetation (Vallisneria americana or Ruppia maritima), located in areas of the saltwater- freshwater interface has been identified as a basis for minimum flow criteria. The integration of field studies, laboratory studies, and literature review was required. From this information we developed ecological modeling tools to quantify and predict plant growth in response to varying environmental variables. Coupled with hydrologic modeling tools questions relating to the quantity and timing of flow and ecological consequences in relation to normal variability are addressed.

Hunt, M. J.; Nuttle, W. K.; Cosby, B. J.; Marshall, F. E.

2005-05-01

270

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

2013-04-01

271

Acceptance Sampling of Neoprene Joint Sealers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes an investigation of acceptance sampling procedures for 1-1/4-in. neoprene joint sealer. Background information is presented on the manufacturing process and quality control techniques. Historical data dealing with rejection rates and...

D. A. Law G. L. Anania

1978-01-01

272

Understanding Diversity, Accepting Others: Realities and Directions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers who have uneasy feelings about diversity should (1) acquire factual and objective knowledge about students' cultures; (2) take steps to develop positive attitudes; and (3) develop teaching and relational skills for accepting diversity. (SK)

Manning, Lee

2000-01-01

273

What Are Acceptable Limits of Radiation?  

NASA Video Gallery

Brad Gersey, lead research scientist at the Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration, or CRESSE, at Prairie View A&M University, describes the legal and acceptable limits ...

274

Technology acceptance and satisfaction with logistics services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use the technology acceptance model (TAM) from the information technology (IT) literature to investigate the relationships among technology use and acceptance, and perceptions of quality and satisfaction with logistics services among industrial customers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – To test the proposed model, an online survey was prepared using WebSurveyor and an introductory e-mail

Carol C. Bienstock; Marla B. Royne

2010-01-01

275

Risk aversion in risk acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The risk averse attitude that is included in some proposed risk acceptance criteria is examined. It is shown that it is a weaker attitude than risk aversion, as is commonly defined in decision theory. Consequently, the boundary curve separating acceptable and unacceptable regions does not have to be a straight line on the logarithmic frequency-consequence space. A curve of variable slope would express the same attitude as long as the slope is less than -1.

Wu-Chien, J. S.; Apostolakis, G.

1981-03-01

276

Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software  

SciTech Connect

This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled.

CREA, B.A.

2000-10-25

277

No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity - a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy  

PubMed Central

Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and ?-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20??M) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle – the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern.

Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

2014-01-01

278

No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity--a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy.  

PubMed

Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and ?-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20??M) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle - the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern. PMID:24848642

Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

2014-01-01

279

Effect of Suppression, Reappraisal, and Acceptance of Emotional Pictures on Acoustic Eye-Blink Startle Magnitude  

PubMed Central

To examine the effects of different emotion regulation strategies on acoustic eye-blink startle, 65 participants viewed positive, neutral, and negative pictures and were instructed to suppress, reappraise, or accept their emotional responses to these pictures using a within-group experimental design with separate blocks of pictures for each strategy. Instructions to suppress the emotional response led to an attenuation of the eye-blink startle magnitude, in comparison with instructions to reappraise or accept. Reappraisal and acceptance instructions did not differ from one another in their effect on startle. These results are discussed within the context of the existing empirical literature on emotion regulation.

Asnaani, Anu; Sawyer, Alice T.; Aderka, Idan M.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

2012-01-01

280

Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders` final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology`s field test; stakeholders` principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Peterson, T.S.

1995-12-01

281

Factors influencing alert acceptance: a novel approach for predicting the success of clinical decision support  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical decision support systems can prevent knowledge-based prescription errors and improve patient outcomes. The clinical effectiveness of these systems, however, is substantially limited by poor user acceptance of presented warnings. To enhance alert acceptance it may be useful to quantify the impact of potential modulators of acceptance. Methods We built a logistic regression model to predict alert acceptance of drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerts in three different settings. Ten variables from the clinical and human factors literature were evaluated as potential modulators of provider alert acceptance. ORs were calculated for the impact of knowledge quality, alert display, textual information, prioritization, setting, patient age, dose-dependent toxicity, alert frequency, alert level, and required acknowledgment on acceptance of the DDI alert. Results 50?788 DDI alerts were analyzed. Providers accepted only 1.4% of non-interruptive alerts. For interruptive alerts, user acceptance positively correlated with frequency of the alert (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.38), quality of display (4.75, 3.87 to 5.84), and alert level (1.74, 1.63 to 1.86). Alert acceptance was higher in inpatients (2.63, 2.32 to 2.97) and for drugs with dose-dependent toxicity (1.13, 1.07 to 1.21). The textual information influenced the mode of reaction and providers were more likely to modify the prescription if the message contained detailed advice on how to manage the DDI. Conclusion We evaluated potential modulators of alert acceptance by assessing content and human factors issues, and quantified the impact of a number of specific factors which influence alert acceptance. This information may help improve clinical decision support systems design.

Seidling, Hanna M; Phansalkar, Shobha; Seger, Diane L; Paterno, Marilyn D; Shaykevich, Shimon; Haefeli, Walter E

2011-01-01

282

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11

283

Flight Crew Workload, Acceptability, and Performance When Using Data Comm in a High-Density Terminal Area Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes a collaborative FAA/NASA experiment using 22 commercial airline pilots to determine the effect of using Data Comm to issue messages during busy, terminal area operations. Four conditions were defined that span current day to future flight deck equipage: Voice communication only, Data Comm only, Data Comm with Moving Map Display, and Data Comm with Moving Map displaying taxi route. Each condition was used in an arrival and a departure scenario at Boston Logan Airport. Of particular interest was the flight crew response to D-TAXI, the use of Data Comm by Air Traffic Control (ATC) to send taxi instructions. Quantitative data was collected on subject reaction time, flight technical error, operational errors, and eye tracking information. Questionnaires collected subjective feedback on workload, situation awareness, and acceptability to the flight crew for using Data Comm in a busy terminal area. Results showed that 95% of the Data Comm messages were responded to by the flight crew within one minute and 97% of the messages within two minutes. However, post experiment debrief comments revealed almost unanimous consensus that two minutes was a reasonable expectation for crew response. Flight crews reported that Expected D-TAXI messages were useful, and employment of these messages acceptable at all altitude bands evaluated during arrival scenarios. Results also indicate that the use of Data Comm for all evaluated message types in the terminal area was acceptable during surface operations, and during arrivals at any altitude above the Final Approach Fix, in terms of response time, workload, situation awareness, and flight technical performance. The flight crew reported the use of Data Comm as implemented in this experiment as unacceptable in two instances: in clearances to cross an active runway, and D-TAXI messages between the Final Approach Fix and 80 knots during landing roll. Critical cockpit tasks and the urgency of out-the window scan made the additional head down time to respond to Data Comm messages undesirable during these events. However, most crews also stated that Data Comm messages without an accompanying audio chime and no expectation of an immediate response could be acceptable even during these events.

Norman, R. Michael; Baxley, Brian T.; Adams, Cathy A.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Latorella, Kara A.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

2013-01-01

284

Acceptable Operating Force for Buttons on In-Ear Type Headphones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The touch headphones are a solution for providing playback and volume controls on in-ear type headphones. One of the issues with placing controls on earpieces is that applied pressure is transferred to the inner ear, which potentially creates discomfort. The experiment described in this short paper shows that conventional button switches are not well accepted. Users preferred to operate a

Vincent Buil; Gerard Hollemans

2005-01-01

285

Perceptions About the Acceptability of Assessments of HIV Medication Adherence in Lilongwe, Malawi and Chennai, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research exists on acceptability issues related to assessments of adherence to ART in resource-poor settings. To help prepare for two large-scale, multisite ART intervention trials, this qualitative study of individuals in Chennai, India (49 men, 11 women; 33 taking ART, 27 not) and Lilongwe, Malawi (5 men, 5 women, all taking ART) examined potential limitations of different types of

Steven A. Safren; N. Kumarasamy; Mina Hosseinipour; Meaghan M. Harwood; Irving Hoffman; Marybeth McCauley; Allan Jumbe; Christina Nyirenda; Matthew J. Mimiaga; Suniti Solomon; David Celentano; Kenneth H. Mayer

2006-01-01

286

Place attachment and public acceptance of renewable energy: A tidal energy case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts by many governments to mitigate climate change by increasing deployment of renewable energy technologies have raised the importance of issues of public acceptance. The ‘NIMBY’ (Not In My Backyard) concept, although popular, has been critiqued as an appropriate and valid way to explain local opposition. This study applies an alternative approach, empirically investigating the role of place attachment and

Patrick Devine-Wright

2011-01-01

287

Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

2013-01-01

288

[Acceptance and mindfulness-based cognitive-behavioral therapies].  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the main approaches in psychotherapy. It teaches the patient to examine the link between dysfunctional thoughts and maladaptive behaviors and to re- evaluate the cognitive biases involved in the maintenance of symptoms by using strategies such as guided discovery. CBT is constantly evolving in part to improve its' effectiveness and accessibility. Thus in the last decade, increasingly popular approaches based on mindfulness and acceptance have emerged. These therapies do not attempt to modify cognitions even when they are biased and dysfunctional but rather seek a change in the relationship between the individual and the symptoms. This article aims to present the historical context that has allowed the emergence of this trend, the points of convergence and divergence with traditional CBT as well as a brief presentation of the different therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. Hayes (2004) described three successive waves in behavior therapy, each characterized by "dominant assumptions, methods and goals": traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. The latter consider that human suffering occurs when the individual lives a restricted life in order avoid pain and immediate discomfort to the detriment of his global wellbeing. These therapies combine mindfulness, experiential, acceptance strategies with traditional behavior principles in order to attain lasting results. There are significant points of convergence between traditional CBT and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. They are both empirically validated, based upon a theoretical model postulating that avoidance is key in the maintenance of psychopathology and they recommend an approach strategy in order to overcome the identified problem. They both use behavioral techniques in the context of a collaborative relationship in order to identify precise problems and to achieve specific goals. They focus on the present moment rather than on historical causes. However, they also present significant differences: control vs acceptance of thoughts, focus on cognition vs behavior, focus on the relationship between the individual and his thoughts vs cognitive content, goal of modifying dysfunctional beliefs vs metacognitive processes, use of experiential vs didactic methods, focus on symptoms vs quality of life, strategies used before vs after the unfolding of full emotional response. The main interventions based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance are: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Therapy, the expanded model of Behavioral Activation, Metacognitive Therapy, Mindfulness based Cognitive Therapy, Dialectic Behavior Therapy, Integrative Behavioral Couples Therapy and Compassionate Mind Training. These are described in this article. They offer concepts and techniques which might enhance therapeutic efficacy. They teach a new way to deploy attention and to enter into a relationship with current experience (for example, defusion) in order to diminish cognitive reactivity, a maintenance factor for psychopathology, and to enhance psychological flexibility. The focus on cognitive process, metacognition as well as cognitive content might yield additional benefits in therapy. It is possible to combine traditional CBT with third wave approaches by using psychoeducation and cognitive restructuring in the beginning phases of therapy in order to establish thought bias and to then encourage acceptance of internal experiences as well as exposure to feared stimuli rather than to continue to use cognitive restructuring techniques. Traditional CBT and third wave approaches seem to impact different processes: the former enhance the capacity to observe and describe experiences and the latter diminish experiential avoidance and increase conscious action as well as acceptance. The identification of personal values helps to motivate the individual to undertake actions required in order to enhance quality of life. In

Ngô, Thanh-Lan

2013-01-01

289

Assistive Technology: Issues and Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses current issues regarding assistive technology devices and services, especially in relation to the roles and responsibilities of the rehabilitation psychologist. Following an introductory section which defines an assistive technology device and an assistive technology service, the following sections discuss: (1) past…

Scherer, Marcia J.

290

Ethical Issues Involving the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet is a network of networks, sharing the same protocol and linking universities, research communities, businesses, and individuals world wide. In this new global information infrastructure, all citizens need to understand the power and pitfalls of the technology in order to function as responsible members. This paper discusses issues

Connolly, Mary V.

291

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. Memorials are deeply rooted in our culture and remind us of a person who has died or an event in which people died, and they provide a place for people to…

Paine, Cathy

2007-01-01

292

Acceptance diagrams for curved neutron guides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method of acceptance diagrams is used to obtain analytic expressions for the intensity and spatial and angular distributions of the neutrons transmitted along a one-dimensional curved guide, provided that the length of the guide is greater than the minimum length necessary to eliminate direct radiation. The acceptance area for curved guides is parabolic in shape, and shows the asymmetry in the spatial distribution of the transmitted neutrons. From these formulations the average number of reflections can be determined as a function of wavelength.

Mildner, D. F. R.

1990-05-01

293

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01

294

Commissioning School Construction Projects. IssueTrak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This "IssueTrak" discusses an increasing interest in verifying the installation and performance of building systems prior to delivery and final acceptance by the building owner. This interest in quality assurance has spawned a new and distinct professional construction discipline referred to as building commissioning. The principal objective of…

Keithly, Peter

2005-01-01

295

Rights & Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue guides teachers and students to annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with topics related to rights and responsibilities. Sidebar features discuss animal rights, handling money responsibly, and taking responsibility for the environment. (Contains Three…

Online-Offline, 2000

2000-01-01

296

Willingness to pay and accept risks to cure chronic disease.  

PubMed Central

Measurements of disease burden focus most often on economic outputs--neglecting effects on quality of life. More comprehensive quantification is based on what people would pay or risk to avoid illness. Many, however, find it difficult to respond thoughtfully to hypothetical questions about what they would pay or risk. With response rates frequently under 50 per cent, the practicality of these methods has been of concern. In this study, specially trained interviewers asked 247 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis how much of their income they would pay and how large a mortal risk they would accept to achieve a hypothetical cure. Ninety-eight per cent of the subjects estimated their maximum acceptable risk (MAR) at an average 27 per cent chance of immediate death. Eighty-four per cent gave plausible responses to the willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions, with a mean WTP of 22 per cent of household income. The aspect of disease most strongly associated with WTP was impairment in activities of daily living; measured pain was most associated with MAR. The response rates achieved indicate the overall feasibility of these methods; the associations of WTP and MAR with other variables suggest systematic consideration of personal circumstances.

Thompson, M S

1986-01-01

297

The Politics and Science Behind GMO Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of nutritional quality has arisen in the International Community over the last few years along with other important issues such as population aging, multipopulation societies, and political conflicts. The nutritional issue is questioned both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is well known that the planet faces enormous problems with food that is available. Nowadays 20% of the population consumes

Theodoros H. Varzakas; Ioannis S. Arvanitoyannis; Haralambos Baltas

2007-01-01

298

Effectiveness of teacher modeling to encourage food acceptance in preschool children.  

PubMed

Although Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997) suggests that teacher modeling would be one of the most effective methods to encourage food acceptance by preschool children, opinions of experienced teachers have not yet been sampled, teacher modeling has rarely been examined experimentally, and it has produced inconsistent results. The present study considers opinions of teachers and conditions under which teacher modeling is effective. Study 1 was a questionnaire in which preschool teachers (N=58) were found to rate modeling as the most effective of five teacher actions to encourage children's food acceptance. Study 2 and Study 3 were quasi-experiments that found silent teacher modeling ineffective to encourage either familiar food acceptance (N=34; 18 boys, 16 girls) or new food acceptance (N=23; 13 boys, 10 girls). Children's new food acceptance was greatest in the first meal and then rapidly dropped, suggesting a "novelty response" rather than the expected neophobia. No gender differences were found in response to silent teacher modeling. Study 4 was a repeated-measures quasi-experiment that found enthusiastic teacher modeling ("Mmm! I love mangos!") could maintain new food acceptance across five meals, again with no gender differences in response to teacher modeling (N=26; 12 boys, 14 girls). Study 5 found that with the addition of a competing peer model, however, even enthusiastic teacher modeling was no longer effective to encourage new food acceptance and gender differences appeared, with girls more responsive to the peer model (N=14; 6 boys, 8 girls). Thus, to encourage children's new food acceptance, present results suggest that teachers provide enthusiastic modeling rather than silent modeling, apply such enthusiastic modeling during the first five meals before children's "novelty response" to new foods drops, and avoid placing competing peer models at the same table with picky eaters, especially girls. PMID:10744893

Hendy, H M; Raudenbush, B

2000-02-01

299

Defining Acceptable Levels for Ecological Indicators: An Approach for Considering Social Values  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components.

Smyth, Robyn L.; Watzin, Mary C.; Manning, Robert E.

2007-03-01

300

Fostering Social Acceptance in Inclusive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mere presence of students with learning disabilities in general education classrooms is not inclusion. Inclusion involves meaningful participation by these students, achievement in accordance with their abilities, and social acceptance by teachers and peers. Teachers who view these students as a challenge rather than a burden, who believe that…

Wiener, Judith

2009-01-01

301

The water acceptance of wrapped subsurface drains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water acceptance of subsurface, agricultural pipe drains is largely determined by the hydraulic conductivity of the surrounding zone. If this zone consists of soil with a poor structural stability, such drains must be wrapped with an envelope to control the rate of pipe sedimentation while safeguarding easy access of water. The studies were made to elicidate the effects of

L. C. P. M. Stuyt

1992-01-01

302

Public acceptance of nuclear power in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is necessary to reach the public acceptance for nuclear power development program. During the process of the application for the approval from the government to implement the Fourth Nuclear Power Plant program in Taiwan, we initialized a series of communication program in the last two years and are expecting to convince the public that to develops nuclear power is

Liao; T. T. L

1992-01-01

303

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28

304

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01

305

Consumer Acceptance of a New Fast Food  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cowpeas are a nutritious legume, but their consumption in the U.S. is limited. Akara is a popular West African food made form cowpea and has potential for extending the use of dry cowpeas in the U.S. markets. The study used survey data of 267 teenagers to assess Akara's acceptability by American teenagers as a fast food alternative. An ordered probit

Sukant K. Misra; Stanley M. Fletcher; Kay H. McWatters

1996-01-01

306

Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-09-15

307

Individual differences in the acceptance of stereotyping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has documented individual differences in a range of constructs relating to social stereotyping, prejudice, and intergroup attitudes. However, research has not sought specifically to measure a general acceptance of social stereotyping. In the present research, we explored attitudinal, cognitive, emotional, and personality correlates of a person’s self-reported willingness to rely on stereotypical information when interacting with people of

Jason D. Carter; Judith A. Hall; Dana R. Carney; Janelle C. Rosip

2006-01-01

308

Emperical Tests of Acceptance Sampling Plans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Acceptance sampling is a quality control procedure applied as an alternative to 100% inspection. A random sample of items is drawn from a lot to determine the fraction of items which have a required quality characteristic. Both the number of items to be inspected and the criterion for determining conformance of the lot to the requirement are given by an appropriate sampling plan with specified risks of Type I and Type II sampling errors. In this paper, we present the results of empirical tests of the accuracy of selected sampling plans reported in the literature. These plans are for measureable quality characteristics which are known have either binomial, exponential, normal, gamma, Weibull, inverse Gaussian, or Poisson distributions. In the main, results support the accepted wisdom that variables acceptance plans are superior to attributes (binomial) acceptance plans, in the sense that these provide comparable protection against risks at reduced sampling cost. For the Gaussian and Weibull plans, however, there are ranges of the shape parameters for which the required sample sizes are in fact larger than the corresponding attributes plans, dramatically so for instances of large skew. Tests further confirm that the published inverse-Gaussian (IG) plan is flawed, as reported by White and Johnson (2011).

White, K. Preston, Jr.; Johnson, Kenneth L.

2012-01-01

309

Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

2007-01-01

310

Review of Recent Treatment Acceptability Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With recent increases in the use of positive approaches to treatment for individuals with developmental disabilities, it seems appropriate to review the variables that have been found to influence the acceptability of various treatments. Programmatic treatments for problematic behaviors that incorporate primarily positive (reinforcement)…

Carter, Stacy L.

2007-01-01

311

FBC: Gaining acceptance. [Fluidized Bed Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This article addresses the growing acceptance of fluidized bed combustion as a technology appropriate for use in dual-purpose power plants. The article reviews projects for cogeneration in California, a demonstration plant sponsored by the US Department of Energy in Ohio (this plant also incorporates combined cycle operation), and an electric power/greenhouse project in Pennsylvania.

Gawlicki, S.M.

1991-04-01

312

Acceptance of Swedish e-health services  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.

Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

2010-01-01

313

Farmer Acceptance of Biotechnology and Marketing Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internationally, agribusiness firms are spending considerable resources on the development of new biotechnological products. Biotechnology has also received considerable attention from the media. Little is known, however, about farmers' perception and concerns regarding biotechnology. Information pertaining to the factors affecting farmers' acceptance of biotechnology is an essential input into agribusiness firms' marketing and product development strategies. This paper presents the

Kurt K. Klein; Jill E. Hobbs; William A. Kerr

1994-01-01

314

Textbook Websites: User Technology Acceptance Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared with course management software (e.g. Blackboard and WebCT), the content and technology offered by a textbook website (TBW) is relatively costless to universities and professors, and is a potentially valuable tool that can be leveraged to help students learn course material. The present study uses the extended Technology Acceptance Model…

Jonas, Gregory A.; Norman, Carolyn Strand

2011-01-01

315

The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) is used to study photo- and electro-induced nuclear and hadronic reactions by providing efficient detection of neutral and charged particles over a good fraction of the full solid angle. A collaboration of about 30 institutions has designed, assembled, and commissioned CLAS in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The CLAS detector

Bernhard Mecking; G. Adams; S. Ahmad; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; T. Auger; H. Avakian; J. P. Ball; F. J. Barbosa; S. Barrow; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; B. L. Berman; N. Bianchi; S. Boiarinov; P. Bonneau; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; T. Carstens; C. Cetina; S. B. Christo; P. L. Cole; A. Coleman; J. Connelly; D. Cords; P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; R. C. Cuevas; P. V. Degtyarenko; L. Dennis; E. Desanctis; R. Devita; J. Distelbrink; G. E. Dodge; W. Dodge; G. Doolittle; D. Doughty; M. Dugger; W. S. Duncan; S. Dytman; H. Egiyan; K. S. Egiyan; L. Elouadrhiri; R. J. Feuerbach; J. Ficenec; V. Frolov; H. Funsten; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; E. Golovatch; J. Gram; M. Guidal; V. Gyurjyan; D. Heddle; P. Hemler; F. W. Hersman; K. Hicks; R. S. Hicks; M. Holtrop; C. E. Hyde-Wright; D. Insley; M. M. Ito; G. Jacobs; D. Jenkins; K. Joo; D. Joyce; D. Kashy; M. Khandaker; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L. Kramer; V. Koubarovski; S. E. Kuhn; A. Lake; D. Lawrence; A. Longhi; K. Lukashin; J. Lachniet; R. A. Magahiz; W. Major; J. J. Manak; C. Marchand; C. Martin; S. K. Matthews; M. McMullen; J. W. C. McNabb; M. D. Mestayer; R. Minehart; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; L. Y. Murphy; G. S. Mutchler; J. Napolitano; I. Niculescu; B. B. Niczyporuk; M. Nozar; J. T. O'Brien; A. K. Opper; J. E. O'Meara; E. Pasyuk; S. A. Philips; E. Polli; J. W. Price; S. Pozdniakov; L. M. Qin; B. A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; C. Riggs; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; J. Robb; F. Ronchetti; P. Rossi; F. Roudot; C. Salgado; V. Sapunenko; R. A. Schumacher; V. S. Serov; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; L. C. Smith; T. Smith; D. I. Sober; A. Stavinsky; S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; M. Taiuti; W. M. Taylor; S. Taylor; D. J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; D. Tilles; L. Todor; T. Y. Tung; W. Tuzel; M. F. Vineyard; A. V. Vlassov; L. B. Weinstein; R. E. Welsh; D. P. Weygand; G. R. Wilkin; M. Witkowski; E. Wolin; A. Yegneswaran; P. Yergin; J. Yun

2003-01-01

316

Technology Acceptance Model for Wireless Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Develops a technology acceptance model (TAM) for wireless Internet via mobile devices (WIMD) and proposes that constructs, such as individual differences, technology complexity, facilitating conditions, social influences, and wireless trust environment determine user-perceived short and long-term usefulness, and ease of using WIMD. Twelve…

Lu, June; Yu, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Chang; Yao, James E.

2003-01-01

317

Generator acceptance test and inspection report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing.

Johns, B.R.

1997-07-24

318

Attachment, Temperament, and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations between preschool children's attachment security, temperament, and peer acceptance. Ninety-eight preschool children and their mothers were recruited through childcare centers in the southeast. Mothers and their children participated in two two-hour home observations. Attachment security was assessed using the…

Szewczyk-Sokolowski, Margaret; Bost, Kelly K.; Wainwright, Ada B.

2005-01-01

319

On the moral acceptability of killing animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to a “rights view” it is acceptable to kill animals if they are innocent threats or shields or are in a “lifeboat situation.” However, according to advocates of such a view, our practices of killing animals for food or scientific research may be morally unacceptable. In this paper we argue that, even if we grant the basic assumptions of

Hugh Lehman

1988-01-01

320

The Problem of Student Acceptance of Evolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questions why the presentation of evolution in class frequently does not achieve acceptance of evolutionary theory. Suggests using a simple test formulated to try to direct students toward the application of information on evolution to material already familiar to them. Reports positive impact of the questionnaire on student attitudes towards…

Blackwell, Will H.; Powell, Martha J.; Dukes, George H.

2003-01-01

321

40 CFR 46.180 - Acceptance of fellowship award.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Acceptance of fellowship award. 46.180 Section 46.180 Protection...AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Award § 46.180 Acceptance of fellowship award. You must accept your fellowship by...

2013-07-01

322

Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage  

PubMed Central

Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required.

Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

2011-01-01

323

A full acceptance SSC detector: The cosmic-ray connection  

SciTech Connect

Bjorken has proposed the construction of a full acceptance SSC detector (FAD) with the capability of observing complete events, i.e., sensitive to all particles at all rapidities. We here draw attention to the fact that the particle physics capabilities of such an instrument can be exploited to resolve important issues in cosmic ray astrophysics. FAD can make a critical contribution to the search for the cosmic accelerator(s) of the highest energy cosmic rays. Also, unlike conventional central detectors, FAD can search for a variety of unusual phenomena associated with production of very forward particles in cosmic ray interactions with collision energy in excess of 10[sup 14]--10[sup 15] eV, i.e. [radical][ital s] larger than 1 TeV.

Halzen, F. (University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, 530706 (United States))

1993-06-15

324

Tongue-palate contact of perceptually acceptable alveolar stops.  

PubMed

Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of /t/, 13 /d/ and 11 /n/) to those produced by eight typical children (32 /t/, 24 /d/ and 16 /n/). The results showed that children with SSD had significantly higher percent contact than the typical children for target /t/; the difference for /d/ and /n/ was not significant. Children with SSD generally showed more contact in the posterior central area of the palate than the typical children. The results suggested that broader tongue-palate contact is a general articulatory feature for children with SSD and its differential effect on error perception might be related to the different articulatory requirements. PMID:23489342

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-04-01

325

Filtering chromatic aberration for wide acceptance angle electrostatic lenses.  

PubMed

Chromatic aberration is a major issue for imaging mainly with large acceptance angle electrostatic lenses. Its correction is necessary to take advantage of the outstanding spatial and angular resolution that these lenses provide. We propose a method to eliminate the effect of chromatic aberration on the measured images by determining the impact resulting from higher and lower kinetic energies. Based on a spectral image sequence and a matrix, which describes the transmission function of the lens, a system of linear equations is solved to approximate the 2D spectral intensity distribution of the sample surface. We present the description of our method and preliminary test results, which show significant contrast and image quality improvement. The presented algorithm can also be applied as a software-based energy analyzer. PMID:24808408

Fazekas, Adam; Toth, Laszlo

2014-07-01

326

Acceptability of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination among adult men  

PubMed Central

Objectives HPV vaccine acceptability was examined as part of a cohort study of HPV infection among adult males. Methods Between July 2004 and June 2007, 445 adult males aged ?18 years were enrolled primarily from a university-based population. A structured questionnaire addressed HPV vaccine awareness, attitudes, and intention to be vaccinated. Results Overall, 69% of men reported that they were likely or very likely to be vaccinated against HPV if a prophylactic vaccine were available. Men most frequently cited side effects (69%), efficacy (65%), and safety (63%) as the major factors that would influence their decision to be vaccinated against HPV. Issues of vaccine costs and efficacy were important considerations for men of vaccine-eligible ages (18–26 years). Men who cited cost as a major factor in their HPV vaccine decisions and those indicating cost as a potential barrier had greater intention to be vaccinated. Heterosexual men had less intention to be vaccinated compared to men who have sex with men. Conclusion Acceptability of HPV vaccination among males is generally high. Costs and sexual history may influence vaccine utilization.

Hernandez, BY; Wilkens, LR; Thompson, PS; Shvetsov, YB; Goodman, MT; Ning, L; Kaopua, L

2010-01-01

327

Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-008/Skid F  

SciTech Connect

Portable Exhauster POR-008 was procured via HNF-0490, Specification for a Portable Exhausted System for Waste Tank Ventilation. Prior to taking ownership, acceptance testing was performed at the vendors. However at the conclusion of testing a number of issues remained that required resolution before the exhausters could be used by Project W-320. The purpose of acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-O49O, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-24

328

Social Perception of Rape: How Rape Myth Acceptance Modulates the Influence of Situational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the role of rape myth acceptance (RMA) and situational factors in the perception of three different rape scenarios (date rape, marital rape, and stranger rape). One hundred and eighty-two psychology undergraduates were asked to emit four judgements about each rape situation: victim responsibility, perpetrator responsibility,…

Frese, Bettina; Moya, Miguel; Megias, Jesus

2004-01-01

329

Issues in Ecology, Issue 14 Press Release  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This November 2011 press release can be used as an accessible reading assignment to accompany and introduce a discussion of the ecological concepts included in issue #14 of ESA's Issues in Ecology series, "Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore ecosystem health."

Lester, Liza

2012-03-07

330

White Paper on the Nature and Scope of Issues on Adoption of Model Use Acceptability Guidance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For many years, the Science Advisory Board (SAB) has been actively advising the Agency on the use of computer models in environmental protection. In 1989, after reviewing several models, SAB offered general advice in its first commentary or resolution (EP...

1999-01-01

331

Disability and stigma: how Japanese educators help parents accept their children's differences.  

PubMed

In this report, part of a larger ethnographic study, the authors examined the support Japanese elementary school educators provide to parents of children with relatively mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and high-functioning autism. Conditions that affect children's learning and behaviors are widespread, but cultures vary in responses to children with such difficulties and their families. In many cultures, disability remains a sensitive issue due to lingering stigma. Japan's recent implementation of special education services for children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities provided a unique context in which to examine otherwise taken-for-granted beliefs and practices related to disability. Participant observations in a Japanese elementary school and individual interviews with educators and parents suggest that parents' sensitivity to other people's "eyes," or stigma, can be an obstacle to their acceptance of their children's need for special education, permission for their children to receive services, and collaboration with educators. Educators supported parents through a steadfast focus on emotional support, communication, relationship building, and partnerships. Japanese practices and adults' reflections on stigma provide a broader context for international, school, and other social workers to reflect on their own beliefs and practices with families of children with disabilities. PMID:24640228

Kayama, Misa; Haight, Wendy

2014-01-01

332

Resource quality or competition: why increase resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics?  

PubMed Central

Some animal species increase resource acceptance rates in the presence of conspecifics. Such responses may be adaptive if the presence of conspecifics is a reliable indicator of resource quality. Similarly, these responses could represent an adaptive reduction in choosiness under high levels of scramble competition. Although high resource quality and high levels of scramble competition should both favor increased resource acceptance, the contexts in which the increase occurs should differ. In this paper, we tested the effect of social environment on egg-laying and aggressive behavior in the walnut fly, Rhagoletis juglandis, in multiple contexts to determine whether increased resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics was better viewed as a response to increased host quality or increased competition. We found that grouped females oviposit more readily than isolated females when provided small (low-quality) artificial hosts but not when provided large (high-quality) artificial hosts, indicating that conspecific presence reduces choosiness. Increased resource acceptance was observed even when exposure to conspecifics was temporally or spatially separate from exposure to the resource. Finally, we found that individuals showed reduced aggression after being housed in groups, as expected under high levels of scramble competition. These results indicate that the pattern of resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics may be better viewed as a response to increased scramble competition rather than as a response to public information about resource quality.

Nufio, Cesar R.; Papaj, Daniel R.

2011-01-01

333

Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2004  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Optimism about the future of nuclear power, by Ruth G. Shaw, Duke Power Company; Licensed in three countries, by GE Energy; Enhancing public acceptance, by Westinghouse Electric Company; Standardized MOV program, by Ted Neckowicz, Exelon; Inservice testing, by Steven Unikewicz, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Asian network for education, Fatimah Mohd Amin, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research; and, Cooling water intake optimization, by Jeffrey M. Jones and Bert Mayer, P.E., Framatome ANP.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2004-09-15

334

Psychological Issues in Relocation: Response to Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Internal factors affecting how people perceive and react to relocation include beliefs about events, and emotions such as anger and loss, effects of early separation experiences, and self-esteem. Counseling can help individuals and families facing the psychological discomfort of this life crisis. (SK)

Hausman, Marcia S.; Reed, James R.

1991-01-01

335

Central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes mediate lung allograft acceptance  

PubMed Central

Memory T lymphocytes are commonly viewed as a major barrier for long-term survival of organ allografts and are thought to accelerate rejection responses due to their rapid infiltration into allografts, low threshold for activation, and ability to produce inflammatory mediators. Because memory T cells are usually associated with rejection, preclinical protocols have been developed to target this population in transplant recipients. Here, using a murine model, we found that costimulatory blockade–mediated lung allograft acceptance depended on the rapid infiltration of the graft by central memory CD8+ T cells (CD44hiCD62LhiCCR7+). Chemokine receptor signaling and alloantigen recognition were required for trafficking of these memory T cells to lung allografts. Intravital 2-photon imaging revealed that CCR7 expression on CD8+ T cells was critical for formation of stable synapses with antigen-presenting cells, resulting in IFN-? production, which induced NO and downregulated alloimmune responses. Thus, we describe a critical role for CD8+ central memory T cells in lung allograft acceptance and highlight the need for tailored approaches for tolerance induction in the lung.

Krupnick, Alexander Sasha; Lin, Xue; Li, Wenjun; Higashikubo, Ryuiji; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Hartzler, Hollyce; Toth, Kelsey; Ritter, Jon H.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Wang, Steven T.; Miller, Mark J.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel

2014-01-01

336

Central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes mediate lung allograft acceptance.  

PubMed

Memory T lymphocytes are commonly viewed as a major barrier for long-term survival of organ allografts and are thought to accelerate rejection responses due to their rapid infiltration into allografts, low threshold for activation, and ability to produce inflammatory mediators. Because memory T cells are usually associated with rejection, preclinical protocols have been developed to target this population in transplant recipients. Here, using a murine model, we found that costimulatory blockade-mediated lung allograft acceptance depended on the rapid infiltration of the graft by central memory CD8+ T cells (CD44(hi)CD62L(hi)CCR7+). Chemokine receptor signaling and alloantigen recognition were required for trafficking of these memory T cells to lung allografts. Intravital 2-photon imaging revealed that CCR7 expression on CD8+ T cells was critical for formation of stable synapses with antigen-presenting cells, resulting in IFN-? production, which induced NO and downregulated alloimmune responses. Thus, we describe a critical role for CD8+ central memory T cells in lung allograft acceptance and highlight the need for tailored approaches for tolerance induction in the lung. PMID:24569377

Krupnick, Alexander Sasha; Lin, Xue; Li, Wenjun; Higashikubo, Ryuiji; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Hartzler, Hollyce; Toth, Kelsey; Ritter, Jon H; Berezin, Mikhail Y; Wang, Steven T; Miller, Mark J; Gelman, Andrew E; Kreisel, Daniel

2014-03-01

337

Flavor-active compounds potentially implicated in cooked cauliflower acceptance.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to determine the flavor-active compounds responsible for the "sulfur" and "bitter" flavors of cooked cauliflower potentially implicated in cauliflower rejection by consumers. Eleven varieties of cauliflower were cooked and assessed by a trained sensory panel for flavor profile determination. Among the 13 attributes, the varieties differed mainly according to their "cauliflower odor note" and their "bitterness". Various glucosinolates were quantified by HPLC and correlated with bitterness intensity. The results showed that neoglucobrassicin and sinigrin were responsible for the bitterness of cooked cauliflower. Application of Dynamic Headspace GC-Olfactometry and DH-GC-MS showed that allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and methanethiol (MT) were the key odorants of cooked cauliflower "sulfur" odors. Moreover, these volatile compounds corresponded to the main compositional differences observed between varieties. Finally, AITC, DMTS, DMS, MT, sinigrin, and neoglucobrassicin were shown to be potential physicochemical determinants of cooked cauliflower acceptance. PMID:12381134

Engel, Erwan; Baty, Céline; Le Corre, Daniel; Souchon, Isabelle; Martin, Nathalie

2002-10-23

338

BAS: balanced acceptance sampling of natural resources.  

PubMed

To design an efficient survey or monitoring program for a natural resource it is important to consider the spatial distribution of the resource. Generally, sample designs that are spatially balanced are more efficient than designs which are not. A spatially balanced design selects a sample that is evenly distributed over the extent of the resource. In this article we present a new spatially balanced design that can be used to select a sample from discrete and continuous populations in multi-dimensional space. The design, which we call balanced acceptance sampling, utilizes the Halton sequence to assure spatial diversity of selected locations. Targeted inclusion probabilities are achieved by acceptance sampling. The BAS design is conceptually simpler than competing spatially balanced designs, executes faster, and achieves better spatial balance as measured by a number of quantities. The algorithm has been programed in an R package freely available for download. PMID:23844595

Robertson, B L; Brown, J A; McDonald, T; Jaksons, P

2013-09-01

339

Induction graphitizing furnace acceptance test report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The induction furnace was designed to provide the controlled temperature and environment required for the post-cure, carbonization and graphitization processes for the fabrication of a fibrous graphite NERVA nozzle extension. The acceptance testing required six tests and a total operating time of 298 hrs. Low temperature mode operations, 120 to 850 C, were completed in one test run. High temperature mode operations, 120 to 2750 C, were completed during five tests.

1972-01-01

340

Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.

Keck, R.D.

1998-02-03

341

Diesel generator trailer acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0252 Rev. 1 and ECNs 609271, and 609272. The equipment being tested is a 150KW Diesel Generator mounted on a trailer with switchgear. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller`s location.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1994-09-23

342

Nurses' Acceptance of Smart IV Pump Technology  

PubMed Central

Background “Smart” intravenous infusion pumps (Smart IV pumps) are increasingly being implemented in hospitals to reduce medication administration errors. Objectives This study examines nurses’ experience with the implementation and use of a Smart IV pump in an academic hospital. Method Data were collected in three longitudinal surveys: (a) a pre-implementation survey, (b) a 6-week-post-implementation survey, and (c) a 1-year-post-implementation survey. We examined: (a) the technology implementation process, (b) technical performance of the pump, (c) usability of the pump, and (d) user acceptance of the pump. Results Initially, nurses had a somewhat positive acceptance of the Smart IV pump technology that significantly increased one year after implementation. User experiences associated with the pump in general improved over time, especially perceptions of pump efficiency. However, user experience with the pump implementation process and pump technical performance did not consistently improve from the pre-implementation survey to the post-implementation survey. Several characteristics of pump technical performance and usability influenced user acceptance at the one-year post-implementation survey. Discussion These data may be useful for other institutions to guide implementation and post-implementation follow-up of IV pump use; other institutions could use the survey instrument from this study to evaluate nurses’ perceptions of the technology. Our study identified several characteristics of the implementation process that other institutions may need to pay attention to (e.g., sharing information about the implementation process with nurses).

Carayon, Pascale; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

2010-01-01

343

Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons  

SciTech Connect

There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

Miyadera, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurennoy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, A J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

344

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

345

Characteristic of Bennett's acceptance ratio method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A powerful and well-established tool for free-energy estimation is Bennett’s acceptance ratio method. Central properties of this estimator, which employs samples of work values of a forward and its time-reversed process, are known: for given sets of measured work values, it results in the best estimate of the free-energy difference in the large sample limit. Here we state and prove a further characteristic of the acceptance ratio method: the convexity of its mean-square error. As a two-sided estimator, it depends on the ratio of the numbers of forward and reverse work values used. Convexity of its mean-square error immediately implies that there exists a unique optimal ratio for which the error becomes minimal. Further, it yields insight into the relation of the acceptance ratio method and estimators based on the Jarzynski equation. As an application, we study the performance of a dynamic strategy of sampling forward and reverse work values.

Hahn, Aljoscha M.; Then, Holger

2009-09-01

346

Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

Dzenitis, J M

2006-12-12

347

Animal care and use: an issue now and in the future.  

PubMed

Animal rights proponents equate human and animal rights or capacity to suffer pain. Animal welfare is a philosophy that centers on animal well-being, a stewardship role that producers view as affecting profitability but the general public may view as having additional components. The agenda of some animal rights proponents may be positioned under the guise of animal welfare to gain acceptability for portions of their work. Currently, guidelines and accreditation programs targeted at ensuring proper animal care and use increasingly include agricultural animals. Also, public initiatives such as the Massachusetts ballot initiative to curtail animal agriculture and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine's attempts to curtail the use of milk and meat in human diets were defeated by educating the general public. Various organizations have been developed to address animal care and use issues. The Animal Industry Foundation is a broad-based agricultural organization addressing animal rights issues. National biomedical organizations, the Foundation of Biomedical Research and the National Association for Biomedical Research, address education and governmental animal rights issues. State-level coalitions, such as those recently organized in Missouri, of agricultural organizations, academic research units, biomedical institutions, and agribusiness or consumer products companies offer great promise of educating others on animals rights and welfare issues. Animal scientists need to educate themselves on these issues, participate in their own institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, and help to educate the general public through organizations and programs at the local, state, and national level. PMID:8778107

Kertz, A F

1996-01-01

348

Animal Experimentation: Issues for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the extent to which issues related to animal experimentation are in conflict and proposes choices that might least comprise them. These issues include animal well-being, human well-being, self-interest of science, scientific validity and responsibility, progress in biomedical and behavioral science, and the future quality of medical care.…

Zola, Judith C.; And Others

1984-01-01

349

Acceptance criteria for urban dispersion model evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors suggested acceptance criteria for rural dispersion models' performance measures in this journal in 2004. The current paper suggests modified values of acceptance criteria for urban applications and tests them with tracer data from four urban field experiments. For the arc-maximum concentrations, the fractional bias should have a magnitude <0.67 (i.e., the relative mean bias is less than a factor of 2); the normalized mean-square error should be <6 (i.e., the random scatter is less than about 2.4 times the mean); and the fraction of predictions that are within a factor of two of the observations (FAC2) should be >0.3. For all data paired in space, for which a threshold concentration must always be defined, the normalized absolute difference should be <0.50, when the threshold is three times the instrument's limit of quantification (LOQ). An overall criterion is then applied that the total set of acceptance criteria should be satisfied in at least half of the field experiments. These acceptance criteria are applied to evaluations of the US Department of Defense's Joint Effects Model (JEM) with tracer data from US urban field experiments in Salt Lake City (U2000), Oklahoma City (JU2003), and Manhattan (MSG05 and MID05). JEM includes the SCIPUFF dispersion model with the urban canopy option and the urban dispersion model (UDM) option. In each set of evaluations, three or four likely options are tested for meteorological inputs (e.g., a local building top wind speed, the closest National Weather Service airport observations, or outputs from numerical weather prediction models). It is found that, due to large natural variability in the urban data, there is not a large difference between the performance measures for the two model options and the three or four meteorological input options. The more detailed UDM and the state-of-the-art numerical weather models do provide a slight improvement over the other options. The proposed urban dispersion model acceptance criteria are satisfied at over half of the field experiments.

Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

2012-05-01

350

Engineering Issues for an Adaptive Defense Network.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Engineering Issues for an Adaptive Defense Network (ADN) examines the ability of network systems to change behavior dynamically to sustain service in response to attacks. To focus the research problem, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks were use...

A. Piszcz D. Moore N. Orlans Z. Eyler-Walker

2001-01-01

351

Four Republican Presidential Candidates Debate Educational Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides the transcript of a September 1987 debate on educational issues between Republican presidential candidates Jack Kemp and Pierre du Pont. Interspersed throughout the transcript are written responses to questions submitted to additional candidates Robert Dole and George Bush. (BJV)

Equity and Excellence, 1988

1988-01-01

352

Consumer Acceptance of Personal Information and Communication Technology Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

In today's information and communication technol- ogy (ICT)-enabled service economy, there is great interest in digital service management. While the extant technology acceptance re- search has mainly studied user acceptance of various ICTs, there is a dearth of research on consumer acceptance of personal ICT services. In this paper, we extend the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

James Y. L. Thong; Viswanath Venkatesh; Xin Xu; Se-Joon Hong; Kar Yan Tam

2011-01-01

353

Perceptions of Social Behavior and Peer Acceptance in Kindergarten.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used social behavior ratings from observers, teachers, and parents to predict kindergartners' perceptions of peer acceptance. Found that friendship skill predicted parent- and child-reported peer acceptance. Shyness/withdrawal inversely predicted teacher-reported peer acceptance. Aggression did not predict peer acceptance. Girls were rated as more…

Phillipsen, Leslie C.; Bridges, Sara K.; McLemore, T. Gayle; Saponaro, Lisa A.

1999-01-01

354

SIMULATION BASED ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR UNMANNED GROUND VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance testing is considered a final stage of validation, and performing acceptance tests of an actual UGV system can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, this paper discusses simulation based acceptance testing for UGVs, which can significantly reduce the time and cost of the acceptance test. In this paper, both dynamic and static simulation models are developed, and the results from

Hyo Jong Lee; A. Galip Ulsoy

2009-01-01

355

Different Perspectives on Technology Acceptance: The Role of Technology Type and Age  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although eHealth technologies offer an enormous potential to improve healthcare, the knowledge about key determinants of acceptance for eHealth technology is restricted. While the underlying technology of eHealth technologies and Information and Communication technology (ICT) is quite similar, utilization contexts and using motives are quite different. In order to explore the role of technology type on acceptance, we contrasted central application characteristics of both technology types using the scenario technique. A questionnaire was administered (n = 104) measuring individual variables (age, gender) and attitudes regarding an eHealth application (blood sugar meter) in contrast to an ICT device (Personal Digital Assistant, PDA). Older users basically approved the utilization of health-related technologies and perceived lower usability barriers. In addition, we identified main utilization motives of eHealth technology and technology-specific acceptance patterns, especially regarding issues of data safety in the eHealth context. Effects of age and gender in acceptance ratings suggest a differential perspective on eHealth acceptance. Finally, practical interventions were derived in order to support eHealth device design and to promote acceptance of eHealth technology.

Arning, Katrin; Ziefle, Martina

356

European public acceptance of euthanasia: socio-demographic and cultural factors associated with the acceptance of euthanasia in 33 European countries.  

PubMed

In many European countries, the last decade has been marked by an increasing debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions in medical practice. Growing public sensibility to a 'right to die' for terminally ill patients has been one of the main constituents of these debates. Within this context, we sought to describe and compare acceptance of euthanasia among the general public in 33 European countries. We used the European Values Study data of 1999-2000 with a total of 41125 respondents (63% response rate) in 33 European countries. The main outcome measure concerned the acceptance of euthanasia (defined as 'terminating the life of the incurably sick', rated on a scale from 1 to 10). Results showed that the acceptance of euthanasia tended to be high in some countries (e.g. the Netherlands, Denmark, France, Sweden), while a markedly low acceptance was found in others (e.g. Romania, Malta and Turkey). A multivariate ordinal regression showed that weaker religious belief was the most important factor associated with a higher acceptance; however, there were also socio-demographic differences: younger cohorts, people from non-manual social classes, and people with a higher educational level tended to have a higher acceptance of euthanasia. While religious belief, socio-demographic factors, and also moral values (i.e. the belief in the right to self-determination) could largely explain the differences between countries, our findings suggest that perceptions regarding euthanasia are probably also influenced by national traditions and history (e.g. Germany). Thus, we demonstrated clear cross-national differences with regard to the acceptance of euthanasia, which can serve as an important basis for further debate and research in the specific countries. PMID:16537097

Cohen, Joachim; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bilsen, Johan; Deboosere, Patrick; van der Wal, Gerrit; Deliens, Luc

2006-08-01

357

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14

358

Issues Management Program Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify a...

M. Gravois

2007-01-01

359

Lobby Day Issue Briefs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compilation of seven briefs is intended to help citizens lobby United States senators, representatives, and their staff members on issues of importance to the Hispanic American community. Each brief synopsizes an issue, reviews current proposals for addressing the issue, and suggests the appropriate action that the member of congress should…

National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC. Office of Research Advocacy and Legislation.

360

Acceptable workloads for three common mining materials.  

PubMed

A series of psychophysical lifting studies was conducted to establish maximum acceptable weights of lift (MAWL) for three supply items commonly handled in underground coal mines (rock dust bags, ventilation stopping blocks, and crib blocks). Each study utilized 12 subjects, all of whom had considerable experience working in underground coal mines. Effects of lifting in four postures (standing, stooping under a 1.5 m ceiling, stooping under a 1.2 m ceiling, and kneeling) were investigated together with four lifting conditions (combinations of lifting symmetry and lifting height). The frequency of lifting was set at four per min, and the task duration was 15 min. Posture significantly affected the MAWL for the rock dust bag (standing MAWL was 7% greater than restricted postures and kneeling MAWL was 6.4% less than stopped); however, posture interacted with lifting conditions for both of the other materials. Physiological costs were found to be significantly greater in the stooped postures compared with kneeling for all materials. Other contrasts (standing versus restricted postures, stooping under 1.5 m ceiling versus stopping under 1.2 m ceiling) did not exhibit significantly different levels of energy expenditure. Energy expenditure was significantly affected by vertical lifting height; however, the plane of lifting had little influence on metabolic cost. Recommended acceptable workloads for the three materials are 20.0 kg for the rock dust bag, 16.5 kg for the ventilation stopping block, and 14.7 kg for the crib block. These results suggest that miners are often required to lift supplies that are substantially heavier than psychophysically acceptable lifting limits. PMID:1387078

Gallagher, S; Hamrick, C A

1992-09-01

361

Breathing air trailer acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0251 Rev. 0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment being tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity for use in the core sampling program. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller`s location. This test procedure is to verify that the American Bristol Industries, Inc., Model 5014-0001 low pressure Mobile Breathing Air Trailer, meets or exceeds the requirements of the Westinghouse Hanford specification.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1994-09-14

362

Development of quantitative risk acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Some of the major considerations for effective management of risk are discussed, with particular emphasis on risks due to nuclear power plant operations. Although there are impacts associated with the rest of the fuel cycle, they are not addressed here. Several previously published proposals for quantitative risk criteria are reviewed. They range from a simple acceptance criterion on individual risk of death to a quantitative risk management framework. The final section discussed some of the problems in the establishment of a framework for the quantitative management of risk.

Griesmeyer, J. M.; Okrent, D.

1981-01-01

363

Six month post-treatment deterioration in acceptance (CPAQ-8) and cognitions following multidisciplinary pain treatment.  

PubMed

Pain acceptance contributes significantly to the effectiveness of pain treatment outcomes. Nevertheless, little research has been conducted to examine whether a decrease in acceptance contributes to a deterioration in post treatment functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the role of pain acceptance in relation to process and outcome variables in the six-months following the conclusion of a pain program. Adults with chronic pain (N = 120) completed assessments at the completion of a 3-week multidisciplinary treatment program and 6-months post-treatment. Process measures included the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire-8 (CPAQ-8); the catastrophizing scale of the Pain Response Self-Statement Scale; the coping cognitions scale of the Pain Response Self-Statement Scale; and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Outcome measures included the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire; the depression scale of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale; and two measures of physical functioning. Deterioration in acceptance of pain was significantly associated with deterioration in depression and disability, even when catastrophizing cognitions and kinesiophobia were accounted for. Decrease in acceptance was the strongest predictor of reliable deterioration in depression and disability. Results indicated the CPAQ-8 has utility as a measure for monitoring patient functioning post-treatment. PMID:23504128

Baranoff, John; Hanrahan, Stephanie J; Kapur, Dilip; Connor, Jason P

2014-06-01

364

75 FR 16127 - Establishment of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission on the Study of Bioethical Issues; Department of Health and Human...the President on bioethical issues that may emerge as consequences...Commission may accept suggestions of issues for consideration from executive...other areas of the humanities or social sciences. Commission...

2010-03-31

365

Hanford Site radioactive solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This manual defines the criteria that must be met by waste generators for radioactive solid waste to be accepted by Westinghouse Hanford Company for storage or disposal at the 200 Area facilities. It is to be used by all waste generators preparing radioactive solid waste for storage or disposal at the Hanford Site facilities. This manual is also intended for use by Westinghouse Hanford Company solid waste technical staff involved with approval and acceptance of radioactive solid waste. The criteria in this manual represent a compilation of state and federal regulation, US Department of Energy Orders, Hanford Site requirements, and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to management of radioactive solid waste. Where appropriate, these requirements are included in the manual by reference. It is the intent of this manual to provide guidance to the waste generator in meeting the applicable requirements. 11 refs.

Stickney, R.G.

1990-01-01

366

Issues in Ecology, Issue 02: Ecosystem Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report defines ecosystem services as a strategy for the conservation of biodiversity. The production of ecosystem goods as it relates to the generation and maintenance of biodiversity is described. Ecosystem services such as flood and drought mitigation, services supplied by soil, pollination, pest control, and seed dispersal are described. Threats to ecosystem services are discussed, as well as their aesthetic, intellectual, and spiritual values. Issues in Ecology is an ongoing series of reports designed to present major ecological issues in an easy-to-read manner. This Issue summarizes the consensus of a panel of scientific experts based on the information that was current and available at the time of its publication in 1997.

Alexander, Susan

2010-02-16

367

Issues in Ecology, Issue 05: Biotic Invasions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report is an introduction to exotic species invasions. An exotic species becomes invasive, when it proliferates unchecked across the region in which it was introduced. The transformation from immigrant to invader and how humans act as dispersal agents is explained. Attributes of invaders, effects on native community, global ecological and economic consequences, prevention, and long term strategies for control and eradication are listed. Recommendations on future research and changes in policy are also made. Issues in Ecology is an ongoing series of reports designed to present major ecological issues in an easy-to-read manner. This Issue summarizes the consensus of a panel of scientific experts based on the information that was current and available at the time of its publication in 2000.

Lonsdale, W. M.

2010-02-16

368

Hunter perceptions and acceptance of alternative deer management regulations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wildlife managers are often confronted with a policy paradox where a majority of the public supports an outcome, but there is no agreement on specific management strategies to achieve this outcome. Previous research has also reported a link between regulatory acceptance, hunter satisfaction, and hunter participation rates. Thus, human dimensions research aimed at understanding hunter motivations and behavior is needed for effective management. In 2005, we surveyed Minnesota (USA) deer hunters (n = 6,000; 59% response) to evaluate attitudes regarding alternative deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvest regulations. We also conducted a series of forced choice experiments in which respondents were asked to select an option from a list of representative regulations that might be adopted to achieve a particular deer management goal. Specifically, we modeled 5 deer population scenarios ranging from low populations with high buck-harvest rates to populations 50% over goal density. Our results indicate that hunters preferred different regulations depending on the population scenario, but generally preferred antler-point restrictions and disliked limiting buck licenses through a lottery. We also found consistency among scenarios, in that a small percentage of respondents indicated they would not hunt if regulations were changed. The results from this study should help wildlife managers design deer harvest regulations that are both acceptable to hunters and achieve management objectives. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Cornicelli, L.; Fulton, D. C.; Grund, M. D.; Fieberg, J.

2011-01-01

369

The validation and acceptance of alternatives to animal testing.  

PubMed

Validation is the key to the regulatory status of alternative methods. A series of questions are put, to which answers are given, including the following: What is validation? What is meant by "relevance", "reliability" and "purpose"? Why and when is formal validation necessary? What comes before and after a formal validation study? How have validation criteria been defined, and to what extent have they been harmonized internationally? How are validation studies set up, managed and funded? What is a test? Do prediction models have to be validated? What is prevalidation? What is acceptance, and who is responsible for acceptance? How are validation studies reported? How should a validated test be defined and recognized? Must all new tests be validated? Are the same standards being applied to new in vitro and new in vivo tests? Has validation been successful so far? What can be done to improve validation? Is validation helping or hindering the development of in vitro toxicology and the implementation of the 'Three Rs' of Russell & Burch? PMID:20654558

Balls, M; Fentem, J H

1999-01-01

370

Predictions and acceptance criteria for K Reactor startup and power ascension  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to consolidate all the work performed on the predictions and acceptance criteria for the K Reactor Startup and Power Ascension Test Program. All results reported in this document are referenced to technical documents. This report consolidates the results of several technical reports previously issued. The technical background of the results can be found in the references given in this document.

Bond, R.A., Jr.

1991-06-01

371

Acceptance of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccination by the Australian public  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the Australian public's expectations, concerns and willingness to accept vaccination with the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccine. Design, setting and participants: A computer-assisted telephone interview survey was conducted between 20 August and 11 September 2009 by trained professional interviewers to study issues relating to vaccine uptake and perceived safety. The sample comprised 1155 randomly selected representative adults

Keith Eastwood; David N Durrheim; Alison Jones; Michelle Butler

372

Public Acceptance of Geological Disposal of Carbon Dioxide and Radioactive Waste: Similarities and Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Public acceptance of geological disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and that of radioactive waste (RW) are fundamentally different problems because of the history, scale and nature of the\\u000a two issues. CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is a technology in its infancy with no full-scale commercial application and there are only a handful\\u000a of full-scale storage projects globally. CO2 storage is

David M. Reiner; William J. Nuttall

373

Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

2000-07-01

374

Why do women accept to undergo a nipple sparing mastectomy or to reconstruct the nipple areola complex when nipple sparing mastectomy is not possible?  

PubMed

In a retrospective study, we investigated the reasons why women accepted to undergo a nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) and why women who could not keep their nipple areola complex (NAC) decided to reconstruct it. We intended to investigate whether keeping the NAC plays a psychological role, to state possible advantages of NSM. Between 2004 and 2006, 310 women with NAC sparing and 143 patients with successive NAC reconstruction were mailed a single open-ended question at follow-up 12 months after final breast reconstruction surgery or final NAC reconstruction with tattoo. The purpose was to explore personal motivations that drove women to accept NSM or to perform a NAC tattoo reconstruction. Responses were classified into 11 categories by five reviewers. We performed an analysis of the relative frequency of emerging issues. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Among the patients who responded to the open-ended question, 190 patients preserved their NAC, and 100 patients received postponed NAC reconstruction. Women in the NSM group were significantly younger (P = 0.02), more highly educated (P < 0.0001), and more frequently lived in Northern Italy (P = 0.03). The reasons for accepting NSM were more frequently related to body image satisfaction and integrity of the body (P = 0.002), reduction of psychological distress (P = 0.003), and surgeon's influence (P < 0.0001). Esthetic reasons were highly associated to the control group. These results help us to better understand the psychological impact of NAC sparing versus NAC reconstruction. NSM was accepted because it was perceived as a technique that preserved the integrity of the body, reduced the feeling of mutilation, improved the breast cosmetic results, and reduced psychological distress regarding the loss of the breast. PMID:22350788

Didier, F; Arnaboldi, P; Gandini, S; Maldifassi, A; Goldhirsch, A; Radice, D; Minotti, I; Ballardini, B; Luini, A; Santillo, B; Rietjens, M; Petit, J Y

2012-04-01

375

Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA  

PubMed Central

It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level.

Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

2010-01-01

376

Honeywell Modular Automation System Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the operability of the three new furnaces as controlled by the new Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS). The Honeywell MAS is being installed in PFP to control the three thermal stabilization furnaces in glovebox HA-211. The ATP provides instructions for testing the configuration of the Honeywell MAS at the Plutonium Finishing Plant(PFP). The test will be a field test of the analog inputs, analog outputs, and software interlocks. The interlock test will check the digital input and outputs. Field equipment will not be connected forth is test. Simulated signals will be used to test thermocouple, limit switch, and vacuum pump inputs to the PLUMAS.

STUBBS, A.M.

1999-09-21

377

Effective communications bring greater public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, GPU Nuclear Corporation announced a plan to evaporate into the atmosphere 2.3 million gal of water remaining from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The water would be processed to remove most of the radioactivity, but still remaining were >1,000 Ci of tritium to be released to the atmosphere during the evaporation process. It was expected that, following regulatory approvals, it would take >2 yr to complete the process. Fed by well-established antinuclear groups, public concern about evaporating the TMI-2-accident-generated water ran high among residents living near the plant. In the years since the TMI-2 accident, GPU Nuclear had developed a highly effective communications program in the communities surrounding TMI. This ongoing program provided a solid foundation on which to create and implement a risk communications approach to community understanding and acceptance of the evaporation process.

Clawson, C. (GPU Nuclear Corp., Parsippany, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01

378

Increasing social engagement among lonely individuals: the role of acceptance cues and promotion motivations.  

PubMed

Lonely individuals typically fear negative evaluation and engage in overly cautious social behaviors that perpetuate their social isolation. Recent research has found analogous security-oriented (i.e., prevention-focused) responses following experiences highlighting concerns with social loss but differing growth-oriented (i.e., promotion-focused ) responses, such as attempts at social engagement, following experiences highlighting concerns with social gain. The present studies thus investigated whether fostering a promotion focus among lonely individuals through subtle primes of acceptance could reduce their self-protective social avoidance. This hypothesis was supported across four studies in which the links between primed acceptance and promotion-focused motivations were first established, and the impact of such primes on lonely individuals' social thoughts, intentions, and behaviors were then tested. Implications of observed differences between effects of acceptance primes on lonely versus nonlonely individuals are discussed in terms of deficits versus satiation with feelings of belonging. PMID:20817823

Lucas, Gale M; Knowles, Megan L; Gardner, Wendi L; Molden, Daniel C; Jefferis, Valerie E

2010-10-01

379

JPRS Report. Environmental Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES ARE DISCUSSED. Partial Contents: Environmental Imperatives, Prtection,Pollution, Symposium, Environmental Protection, Nuclear Tests, Government Policy, Agro Chemical Poisoning, Air Pollution, Nature Reserves, Climates, E...

1991-01-01

380

Acceptance, acceptability and environmental justice: the role of community benefits in wind energy development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conflict around wind farm development has stimulated interest in ‘community benefits’ – the provision of financial or material benefits by the developers to the area affected by these facilities. By and large, both policy makers and researchers have couched the rationale for community benefits in instrumental terms, i.e. that an increased flow of community benefits will improve the social acceptability

Richard Cowell; Gill Bristow; Max Munday

2011-01-01

381

Acceptance- versus Change-Based Pain Management: The Role of Psychological Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared two theoretically opposed strategies for acute pain management: an acceptance-based and a change-based approach. These two strategies were compared in a within-subjects design using the cold pressor test as an acute pain induction method. Participants completed a baseline pain tolerance assessment followed by one of the two…

Blacker, Kara J.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Kounios, John

2012-01-01

382

User Acceptance of Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Services: An Application of Extended Technology Acceptance Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated path model in order to explore user acceptance of long-term evolution (LTE) services by examining potential causal relationships between key psychological factors and user intention to use the services. Design/methodology/approach: Online survey data collected from 1,344 users are analysed…

Park, Eunil; Kim, Ki Joon

2013-01-01

383

User Acceptance of YouTube for Procedural Learning: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study was framed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to identify determinants affecting behavioral intention to use YouTube. Most importantly, this research emphasizes the motives for using YouTube, which is notable given its extrinsic task goal of being used for procedural learning tasks. Our conceptual framework included two…

Lee, Doo Young; Lehto, Mark R.

2013-01-01

384

Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

Yousif, Wael K.

2010-01-01

385

Defining acceptable levels for ecological indicators: an approach for considering social values.  

PubMed

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components. PMID:17203340

Smyth, Robyn L; Watzin, Mary C; Manning, Robert E

2007-03-01

386

Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

Freeman, R.D.

1994-10-20

387

48 CFR 52.214-16 - Minimum Bid Acceptance Period.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Clauses 52.214-16 Minimum Bid Acceptance Period. As prescribed...following provision in invitations for bids, except for construction, if the contracting officer determines...period must be specified: Minimum Bid Acceptance Period (APR...

2013-10-01

388

33 CFR 175.130 - Visual distress signals accepted.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Visual distress signals accepted. 175.130 Section 175.130...SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.130 Visual distress signals accepted. (a) Any of the following...

2009-07-01

389

46 CFR 164.015-5 - Procedure for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Plastic Foam, Unicellular, Buoyant, Sheet and...Procedure for acceptance. (a) Unicellular plastic foam is not subject to formal approval...manufacturer. (c) Acceptance of unicellular plastic foam prior to being incorporated...

2013-10-01

390

Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system. Acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on Flammable Gas Watch List waste tank 104-AN. This document is the acceptance test report for the acceptance testing of the SHMS.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-17

391

46 CFR 164.120-9 - Procedure for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Fire Retardant Resins for Lifeboats and Rescue...Procedure for acceptance. (a) Fire retardant resin is not subject to formal...equipment. Coast Guard acceptance of fire retardant resin for use in the...

2013-10-01

392

An integrated model of technology acceptance for mobile computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology acceptance models have been an important area of research in the Information Systems arena especially in the last 20 years. Most technology acceptance studies use factors from Davis's Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Davis and Venkatesh's Extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM2), Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), and\\/or Goodhue's Task-Technology Fit (TTF) model. This study integrates factors from these four

Patricia H Lapczynski

2004-01-01

393

Soldier acceptability of a camouflage face paint combined with DEET insect repellent.  

PubMed

Under operational conditions, current doctrine requires separate application of the standard military insect repellent and camouflage face paint. Working with an industrial partner, Amon Re, Inc., we developed a combined camouflage face paint and insect repellent that offers excellent protection from arthropod disease vectors. We undertook a study to determine whether the new product was acceptable to soldiers under field conditions. A new formulation of camouflage face paint containing the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methyl-benzamide (DEET) was tested for user acceptability during a joint-service, multinational, military field training exercise (Operation Cobra Gold 1999) in Thailand. Soldiers testing the camouflage face paint were members of one of three companies (A, B, and C) of 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Soldiers in A company (N = 98) received standard military camouflage face paint and the U.S. military's Extended Duration Topical Insect and Arthropod Repellent containing 33% DEET, soldiers in B company (N = 75) received a new formulation of camouflage face paint without DEET, and soldiers in C company (N = 88) received the new formulation of camouflage face paint containing 30% DEET. Every soldier who volunteered to participate completed the study and submitted responses to the questionnaire. The different treatments were evaluated while soldiers spent 4 days conducting simulated combat exercises in a hot, tropical environment in central Thailand. Soldiers were provided the test materials, given a briefing on the study, and completed an initial questionnaire on May 19, 1999. Soldiers completed a final questionnaire after they returned from the training exercise on May 24, 1999. Results of the study indicated that soldiers found the new formulation of 30% DEET camouflage face paint easier to apply (88% of respondents) and remove (77%) than the current standard issue camouflage face paint. Soldiers liked the new 30% DEET camouflage face paint formulation better (61%) and were more likely to recommend it (67%) than the old camouflage face paint formulation. Although the addition of DEET to the camouflage face paint occasionally caused minor irritation after application for a short period (less than 15 minutes), the new camouflage face paint formulation with 30% DEET was evaluated most often (72%) as either good or excellent. The new 30% DEET camouflage face paint formulation offers significant operational advantages: protection from disease-transmitting arthropods, elimination of the need to carry separate insect repellent and camouflage face paint, and reduction in the time required to apply repellent and camouflage face paint separately. PMID:11569440

Debboun, M; Coleman, R E; Sithiprasasna, R; Gupta, R K; Strickman, D

2001-09-01

394

Rules of the Road: Why You Need an Acceptable Use Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increasing Internet access, library media specialists are implementing acceptable use policies to govern student conduct online. Policy components include definition and purpose; rights, responsibilities, and risks; penalties; and parental consent. Effective policies have input from all community members, are concise, and serve as guidelines…

Palgi, Rebecca D.

1996-01-01

395

The Acceptability of Home Monitoring Technology Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Baby Boomers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study investigated the willingness of two generational cohorts (current baby boomers and older adults) to accept home monitoring technology. Thirty individuals (15 baby boomers and 15 older adults) of both genders and living in the community participated in structured, mixed methods interviews. The participants' opinions and views on various technologies (e.g., personal emergency response systems, fall detection systems)

Alex Mihailidis; Amy Cockburn; Catherine Longley; Jennifer Boger

2008-01-01

396

Researchers’ Views of the Acceptability of Restrictive Provisions in Clinical Trial Agreements with Industry Sponsors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a mail survey of 884 U.S. medical school faculty active in clinical research to elicit their views about the acceptability of provisions in contracts for industry-sponsored clinical trials that would restrict investigators’ academic freedom and control over trials. We compared their responses to results from a similar survey of research administrators at 107 medical schools. There was substantial

Michelle M. Mello; Brian R. Clarridge; David M. Studdert

2005-01-01

397

Acceptance and Community Building in Schools through Increased Dialogue and Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stories of two students remind teachers that their actions, interactions and responses can encourage students to understand the need for strong, supportive relationships. Scott and Jason needed their teachers to help them find ways to be accepted and develop a confidence in their own identity, ways that helped them find their place on the…

Northfield, Shawn; Sherman, Ann

2004-01-01

398

Religious and Nonreligious Spirituality in Relation to Death Acceptance or Rejection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Meanings of religious and nonreligious spirituality are explored, with implications for death acceptance, death rejection, and life extension. In the first of two exploratory studies, 16 elders low on intrinsic religiosity were compared with 116 elders high in religiosity; they differed both in qualitative responses and on death attitudes. In the…

Cicirelli, Victor G.

2011-01-01

399

Extended TAM Model: Impacts of Convenience on Acceptance and Use of Moodle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increasing online access to courses, programs, and information has shifted the control and responsibility of learning process from instructors to learners. Learners' perceptions of and attitudes toward e-learning constitute a critical factor to the success of such system. The purpose of this study is to take TAM (technology acceptance model)…

Hsu, Hsiao-hui; Chang, Yu-ying

2013-01-01

400

Exploring Mobile User Acceptance Based on UTAUT and Contextual Offering  

Microsoft Academic Search

A precondition for mobile commerce success is user acceptance. Based on UTAUT that explains user acceptance of information technology, and combined with a special characteristic of mobile technology: contextual offering, we examined the factors significantly affecting mobile commerce user acceptance. We employed questionnaire survey to collect 250 valid papers and analyzed data with SEM software: LISERL. The results show that

Tao Zhou

2008-01-01

401

Worldwide Tests of Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parental acceptance-rejection theory (PART) is a theory of socialization which attempts to predict major psychological, environmental, and main tenance systems conditions under which parents the world over are likely to accept or reject their children. It attempts as well to predict significant consequences of parental acceptance-rejection, both for behavioral devel opment and for selected institutionalized expressive features of society. Drawing

Ronald P. Rohner

1980-01-01

402

Mindfulness and Acceptance in the Treatment of Disordered Eating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches to the treatment of clinical problems are accruing substantial empirical support. This article examines the application of these approaches to disordered eating. Theoretical bases for the importance of mindfulness and acceptance in the treatment of eating problems are reviewed, and interventions for eating problems that incorporate mindfulness and acceptance skills are briefly described. Empirical data are

Ruth A. Baer; Sarah Fischer; Debra B. Huss

2005-01-01

403

The potential use of DEA for credit applicant acceptance systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows how Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) may be used to develop an acceptance boundary for use in case based computer systems. Acceptability of cases is identified with cases which lie on or above the efficient frontier in the DEA sense. The method requires convexity of the acceptable set to hold as its major condition. The method also assumes

Marvin D. Troutt; Arun Rai; Aimao Zhang

1996-01-01

404

Deans in German Universities: Goal Acceptance and Task Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an empirical study which explored how deans at German universities accept their new role as manager, and which factors influence the acceptance of this role. Within a framework referring to Locke and Latham's goal setting theory, the acceptance of operative goals implemented in the faculties served as an indicator of how well…

Scholkmann, Antonia

2011-01-01

405

Predictors of Influenza Vaccine Acceptance among Healthy Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Previous studies investigating predictors of influenza vaccine acceptance have focused on high-risk patients or health care workers. Few studies have examined flu shot acceptance among healthy adults in workplace settings, even though influenza vaccine is recommended for this group as well.Methods. Two studies investigated predictors of flu vaccine acceptance in workplace samples of healthy adults. In the first study,

Gretchen B. Chapman; Elliot J. Coups

1999-01-01

406

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

SciTech Connect

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11

407

Launch Risk Acceptability: The Public Speaks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The perspective of those assuming risk has become increasingly important to launch agencies. The IAASS white paper "An ICAO for Space?" proposed four ultimate goals of any international regulatory framework. The first of these was to "Ensure that citizens of all nations are equally protected from "unreasonable levels" of risk from overflight by missiles, launch vehicles and returning spacecraft". A key component of this concept is the issue of what is an "unreasonable level" of risk from the perspective of those assuming the risk.

Haber, Jerold M.; Lamoreaux, Richard W.

2008-01-01

408

Issues in Pupil Transportation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this book is to present the critical issues in pupil transportation that will confront pupil transportation supervisors in local school districts. The following issues are discussed: (1) demands for extended service from community pressure groups; (2) reductions in budget requests by governing bodies; (3) unrest among driver…

Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

409

Yellowstone Resources and Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park online book is a compendium of concise information about the park's history, natural and cultural resources, issues, and major areas. Chapters, which are downloadable as PDF files, focus on the history of the park, the yellowstone ecosystem, geology, life in extreme heat (as in the hot springs), vegetation, fire in yellowstone, wildlife, and park issues.

Park, Yellowstone N.

410

Critical Issues and Leadership.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lack of administrative power causes concern today when the outstanding issues in higher education are concerned with questions of student, faculty or other kinds of power. The position that leadership takes in resolving these issues determines whether they become more or less explosive. There is no guaranteed formula for solving the complex…

Peoples, John A., Jr.

411

Issues in International Rehabilitation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight articles address issues and programs in international rehabilitation. The issue is introduced by a message from the Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Education for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, Robert R. Davila. Next, "A History of International Rehabilitation" (Nora Ellen Groce) reports on…

Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

1991-01-01

412

TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS  

EPA Science Inventory

These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

413

The classic environmental issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental issues are rarely straightforward. The construction of the Tellico Dam not only proved to be an exceptionally complex environmental problem but also developed into a major political issue in its own right. Following the discovery of a previously unknown species of fish near the site of the nearly completed dam, environmentalists began a long legal battle to halt construction

Graham Bennett

1981-01-01

414

Investigating an issue  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This critical thinking guide introduces students to a three-stage process for investigating an issue. The three stages include discovering and defining, delving deep, and responding to the issue. A student tip sheet explains each stage and enables students to work through the processes in a step-by-step manner while seeing how the information is tied together. Students identify, explore, and critically summarize the information concerning their issue. A graphic organizer provides students with an opportunity to evaluate the issue they have researched. A brief outline of the three stages provides students with a handy summary for use while investigating an issue. The activity sheets are in pdf format and are provided as part of a site about the future of energy. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Project, Iowa P.

2004-01-01

415

Multicultural Issues in Deafness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book considers, from both educational and cultural perspectives, the needs of children with deafness from African American, American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Island families. The text calls for a child-centered curriculum based on a fundamental acceptance of differences in communication and interpretation. Section I presents the…

Christensen, Kathee M., Ed.; Delgado, Gilbert L., Ed.

416

Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table ... turn Javascript on. What is a High-Risk Pregnancy? All pregnancies involve a certain degree of risk ...

417

Electric top drives gain wide industry acceptance  

SciTech Connect

Since its introduction, the top drive drilling system has gained acceptance as a productive and safe method for drilling oil and gas wells. Originally, the system was used mostly for offshore and higher cost land drilling, and it had to be installed as a permanent installation because of its enormous weight and size. Essentially, a top drive replaces the kelly and rotary table as the means of rotating drillpipe on oil, gas and geothermal rigs and is considered to be 15% to 40% more efficient than a kelly drive. Top drive systems allow the operator to drill and maintain directional orientation for triple stands and provide tripping efficiency because of the ability to ream and circulate with triple stands, to reduce the risk of stuck pipe or lost wells, and to improve well control and pipe handling safety. The paper describes electric top drives with DC motors, top drives with AC motors, top drives with permanent magnet motors, and top drives with permanent magnet brushless synchronous motors.

Riahi, M.L.

1998-05-01

418

PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

Honeyman, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

1997-05-01

419

Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.  

PubMed

The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. PMID:22805120

Norten, Adam

2012-10-01

420

MFTF-B acceptance tests and operation  

SciTech Connect

Final acceptance tests of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) were completed in February 1986. These tests verified performance of the following subsystems: the magnet system, the vacuum system and vessel, cryogenic systems, 80-keV neutral-beam sources and power supplies, microwave power systems for plasma heating, the supervisory control and diagnostic system, and the local control and instrumentation system. The entire magnet system was operated at full field continuously for 24 hours. The largest field alignment error under full load, determined using an electron beam technique, was 6 mm, well within the required precision of 15 mm. Absolute values of the magnetic field were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and were found to be within 2% of predicted values. All magnetic protection systems and fault protection systems were tested at full load. At 4.35 K, the cooling capacity of the liquid helium system exceeded the 11 kW rating and the nitrogen reliquifier met its 500 kW rating.

Coensgen, F.H.; Gerich, J.W.; Holl, P.M.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kozman, T.A.; Krause, K.H.; Labiak, W.C.; Lang, D.D.; Lathrop, G.H.; Lindquist, W.B.

1986-09-24

421

Acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts  

SciTech Connect

Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site production reactors contains two parallel single-pass heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary coolant (D{sub 2}O) to the secondary cooling water (H{sub 2}O). The configuration of the heat exchangers includes a plenary space defined by the heat exchanger tubesheet and the heat exchanger head at both the heat exchanger inlet and outlet to the primary piping. The primary restraint of the heat exchanger head (Type 304 stainless steel) is provided by 84 staybolts (Type 303 stainless steel) which attach to the tubesheet. The staybolts were cap seal-welded in the mid-1960's and are immersed in moderator. Access to inspect the staybolts is limited to a recently-developed ultrasonic technique shooting a beam through the staybolt assembly. Acceptance Criteria to allow disposition of flaws detected by UT inspection have been developed. The structural adequacy to protect against collapse loading of the head is demonstrated by finite element analysis of the head assembly and fracture analysis of flaw postulates in the staybolts. Both normal operation and normal operation plus seismic loading conditions were considered. Several bounding cases containing various configurations of nonactive (exceeding critical flaw size) staybolts were analyzed. The model of the head assembly can be applied to evaluate any active staybolt configurations based on the results from future inspections. 9 refs.

Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Barnes, D.M.; Placr, A.; Morrison, J.M.

1991-01-01

422

Acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts  

SciTech Connect

Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site production reactors contains two parallel single-pass heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary coolant (D{sub 2}O) to the secondary cooling water (H{sub 2}O). The configuration of the heat exchangers includes a plenary space defined by the heat exchanger tubesheet and the heat exchanger head at both the heat exchanger inlet and outlet to the primary piping. The primary restraint of the heat exchanger head (Type 304 stainless steel) is provided by 84 staybolts (Type 303 stainless steel) which attach to the tubesheet. The staybolts were cap seal-welded in the mid-1960`s and are immersed in moderator. Access to inspect the staybolts is limited to a recently-developed ultrasonic technique shooting a beam through the staybolt assembly. Acceptance Criteria to allow disposition of flaws detected by UT inspection have been developed. The structural adequacy to protect against collapse loading of the head is demonstrated by finite element analysis of the head assembly and fracture analysis of flaw postulates in the staybolts. Both normal operation and normal operation plus seismic loading conditions were considered. Several bounding cases containing various configurations of nonactive (exceeding critical flaw size) staybolts were analyzed. The model of the head assembly can be applied to evaluate any active staybolt configurations based on the results from future inspections. 9 refs.

Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Barnes, D.M.; Placr, A.; Morrison, J.M.

1991-12-31

423

Childlessness in Nigeria: perceptions and acceptability.  

PubMed

Childlessness has major psychological and social implications for affected persons, especially in settings where fertility is highly valued. While a number of studies have documented how childlessness is perceived in these societies and the multitude of adverse consequences suffered by affected individuals, studies have not made a clear distinction between voluntary and involuntary childlessness in these settings. Using focus-group discussions from three Nigerian communities, this study explores societal perception and acceptance of childlessness in Nigeria, focusing on both voluntary and involuntary childlessness. Findings show that not having children, whether voluntarily or not, contributes to a kind of invisibility and poverty in Nigeria. Regardless of the reason, voluntary childlessness evoked strong negative feelings among discussants. The study also shows the broad definition given to voluntary childlessness in Nigeria as including individuals that are childless because they chose to stay with an infertile partner and also those who could not have biological children and chose not to adopt. Childlessness is not yet embraced in Nigeria, where pronatalist culture is still very strong. However, the study noted a more tolerant attitude to involuntary childlessness, suggesting possible changes in perceptions of the condition. Policy and programme implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24236953

Ibisomi, Latifat; Mudege, Netsayi Noris

2014-01-01

424

Issues in Monitoring Medication Effects in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The task of medication monitoring in the schools has increased for school psychologists, yet there is little research specific to pediatric psychoactive medication. The current article reviews issues pertinent to school-based medication monitoring. Feasibility, acceptability, and perception of effectiveness are reviewed as fundamental…

Anderson, Laura; Walcott, Christy M.; Reck, Sarah G.; Landau, Steven

2009-01-01

425

Ethical Issues in Withholding Care from Severely Handicapped Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical issues are examined that involve withholding medical treatment from severely handicapped infants. Although current laws do not sanction euthanasia, severely handicapped infants are often assisted in dying. Discussion includes society's apparent acceptance of this practice and several solutions to the problems. (Author)

Cohen, Libby

1981-01-01

426

THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A META MODEL TO EXPLAIN AND PREDICT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE AND SUCCESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under-used and never-implemented information systems represent wasted investment. This paper proposes a new model - the Information Systems Acceptance (ISA) model - to explain and predict information systems (IS) acceptance. The ISA model integrates three sets of factors influencing IS acceptance: software characteristics; implementation processes; and system use, user satisfaction and system outcomes. These sets of factors are drawn from

Megan Seen; Anne Rouse; Nicholas Beaumont; Christine Mingins

2006-01-01

427

Self-Reported Acceptance of Social Anxiety Sypmtoms: Development and Validation of the Social Anxiety-Acceptance and Action Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness-based interventions have been used in the treatment of social anxiety with initial success. Mindfulness is defined as an awareness and acceptance of the present moment. Acceptance when used as a coping strategy is related to reduced distress during anxiety-provoking tasks and increased willingness to experience unpleasant events. The purpose of this research was to examine acceptance, willingness and distress

Meagan B. MacKenzie

2008-01-01

428

ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-12-05

429

Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Increases Postnatal Acceptability of Nicotine Odor and Taste in Adolescent Rats  

PubMed Central

Human studies indicate that alcohol exposure during gestation not only increases the chance for later alcohol abuse, but also nicotine dependence. The flavor attributes of both alcohol and nicotine can be important determinants of their initial acceptance and they both share the component chemosensory qualities of an aversive odor, bitter taste and oral irritation. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating epigenetic chemosensory mechanisms through which fetal alcohol exposure increases adolescent alcohol acceptance, in part, by decreasing the aversion to alcohol's bitter and oral irritation qualities, as well as its odor. Given that alcohol and nicotine have noteworthy chemosensory qualities in common, we investigated whether fetal exposure to alcohol increased the acceptability of nicotine's odor and taste in adolescent rats. Study rats were alcohol-exposed during fetal development via the dams' liquid diet. Control animals received ad lib access to an iso-caloric, iso-nutritive diet throughout gestation. Odorant-induced innate behavioral responses to nicotine odor (Experiment 1) or orosensory-mediated responses to nicotine solutions (Experiment 2) were obtained, using whole-body plethysmography and brief access lick tests, respectively. Compared to controls, rats exposed to fetal alcohol showed an enhanced nicotine odor response that was paralleled by increased oral acceptability of nicotine. Given the common aversive component qualities imbued in the flavor profiles of both drugs, our findings demonstrate that like postnatal alcohol avidity, fetal alcohol exposure also influences nicotine acceptance, at a minimum, by decreasing the aversion of both its smell and taste. Moreover, they highlight potential chemosensory-based mechanism(s) by which fetal alcohol exposure increases the later initial risk for nicotine use, thereby contributing to the co-morbid expression with enhanced alcohol avidity. Where common chemosensory mechanisms are at play, our results suggest broader implications related to the consequence of fetal exposure with one substance of abuse and initial acceptability of others.

Mantella, Nicole M.; Youngentob, Steven L.

2014-01-01

430

Acceptance of HIV testing in medical inpatients: a local acceptability study.  

PubMed

Late diagnosis remains the most important factor related to death due to HIV in the UK. To reduce late diagnosis, the British HIV Association (BHIVA), the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH), and the British Infection Society jointly released national guidelines for HIV testing in the UK in 2008. They recommend local evaluation of HIV testing for all medical admissions aged 15-59 years in areas where the local prevalence is above 2/1000. The local prevalence of HIV in Croydon is 4.17/1000. We carried out a local acceptability study at Mayday Hospital in Croydon and found that 84/101 medical patients agreed to have an HIV test. A previous audit showed that only 9/1047 medical admissions had been tested for HIV. This study shows that HIV testing is acceptable and that more patients could be tested. PMID:21515748

Chan, S Y; Hill-Tout, R; Rodgers, M; Cormack, I

2011-04-01

431

Emerging Issues in International Humanitarian Law: The Right to Counsel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the United States initiated its military response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, law and respect for legal rights has remained a focal point of legitimacy. No single issue, however, has dominated the legal debate. Instead, like Republican candidates for the presidential nomination, different issues have risen to discourse dominance, only to recede as other issues displaced

Geoffrey S. Corn; Peter Chickris

2012-01-01

432

Plants and gravity. Special issue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This issue of the Journal of Plant Growth Regulation explores the effects of gravity on plant growth and development from several perspectives. Most of the review papers consider plants and gravity from the viewpoint of ground-based laboratory research, and several papers consider gravitropism, the directed growth in response to gravity, in some detail. However, another approach to study the effects of gravity on plant is to effectively remove the force due to gravity. A very dramatic way to accomplish this goal is through the free-fall conditions achieved by spacecraft in low Earth orbit, so some of the authors have reviewed recent advances in spaceflight research with plant systems.

Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

2002-01-01

433

Handbook on Ethical Issues in Anthropology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Anthropological Association has recently added number 23 to its series of special online publications. Edited by Joan Cassell and Sue-Ellen Jacobs, this collection of six essays is presented to "stimulate discussion and reflection on ethical issues" among anthropologists. Offerings include a background essay and annotated bibliography, two essays containing fictional ethical dilemmas and proposed solutions, an essay on introducing issues of ethical responsibility into the classroom, and guidelines on holding a workshop on ethical problems in fieldwork.

1996-01-01

434

PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http:\\/\\/cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http:\\/\\/cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole

Mirjana Bozic; Margarita Man'ko

2009-01-01

435

Plus Magazine: Issue 20  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Plus is an internet magazine which aims to introduce readers to the beauty and the practical applications of mathematics." It is published in conjunction with the Cambridge-based Millennium Mathematics Project. The current issue addresses a wide range of topics that include fluid mechanics; probability; and the true, original purpose of the Game of Life. Besides several feature articles, each issue also has fun puzzles, mathematical curiosities, and a news section. The news items take a mathematical perspective of current events or recent scientific investigations. Plus is released about once every other month, on average, and all the back issues are kept in an online archive.

1997-01-01

436

Acceptability of a Mobile Health Unit for Rural HIV Clinical Trial Enrollment and Participation  

PubMed Central

Few rural minorities participate in HIV clinical trials. Mobile health units (MHUs) may be one strategy to increase participation. We explored community perceptions of MHU acceptability to increase clinical trial participation for rural minorities living with HIV/AIDS. We conducted 11 focus groups (service providers and community leaders) and 35 interviews (people living with HIV/AIDS). Responses were analyzed using constant comparative and content analysis techniques. Acceptable MHU use included maintaining accessibility and confidentiality while establishing credibility, community ownership and control. Under these conditions, MHUs can service rural locations and overcome geographic barriers to reaching major medical centers for clinical trials.

Miles, Margaret Shandor; Banks, Bahby; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

2013-01-01

437

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1) SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain''--research on duct injection; (2) Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option''--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3) Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''--PETC's efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4) Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment''--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J. (eds.)

1990-03-01

438

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4)``Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment``--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J. [eds.

1990-03-01

439

Ionizing radiation--understanding and acceptance.  

PubMed

A written survey about perceived radiation risks was conducted among three groups of a total of 400 individuals. Seventy-seven (26%) of the respondents were radiation workers, 35 (12%) were medical doctors without professional exposure, and 177 (68%) belonged to the general population. Even if the sample is not representative of the Romanian population as a whole, some interesting conclusions can be made. The level of anxiety toward radiation, expressed as a hazard perception index, is significantly lower in radiation workers when compared to medical doctors and the general population (0.81 +/- 0.94, 1.42 +/- 1.21, and 1.72 +/- 1.34, respectively, p < 0.001). Hazard perception index values also varied with the education status, with lowest values among medical university graduates and highest among public school graduates (p < 0.001). Both university-graduated groups significantly differ from the non-university groups (p < 0.05). Knowledge about radiation and emergency plans for nuclear accidents/incidents was also correlated with hazard perception, with the results confirming the hypothesis that better knowledge is associated with lower radiation hazard perception. The extent to which people accept civilian nuclear power is also related to hazard perception and knowledge. The way people perceive the radiation risk differed among the three groups. Different levels of risk perception were associated with radiation from nuclear energy and diagnostic x rays. It is important that radiological protection authorities develop new plans and materials for communicating with the general public in order to improve knowledge of ionizing radiation, radiation risks, and the safety of civilian nuclear energy employment. PMID:16155459

Mihai, Laurentiu Teodor; Milu, Constantin; Voicu, Bogdan; Enachescu, Dan

2005-10-01

440

Health Issues and Treatments  

MedlinePLUS

... 888) 232-6348 Contact CDC-INFO Spina Bifida Homepage Facts Health Issues & Treatments Living With Spina Bifida Infants Toddlers and Preschoolers School-Aged Adolescents & Teens Young Adults My Story Data and Statistics Research & Tracking Spina Bifida ...

441

JPRS Report, Environmental Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on environmental issues all over the world. Titles include: Soviet Government Spokesman on Joining UN Ecology Program; Petroleum Minister on Alternative Energy Sources; Ottawa ...

1991-01-01

442

JPRS Report, Environmental Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on environmental issues around the world. Titles include: U.S.-Japan Ozone Layer Protection Experiment Planned; Pioneer Effort in Total Waste Recycling Initiated; ANC Policy Do...

1991-01-01

443

Special Issue: Viktor Lowenfeld.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Viktor Lowenfeld's role in fashioning a predominant ideology and teaching method for art education in schools is an indispensable chapter in the history of art education. His contributions are discussed in this special issue. (RM)

Youngblood, Michael S., Ed.

1982-01-01

444

JPRS Report, Environmental Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on environmental issues. Titles include: Criticism Continues Over U.S. Johnston Atoll Chemical Destruction Plan; Soviet Authorities Release Norwegian Ecology Vessel; USSR Accep...

1990-01-01

445

Issues in DNA Fingerprinting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use, in court, of DNA Profiling, popularly referred to as DNA Fingerprinting, for forensic identification purposes has been questioned. A report of the National Research Council was solicited to clarify the issues and propose procedures of how and whe...

H. Chernoff

1994-01-01

446

The New Issues Puzzle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Companies issuing stock during 1970 to 1990, whether an initial public offering or a seasoned equity offering, have been poor long-run investments for investors. During the five years after the issue, investors have received average returns of only 5 percent per year for companies going public and only 7 percent per year for companies conducting a seasoned equity offer. Book-to-market

Tim Loughran; Jay R Ritter

1995-01-01

447

TaxIssue.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Athmatic Media, TaxIssue.com provides a plentitude of free tax information. The Resources section includes filing information, tax statistics, and both federal and state tax forms. Several utilities allow users to search tax codes, tax cases, and revenue procedures as well as estimate their tax refunds and view interest rate data. Interested users may also subscribe to the TaxIssue.com newsletter.

448

Rangeland Policy Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides a balanced venue for the public to explore the key issues surrounding the use and management of rangelands. The goals of the website are to help citizens to clarify issues, to analyze management alternatives and their consequences, to stay abreast of legislation and legal decisions to discover new techniques of conflict resolution, and to encourage an informed public to engage in policy debate and work toward resolving conflicts over rangeland resources.

Center, Agriculture N.; Partnership, Western R.

449

Special issue on filamentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

2014-05-01

450

Ethical and legal issues in suicide research.  

PubMed

Moralist, libertarian and relativist ethical positions concerning suicide and its prevention are presented in order to clarify premises upon which ethical issues in suicide research may be resolved. Ethical concerns are differentiated from legal considerations and the implications of the vulnerability of suicidology research participants are discussed. Specific issues that arise in design, choice of participants, interpretation, diffusion of results and evaluative research are treated. These include: experimental methodologies, obtaining informed consent, deception and disclosure, studying innovative and unproven interventions, unknown consequences of participation, rescue criteria, disclosure of information to third parties, research with special populations, risks in publicizing results and measuring the value of human life. When specific legal obligations are lacking, ethical premises concerning the acceptability of suicide and obligations to intervene may influence research protocols. PMID:15710447

Mishara, Brian L; Weisstub, David N

2005-01-01

451

Training and information technology issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the May-June issue is on training and information technology. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Communicating effectively, by Alain Bucaille, AREVA; Reputation management, by Susan Brisset, Bruce Power; Contol room and HSI modernization guidance, by Joseph Naser, EPRI; How far are we from public acceptance, by Jennifer A. Biedscheid and Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions LLC; Spent fuel management options, by Brent W. Dixon and Steven J. Piet, Idaho National Laboratory; Industry Awards; A secure energy future for America, by George W. Bush, President, United States of America; Vision of the future of nuclear energy, by Anne Lauvergeon, AREVA; and, Plant profile: strategy for transition to digital, TXU Power.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-05-15

452

Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs.

Not Available

1990-03-01

453

Trust, confidence, procedural fairness, outcome fairness, moral conviction, and the acceptance of GM field experiments.  

PubMed

In 2005, Swiss citizens endorsed a moratorium on gene technology, resulting in the prohibition of the commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops and the growth of genetically modified animals until 2013. However, scientific research was not affected by this moratorium, and in 2008, GMO field experiments were conducted that allowed us to examine the factors that influence their acceptance by the public. In this study, trust and confidence items were analyzed using principal component analysis. The analysis revealed the following three factors: "economy/health and environment" (value similarity based trust), "trust and honesty of industry and scientists" (value similarity based trust), and "competence" (confidence). The results of a regression analysis showed that all the three factors significantly influenced the acceptance of GM field experiments. Furthermore, risk communication scholars have suggested that fairness also plays an important role in the acceptance of environmental hazards. We, therefore, included measures for outcome fairness and procedural fairness in our model. However, the impact of fairness may be moderated by moral conviction. That is, fairness may be significant for people for whom GMO is not an important issue, but not for people for whom GMO is an important issue. The regression analysis showed that, in addition to the trust and confidence factors, moral conviction, outcome fairness, and procedural fairness were significant predictors. The results suggest that the influence of procedural fairness is even stronger for persons having high moral convictions compared with persons having low moral convictions. PMID:22150405

Siegrist, Michael; Connor, Melanie; Keller, Carmen

2012-08-01

454

Acceptance of canisters of consolidated spent nuclear fuel by the Federal Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for deliver; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. This document discusses canister standards and criteria. 12 refs., 7 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1990-03-01

455

Issues Management: End of First Decade Progress Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that issues management is a robust contribution to the public relations discipline. Offers additional rationale for empowering public relations practitioners by involving them in strategic planning, making them responsible for issue scanning and monitoring, integrating their advice into standards of corporate social responsibility, and…

Heath, Robert L.; Cousino, Kenneth R.

1990-01-01

456

The New Deal: Government and the Economy. Public Issues Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is part of a series designed to help students take and defend a position on public issues. This unit on the New Deal era raises the following issues: (1) How responsible should the government be for the economic well being of citizens? To what extent should this responsibility outweigh traditional ideas of property rights? (2) What…

Singleton, Laurel R., Ed.

457

Trends in Current Issues, Y2K-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

EDUCAUSE inaugurated its annual Current Issues Survey in 2000 by asking the primary representatives, typically CIOs, of its member institutions to identify up to three critical IT issues (five starting in 2004) from among 30 to 40 in response to each of four questions. The survey response rate has typically been 35 to 40 percent, with a…

Maltz, Leslie; DeBlois, Peter B.

2005-01-01

458

Framing ethical acceptability: a problem with nuclear waste in Canada.  

PubMed

Ethical frameworks are often used in professional fields as a means of providing explicit ethical guidance for individuals and institutions when confronted with ethically important decisions. The notion of an ethical framework has received little critical attention, however, and the concept subsequently lends itself easily to misuse and ambiguous application. This is the case with the 'ethical framework' offered by Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), the crown-corporation which owns and is responsible for the long-term management of Canada's high-level nuclear fuel waste. It makes a very specific claim, namely that it is managing Canada's long-lived radioactive nuclear fuel waste in an ethically responsible manner. According to this organization, what it means to behave in an ethically responsible manner is to act and develop policy in accordance with its ethical framework. What, then, is its ethical framework, and can it be satisfied? In this paper I will show that the NWMO's ethical and social framework is deeply flawed in two respects: (a) it fails to meet the minimum requirements of a code of ethic or ethical framework by offering only questions, and no principles or rules of conduct; and (b) if posed as principles or rules of conduct, some of its questions are unsatisfiable. In particular, I will show that one of its claims, namely that it seek informed consent from individuals exposed to risk of harm from nuclear waste, cannot be satisfied as formulated. The result is that the NWMO's ethical framework is not, at present, ethically acceptable. PMID:21318321

Wilding, Ethan T

2012-06-01

459

Culturally-Competent Treatments for Asian Americans: The Relevance of Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Psychotherapies  

PubMed Central

The development of effective treatments for Asian Americans is important because treatment disparities continue to exist for this population. Because of their theoretical grounding in East Asian philosophies, mindfulness and acceptance-based psychotherapies appear to constitute promising ways to provide culturally responsive mental health care to Asian Americans. However, in practice these approaches often reflect conceptions of mental health that are more consistent with Western world views. We review points of intersection and divergence between Western-based mindfulness and acceptance psychotherapies and Asian American cultural values. We then propose a culturally syntonic approach that accentuates certain components of mindfulness and acceptance psychotherapies and adapts other components of these approaches to be more consistent with Asian American cultural values.

Nagayama Hall, Gordon C.; Hong, Janie J.; Zane, Nolan W. S.; Meyer, Oanh L.

2011-01-01

460

Focus Issue: Understanding Mechanisms of Inflammation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Inflammation, includes research that reveals regulators of a receptor implicated in an inflammatory bowel disease, as well as the contribution of a matrix metalloproteinase to skin inflammation. Perspectives discuss the role of proinflammatory cytokines in brain inflammatory disorders and the regulation of multiple types of cell death in tissues in response to proinflammatory factors. Together with content from the Science Signaling Archives, these articles underline the importance of understanding the basis of inflammatory responses that can both protect and harm the host.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2013-01-15

461

The Murmansk Initiative - RF: Acceptance Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping. The trilateral project among Norway, the RF, and the United States of America (U.S.) began in 1994 and was the first to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors to upgrade and expand an existing LLRW treatment plant on the premises of RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia. The project moved quickly through the design phase. Progress during the construction phase was somewhat slower because of difficulties with acquisition of hardware, inexperience with automated instrumentation and control equipment, and unexpected design changes in the cementation unit. The project advanced into the test-operation phase, which is currently underway, in June 2001. Initial runs with liquid waste have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents could be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. Resolution of these issues is expected within the next few months.

Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Soerlie, A. A.; Moller, B.; Barnes, E.

2002-02-26

462

Physicians' acceptance of pharmacokinetics-based clinical decision support systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports a finding of a field study on the physicians’ acceptance of a pharmacokinetics-based clinical decision support system (CDSS). A research model was used to explain the acceptance of the technology of 140 participated physicians from three hospitals. The results indicated that the research model was acceptable with a reasonable goodness-of-fit. Both performance expectancy and effort expectancy have

I-chiu Chang; Hsin-ginn Hwang; Won-fu Hung; Yi-chang Li

2007-01-01

463

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

NONE

2000-12-01

464

Communicating Domain Knowledge in Executable Acceptance Test Driven Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results of a case study looking at how domain knowledge is communicated to developers using executable acceptance\\u000a test driven development at a large software development company. We collected and analyzed qualitative data on a large software\\u000a development team’s testing practices and their use of a custom-built executable acceptance testing tool. Our findings suggest\\u000a that executable acceptance tests (1)

Shelly Park; Frank Maurer

2009-01-01

465

Access to appropriate information on HIV is important in maximizing the acceptance of the antenatal HIV antibody test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The universal HIV antibody testing programme was implemented in Hong Kong in September 2001. A survey on acceptance of the test was conducted in the territory's maternal and child health centres in a two-month period. The response rate was 98.2% and 2,669 valid questionnaires were analysed. Seventy per cent (n=1,825) of the respondents indicated their acceptance of the test. A

K. Lee; W. T. Cheung; V. S. C. Kwong; W. Y. Wan; S. S. Lee

2005-01-01

466

ESH Division issue management process  

SciTech Connect

An issue management process that effectively captures, evaluates, and dispositions issues is an important element of the LANL ESH Division`s Management Process. As part of the overall ESH Division Management Process improvement program, an approach to implementing issue management is outlined in this final report. Issues as defined in source documents, or as originally received or defined by ESH Division are called Source Issues. Through issue analysis and integration, a set of Planning Issues are defined for which resolution strategies are developed. This implementation of the Issue Management Process is outlined as follows: issue collection; issue filtering and analysis; issue evaluation and prioritization; issue resolution strategy development; and issue status communication and monitoring.

NONE

1998-11-01

467

In this issue: transplant immunology and transplant biology.  

PubMed

Transplantation faces an unprecedented shortage of organs available for transplantation, resulting in longer waiting times and transplant candidates on the waiting list dying before getting a transplant. This dramatic situation triggered the search for new approaches and innovations to increase the donor pool, such as extending the acceptance criteria concerning donor age or organ transplantation across blood group barriers. Herein, leading experts detailed the immunological and molecular concepts behind the successful clinical translation of these strategies. Organ rejection remains a constant challenge and transplantation tolerance is still elusive as the current paradigm aims for immunosuppression rather than immune modulation. Two contributions in this issue review two different molecular paradigms in harnessing the immunologic response after transplantation. The interplay between the intestinal innate and adaptive immunity is particularly intricate and the intestine remains the organ with the highest rate of acute rejection after transplantation. Experts in the field summarized both time-honored and recent knowledge in intestinal preservation and tolerance in intestinal transplantation with potential for further basic and translational research. PMID:24833285

Jiga, Lucian P; Oltean, Mihai

2014-01-01

468

[Acceptance of illness scale and its clinical impact].  

PubMed

The level of chronic illness acceptance is an indicator of functioning and predictor of quality of life. The greater the acceptance of disease is, the less mental discomfort and less severe negative emotions there are. This paper presents Acceptance of Illness Scale and the main results and conclusions of the recent publications dealing with this problem in patients with chronic diseases. It has been proved that the level of acceptance of illness is significantly associated with a variety of clinical and sociodemographic factors. This justifies the rightness of its assessment, which appears to be an important element in the holistic medical and nonmedical care. PMID:24720106

Mazurek, Justyna; Lurbiecki, Jurgen

2014-02-01

469

5 CFR 2601.204 - Conditions for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS STATUTORY GIFT ACCEPTANCE AUTHORITY...gift in a publication, speech or other...

2010-01-01

470

5 CFR 2601.204 - Conditions for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS STATUTORY GIFT ACCEPTANCE AUTHORITY...gift in a publication, speech or other...

2009-01-01

471

It Top-10 Issues 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2005 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

Dewey, Barbara I.; DeBlois, Peter B.

2006-01-01

472

Top 10 IT Issues, 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2006 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter