Science.gov

Sample records for acceptance issues response

  1. Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

  2. Conceptual Issues in Response-Time Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    Two different traditions of response-time (RT) modeling are reviewed: the tradition of distinct models for RTs and responses, and the tradition of model integration in which RTs are incorporated in response models or the other way around. Several conceptual issues underlying both traditions are made explicit and analyzed for their consequences. We…

  3. Evaluation of the Acceptance of Audience Response System by Corporations Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsing-Hui; Lu, Ta-Jung; Wann, Jong-Wen

    The purpose of this research is to explore enterprises' acceptance of Audience Response System (ARS) using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The findings show that (1) IT characteristics and facilitating conditions could be external variables of TAM. (2) The degree of E-business has positive significant correlation with behavioral intention of employees. (3) TAM is a good model to predict and explain IT acceptance. (4) Demographic variables, industry and firm characteristics have no significant correlation with ARS acceptance. The results provide useful information to managers and ARS providers that (1) ARS providers should focus more on creating different usages to enhance interactivity and employees' using intention. (2) Managers should pay attention to build sound internal facilitating conditions for introducing IT. (3) According to the degree of E-business, managers should set up strategic stages of introducing IT. (4) Providers should increase product promotion and also leverage academic and government to promote ARS.

  4. Telephone Acceptable Use Policy Issue Date: December 2014 Version 3

    E-print Network

    Daley, Monica A.

    The purpose of this Policy is to describe the service standards to be applied and the operational procedures to be followed by all employees of the College when using landline or mobile telephones for internal and external and mobile telephones all users are expected to act responsibly and keep costs to a minimum. Wherever

  5. Thinking Differentially: A Response to Issues in Differential Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluke, John D.; Merkel-Holguin, Lisa; Schene, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This is a response to the document by Hughes et al. in this issue that offers a critique of the status of differential response (DR). We find the document to be helpful in intent, but do not find that it reflects scientifically sound methods, and contains many mischaracterizations of the status, impetus, research, and evaluation of DR to date. We…

  6. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

    1999-03-01

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

  7. College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Samantha R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

  8. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

  9. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

  10. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  11. Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues Associated With Two New Generation Vehicles: P2000 and EXS2

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S

    2000-06-06

    As the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) has been proceeding with the development of designs for high-fuel-economy vehicles, it also has been assessing whether impediments exist to the transition to these vehicles. Toward that end, as materials options and vehicle designs have been developed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been conducting analyses related to the attendant materials infrastructure requirements. This report addresses the question, what are the infrastructure requirements, acceptance issues, and life-cycle impacts associated with PNGV vehicles constructed of lightweight materials.

  12. Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.E.; Rubin, J.D.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.

    1999-03-01

    To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute materials and the components of the substitute materials, as well as the automotive parts constructed from the new materials. This report documents a set of analyses that attempt to identify potential barriers--economic, infrastructure, and public acceptance barriers--to the materials substitution in New Generation Vehicles. The analyses rely on hypothetical vehicle market penetration scenarios and material composition. The approach is comprehensive, examining issues ranging from materials availability to their eventual disposition and its effect on the automobile recycling industry, and from supporting industries' capacity to the public acceptability of these vehicles. The analyses focus on two likely substitute materials, aluminum and glass-reinforced polymer composites.

  13. Assessing Education's Response to Multicultural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Finds that, according to responses by administrators, most journalism/mass communication units accredited by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication seem to have done somewhat more than unaccredited units to sensitize students to a multicultural society and to hire minority faculty and recruit minority students. (SR)

  14. Responding to "Issues in Differential Response"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Robin Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes's article represents an important effort to critically examine the foundation of thought and empirical evidence associated with the rise in prominence of differential response (DR) within child welfare systems throughout the United States. The insights and criticisms offered are an important…

  15. A Quantitative Assessment of the Factors that Influence Technology Acceptance in Emergency Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiter, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional models for studying user acceptance and adoption of technology focused on the factors that identify and tested the relationships forged between the user and the technology in question. In emergency response, implementing technology without user acceptance may affect the safety of the responders and citizenry. Integrating the factors…

  16. 30 CFR 1227.200 - What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation? 1227.200 Section 1227.200 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING...' Responsibilities to Perform Delegated Functions § 1227.200 What are a State's general responsibilities if...

  17. Reliability-based calibration of design seismic response spectra and structural acceptance criteria

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    alternate "explicit" check, which commonly specifies a design spectrum and associated structural response for such analysis. In this work, we show that the use of a specific Conditional Mean Spectrum (CMS) is a natural codes via a single response spectrum. If the build- ing behaves acceptably when analyzed under that de

  18. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented,

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianwei

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted

  19. QA/QC issues to aid regulatory acceptance of microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Shi, Leming

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is responsible for (1) promoting and protecting public health by assuring the safety and effectiveness of medicines and medical devices and (2) advancing public health by helping to speed innovations that make medicines and foods safer, more effective, and more affordable. The genomics revolution has dramatically increased our knowledge of basic biology but this has not resulted in the expected acceleration of new medical product development. The Agency's Critical Path to New Medical Products stresses that new tools are needed to address this pipeline problem. Microarray technology is one of these promising tools although questions have risen about the reproducibility of measurements. The Microarray Quality Control (MAQC) Project was initiated by FDA scientists to address this issue. This large project, which evaluated reference RNA samples on seven microarray platforms, found good intralaboratory repeatability and interlaboratory reproducibility. In addition, there was high cross-platform consistency. All data are available free of cost and the reference RNA samples are available for proficiency testing. Thus, current microarray technology appears to provide both reliability and consistency for regulatory submissions. PMID:17567852

  20. 30 CFR 1227.200 - What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation? 1227.200 Section 1227.200 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE DELEGATION TO STATES...

  1. 30 CFR 1227.200 - What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation? 1227.200 Section 1227.200 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE DELEGATION TO STATES...

  2. 30 CFR 1227.200 - What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are a State's general responsibilities if it accepts a delegation? 1227.200 Section 1227.200 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE DELEGATION TO STATES...

  3. DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS RESPONSE AND HIGH-

    E-print Network

    Klemmer, Scott

    DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS is known about how to design checklists well, especially new forms of computer-aided checklists; experts produce most existing designs in an ad-hoc manner. In response, we introduce the Dynamic Procedure aids

  4. Host acceptance and sex allocation of Nasonia wasps in response to conspecifics

    E-print Network

    Shuker, David

    Host acceptance and sex allocation of Nasonia wasps in response to conspecifics and heterospecifics of an organism's biology. Here, we consider how parasitoid wasps vary their reproductive decisions when such as parasitoid wasps, populations are often highly structured with only one or a few females contributing

  5. 42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter into a construction project agreement? 137.285 Section 137...-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter into a...

  6. In this issue: FOX genes and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Pignata, Claudio; Romano, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    In this issue of the journal, we host a topic focused on the roles of human Forkhead-box (FOX) gene family members, including FOXN1, FOXP genes, and FOXO1, in the immune system. In the first review of the issue, Palamaro et al. focused their attention on the pivotal role of FOXN1 in T-cell development and the clinical implications of its mutation in humans. Dr Fleskens and Dr van Boxtel detailed the role of FOXP members in immune regulation. Concerning the roles of FOXP members in immune response, Vent-Schmidt et al. focused the attention on FOXP3. Passerini et al. highlighted the current knowledge on the involvement of FOXP3 in the development and function of Treg cells. Eventually, in the last review of this special issue, Szyd?owski et al. focused on the role of FOXO1 in B-cell development and differentiation, paying particular attention to the role of PI3K-AKT signaling activation in development, differentiation, function, and homeostasis of B cells. Notably, studies on the role of FOX family members in immune response could be helpful to further investigate pathogenesis of immunological disease and to develop a novel therapeutics approach for human diseases. PMID:24621091

  7. Presenting Global Warming and Evolution as Public Health Issues to Encourage Acceptance of Scientific Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Shawn K.; McArthur, Laurence B.; Mabry, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence supporting anthropogenic global warming and evolution by natural selection is considerable, the public does not embrace these concepts. The current study explores the hypothesis that individuals will become more receptive to scientific viewpoints if evidence for evolution and implications of global warming are presented as issues

  8. Issues of social impact and response. Amsterdam report.

    PubMed

    Bryce, J

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 international AIDS conference in Amsterdam, the netherlands had 4 conference tracks 1 of which was entitled Social Impact and REsponse. In 1990-91, 38 countries disbursed US$7.62 billion dollars for AIDS programs and 87-94% remained within developed countries. Yet 60% of the people with AIDS lived in developing countries. Poverty is a main contributor to the sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV epidemic since it drives men to urban areas, women to become prostitutes, and limits access to treatment. The role and status of women was an important HIV prevention issue. Participants learned that differences between men and women in natural history of HIV infection may actually be due to different access to health care instead of biological differences. 1 researcher called for more attention to gynecologic symptoms of HIV infection and to ways in which poverty and lack of access to services impede HIV prevention and care. Relationships between public policy and AIDS were a theme at the conference and at the round table session called National Policies on International Mobility. Evidence emerged at the conference that many prisons violated prisoners' rights by not providing HIV-related education and segregating HIV-positive prisoners. Segregation becomes a further issue as more and more HIV-positive people acquire tuberculosis (TB) since TB patients tend to be segregated in hospitals anyhow. The conference expanded the prevention focus from individual behavioral change to social and political conditions that promote safe behavior. For example, we need to strengthen communities, change the economic environment, improve access to and provide health care, and change punitive laws. Another main issue was practical and effective program management especially as HIV/AIDS services integrate with STD, family planning, and primary health care services and for successful evaluation of HIV/AIDS programs. Participants agreed that more research on community-based programs was needed. PMID:12317711

  9. Prediction of adaptive self-regulatory responses to arthritis pain anxiety in exercising adults: Does pain acceptance matter?

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Miranda A; Gyurcsik, Nancy C; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercising for ?150 min/week is a recommended strategy for self-managing arthritis. However, exercise nonadherence is a problem. Arthritis pain anxiety may interfere with regular exercise. According to the fear-avoidance model, individuals may confront their pain anxiety by using adaptive self-regulatory responses (eg, changing exercise type or duration). Furthermore, the anxiety-self-regulatory responses relationship may vary as a function of individuals’ pain acceptance levels. OBJECTIVES: To investigate pain acceptance as a moderator of the pain anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. The secondary objective was to examine whether groups of patients who differed in meeting exercise recommendations also differed in pain-related and self-regulatory responses. METHODS: Adults (mean [± SD] age 49.75±13.88 years) with medically diagnosed arthritis completed online measures of arthritis pain-related variables and self-regulatory responses at baseline, and exercise participation two weeks later. Individuals meeting (n=87) and not meeting (n=49) exercise recommendations were identified. RESULTS: Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that pain acceptance moderated the anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. When pain anxiety was lower, greater pain acceptance was associated with less frequent use of adaptive responses. When anxiety was higher, adaptive responses were used regardless of pain acceptance level. MANOVA findings revealed that participants meeting the recommended exercise dose reported significantly lower pain and pain anxiety, and greater pain acceptance (P<0.05) than those not meeting the dose. CONCLUSIONS: Greater pain acceptance may help individuals to focus their efforts to adapt to their pain anxiety only when it is higher, leaving self-regulatory capacity to cope with additional challenges to exercise adherence (eg, busy schedule). PMID:25621990

  10. Physiological and psychophysical responses in handling maximum acceptable weights under different footwear--floor friction conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Way; Yu, Rui-feng; Han, Xiao L

    2007-05-01

    A study on combined manual materials-handling tasks performed on floors under three friction levels was conducted. Eight male subjects participated in the study. The maximum acceptable weight of handling, including lifting, carrying for 3m, lowering, and walking 3m back at twice per minute was determined. The subject then performed the same tasks for 10 min. Heart rate, Vo2, energy efficiency, perceived sense of slip, and rating of perceived exertion for whole body strain were measured. The results showed that the effects of friction level on the maximum acceptable weights of handling, perceived sense of slip, Vo2, and energy efficiency were statistically significant (pacceptable weights of handling increased from 8.15 to 9.34 kg. The energy efficiency on the low friction condition (12.58 kg/L/min) was significantly lower than those of the medium (15.73 kg/L/min) and high (15.38 kg/L/min) friction conditions. The perceived sense of slip was the highest (5.44) on the low-friction condition, followed by the medium-friction condition (3.58), and last the high-friction condition (1.84). The implication of this study was that friction level should be regarded as one of the major environmental factors in designing MMH tasks as it affected both physiological and psychophysical responses of the subjects. Low-friction footwear-floor interface should be avoided as it resulted in not only high scores of perceived sense of slip but also in low-energy efficiency utilized in the body. PMID:17010302

  11. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 1200.2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...or opposing the ASC. (c) Formal Adoption of the New Accounting...

  12. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 1200.2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...or opposing the ASC. (c) Formal Adoption of the New Accounting...

  13. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 1200.2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles...or opposing the ASC. (c) Formal Adoption of the New Accounting...

  14. Sexual Minority Youth in the Schools: Issues and Desirable Counselor Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Mark

    This paper addresses the issues and desirable professional school counselor responses when working with sexual minority youth in the schools, including gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, and questioning youth. The issues that are addressed include: developing a context in which to discuss these issues; coming out or the…

  15. 39 CFR 3005.13 - Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. 3005.13 Section 3005.13 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR COMPELLING PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION BY THE POSTAL SERVICE Subpoenas § 3005.13 Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. (a) Procedure...

  16. Individualism, acceptance and differentiation as attitude traits in the public’s response to vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Velan, Baruch; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Ziv, Arnona; Yagar, Yaakov; Kaplan, Giora

    2012-01-01

    The attitude of the general public to vaccination was evaluated through a survey conducted on a representative sample of the Israeli population (n = 2,018), in which interviewees were requested to express their standpoints regarding five different vaccination programs. These included: pandemic influenza vaccination, seasonal influenza vaccination, travel vaccines, Human Papilloma Virus vaccine and childhood vaccinations. Analysis of the responses reveal three major attitude traits: a) acceptance, characterized by the opinion that targets should be vaccinated; b) individualism, characterized by the opinion that vaccination should be left to personal choice; and c) differentiation, characterized by the tendency to express different attitudes when addressing different vaccination programs. Interestingly, direct opposition to vaccination was found to be a minor attitude trait in this survey. Groups within the population could be defined according to their tendency to assume these different attitudes as Acceptors, Judicious-acceptors, Differentiators, Soft-individualists, and Hard-individualists. These groups expressed different standpoints on all five vaccination programs as well as on other health recommendations, such as screening for early detection of cancer. Attitude traits could be also correlated, to a certain extent, with actual compliance with vaccination programs. Interestingly, attitudes to vaccination were not correlated with social profiles related to income or education, although younger individuals exhibited higher degrees of individualism and differentiation. Taken together, all this is in accordance with the current social settings, underlining the individual's tendency for critical evaluation and self-stirring. This should be taken into consideration by health authorities involved in vaccination programs. PMID:22894959

  17. Received 17 May 2013 | Accepted 2 Sep 2013 | Published 26 Sep 2013 Plant immune response to pathogens differs

    E-print Network

    Sheen, Jen

    effectors. In particular, many pathogenic bacteria deliver a plethora of effector proteins into host cellsARTICLE Received 17 May 2013 | Accepted 2 Sep 2013 | Published 26 Sep 2013 Plant immune response to pathogens differs with changing temperatures Cheng Cheng1,*, Xiquan Gao2,3,*, Baomin Feng1, Jen Sheen4, Libo

  18. Kindergarten Children's Initial Experiences in Physical Education: The Relentless Persistence for Play Clashes with the Zone of Acceptable Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Steve; Graham, George

    1995-01-01

    Reports a study that investigated how kindergarten children view participation in physical education. Four students of varying skill levels were observed, interviewed, and videotaped. The students demonstrated a relentless persistence for play, which conflicted with the teacher's zone of acceptable responses. Children preferred tasks presented in…

  19. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.125 Who has the responsibility for... acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of the fire scenarios for the facility, and the reasonableness of the assumed maximum probable loss....

  20. Professional Responsibility--An Issue for Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Karseth, Berit

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on some aspects of professional responsibility by investigating students' visions of future work and notions of professional responsibility. The data is based on interviews with samples of freshmen in three educational programmes at the University of Oslo in Norway. The data has been analysed in relation to…

  1. LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, W W

    2009-11-19

    This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

  2. Interpersonal motives and social-evaluative threat: Effects of acceptance and status stressors on cardiovascular reactivity and salivary cortisol response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy W; Jordan, Kevin D

    2015-02-01

    Social-evaluative threat evokes increases in salivary cortisol and heightened cardiovascular reactivity. However, the types or content of social threats underlying these physiological responses are not clearly delineated in direct comparisons. Based in interpersonal theory, the present study manipulated high and low levels of acceptance threat (i.e., evaluation of likability, potential for inclusion) and status threat (i.e., evaluation of competence, leadership potential) during a modified Trier Social Stress Test, using a sample of 137 undergraduates (73 women). Both acceptance threat and status threat heightened salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to the task. Hence, concerns about social inclusion or connection with others and concerns about social standing or status can contribute independently to physiological stress responses. PMID:25134736

  3. Approaching Civic Responsibility Using Guided Controversies about Environmental Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresner, Marion; Blatner, Jen Seamans

    2006-01-01

    We implemented a series of three guided controversies to provide experience in environmental problem solving to students in a science course designed for nonmajors. Students wrote essays in response to their experiences in each controversy; we analyzed these essays for five problem-solving criteria. A questionnaire administered at the end of the…

  4. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  5. A call for responsibility in ethical issues for IS professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of persons in the business world. Public abhorrence of questionable behavior of politicians, the savings and loan scandal and insider trading violations are just a few examples of many problems in business and professional life. A 1992 study by the Josephson Institute of Ethics involving 9,000 young people and adults revealed alarmingly low ethical characteristics in American institutions. Ferrell and Fraedrick have concluded that {open_quotes}business ethics is one of the most important concerns in today`s business world.{close_quote} A few professional organizations have tried to comprehend the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of their constituents. Vittrell has studied the frequency of ethical behavior for management information specialists. Martin and Peterson have examined the ethical issues of insider trading. Fimbel and Burstein have investigated the ethical values of technology professionals. Thornburg made use of a survey concerning the ethical beliefs and practices of human resources professionals. On a preliminary basis, these studies indicate the various ethical issues and uncertainties which are problematic for members of the various professions. Most business people are ethical segregationists, that is they tend to segregate their ethical values into one type of behavior for business and another type of behavior away from business. Managers accused of unethical behavior respond with, III am not that type of person. I am active in my church, in community affairs, a good family man, and so on.

  6. Will These Trees "Ever" Bear Fruit? A Response to the Special Issue on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Alexander C.; McClenney, Kay

    2012-01-01

    The authors articulate objections to the organization of the recent special issue on student engagement and respond in detail to three criticisms leveled in that issue. Situating their response relative to longstanding calls to make research more relevant to practice, they argue that the validity critique inappropriately focuses on criterion…

  7. 39 CFR 3005.13 - Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. 3005.13 Section 3005.13 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR COMPELLING PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION BY THE POSTAL SERVICE Subpoenas § 3005.13 Subpoenas issued in...

  8. 39 CFR 3005.13 - Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. 3005.13 Section 3005.13 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR COMPELLING PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION BY THE POSTAL SERVICE Subpoenas § 3005.13 Subpoenas issued in...

  9. 39 CFR 3005.13 - Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. 3005.13 Section 3005.13 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR COMPELLING PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION BY THE POSTAL SERVICE Subpoenas § 3005.13 Subpoenas issued in...

  10. 39 CFR 3005.13 - Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Subpoenas issued in response to a third-party request. 3005.13 Section 3005.13 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR COMPELLING PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION BY THE POSTAL SERVICE Subpoenas § 3005.13 Subpoenas issued in...

  11. Effects of Issue Involvement and Framing of a Responsible Drinking Message on Attitudes, Intentions, and Behavior.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Anneke; van den Putte, Bas; de Bruijn, Gert-Jan

    2015-08-01

    To decrease the prevalence and the amount of alcohol consumption among students, health messages advocating responsible alcohol behavior can be used. However, it is unclear whether responsible drinking messages are most effective when they use a gain frame, presenting the advantages of responsible drinking, or a loss frame, presenting the disadvantages of irresponsible drinking. This study tests the effects of framing and the moderating role of involvement with the issue of responsible drinking. A three-wave, between-subjects, experimental study was conducted, in which participants (N = 90) were exposed to either a gain- or loss-framed message about responsible drinking behavior at Wave 2. At all three waves, attitudes, intentions and behavior toward responsible drinking were measured. Results showed that for participants with low issue- involvement, a gain frame led to more positive attitudes and intentions toward responsible alcohol use, whereas a loss frame did not have any effects for them. For participants with high issue involvement, a loss frame led to more positive attitudes and intentions toward responsible alcohol use, whereas a gain frame did not have an effect on attitude and only a delayed effect on intention. However, there were no effects of frame and issue involvement on adhering to the guideline of responsible alcohol use and average drinking behavior. PMID:26132603

  12. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, will inform the... Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, will accept for... New Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, that...

  13. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, will inform the... Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, will accept for... New Reactors or the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, as appropriate, that...

  14. A Closer Look at Transition Issues for the 1990s: A Response to Rusch and Menchetti

    E-print Network

    Clark, Gary M.; Knowlton, H. Earle

    1988-01-01

    Clark, Gary M. and Knowlton, H. Earle. (1988) A closer look at transition issues for the 1990s: a response to Rusch and Menchetti. Exceptional Children, 54.4: p365. Publisher’s official version: http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA6374415&v....] A Closer Look at Transition Issues for the 1990s: A Response to Rusch and Menchetti Gary M. Clark and H. Earle Knowlton Paper citation: Clark, Gary M. and Knowlton, H. Earle. (1988) A closer look at transition issues for the 1990s: a...

  15. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  16. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  17. 10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a construction...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  18. 10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a construction...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  19. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  20. 10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a construction...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  1. 10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a construction...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  2. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  3. 10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a construction...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  4. 10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...unless it describes the applicant's site selection process, specifies the extent to...the consideration of alternative sites, explains the relationship...

  5. IMPROVING WILLINGNESS-TO-ACCEPT RESPONSES USING ALTERNATE FORMS OF COMPENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to design a pilot survey to investigate why surveys that ask willingness-to-accept compensation questions so often yield unreliable data and whether respondents would find alternate modes of compensation (specifically, public goods) more acceptab...

  6. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  7. Dynamic pushing on three frictional surfaces: maximum acceptable forces, cardiopulmonary and calf muscle metabolic responses in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Maikala, Rammohan V; Dempsey, Patrick G; Ciriello, Vincent M; O'Brien, Niall V

    2009-06-01

    Pushing is an important materials handling activity in many occupations; however, pushing-related physiological investigations are still in infancy. The purpose was to evaluate maximum acceptable forces and physiological responses while pushing on: treadmill (TREAD); plywood floor (PLY); and Teflon floor (TEF). Acceptable forces, cardiopulmonary and calf muscle oxygenation and blood volume responses were collected simultaneously while 12 men (age 39 +/- 13 years; height 178 +/- 6 cm; and body mass 91.5 +/- 16 kg) pushed for 2 h on each surface at their psychophysical workload. Participants selected higher forces on the PLY, resulting in higher pulmonary oxygen uptake compared to that of TEF (by approximately 9%) and TREAD (by approximately 18%). Pushing on the TEF demonstrated 50-56% lower blood volume changes and 1.5-1.8 times more oxygenation-force ratio than that for other surfaces. It is concluded that, to avoid a potential slip, participants were conservative in selecting acceptable forces to push on the slippery TEF. Part of this compensatory strategy on the TEF resulted in less muscle activity and, therefore, less demand for oxygen delivery to the calf muscle than for other surfaces. The present findings of significant force- and physiological-related differences in treadmill vs. high inertia pushcart clearly demonstrate that pushing experiments are essential to evaluate functional abilities of the workers. PMID:19431004

  8. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  9. Response efficacy: the key to minimizing rejection and maximizing acceptance of emotion-based anti-speeding messages.

    PubMed

    Lewis, I M; Watson, B; White, K M

    2010-03-01

    This study sought to improve understanding of the persuasive process of emotion-based appeals not only in relation to negative, fear-based appeals but also for appeals based upon positive emotions. In particular, the study investigated whether response efficacy, as a cognitive construct, mediated outcome measures of message effectiveness in terms of both acceptance and rejection of negative and positive emotion-based messages. Licensed drivers (N=406) participated via the completion of an on-line survey. Within the survey, participants received either a negative (fear-based) appeal or one of the two possible positive appeals (pride or humor-based). Overall, the study's findings confirmed the importance of emotional and cognitive components of persuasive health messages and identified response efficacy as a key cognitive construct influencing the effectiveness of not only fear-based messages but also positive emotion-based messages. Interestingly, however, the results suggested that response efficacy's influence on message effectiveness may differ for positive and negative emotion-based appeals such that significant indirect (and mediational) effects were found with both acceptance and rejection of the positive appeals yet only with rejection of the fear-based appeal. As such, the study's findings provide an important extension to extant literature and may inform future advertising message design. PMID:20159067

  10. Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C.L.

    1998-09-01

    Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

  11. 46 CFR 385.34 - Responsibility for issuing solicitations for proposals or applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibility for issuing solicitations for proposals or applications. 385.34 Section 385.34 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT GRANT AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS REGULATIONS General Policies §...

  12. Introduction to the Special Issue on the U.S. Response to the Fukushima Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2012-05-01

    Provides an introduction to the May 2012 issue of Health Physics, based on a special session at the 2011 Health Physics Society (HPS) annual meeting that focused on the United States' radiological response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This introduction outlines the papers in this important issue and describes the activities of the U.S. response participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations. Observations are provided and the stage is set for the articles in this issue which document many of the activities undertaken during the Fukushima accident and which describe challenges faced and valuable lessons learned.

  13. Consultant Effectiveness and Treatment Acceptability: An Examination of Consultee Requests and Consultant Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Dinah S.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates teachers' preferences for a collaborative versus an expert consultation approach. Teachers viewed and responded to videotaped scenarios in which a consultee presented a request to a consultant. Analyses yielded a main effect for type of teacher request and consultant response. (MKA)

  14. What Responsibilities Should Teachers Accept? Stirling Educational Seminar Papers No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Donald

    1979-01-01

    Five value-laden levels of increasing responsibility are outlined as criteria applied to teacher's own activities; students' overt classroom behavior; comprehension and attitudes; abilities acquired by students; and future characteristics of students. Knowledge available to a teacher and working conditions influence level choice more than teacher…

  15. Responses to GM food content in context with food integrity issues: results from Australian population surveys.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Philip; Golley, Sinéad

    2016-01-25

    This study examined community responses to use of genetically modified (GM) content in food in the context of responses to familiar food additives by testing an empirically and theoretically derived model of the predictors of responses to both GM content and food integrity issues generally. A nationwide sample of 849 adults, selected at random from the Australian Electoral Roll, responded to a postal Food and Health Survey. Structural equation modelling analyses confirmed that ratings of general concern about food integrity (related to the presence of preservatives and other additives) strongly predicted negativity towards GM content. Concern about food integrity was, in turn, predicted by environmental concern and health engagement. In addition, both concern about food integrity generally and responses to GM content specifically were weakly predicted by attitudes to benefits of science and an intuitive (i.e., emotionally-based) reasoning style. Data from a follow-up survey conducted under the same conditions (N=1184) revealed that ratings of concern were significantly lower for use of genetic engineering in food than for four other common food integrity issues examined. Whereas the question of community responses to GM is often treated as a special issue, these findings support the conclusion that responses to the concept of GM content in food in Australia are substantially a specific instance of a general sensitivity towards the integrity of the food supply. They indicate that the origins of responses to GM content may be largely indistinguishable from those of general responses to preservatives and other common food additives. PMID:26348278

  16. On Semiotics and Subjectivity: A Response to Tony Brown's "Signifying 'Students', 'Teachers', and 'Mathematics' -- A Reading of a Special Issue"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presmeg, Norma; Radford, Luis

    2008-01-01

    In this response we address some of the significant issues that Tony Brown raised in his analysis and critique of the Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "Semiotic perspectives in mathematics education" (Saenz-Ludlow & Presmeg, Educational Studies in Mathematics 61(1-2), 2006). Among these issues are conceptualizations of…

  17. 75 FR 28610 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD). These analyses have not...

  18. 75 FR 33615 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (EPA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The release of the draft...

  19. 75 FR 35800 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments...3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). These analyses have not...

  20. Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating various aspects of DR programs. This paper also describes the various technical aspects of the DRAS including its interfaces and major modes of operation. This includes how the DRAS supports automating such Utility/Customer interactions as automated DR bidding, automated DR event handling, and finally real-time pricing.

  1. Task force St. Bernard: operational issues and medical management of a National Guard disaster response operation.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Carl J; Schock, Tony R; McVaney, Kevin E; Colwell, Christopher B; Depass, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States on 29 August 2005, it became obvious that the country was facing an enormous national emergency. With local resources overwhelmed, governors across the US responded by deploying thousands of National Guard soldiers and airmen. The National Guard has responded to domestic disasters due to natural hazards since its inception, but an event with the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina was unprecedented. The deployment of >900 Army National Guard soldiers to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana in the aftermath of the Hurricane was studied to present some of the operational issues involved with providing medical support for this type of operation. In doing so, the authors attempt to address some of the larger issues of how the National Guard can be incorporated into domestic disaster response efforts. A number of unforeseen issues with regards to medical operations, medical supply, communication, preventive medicine, legal issues, and interactions with civilians were encountered and are reviewed. A better understanding of the National Guard and how it can be utilized more effectively in future disaster response operations can be developed. PMID:18087915

  2. Young Children’s Affective Responses to Acceptance and Rejection From Peers: A Computer-based Task Sensitive to Variation in Temperamental Shyness and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Grace Z.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a novel task examining young children’s affective responses to evaluative feedback—specifically, social acceptance and rejection—from peers. We aimed to determine (1) whether young children report their affective responses to hypothetical peer evaluation predictably and consistently, and (2) whether young children’s responses to peer evaluation vary as a function of temperamental shyness and gender. Four- to seven-year-old children (N = 48) sorted pictures of unknown, similar-aged children into those with whom they wished or did not wish to play. Computerized peer evaluation later noted whether the pictured children were interested in a future playdate with participants. Participants then rated their affective responses to each acceptance or rejection event. Children were happy when accepted by children with whom they wanted to play, and disappointed when these children rejected them. Highly shy boys showed a wider range of responses to acceptance and rejection based on initial social interest, and may be particularly sensitive to both positive and negative evaluation. Overall, the playdate task captures individual differences in affective responses to evaluative peer feedback and is potentially amenable to future applications in research with young children, including pairings with psychophysiological measures. PMID:23997429

  3. Individual and organizational predictors of the ethicality of graduate students' responses to research integrity issues.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Philip J; Bent, Blake J

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective means to enhance research integrity by universities requires baseline measures of individual, programmatic, and institutional factors known to contribute to ethical decision making and behavior. In the present study, master's thesis and Ph.D. students in the fields of biological, health and social sciences at a research extensive university completed a field appropriate measure of research ethical decision making and rated the seriousness of the research issue and importance for implementing the selection response. In addition they were asked to rate their perceptions of the institutional and departmental research climate and to complete a measure of utilitarian and formalistic predisposition. Female students were found to be more ethical in their decision making compared to male students. The research ethical decision measure was found to be related to participants' ethical predisposition and overall perception of organizational and departmental research climate; however, formalism was the only individual predictor to reach statistical significance and none of the individual subscales of the research climate measure were significantly correlated to ethicality. Participants' ratings of the seriousness of the issue were correlated with their ratings of the importance of carrying out their selected response but neither was significantly predictive of the ethicality of their responses. The implications of these findings for the development of more effective training programs and environments for graduate students in research ethics and integrity are discussed. PMID:24048818

  4. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 1

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jiandong

    and manufacturing, and oil and gas, and is one of the fundamental tools in advanced alarm management systems. IndexThis article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final coefficient and distribution of the correlation delay. Numerical and industrial examples are provided

  5. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS 1

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    ], gas pipelines [8], or oil pipelines [9]. Manuscript received January 31, 2010; revised July 20, 2010This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as efficiently as possible. This problem naturally arises in many industrial sectors, i.e., the routing of street

  6. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS 1

    E-print Network

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final power, wasted cycles for data alignment, etc., and cannot satisfy the higher throughput and lower power is with the Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Kwangwoon University, 139-701 Seoul, Korea (e

  7. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORKING 1

    E-print Network

    Huang, Polly

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORKING 1 Modeling the QoE of Rate-centric view (i.e., adapting the sending rate of voice calls based on user satisfaction [1], [2]). Rate

  8. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION 1

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final) is a challenging combinatorial optimization problem with many real- world applications, e.g., salting route waste collection [7], [8], and snow removal [9], [10], CARP has been intensively investigated

  9. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE 1

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final transport barrier in the core of the plasma [2], and provides enhanced confinement. In contrast Taylor-relaxed regions separated by an ideal transport barrier. The existence of a transport barrier

  10. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS 1

    E-print Network

    Ray, Asok

    This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS 1.2409798 school of fish), and transport of granular media [1]. However, the primary reason for the continued

  11. Acceptance and commitment therapy group-treatment for non-responsive patients with personality disorders: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Chakhssi, Farid; Janssen, Wim; Pol, Silvia M; van Dreumel, Malinda; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2015-11-01

    Patients with personality disorders who did not respond to previous outpatient treatment are among the most challenging patients to treat and are often referred to specialized settings. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is an innovative therapy that has shown effectiveness in treatment-resistant cases with chronic or recurrent depression with or without co-morbid personality disorders. The central role that ACT accords to positive values and experiential avoidance may enhance treatment responsivity in patients with personality disorders that did not respond to previous treatments. The current nonrandomized study explored the effectiveness of a 26-week ACT-based group treatment (n?=?60) for personality disorders compared to treatment-as-usual (n?=?21) based on cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-TAU) at a specialized setting for patients with personality disorders. Individuals in both treatment conditions demonstrated small to moderate decreases in general psychological functioning and personality pathology. There was no main effect of therapy condition. Overall, results suggest that ACT is a possible treatment option for individuals with difficult-to-treat personality pathology and further outcome research is warranted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26369394

  12. Ethical issues in a study of Internet use: uncertainty, responsibility, and the spirit of research relationships.

    PubMed

    Bier, Melinda C; Sherblom, Stephen A; Gallo, Michael A

    1996-01-01

    In this article we explore ethical issues arising in a study of home Internet use by low-income families. We consider questions of our responsibility as educational researchers and discuss the ethical implications of some unanticipated consequences of our study. We illustrate ways in which the principles of research ethics for use of human subjects can be ambiguous and possibly inadequate for anticipating potential harm in educational research. In this exploratory research of personal communication technologies, participants experienced changes that were personal and relational. These unanticipated changes in their way of being complicated our research relationships, testing the boundaries of our committment to the principle of trustworthiness and forcing us to reevaluate our responsibilities. PMID:11654970

  13. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or... Intelligence is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of classified...

  14. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods... (a) The Director of National Intelligence is responsible for issuing...

  15. Finally Making Good on the Promise of Qualitative Research in Special Education? A Response to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugach, Marleen C.; Mukhopadhyay, Ananya; Gomez-Najarro, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    In this response to the special issue, we would like to offer two additional considerations to the discourse on qualitative research and special education this issue is meant to catalyze. First, we would like to further problematize the question of why qualitative research continues to be so sparsely represented in most prominent publications of…

  16. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of the fire scenarios for the facility,...

  17. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of the fire scenarios for the facility,...

  18. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...accepted equivalent level of safety analysis and provide copies to fire departments or other...

  19. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...accepted equivalent level of safety analysis and provide copies to fire departments or other...

  20. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...accepted equivalent level of safety analysis and provide copies to fire departments or other...

  1. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of Ms. Cleary's Newbery medal acceptance speech in which she gives personal history concerning her development as a writer and her response to the letters she receives from children. (CRH)

  2. EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

  1. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ...with dangerous pathogens. The discussion will inform NSABB deliberations and ultimately the development of an NSABB report on the...responsibility regarding biosecurity. This input will inform NSABB deliberations on these topics and contribute to the development of...

  2. Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa. PMID:21981823

  3. Response to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention for autism--an umbrella approach to issues critical to treatment individualization.

    PubMed

    Fava, Leonardo; Strauss, Kristin

    2014-12-01

    Integrating knowledge across the disciplines of genetics, neurological, and behavioral science targets, so far, early identification of children with autism and thus early access to intervention. Cross-discipline collaboration might be substantially improve treatment efficacy via individualized treatment based on the child and family needs, consistency across treatment providers and careful planning of skill curricula, setting and techniques. This paper documents the current state of five main issues critical to treatment individualization where cross-discipline collaboration is warranted: (1) developmental timing, (2) treatment intensity, (3) heterogeneity in treatment response, (4) program breath and flexibility, and (5) formats of treatment provision. PMID:24866707

  4. View of socioscientific issues among educators: The willingness of teachers to accept SSI into the classroom and the reasoning underyling those beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, John Carlos

    Socioscientific issues (SSI) are potentially controversial topics, which can be examined using a social and a scientific perspective. The inclusion of these topics in elementary and secondary classrooms has caused a number of conflicts over the past century. In the present study, I explore the willingness of teachers to include three SSI: evolution, stem cell research, and global climate change in the science curricula. Participants included 221 educators currently employed in K-12 schools. Teachers have the greatest impact on classroom instruction, regardless of state curricula. I found most educators willing to include the three previously named SSI in the curricula, but support was not an indication of a pro-science perspective. Teachers modestly preferred the inclusion of scientific perspectives over alternative ideas, but this support was not universal. Potentially important demographic factors were collected; participants from rural populations, Evangelicals, frequent church attendees, Republicans, and conservatives were found to be less receptive to science-supported ideas. A similarly lower level of support was found among those teachers who did not teach secondary science and those who had taken fewer science courses while in college. Interestingly, a possible correlation between the aforementioned demographic factors and chosen teaching position was identified. I identified a perceived low level of support for the science underlying the selected SSI as one possible explanation for the lack of emphasis on empirically supported concepts. Similarly, the majority of educators were willing to support legislation which formally encouraged the idea of "balanced" coverage. I found the lack of support for scientific ideas and the reasoning quality supporting these views surprisingly low. Educators consider SSI using very different lenses. It was these lenses, and not empirical evidence, which had the greatest impact on decision making. For some participants these frames of reasoning seemed so engrained that they were unwilling to even contemplate the validity of opposing viewpoints.

  5. The effects of container design and stair climbing on maximal acceptable lift weight, wrist posture, psychophysical, and physiological responses in wafer-handling tasks.

    PubMed

    Chung, H C; Wang, M J

    2001-12-01

    Despite the high level of automation in semiconductor manufacturing processes, many manual operations are still involved in the workplace. Due to inadequate human-machine interface design, stairs are frequently used to help operators perform wafer-handling tasks. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of climbing stairs and carrying wafer containers (pods) on psychophysical responses (maximal acceptable weight of lift--MAWL, and ratings of perceived exertion--RPE), physiological responses (oxygen consumption--VO2, and heart rate--HR), and wrist posture (ulnar and radial deviations). Each of 12 subjects (six males and six females) performed six sessions (3 climbing stairs x 2 pods types). The results indicate that climbing stairs had a significant influence on MAWL and VO2 (p<0.01). The type of pod effect on wrist posture was significant (p<0.01). Gender effect differences on MAWL, VO2 and wrist posture were also significant (p<0.05). Job design implications are discussed. PMID:11703045

  6. "Old Habits Die Hard:" Past and Current Issues Pertaining to Response-to-Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restori, Alberto F.; Gresham, Frank M.; Cook, Clayton R.

    2008-01-01

    When Congress passed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act in 2004 (IDEIA 2004), local educational agencies (LEA) were permitted to use a Response-to-Intervention (RtI) approach for identifying children with possible learning disabilities for special education. Furthermore, IDEIA 2004 no longer required LEAs to establish an…

  7. Teacher Perceptions of Issues Related to Implementation of Response to Intervention in the Regular Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissell, Erica K.

    2012-01-01

    Although several school districts in a southern US state use a three-tiered Response to Intervention (RtI) model to supplemental core reading instruction and positively impact student achievement, the model appears to have had nominal impact. The theoretical foundation for this study is anchored in a constructivist approach to education. Three…

  8. Declining Enrolments--Issues and Responses. An Annotated Bibliography. Current Bibliography No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Linda, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography reflects an attempt to indicate the range and quality of published responses to the complex phenomenon of declining enrollments in elementary and secondary schools. It is intended to suggest sources of practical information and advice and to provide a larger context for administrators coping with the effects of decline…

  9. Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

    2002-01-01

    This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

  10. SPECIAL ISSUE ON 'CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING MITIGATION ANDADAPTATION AS RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE'

    SciTech Connect

    WILBANKS, THOMAS J.; SATHAYE JAYANT; KLEIN, RICHARD J.T.

    2007-05-01

    This special issue of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategiesfor Global Change (MITI) reflects a growing recognition that the globalresponse to possible impacts of climate change will include bothmitigation and adaptation (M&A). On the one hand, impacts are alreadyemerging and mitigation efforts are not progressing as rapidly as hadonce been hoped. Further, even if greenhouse gas emissions were to stopabruptly, climate change will continue because of historically committedemissions. As a result, adaptation cannot be avoided. It will beessential, and in some cases it is essential now. On the other hand, ifclimate change is significant, impacts may exceed the capacity of manydeveloping countries, natural ecosystems, and high-impact sites to adapt,which means that mitigation is equally essential.

  11. Response to Special Issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" Concerning "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the six authors in the special issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" concerning her book "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy." In this response, the author focuses on some general observations that came to mind whilst reading the valuable set of…

  12. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters. Experts` determination of structural response issues

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, R.J.; Harper, F.T.; Brown, T.D.; Gregory, J.J.; Payne, A.C.; Gorham, E.D.; Murfin, W.; Amos, C.N.

    1992-03-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) assessment of the risk from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants in the US reported in NUREG-1150, the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SAARP) has completed a revised calculation of the risk to the general public from severe accidents at five nuclear power plants: Surry, Sequoyah, Zion, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf. The emphasis in this risk analysis was not on determining a ``so-called`` point estimate of risk. Rather, it was to determine the distribution of risk, and to discover the uncertainties that account for the breadth of this distribution. Off-site risk initiation by events, both internal to the power station and external to the power station were assessed. Much of the important input to the logic models was generated by expert panels. This document presents the distributions and the rationale supporting the distributions for the questions posed to the Structural Response Panel.

  13. Dealing with global safety issues : was the response to QT-liability of non-cardiac drugs well coordinated?

    PubMed

    Stockbridge, Norman; Morganroth, Joel; Shah, Rashmi R; Garnett, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced torsade de pointes (TdP) is a potentially fatal iatrogenic entity. Its reporting rate in association with non-cardiac drugs increased exponentially from the early 1990s and was associated with an increasing number of new non-cardiac drugs whose proarrhythmic liability was not appreciated pre-marketing. This epidemic provoked a comprehensive global response from drug regulators, drug developers and academia, which resulted in stabilization of the reporting rate of TdP. This commentary reviews the chronology and nature of, and the reasons for, this response, examines its adequacy, and proposes future strategies for dealing with such iatrogenic epidemics more effectively. It is concluded that the response was piecemeal and lacked direction. No one entity was responsible, with the result that important contributions from regulators, industry and academia lacked coordination. While the process of dealing with QT crisis seemed to have worked reasonably well in this instance, it does not seem wise to expect the next crisis in drug development to be managed as well. Future crises will need better management and the challenge is to implement a system set up to respond globally and efficiently to a perceived drug-related hazard. In this regard, we discuss the roles of new tools the legislation has provided to the regulators and the value of an integrated expert assessment of all pre-approval data that may signal a potential safety issue in the postmarketing period. We also discuss the roles of other bodies such as the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring, CIOMS and the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). PMID:23417505

  14. Research Lasers and Air Traffic Safety: Issues, Concerns and Responsibilities of the Research Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessler, Phillip J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of outdoor use of lasers relative to air traffic has become a diverse and dynamic topic. During the past several decades, the use of lasers in outdoor research activities have increased significantly. Increases in the outdoor use of lasers and increases in air traffic densities have changed the levels of risk involved. To date there have been no documented incidents of air traffic interference from research lasers; however, incidents involving display lasers have shown a marked increase. As a result of the national response to these incidents, new concerns over lasers have arisen. Through the efforts of the SAE G-10T Laser Safety Hazards Subcommittee and the ANSI Z136.6 development committee, potential detrimental effects to air traffic beyond the traditional eye damage concerns have been identified. An increased emphasis from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Center for Devices and Radiological Hazards (CDRH), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) along with increased concern by the public have resulted in focused scrutiny of potential hazards presented by lasers. The research community needs to rethink the traditional methods of risk evaluation and application of protective measures. The best current approach to assure adequate protection of air traffic is the application of viable hazard and risk analysis and the use of validated protective measures. Standards making efforts and regulatory development must be supported by the research community to assure that reasonable measures are developed. Without input, standards and regulations can be developed that are not compatible with the needs of the research community. Finally, support is needed for the continued development and validation of protective measures.

  15. Stream Macroinvertebrate Response Models for Bioassessment Metrics: Addressing the Issue of Spatial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

    2014-01-01

    We developed independent predictive disturbance models for a full regional data set and four individual ecoregions (Full Region vs. Individual Ecoregion models) to evaluate effects of spatial scale on the assessment of human landscape modification, on predicted response of stream biota, and the effect of other possible confounding factors, such as watershed size and elevation, on model performance. We selected macroinvertebrate sampling sites for model development (n?=?591) and validation (n?=?467) that met strict screening criteria from four proximal ecoregions in the northeastern U.S.: North Central Appalachians, Ridge and Valley, Northeastern Highlands, and Northern Piedmont. Models were developed using boosted regression tree (BRT) techniques for four macroinvertebrate metrics; results were compared among ecoregions and metrics. Comparing within a region but across the four macroinvertebrate metrics, the average richness of tolerant taxa (RichTOL) had the highest R2 for BRT models. Across the four metrics, final BRT models had between four and seven explanatory variables and always included a variable related to urbanization (e.g., population density, percent urban, or percent manmade channels), and either a measure of hydrologic runoff (e.g., minimum April, average December, or maximum monthly runoff) and(or) a natural landscape factor (e.g., riparian slope, precipitation, and elevation), or a measure of riparian disturbance. Contrary to our expectations, Full Region models explained nearly as much variance in the macroinvertebrate data as Individual Ecoregion models, and taking into account watershed size or elevation did not appear to improve model performance. As a result, it may be advantageous for bioassessment programs to develop large regional models as a preliminary assessment of overall disturbance conditions as long as the range in natural landscape variability is not excessive. PMID:24675770

  16. Do Ethical Judgments Depend on the Type of Response Scale? Comparing Acceptability versus Unacceptability Judgments in the Case of Life-Ending Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Gonzalez, Charlene; Lhermitte, Astrid; Sorum, Paul C.; Mullet, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    Using Functional Measurement (Anderson, 2008), Frileux, Lelievre, Munoz Sastre, Mullet, and Sorum (2003) examined the joint impact of several key factors on lay people's judgments of the acceptability of physicians' interventions to end patients' lives. The level of acceptability was high, and the information integration rule that best described…

  17. Linking Morphodynamic Response with Sediment Mass Balance: Issues of Scale, Geomorphic Setting, and Sampling Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, P. E.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Kaplinski, M. A.; Hazel, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The sediment mass balance, or budget, is one of the most powerful and frequently used conceptual frameworks in fluvial geomorphology. Sediment budgets are used to evaluate the effects of streamflow regulation, inform the design of stream restoration projects, and anticipate the outcomes of dam removal, among other applications. In almost every case, the primary interest is the interaction between changes in the sediment budget and the morphodynamics of specific channel features that make up the components of the sediment budget. However, linkages between changes in specific morphologic features and changes in the sediment budget are not necessarily straightforward and are often poorly understood. In order for the sediment budget to be used as an effective tool, these linkages must be better quantified. A complete understanding of these linkages is usually hampered by sparse data. Measurements of morphologic change typically consist of some type of sampling scheme that requires extrapolation to the reach scale and adequate measurements of both sediment influx and efflux are rarely available. Our attempts to develop a monitoring program for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon that tracks changes in specific morphologic features, transfers in sediment storage among channel features, and changes in the sediment budget have yielded several insights: (1) changes in sediment storage can be highly localized with as much as 80% of changes in storage occurring within as little as 1% of a reach; (2) areas where large storage changes are likely may be predictable in the sense that the largest changes tend to occur in specific geomorphic settings; (3) magnitudes of changes are unpredictable because nearby features of the same general geomorphic type often respond differently due to differences in local hydraulics; (4) the morphology of a set of features at the time of measurement may be strongly affected by the antecedent flow regime, thereby confounding attempts to make comparisons among data collected under different flow regimes; and (5) even with a relatively robust topographic measurement program and rational method of extrapolation, a sediment budget based on morphologic change may be inconsistent with a flux-based mass balance. These findings illustrate the many pitfalls that exist and may result in severe bias when one attempts to reconcile the sediment budget with measured morphologic changes. Our findings are based on a data set that includes airborne lidar, aerial photogrammetry, and total station surveys for terrestrial measurements; multibeam and singlebeam sonar for bathymetric measurements; and multi-frequency acoustics for a continuous record of sediment influx and efflux. While the examples that are provided are specific to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, the observed processes apply to many bedrock canyon rivers, and the basic problem of linking morphodynamic response with the sediment budget is general to all rivers.

  18. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence determinations. 531.409 Section... § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence determinations. (a) Responsibility...performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis for...

  19. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence determinations. 531.409 Section... § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence determinations. (a) Responsibility...performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis for...

  20. Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident: experiences of the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Homma, T; Takahara, S; Kimura, M; Kinase, S

    2015-06-01

    Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident are discussed in this paper based on the experiences following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The criteria for use in nuclear emergencies in the Japanese emergency preparedness guide were based on the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 63. Although the decision-making process for implementing protective actions relied heavily on computer-based predictive models prior to the accident, urgent protective actions, such as evacuation and sheltering, were implemented effectively based on the plant conditions. As there were no recommendations and criteria for long-term protective actions in the emergency preparedness guide, the recommendations of ICRP Publications 103, 109, and 111 were taken into consideration in determining the temporary relocation of inhabitants of heavily contaminated areas. These recommendations were very useful in deciding the emergency protective actions to take in the early stages of the Fukushima accident. However, some suggestions have been made for improving emergency preparedness and response in the early stages of a severe nuclear accident. PMID:25915551

  1. Effects of Color, Format, and Severity of Issue on Response Rate of Mail Questionnaires When Respondent Population Has Some Familiarity with Sender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, C. L.; Summerhill, W. R.

    The effects of (1) format and color, and (2) severity of issue (freeze damage to citrus industry) on response rate of mail questionnaires is presented. Questionnaires were formatted in two different ways: a one page, legal size printed on both sides, and one sheet 11- by 17-inch size center-folded with items on three pages. Two colors were used:…

  2. Taste responses to naringin, a flavonoid, and the acceptance of grapefruit juice are related to genetic sensitivity to 6-n-propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, A; Henderson, S A; Shore, A B

    1997-08-01

    Increased consumption of vegetables and fruit has long been the focus of dietary strategies for disease prevention. Some vegetables and fruit have bitter tastes, which can be aversive to consumers, particularly children. The present study tested the hypothesis that acceptance of grapefruit juice is influenced, in part, by sensitivity to the bitter taste of 6-n-propylthiouracil (Prop), a heritable trait. A sample of 123 women, mean age 28 y, was divided into nontasters (n = 39), tasters (n = 49), and supertasters (n = 35) of Prop by using procedures validated previously based on Prop detection thresholds and on intensity scaling of five suprathreshold solutions of Prop and sodium chloride. The subjects tasted and rated five solutions of the bioflavonoid naringin in 4% sucrose. Naringin, the principal bitter ingredient of grapefruit juice, has been implicated in the regulation of cytochrome P-450 enzymes. Increased taste acuity for both Prop and naringin was associated with greater dislike for each bitter compound. Prop supertasters disliked bitter naringin solutions significantly more than did either tasters or nontasters. Prop sensitivity was also associated with reduced acceptability of grapefruit juice. Acceptability of orange juice, which does not contain naringin, was unrelated to Prop taster status. Is the acceptability of other bitter vegetables and fruit also limited by inherited taste factors? If so, then genetic taste markers might limit dietary exposure to valuable dietary constituents and pose a barrier to current strategies for dietary change. PMID:9250119

  3. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1

    E-print Network

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1 Nonlinear in the geoscience community Manuscript received July 16, 2010; revised October 15, 2010; accepted November 28, 2010

  4. Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

    The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

  5. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities... procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods, or of classified cryptologic information in NARA's holdings? (a) The Director of National...

  6. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities... procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods, or of classified cryptologic information in NARA's holdings? (a) The Director of National...

  7. Received June 9, 2005; revised August 26, 2005; accepted September 3, 2005 The Time and Spatial Effects of Bystander Response in Mammalian Cells

    E-print Network

    Effects of Bystander Response in Mammalian Cells Induced by Low Dose Radiation Burong Hu1 , Lijun Wu1: The time and spatial effects of bystander response Corresponding Authors: Lijun Wu & Zengliang Yu Address, radiation-induced bystander effects; SCE, sister chromatid exchanges; MN, micronucleus. The Author 2005

  8. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING 1

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , moorings, battery powered instruments, etc. However, these approaches are limited to observing processes; accepted October 06, 2014. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China Foundation of China under Grant 51221004, by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China

  9. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or methods, or of classified cryptologic records in NARA's holdings? 1260.26 Section 1260... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources...

  10. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or methods, or of classified cryptologic records in NARA's holdings? 1260.26 Section 1260... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources...

  11. Selected College Students' Knowledge and Perceptions of Biotechnology Issues Reported in the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.; Dunsford, Deborah W.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural communications students (n=330) were surveyed to determine their knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnology issues reported in the mass media. Although students achieved only 30% correct responses, 84% perceived their knowledge level to be average to high. Most were somewhat accepting of genetic modification for plants but less…

  12. Linguistic Models of FO Use, Physiological Models of FO Control, and the Issue of "Mean Response Time."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rebecca; Beckman, Mary; Honda, Kiyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates "mean response time" (MRT), a method used in previous studies to relate physiological evidence (recordings of electromyographic activity in the cricothyroid and sternohyoid) to acoustic evidence (fundamental frequency). (Author/VWL)

  13. Psychological and Moral Responses to Environmental Knowledge: Reflections on the Impact of an Introductory Course in Environmental Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garb, Yaakov J.

    1989-01-01

    Very little is known about the processes whereby people encounter and assimilate knowledge about the environmental crisis. The author raises observations and reflections on people's responses to this kind of knowledge. (Author/JOW)

  14. Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

  15. HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles: a mixed-method approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Brooks, Ronald A; Newman, Peter A; Seiden, Danielle; Sangthong, Rassamee; Duan, Naihua

    2008-11-01

    This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles, California. We combined a qualitative research method (focus groups) with an innovative market research method (conjoint analysis). Focus groups explored social issues, concerns, barriers and motivators associated with HIV vaccine acceptability. Conjoint analysis was used to assess preferences among eight hypothetical HIV vaccines with varying attribute profiles and the impact of various attributes on acceptability. Five main themes were identified in the focus groups regarding acceptance and utilization of preventive HIV vaccines: (1) vaccine characteristics, such as efficacy, physical side-effects and cost, (2) fear of a vaccine, (3) vaccine acceptability and optimism, (4) social and family responses and (5) behavioral disinhibition. Conjoint analysis revealed HIV vaccine acceptability ranging from 7.4 (SD = 19.4) to 85.2 (SD = 24.3) across eight hypothetical vaccines. The vaccine with the highest acceptability had the following attributes: 99% efficacy, no side-effects, 10 years of protection, protects against one sub-type, free, one dose and given by injection. Vaccine efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability (51.4, p=.005), followed by side-effects (11.1, p=.005) and duration of protection (8.3, p=.005). Despite some apprehensions and concerns, Thai residents perceived an HIV vaccine as making an important contribution to society and to protecting oneself and one's family from HIV infection. Nevertheless, acceptability of a partially efficacious vaccine may be low, suggesting the need for tailored social marketing interventions that might emphasize a collectivistic rather than an individualistic focus. Assessing HIV vaccine acceptability using a mixed-method approach is feasible with Thai residents and should lend itself to HIV vaccine research with other Asian Pacific Islander populations in the US. PMID:18608068

  16. Effectiveness of an on-body lifting aid at reducing low back physical demands during an automotive assembly task: assessment of EMG response and user acceptability.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ryan B; Agnew, Michael J; Stevenson, Joan M

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and user acceptability of a Personal Lift-Assist Device (PLAD) at an automotive manufacturing facility, with operators who perform an on-line assembly process requiring forward bending and static holding. Surface EMG data were collected at six sites on the low back and abdomen, and an accelerometer was used to measure trunk inclination. Use of the PLAD significantly reduced the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae activity and EMG-predicted compression at the 10th, 50th, and 90th APDF percentile levels (p < or = 0.05), without significantly increasing rectus abdominus activity or trunk flexion. Similarly, ratings of perceived exertion were found to be significantly lower when wearing the PLAD (p = 0.006). Subjective opinions were positive, with 8/10 subjects indicating they would wear the device everyday. With slight changes, workers felt that the PLAD could be beneficial at reducing forces and discomfort in similar industrial or manual materials handling tasks that place excessive physical demands on the low back. PMID:19223026

  17. Psychological issues surrounding paternal perinatal mental health.

    PubMed

    Currid, Thomas J

    It has become widely accepted that the perinatal period can be a time of heightened risk for mental health problems and emotional responses in women. However, there has been less research on men in this area and it has remained a somewhat neglected area. While perinatal mental health services are increasing for women, few exist for men. While the author acknowledges the greater impact perinatal mental health problems can have on women, this article explores psychological issues relating to paternal perinatal mental health. PMID:15732493

  18. Features of State Response to Intervention Initiatives in Northeast and Islands Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2009-No. 083

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocala, Candice; Mello, Daniel; Reedy, Kristin; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach to instruction, assessment, and intervention that enables early identification of students who are experiencing academic or behavioral difficulties. The jurisdictions served by the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands expressed interest in a study of whether and how state education…

  19. Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

  20. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CYBERNETICS 1

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    carrier flight deck, where, in current operations, replanning is done without the aid of any computerized. To investigate these issues formally, we have developed a decision support system for flight deck operations of Expert User Heuristics and an Integer Linear Program in Aircraft Carrier Deck Operations Jason C. Ryan

  1. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING 1

    E-print Network

    Du, Jenny (Qian)

    AND REMOTE SENSING 1 Foreword to the Special Issue on Pattern Recognition in Remote Sensing S PACEBORNE in the analysis of remote sensing data. The large amount of data available makes remote sensing technology in pattern recog- nition in remote sensing, the Remote Sensing and Mapping Technical Committee (TC7

  2. Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS) issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. Results The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern handling of sensitive information and return of results. In all studies, signs of child abuse require reports to authorities, but this disclosure duty is not always stated in consent materials. Studies vary in whether they will return to participants results of routine tests/measures, but none inform participants about findings with unknown clinical significance. Conclusions Analysis of how cohort studies in various jurisdictions handle key ELS issues provides informative data for comparison and contrast. Consideration of these and other examples and further scholarly exploration of ELS issues provides insight on how best to address these aspects in ways that respect the well-being of participants, especially children who become research subjects at the start of their lives. PMID:20331891

  3. Public Policy Issues Associated with Tsunami Hazard Mitigation, Response and Recovery: Transferable Lessons from Recent Global Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2004, a sequence of devastating tsunamis has taken the lives of more than 300,000 people worldwide. The path of destruction left by each is typically measured in hundreds of meters to a few kilometers and its breadth can extend for hundreds even thousands of kilometers, crossing towns and countries and even traversing an entire oceanic basin. Tsunami disasters in Indonesia, Chile, Japan and elsewhere have also shown that the almost binary nature of tsunami impacts can present some unique risk reduction, response, recovery and rebuilding challenges, with transferable lessons to other tsunami vulnerable coastal communities around the world. In particular, the trauma can motivate survivors to relocate homes, jobs, and even whole communities to safer ground, sometimes at tremendous social and financial costs. For governments, the level of concentrated devastation usually exceeds the local capacity to respond and thus requires complex inter-governmental arrangements with regional, national and even international partners to support the recovery of impacted communities, infrastructure and economies. Two parallel projects underway in California since 2011—the SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) tsunami scenario project and the California Tsunami Policy Working Group (CTPWG)—have worked to digest key lessons from recent tsunami disasters, with an emphasis on identifying gaps to be addressed in the current state and federal policy framework to enhance tsunami risk awareness, hazard mitigation, and response and recovery planning ahead of disaster and also improve post-disaster implementation practices following a future California or U.S. tsunami event.

  4. Minimizing false positive error with multiple performance validity tests: response to Bilder, Sugar, and Hellemann (2014 this issue).

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-01-01

    Bilder, Sugar, and Hellemann (2014 this issue) contend that empirical support is lacking for use of multiple performance validity tests (PVTs) in evaluation of the individual case, differing from the conclusions of Davis and Millis (2014), and Larrabee (2014), who found no substantial increase in false positive rates using a criterion of failure of ? 2 PVTs and/or Symptom Validity Tests (SVTs) out of multiple tests administered. Reconsideration of data presented in Larrabee (2014) supports a criterion of ? 2 out of up to 7 PVTs/SVTs, as keeping false positive rates close to and in most cases below 10% in cases with bona fide neurologic, psychiatric, and developmental disorders. Strategies to minimize risk of false positive error are discussed, including (1) adjusting individual PVT cutoffs or criterion for number of PVTs failed, for examinees who have clinical histories placing them at risk for false positive identification (e.g., severe TBI, schizophrenia), (2) using the history of the individual case to rule out conditions known to result in false positive errors, (3) using normal performance in domains mimicked by PVTs to show that sufficient native ability exists for valid performance on the PVT(s) that have been failed, and (4) recognizing that as the number of PVTs/SVTs failed increases, the likelihood of valid clinical presentation decreases, with a corresponding increase in the likelihood of invalid test performance and symptom report. PMID:25491180

  5. Evolving an acceptable nuclear power fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1986-10-01

    The following issues are examined: long-term safe nuclear power plant operation; acceptable nuclear waste management and, mainly, high-level waste management; and provision for long-term fissile fuel supply in a long-term nuclear fission economy. (LM)

  6. Examining Social Acceptance & Rejection. FPG Snapshot #44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This FPG Snapshot summarizes the findings of a study, published in the November 2006 issue of the "Journal of Educational Psychology," that examined whether children with disabilities are accepted or rejected by their classmates in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, the study examined two sets of related questions: (1) Are individual children…

  7. OnlineTED.com ? a novel web-based audience response system for higher education. A pilot study to evaluate user acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Kühbeck, Felizian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Audience response (AR) systems are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education. However, high costs and complexity of conventional AR systems often limit their use. Here we present a novel AR system that is platform independent and does not require hardware clickers or additional software to be installed. Methods and results: “OnlineTED” was developed at Technische Universität München (TUM) based on Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) with a My Structured Query Language (MySQL)-database as server- and Javascript as client-side programming languages. “OnlineTED” enables lecturers to create and manage question sets online and start polls in-class via a web-browser. Students can participate in the polls with any internet-enabled device (smartphones, tablet-PCs or laptops). A paper-based survey was conducted with undergraduate medical students and lecturers at TUM to compare "OnlineTED" with conventional AR systems using clickers. "OnlineTED" received above-average evaluation results by both students and lecturers at TUM and was seen on par or superior to conventional AR systems. The survey results indicated that up to 80% of students at TUM own an internet-enabled device (smartphone or tablet-PC) for participation in web-based AR technologies. Summary and Conclusion: “OnlineTED” is a novel web-based and platform-independent AR system for higher education that was well received by students and lecturers. As a non-commercial alternative to conventional AR systems it may foster interactive teaching in undergraduate education, in particular with large audiences. PMID:24575156

  8. Local acceptance of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    The siting of nuclear waste facilities has been very difficult in all countries. Recent experience in Sweden indicates, however, that it may be possible, under certain circumstances, to gain local support for the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository. The article reports on a study of attitudes and risk perceptions of people living in four municipalities in Sweden where HLNW siting was being intensely discussed at the political level, in media, and among the public. Data showed a relatively high level of consensus on acceptability of at least further investigation of the issue; in two cases local councils have since voted in favor of a go-ahead, and in one case only a very small majority defeated the issue. Models of policy attitudes showed that these were related to attitude to nuclear power, attributes of the perceived HLNW risk, and trust. Factors responsible for acceptance are discussed at several levels. One is the attitude to nuclear power, which is becoming more positive, probably because no viable alternatives are in sight. Other factors have to do with the extensive information programs conducted in these municipalities, and with the logical nature of the conclusion that they would be good candidates for hosting the national HLNW repository. PMID:15209942

  9. POSITION ACCEPTANCE Student Name

    E-print Network

    POSITION ACCEPTANCE Student Name Student Address City, ST Zip Code March 8, 20XX Person Who Made the Offer Corporation Name Address City, ST Zip Code Dear Mr./Ms. Person Who Made the Position Offer, I am writing to accept the offer of employment as a Supply Chain Manager at Corporation Name. I am very excited

  10. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  11. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael B; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  12. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES 1

    E-print Network

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    on a ZnO film sensitized with lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS-QDs) is reported. The UV response arises from--Dual band, lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS-QDs), low cost, ultraviolet­infrared (UV­IR), ZnO. I. INTRODUCTION such as mine detection and identification of the source of a fire. Several quantum dot (QD), dots

  13. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  14. Acceptance procedures: Microfilm printer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Acceptance tests were made for a special order automatic additive color microfilm printer. Tests include film capacity, film transport, resolution, illumination uniformity, exposure range checks, and color cuing considerations.

  15. Acceptance of Internet Banking Systems among Young Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; M, Yeow S.; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine acceptance of internet banking system among potential young users, specifically future young managers. The relationships and the effects of computer self-efficacy (CSE) and extended technology acceptance model (TAM) on the behavioural intention (BI) to use internet banking system were examined. Measurement of CSE, TAM and BI were adapted from previous studies. However construct for TAM has been extended by adding a new variable which is perceived credibility (PC). A survey through questionnaire was conducted to determine the acceptance level of CSE, TAM and BI. Data were obtained from 275 Technology Management students, who are pursuing their undergraduate studies in a Malaysia's public university. The confirmatory factor analysis performed has identified four variables as determinant factors of internet banking acceptance. The first variable is computer self-efficacy (CSE), and another three variables from TAM constructs which are perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PE) and perceived credibility (PC). The finding of this study indicated that CSE has a positive effect on PU and PE of the Internet banking systems. Respondents' CSE was positively affecting their PC of the systems, indicating that the higher the ability of one in computer skills, the higher the security and privacy issues of PC will be concerned. The multiple regression analysis indicated that only two construct of TAM; PU and PC were significantly associated with BI. It was found that the future managers' CSE indirectly affects their BI to use the internet banking systems through PU and PC of TAM. TAM was found to have direct effects on respondents' BI to use the systems. Both CSE and the PU and PC of TAM were good predictors in understanding individual responses to information technology. The role of PE of the original TAM to predict the attitude of users towards the use of information technology systems was surprisingly insignificant.

  16. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  17. Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

  18. Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: Issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

  19. Fair Play: Accepting Responsibility for Student Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karns, Michelle S.; Parker, Dennis R.

    2007-01-01

    Equity in education relies on equal access to learning experiences and fair play during those experiences. Too often policy makers, voters and even some educators define equity only in terms of equal access. Equity is less about the same treatment for all and more about holding everyone to the same high standards and high expectations. All…

  20. Special Issue: In Google's Broad Wake: Taking Responsibility for Shaping the Global Digital Library. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Number 250

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    "ARL" is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). "ARL" reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff and users; higher…

  1. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  2. "It's Still Science but Not Like Normal Science": Girls' Responses to the Teaching of Socio-Scientific Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues, which are often controversial, involve the use of science and are of interest to society, raising ethical and moral dilemmas. Examples of these issues could include genetic technology or air pollution. Following a curriculum reform in England in 2006, socioscientific issues now have a heightened presence in the 14-16…

  3. Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision of adequate palliative/end-of-life (P/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P/EOL care often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits social program aimed at informal P/EOL caregivers - operates as a public health response in sustaining informal caregivers providing P/EOL care, and whether or not it adequately addresses known aspects of caregiver burden that are addressed within the population health promotion (PHP) model. Methods As part of a national evaluation of Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit, 57 telephone interviews were conducted with Canadian informal P/EOL caregivers in 5 different provinces, pertaining to the strengths and weaknesses of the CCB and the general caregiving experience. Interview data was coded with Nvivo software and emerging themes were identified by the research team, with such findings published elsewhere. The purpose of the present analysis was identified after comparing the findings to the literature specific to caregiver burden and public health, after which data was analyzed using the PHP model as a guiding framework. Results Informal caregivers spoke to several of the determinants of health outlined in the PHP model that are implicated in their burden experience: gender, income and social status, working conditions, health and social services, social support network, and personal health practises and coping strategies. They recognized the need for improving the CCB to better address these determinants. Conclusions This study, from the perspective of family caregivers, demonstrates that the CCB is not living up to its full potential in sustaining informal P/EOL caregivers. Effort is required to transform the CCB so that it may fulfill the potential it holds for serving as one public health response to caregiver burden that forms part of a healthy public policy that addresses the determinants of this burden. PMID:21592383

  4. ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT hummingbirds

    E-print Network

    Faraon, Andrei

    performance, and wing morphology predicted only the use of arcing turns and high centripetal25 accelerationsACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT hummingbirds Burst muscle performance predicts the speed, acceleration;Burst muscle performance predicts the speed, acceleration, and1 turning performance of Anna

  5. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  6. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  7. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living with Autism > Family Issues Family Issues A child’s autism diagnosis affects every member of the family in ... can help their family by informing their other children about autism and the complications it introduces, understanding the challenges ...

  8. Stakeholders' Engagement Methods for the Mining Social Responsibility Practice: Determination of Local Issues and Concerns Related to the Mines Operations in Northwest of the US.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaitis, A.

    2014-12-01

    Every year, all around the world, global environmental change affects the human habitat. This is effect enhanced by the mining operation, and creates new challenges in relationship between the mining and local community. The purpose of this project are developed the Stakeholders engagement evaluation plan which is currently developed in University of Nevada, Reno for the Emigrant mining project, located in the central Nevada, USA, and belong to the Newmont Mining Corporation, one of the gold production leader worldwide. The needs for this project is to create the open dialog between Newmont mining company and all interested parties which have social or environmental impacts from the Emigrant mine. Identification of the stakeholders list is first and one of the most difficult steps in the developing of mine social responsibility. Stakeholders' engagement evaluation plan must be based on the timing and available resources of the mining company, understanding the goals for the engagement, and on analyzes of the possible risks from engagement. In conclusion, the Stakeholders engagement evaluation plan includes: first, determinations of the stakeholders list, which must include any interested or effected by the mine projects groups, for example: state and local government representatives, people from local communities, business partners, environmental NGOs, indigenous people, and academic groups. The contacts and availability for communication is critical for Stakeholders engagement. Next, is to analyze characteristics of all these parties and determinate the level of interest and level of their influence on the project. The next step includes the Stakeholders matrix and mapping development, where all these information will be put together.After that, must be chosen the methods for stakeholders' engagement. The methods usually depends from the goals of engagement (create the dialog lines, collect the data, determinations of the local issues and concerns, or establish the negotiation process) and available resources as a time, people, budget. Is it very important here to recognize the possible risks from the engagement and establish the key massage for stakeholders. Finally, the engagement plan should be evaluated and can be implementing for the new social responsibility practice development.

  9. Examining the relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, victim blame, homophobia, gender roles, and ambivalent sexism.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michelle; Gilston, Jennifer; Rogers, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, attitudes toward gay men, a series of gender role and sexism measures, victim blame and assault severity were investigated. It was predicted that men would display more negative, stereotypical attitudes than women and that male rape myth endorsement would be related to, and predicted by, the other attitude and attribution scales. Respondents comprised 323 undergraduates (146 males and 177 females) from a large University in the Northwest of England. Results broadly conformed to predictions, with men generally more negative than women, and male rape myth acceptance significantly related to female rape myth acceptance, negative attitudes about gay men, gender role attitudes, and victim blame. Furthermore, male rape myth acceptance was predicted by female rape myth acceptance, gender attitudes, and victim blame. Methodological issues and implications for future work and those working with victims are discussed. PMID:22550150

  10. Do I Have to Learn Something New? Mental Models and the Acceptance of Replacement Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Few studies in technology acceptance have explicitly addressed the acceptance of replacement technologies, technologies that replace legacy ones that have been in use. This article explores this issue through the theoretical lens of mental models. We contend that accepting replacement technologies entails both mental model maintenance and mental…

  11. Assessing E-Learning Acceptance by University Students in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Wong, Su Luan; Thammetar, Thapanee; Chattiwat, Wisa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess e-learning acceptance by students, using data collected from 377 students at three public universities in Thailand. Using the "E-learning Acceptance Measure" (Teo, 2010b), participants gave their responses to 21 statements on three factors hypothesised to measure e-learning: tutor quality, perceived usefulness,…

  12. Issues management made easier

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, L.

    1993-10-01

    Increases in ES&H compliance issues within the past few years have necessitated a formal process by which DOE facilities address these issues. In May 1991, ANL-W implemented the ANL-W Issues Management System (IMS) to facilitate the management of compliance issues and scheduling of corrective action plans with limited resources. The central focus of this process is a computer database, Integrated Resource Management System (IRMS), which allows quick retrieval of compliance information, organization of compliance issues based on a risk-based prioritization methodology, and tracking of corrective action plans. Without the IRMS, the ANL-W Issues Management System would have been difficult to administer and manage. ANL-W has used the IRMS for both audit preparation and audit response, most noticeably the preparation and subsequent response to the 1991 Tiger Team audit. The IRMS was used to track ANL-W Self-Assessment corrective action plans, provide instant information to Tiger Team members regarding Self-Assessment findings, produce prioritized lists of Tiger Team concerns for developing corrective action plans, and track Tiger Team corrective action plans. Status reports to senior, laboratory management regarding the Tiger Team corrective action plan are produced based on information provided by the IRMS. This paper discusses the criteria used for selecting the IRMS, implementation of the Issues Management System using the IRMS, lessons learned, and the future evolution of the IRMS.

  13. Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

  14. Industrial Marketing Management Special Issue

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Mark

    Industrial Marketing Management Special Issue Power in Business, Customer and Market Relationships. Stefanos Mouzas Stefanos Mouzas is a Professor of Marketing and Strategy at Lancaster University Management Revised April 2014, September 2014 Accepted April 1, 2015 Exercising power in asymmetric relationships

  15. Issues in College Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsner, Lydia

    1991-01-01

    This journal issue discusses student attrition and the major recurring themes regarding students withdrawing from college. It is revealed that less than 15 percent of student departures are as a result of academic dismissal, with the remaining students leaving voluntarily, even when their academic performance is clearly acceptable. The following…

  16. A framework for examining the sustained acceptability of microbicides.

    PubMed

    Severy, Lawrence J; Tolley, Elizabeth; Woodsong, Cynthia; Guest, Greg

    2005-03-01

    The concept of acceptability involves a complex set of individual, couple and socio-cultural factors. Within a specific focus on microbicides, this article sets forth the relevant behavioral issues demanding attention as scientists and product developers strive to identify microbicides that will be used in a sustained, long-term fashion to prevent HIV/AIDS. The paper re-conceptualizes long-term acceptability within the ARRM framework, reviews the basic issues and research related to microbicide acceptability, discusses couple relationships (especially the nature of intimate relationships), and identifies related gender and power factors. The importance of the cultural context within various international settings pervades all of these issues. Finally, a set of challenges is discussed for those contemplating such research. PMID:15812619

  17. Issues Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sando, Joe S.

    A program for teaching techniques of critical thinking on issues concerning American Indians was developed for students at Albuquerque Indian School. It was designed to include not only the students but also their families with learning activities that required consultation in search of answers or understanding. The first issue presented sought to…

  18. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 Israel Chemical, Environment Technology Administration, Ministry of Industry & Trade, 30 Agron Street, Jerusalem 94190, Israel Contact: Josef Dancona, Deputy Director,...

  19. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 Israel Chemical, Environment Technology Administration, Ministry of Industry & Trade, 30 Agron Street, Jerusalem 94190, Israel Contact: Josef Dancona, Deputy Director,...

  20. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 Israel Chemical, Environment Technology Administration, Ministry of Industry & Trade, 30 Agron Street, Jerusalem 94190, Israel Contact: Josef Dancona, Deputy Director,...

  1. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 Israel Chemical, Environment Technology Administration, Ministry of Industry & Trade, 30 Agron Street, Jerusalem 94190, Israel Contact: Josef Dancona, Deputy Director,...

  2. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 Israel Chemical, Environment Technology Administration, Ministry of Industry & Trade, 30 Agron Street, Jerusalem 94190, Israel Contact: Josef Dancona, Deputy Director,...

  3. Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

    2010-06-01

    Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

  4. Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

    2009-04-01

    Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of the local public, we put some effort in informing interested people, media, politicians on all l

  5. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  6. Population Issues & Policies Population Issues

    E-print Network

    Huang, Youqin

    ? How? Is population growth detrimental to economic development? Does population growth lead to environmental degradation? Figure 3.1 The basic (and wrong) Malthusian ideas about the growth of population1 Unit 6: Population Issues & Policies Population Issues Can we feed the growing world population

  7. Safe days in space with acceptable uncertainty from space radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Alp, Murat; Rowedder, Blake; Kim, Myung-Hee Y

    2015-04-01

    The prediction of the risks of cancer and other late effects from space radiation exposure carries large uncertainties mostly due to the lack of information on the risks from high charge and energy (HZE) particles and other high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. In our recent work new methods were used to consider NASA's requirement to protect against the acceptable risk of no more than 3% probability of cancer fatality estimated at the 95% confidence level. Because it is not possible that a zero-level of uncertainty could be achieved, we suggest that an acceptable uncertainty level should be defined in relationship to a probability distribution function (PDF) that only suffers from modest skewness with higher uncertainty allowed for a normal PDF. In this paper, we evaluate PDFs and the number or "safe days" in space, which are defined as the mission length where risk limits are not exceeded, for several mission scenarios at different acceptable levels of uncertainty. In addition, we briefly discuss several important issues in risk assessment including non-cancer effects, the distinct tumor spectra and lethality found in animal experiments for HZE particles compared to background or low LET radiation associated tumors, and the possibility of non-targeted effects (NTE) modifying low dose responses and increasing relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors for tumor induction. Each of these issues skew uncertainty distributions to higher fatality probabilities with the potential to increase central values of risk estimates in the future. Therefore they will require significant research efforts to support space exploration within acceptable levels of risk and uncertainty. PMID:26177847

  8. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  9. Definitions in Hemophilia: Resolved and Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Victor S; Srivastava, Alok

    2015-11-01

    Definitions of clinical events and end points of care are important for disease characterization as well as documentation of outcomes in clinical practice and trials. Until recently, the only definitions in hemophilia that were provided through an international scientific organization related to disease severity and levels of inhibitors. Recently, the Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC) of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis, through its Factor VIII and IX subcommittee, published consensus definitions for several other aspects of hemophilia management, including classification of disease severity; inhibitors; bleeding (and rebleeding) into muscles and joints; target joints; different forms of factor replacement therapy; and response to therapy for joint bleeding and surgical hemostasis. These definitions should help to bring greater uniformity in the documentation of critical clinical events and laboratory data that are reported both from clinical trials as well as real-world practice. This article describes these definitions in greater detail than the SSC short report and also addresses some of the unresolved issues. Wide dissemination of these concepts and definitions and their acceptance by relevant leading scientific societies, drug regulators, industry, and patient organizations will go a long way in ensuring their acceptance and use globally. PMID:26479892

  10. Rights & Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue guides teachers and students to annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with topics related to rights and responsibilities. Sidebar features discuss animal rights, handling money responsibly, and taking responsibility for the environment. (Contains Three…

  11. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.K. ); Davis, J. ); Lee, L. ); Lein, P. . West Valley Demonstration Project); Omberg, S. . Waste Iso

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria.

  12. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.K.; Davis, J.; Lee, L.; Lein, P.; Omberg, S.

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M & 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria.

  13. IEEE Trans. Neural Nets special issue on spiking neural computation (2004) in press 1 Abstract--Responses of vestibular primary afferent neurons to

    E-print Network

    Paulin, Mike

    2004-01-01

    the head tends to be in a localized region of its state space at spike times of a particular neuron during, 2]. Spike timing is crucial. It is literally a life or death issue in this situation. But it is not a code for anything, except timing. The spike itself conveys a message. This message can be thought

  14. ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taymans, Mary Frances; McDonald, Dale

    2007-01-01

    The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" is a newsletter that provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue, entitled "Emergency Management Opportunities and Challenges for Non-Public Schools," examines integrating non-public schools into emergency…

  15. Traffic Calming: A Social Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Substantial urban growth fueled by a strong economy often results in heavy traffic thus making streets less hospitable. Traffic calming is one response to the pervasiveness of the automobile. The issues concern built environments and involve multiple actors reflecting different interests. The issues are rarely technical and involve combinations of…

  16. ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue of "ERCMExpress," titled "Coping with the Death of a Student or Staff Member," highlights the range of impact death can have on a school community;…

  17. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  18. Acceptance of Online Degrees by Undergraduate Mexican Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia; Adams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The quality and acceptance of online degree programs are still controversial issues. In Mexico, where access to technology is limited, there are few studies on the matter. Undergraduate students (n = 104) answered a survey that aimed to evaluate their knowledge of virtual education, their likelihood of enrollment in an online degree program, and…

  19. Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin's theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that…

  20. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts. PMID:25708001

  1. Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihuan

    Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

  2. Accepters and Rejecters of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Harriett A.; Elton, Charles F.

    Personality differences between students who accept or reject proffered counseling assistance were investigated by comparing personality traits of 116 male students at the University of Kentucky who accepted or rejected letters of invitation to group counseling. Factor analysis of Omnibus Personality Inventory (OPI) scores to two groups of 60 and…

  3. Workforce Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented during a symposium on work force issues moderated by Jan DeJong at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Rethinking the Ties that Bind: An Exploratory Study of Employee Development in Utilities in Canada and the United States" (Michael Aherne, David Barron) reports…

  4. Unaddressed Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester, J. Martin

    2005-01-01

    Walter Parker's January article, "Teaching Against Idiocy," raises important and fascinating issues relating to the proper role and function of the K-12 social studies classroom. Although J. Martin Rochester, the author of this article, agrees with his basic premise that schools obviously have an obligation to help promote citizenship education,…

  5. Sanskrit Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

  6. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  7. Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes towards and acceptability of genetic modification in Germany.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Inken B; Bruhn, Maike; Roosen, Jutta

    2008-07-01

    Genetic modification remains a controversial issue. The aim of this study is to analyse the attitudes towards genetic modification, the knowledge about it and its acceptability in different application areas among German consumers. Results are based on a survey from spring 2005. An exploratory factor analysis is conducted to identify the attitudes towards genetic modification. The identified factors are used in a cluster analysis that identified a cluster of supporters, of opponents and a group of indifferent consumers. Respondents' knowledge of genetics and biotechnology differs among the found clusters without revealing a clear relationship between knowledge and support of genetic modification. The acceptability of genetic modification varies by application area and cluster, and genetically modified non-food products are more widely accepted than food products. The perception of personal health risks has high explanatory power for attitudes and acceptability. PMID:18243411

  9. Issues in workforce composition analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeck, D.C.; Rogers, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    An issue of paramount interest to US industry is the supply and quality of human resources available for this country`s scientific and technological activities. The changing composition of the workforce and the responsibility that an organization has to assure equal opportunity, give rise to various issues. This paper discusses some of the issues associated with the scientific and technical workforce. Specifically, it explores some of the questions pertaining to workforce composition and measures of workforce composition. This paper should be useful to those responsible for personnel policies.

  10. Dioxin issue stirs debate

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is based on a review of comments from the scientific community concerning the health risks associated with dioxin, the need to control or ban its use, the nature of the scientific data currently available, and the best way for industry and regulators to react in the absence of more conclusive evidence. The comments were received in response to ''Dioxin - A Water Pollution Control Federation Issue Paper'' distributed in March 1984.

  11. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  12. ERCMExpress. Volume 1, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This is the inaugural issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress," and it focuses on the new technical assistance center. The center will support 243 grantees funded under the Emergency Response and Crisis Management program in managing and implementing their projects, and in sustaining…

  13. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" focuses on integrating students with special needs and disabilities into emergency response and crisis management planning. Meeting the needs of students with disabilities and special needs in the event of an emergency does not have to be…

  14. 75 FR 52860 - Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ...Administration 14 CFR Part 21 Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary...ACTION: Issuance of final Airworthiness Design Standards...SUMMARY: This Airworthiness Design Standard is issued to OHA, Inc.,...

  15. 77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ...Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...Certificate of Authority issued by the Treasury to Western Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to...

  16. 76 FR 20042 - Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement and Terminating Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement and..., Drug Enforcement Administration, issued an Order to Show Cause to Four Seasons Distributors,...

  17. 76 FR 20042 - Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement and Terminating Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ...Drug Enforcement Administration [Docket No. 08-16] Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement...Enforcement Administration, issued an Order to Show Cause to Four Seasons Distributors, Inc. (Respondent), of...

  18. 77 FR 25536 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Endurance American Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ...Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Endurance American Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service...issued under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to the following company: Endurance American Insurance Company (NAIC 10641)....

  19. Factors of accepting pain management decision support systems by nurse anesthetists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain management is a critical but complex issue for the relief of acute pain, particularly for postoperative pain and severe pain in cancer patients. It also plays important roles in promoting quality of care. The introduction of pain management decision support systems (PM-DSS) is considered a potential solution for addressing the complex problems encountered in pain management. This study aims to investigate factors affecting acceptance of PM-DSS from a nurse anesthetist perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data from nurse anesthetists in a case hospital. A total of 113 questionnaires were distributed, and 101 complete copies were returned, indicating a valid response rate of 89.3%. Collected data were analyzed by structure equation modeling using the partial least square tool. Results The results show that perceived information quality (?=.451, p<.001), computer self-efficacy (?=.315, p<.01), and organizational structure (?=.210, p<.05), both significantly impact nurse anesthetists’ perceived usefulness of PM-DSS. Information quality (?=.267, p<.05) significantly impacts nurse anesthetists’ perceptions of PM-DSS ease of use. Furthermore, both perceived ease of use (?=.436, p<.001, R2=.487) and perceived usefulness (?=.443, p<.001, R2=.646) significantly affected nurse anesthetists’ PM-DSS acceptance (R2=.640). Thus, the critical role of information quality in the development of clinical decision support system is demonstrated. Conclusions The findings of this study enable hospital managers to understand the important considerations for nurse anesthetists in accepting PM-DSS, particularly for the issues related to the improvement of information quality, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. In addition, the results also provide useful suggestions for designers and implementers of PM-DSS in improving system development. PMID:23360305

  20. Solid propellant environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Le, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of the Solid Propellant Environmental Issues (SPEI) project is to demonstrate environmentally acceptable technologies that will enhance the continued production of solid rocket motors (SRMs) by complying with current and anticipated environmental regulations. Phase 1 of the project identifies current and anticipated environmental regulations that may affect SRMs manufacturing in the future and identify emerging process technologies which comply with these regulations. Phase 2 of the project established a baseline database by fabricating a 363 kg motor using the current manufacturing process. In Phase 3, environmentally acceptable process technologies were evaluated, ranked, and selected for demonstration using criteria developed by the team. The results for Phase 1--3 have previously been presented. This paper will present data obtained to date on Phase 4. In Phase 4, the alternate process technologies were evaluated for compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and waste minimization/pollution prevention. The best performing candidate for each application area was selected for demonstration. The selected process technologies will be inserted into the baseline manufacturing process from Phase 2. The new manufacturing process will be demonstrated and evaluated through the scale-up and fabrication of two 363 kg solid rocket motors.

  1. Accepted scientific research works (abstracts).

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    These are the 39 accepted abstracts for IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) September 24-24, 2014 at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and published in the Final Program Guide and Abstracts. PMID:25645134

  2. Fracture mechanics for weld acceptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, C. A.; Loechel, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Criteria include specifications for allowable cracklike defect lengths, undercut, underfill, suckback, mismatch, peaking in butt welds, root penetration, weld beam dimensions, lap joint dimensions, and acceptable defect sizes and densities for double and single fillet welds.

  3. L-286 Acceptance Test Record

    SciTech Connect

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-14

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  4. Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

  5. Information Communication Technologies in the Classroom: Expanding TAM to Examine Instructor Acceptance and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Heidi; Worrell, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Studies show that use of computer-based information communication technologies (ICTs) can have positive impacts on student motivation and learning. The present study examines the issue of ICT adoption in the classroom by expanding the Technology Acceptance Model to identify factors that contribute to teacher acceptance and use of these…

  6. Racial and Ethnic Cultural Factors in the Process of Acceptance of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizock, Lauren; Russinova, Zlatka

    2013-01-01

    Acceptance of mental illness is essential to promoting recovery and is uniquely impacted by issues of culture, race, and ethnicity. Qualitative case narrative methodology was used to identify themes related to the cultural facilitators and barriers in the acceptance process. Five participant narratives are presented to assist practitioners in…

  7. An Integrated Approach for Preservice Teachers' Acceptance and Use of Technology: UTAUT-PST Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabakçi-Yurdakul, Isil; Ursavas, Ömer Faruk; Becit-Isçitürk, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: In educational systems, teachers and preservice teachers are the keys to the effective use of technology in the teaching and learning processes. Predicting teachers' technology acceptance and use remains an important issue. Models and theories have been developed to explain and predict technology acceptance. The Unified Theory…

  8. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

  9. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  10. Pipeline issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisley, Joe T.

    1990-01-01

    The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

  11. Investigation and study on debris flow risk perception and acceptable risk criteria in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Nan; Chen, Jie-Ru

    2014-05-01

    Debris flow disaster mitigation is one of important issues to be addressed in Taiwan. Past studies in this field have been focused mainly on topics related to potential assessment and susceptibility characterizations. Some valuable research results have been completed. Application of risk management in debris flow disaster mitigation has gradually become an emerging topic, as an effective and comprehensive strategy on disaster management is still been sought for. One of the key elements in risk management is the establishment of rational risk acceptance criteria. Various factors have to be taken into account and whether the set of criteria can be operable is of great concern. The purpose of this study is to provide useful information for the establishment of acceptance criteria. First, the 39 debris flow events that claims death tolls for the past 20 years are compiled. The information is used to develop a questionnaire containing six questions for the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster which would cause death and the death tolls in single debris flow event. The questionnaire is sent to general public, local government officer, and rescue members for a survey. In total, 681 effective samples is obtained. The response of each question is identified as 5 scales which is later transferred into scores using a triangular function. Through the application of fuzzy performance theory, the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster and its corresponding number of fatalities (N) is calculated. The risk perception results are plotted in the form of log-log F-N curves where F is the frequency of N or more fatalities. The results indicate that the tolerability criterion is 10-2 while the F-N curve shows a minus-one trend. Compared with the F-N curve for slope stability in Hong Kong, the curve trend is similar but the tolerability criterion is one order higher. It indicates the tolerability of fatal debris flow event in Taiwan in higher that the fatal slope stability event in Hong Kong. The acceptability criteria are about 3x10-4 while the F-N curves also shows a minus-one trend. There is about 1 to 2 orders discrepancy between tolerability and acceptability F-N curves. The resulting F-N curves are useful reference for debris flow management by taking hardware and software approaches to reduce risk level.

  12. 75 FR 62534 - Reliability Monitoring, Enforcement and Compliance Issues; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Monitoring, Enforcement and Compliance Issues; Notice of... reliability monitoring, enforcement and compliance, as announced in the Commission's order issued September 16, 2010 that accepted the North American Electric Reliability Corporation's initial assessment in...

  13. Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Jose R.; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, H. Javier

    2006-07-01

    The nuclear energy is attracting renewed interest of public and policy makers due to his potential role in long term strategies aiming to reduce the risk of global warming and in a more general, to carry out sustainable policies, however, any project of nuclear nature arise concerns about the risks associated with the release of radioactivity during accident conditions, radioactive waste disposal and nuclear weapons proliferation. Then in light of the likeliness for a new nuclear project in Mexico, is necessary to design a strategy to improve the social acceptance of nuclear power. This concern is been boarding since the environmental and economic point of view. The information that can change the perception of nuclear energy towards increase public acceptance, should be an honest debate about the benefits of nuclear energy, of course there are questions and they have to be answered, but in a realistic and scientific way: So thinking in Mexico as a first step it is important to communicate to the government entities and political parties that nuclear energy is a proven asset that it is emission free and safe. Of course besides the guarantee of a proven technology, clean and safe relies the economic fact, and in Mexico this could be the most important aspect to communicate to key people in government. Based in the Laguna Verde survey it is clear that we have to find the adequate means to distribute the real information concerning nuclear technology to the public, because the results shows that Mexican people does not have complete information about nuclear energy, but public can support it when they have enough information. From the IAEA study we can say that in Mexico public acceptance of nuclear energy it s not so bad, is the highest percentage of acceptance of nuclear technology for health, considering benefits to the environment Mexican opposition to build new plants is the second less percentage, and generally speaking 60% of the people accept somehow nuclear energy. Also we can say that in Mexico there are few nuclear information centers one is located at Laguna Verde power plant, and there is other one at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). So if we want to improve public acceptance in Mexico we should design a well defined strategy to communicate nuclear issues to the public. This strategy should point out many aspects of nuclear power as discussed before. In addition, recent economic studies performed at ININ, indicate that, nuclear energy is currently is price competitive with other sources based on fossil fuels. This facts are currently under discussion with government entities, and now acceptance of government entities is increasing. Even there was a public announce of Mexican government in the sense that Mexico is considering the nuclear option as a part of its energy strategy for the near future. (authors)

  14. Defining acceptable conditions in wilderness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenbuck, J. W.; Williams, D. R.; Watson, A. E.

    1993-03-01

    The limits of acceptable change (LAC) planning framework recognizes that forest managers must decide what indicators of wilderness conditions best represent resource naturalness and high-quality visitor experiences and how much change from the pristine is acceptable for each indicator. Visitor opinions on the aspects of the wilderness that have great impact on their experience can provide valuable input to selection of indicators. Cohutta, Georgia; Caney Creek, Arkansas; Upland Island, Texas; and Rattlesnake, Montana, wilderness visitors have high shared agreement that littering and damage to trees in campsites, noise, and seeing wildlife are very important influences on wilderness experiences. Camping within sight or sound of other people influences experience quality more than do encounters on the trails. Visitors’ standards of acceptable conditions within wilderness vary considerably, suggesting a potential need to manage different zones within wilderness for different clientele groups and experiences. Standards across wildernesses, however, are remarkably similar.

  15. Vaccine acceptance: the UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Ford, John A; Mahgoub, Hamid; Shankar, Ananda Giri

    2013-12-01

    The United Kingdom has had a long history with vaccine acceptability dating back to Edward Jenner's theory of small pox vaccination. More recently, the discredited, Wakefield study published in 1998 continues to cause MMR skepticism. In pregnant women pertussis vaccination has been considerably more successful than influenza vaccination. Influenza vaccine uptake in healthcare workers remains poor. The media, politicians, and health reforms have contributed to the mixed coverage for these vaccines. In this article we examine vaccine acceptability from a UK perspective, and consider the future impact this is likely to have on the introduction of rotavirus and shingles vaccine in the UK in 2013. PMID:24025731

  16. Psycho-vibratory evaluation of timber floors - Towards the determination of design indicators of vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreira, J.; Trollé, A.; Jarnerö, K.; Sjökvist, L.-G.; Bard, D.

    2015-03-01

    In timber housing constructions, vibrations can be a nuisance for inhabitants. Notably, the vibrational response of wooden floor systems is an issue in need of being dealt with more adequately in the designing of such buildings. Studies addressing human response to vibrations are needed in order to be able to better estimate what level of vibrations in dwellings can be seen as acceptable. In the present study, measurements on five different wooden floors were performed in a laboratory environment at two locations in Sweden (SP in Växjö and LU in Lund). Acceleration measurements were carried out while a person either was walking on a particular floor or was seated in a chair placed there as the test leader was walking on the floor. These participants filled out a questionnaire regarding their perception and experiencing of the vibrations in question. Independently of the subjective tests, several static and dynamic characteristics of the floors were determined through measurements. The ultimate aim was to develop indicators of human response to floor vibrations, specifically those regarding vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance, their being drawn based on relationships between the questionnaire responses obtained and the parameter values determined on the basis of the measurements carried out. To that end, use was made of multilevel regression. Although the sample of floors tested was small, certain clear trends could be noted. The first eigenfrequency (calculated in accordance with Eurocode 5) and Hu and Chui's criterion (calculated from measured quantities) proved to be the best indicators of vibration annoyance, and the Maximum Transient Vibration Value (computed on the basis of the accelerations experienced by the test subjects) to be the best indicator of vibration acceptability.

  17. Geographic variation in social acceptability of wildland fuels management in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunson, M.; Schindler, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary natural resource management requires consideration of the social acceptability of management practices and conditions. Agencies wishing to measure, respond to, and influence social acceptability must understand the nuances of public perception regarding controversial issues. This study explores social acceptability judgments about one such issue: reduction of wildland fuel hazards on federal lands in the western United States. Citizens were surveyed in four locations where fire has been a significant ecological disturbance agent and public land agencies propose to reduce wildland fuel levels and wildfire hazards via prescribed burning, thinning, brush removal, and/or livestock grazing. Respondents in different locations differed in their knowledge about fire and fuel issues as well in their acceptability judgments. Differences are associated with location-specific social and environmental factors as well as individual beliefs. Results argue against using a??one-size-fits-alla?? policies or information strategies about fuels management.

  18. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making processmore »regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.« less

  19. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making process regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.

  20. The revision of RP 91 on criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, K; Malone, J F; Christofides, S; Lillicrap, S; Horton, P

    2013-02-01

    In 1997 the European Commission published Radiation Protection 91: 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations'. This document specified the minimum criteria for acceptability. It has been used to this effect in legislation, codes of practice and by individual professionals. In a single document, it defined a level of performance at which remedial action was required. The document specified a series of parameters which characterised equipment performance and acceptable levels of performance. In its time it proved to be a useful document which was applied in member states to various degrees. Since the publication of Report 91 in 1997, a series of weaknesses emerged over time. Development of new radiological systems and technologies, as well as improvements in traditional technologies, has created circumstances where the acceptability criteria were in need of review. These weaknesses were recognised by the European Commission and a tender for its revision was issued. The criteria were developed by a team drawn from a broad range of backgrounds including hospitals, industry, government bodies, regulators and standardisation organisations. Representatives were mainly from Europe, but individuals from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and International Atomic Energy Agency were included in the drafting process. This study describes the process employed in developing the revised document and the consultation process involved. One of the major difficulties the revision team encountered was related to an understanding of the actual meaning of the EC Directive. The view taken by the revision team was that Article 8, paragraph 3 places responsibilities on both the holders of radiological equipment and competent authorities. The acceptability criteria have been produced consistent with the European Commission's Medical Exposures Directive, which requires that patient exposures are optimised and justified. PMID:23169813

  1. 2002 Special issue Dopamine: generalization and bonuses

    E-print Network

    Kakade, Sham M.

    2002 Special issue Dopamine: generalization and bonuses Sham Kakade*, Peter Dayan Gatsby October 2001; accepted 2 April 2002 Abstract In the temporal difference model of primate dopamine neurons of experimental data. However, in certain circumstances, the activity of the dopamine cells seems anomalous under

  2. Monoliths: special issue in a new package.

    PubMed

    Svec, Frantisek

    2013-08-01

    Regular special issues concerning monoliths have always been a stronghold of the Journal of Separation Science. Typically, we issued a call for papers, collected and processed the submitted manuscripts, and all of them were then printed in a single issue of the journal. This approach worked to a certain limit quite acceptably but there was always a longer waiting time between the early submissions and publication. This is why we decided to do it this year differently. I claimed in my 2013 New Years Editorial: "We are living in the electronic era! Why not to make an advantage of that?" And we do. As a result, all manuscript submitted for publication in the special issue Monoliths have already been published in regular issues as soon as they were accepted. The first page of these papers includes a footnote: "This paper is included in the virtual special issue Monoliths available at the Journal of Separation Science website." All papers published with this footnote were collected in a virtual special issue accessible through the internet. This concept ruled out possible delays in publication of contributions submitted early. Since we did not have any real "special issue", there was no need for any hard deadline for submission. We just collected manuscripts submitted for the special issue Monoliths published from January to July 2013 and included them in the virtual special issue. This new approach worked very well and we published 22 excellent papers that are included in the issue available now at this website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1615-9314/homepage/virtual_special_issue__monoliths.htm. PMID:23939823

  3. Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is

    E-print Network

    Mateo, Jill M.

    Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is required for all advertisements. All advertisements are subject to approval. The University of Chicago Press reserves the right to reject advertising for any reason. The advertiser and/or its advertising agency are entirely responsible for the lawfulness

  4. The Relationship Between Children's Ideas About Helpfulness and Peer Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Gary W.; Oden, Sherri L.

    This study investigates the relationship between children's ideas about how to be helpful to peers and peer acceptance. Third- and fifth-grade children responded to three sociometric measures and were later individually interviewed under four conditions on two occasions in response to different cartoon situations. Children were asked to suggest…

  5. Host, vehicular and environmental factors responsible for road traffic crashes in a nigerian city: identifiable issues for road traffic injury control

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Peter Oladapo; Kadri, Dotun Musiliu; Bello, Jibril Oyekunle; Ofoegbu, Chima Kingsley Pascal; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman Olajide; Adekanye, Adedeji Olugbenga; Solagberu, Babatunde Akeeb

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Road traffic injury (RTI) has assumed major public health importance world-wide and the burden is heavier on the health-care infrastructure of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Nigeria, RTI is the leading cause of trauma related morbidity and mortality. While there are some published epidemiological reports on RTI in the region, studies on the mechanism of causation of road traffic crashes (RTC) are not available. Methods Over a 9-month period, we prospectively captured the 571 victims of RTC presenting to a single tertiary health care center in Nigeria. Data collected include demographic data, Mechanism of causation of RTC, Injuries sustained and outcomes. Results Over three-quarters of the victims are young people and half were either traders (27.5%) or students (20%). Pedestrians, motorcycle riders and open truck occupants (people sitting at the rear loading compartment of trucks) often had fatal injuries. Analysis of collision patterns showed that lone crashes were the most frequent though car-to-motorcycle crashes caused a quarter of the deaths. Host factors (over-speeding driver, driver misjudgment, sleeping driver etc.) were responsible for four-fifths of the crashes while vehicular and environmental factors accounted for the remaining. On binary regression analysis, head injured victims had higher odds of dying than the non-head injured (Odds ratio = 6.5). Conclusion This paper elucidates the mechanisms of causation of and types of injuries sustained following RTC in Nigeria and thus provide opportunities for prevention and control of this unacceptable situation. PMID:25780490

  6. Negotiating vaccine acceptance in an era of reluctance

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Heidi J

    2013-01-01

    Studies to better understand the determinants of vaccine acceptance have expanded to include more investigation into dynamics of individual decision-making as well as the influences of peers and social networks. Vaccine acceptance is determined by a range of factors, from structural issues of supply, costs and access to services, as well as the more demand-side determinants. The term vaccine hesitancy is increasingly used in the investigation of demand-side determinants, moving away from the more polarized framing of pro- and anti-vaccine groups to recognizing the importance of understanding and engaging those who are delaying vaccination, accepting only some vaccines, or who are yet undecided, but reluctant. As hesitancy is a state of indecision, it is difficult to measure, but the stage of indecision is a critical time to engage and support the decision-making process. This article suggests modes of investigating the determinants of vaccine confidence and levers of vaccine acceptance toward better engagement and dialogue early in the process of decision-making. Pressure to vaccinate can be counter-productive. Listening and dialog can support individual decision-making and more effectively inform the public health community of the issues and concerns influencing vaccine hesitancy. PMID:23896582

  7. Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work

    E-print Network

    Raffray, A. René

    Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work R.E. Nygren, R. Raffray, D. Whyte, M.A. Urickson, M.A. Urickson, M. Baldwin, L.L. Snead, Making Tungsten Work, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi: 10.1016/j the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain. #12;Making Tungsten Work - ICFRM-14

  8. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    This is the introductory article to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Instead of each article herein reviewing the basics of ACT, this article contains that review. This article provides a description of where ACT fits within the larger category of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT):…

  9. W-025, acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Roscha, V.

    1994-10-04

    This acceptance test report (ATR) has been prepared to establish the results of the field testing conducted on W-025 to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation systems functioned as intended by design. This is part of the RMW Land Disposal Facility.

  10. Who accepts first aid training?

    PubMed

    Pearn, J; Dawson, B; Leditschke, F; Petrie, G; Nixon, J

    1980-09-01

    The percentage of individuals trained in first aid skills in the general community is inadequate. We report here a study to investigate factors which influence motivation to accept voluntary training in first aid. A group of 700 randomly selected owners of inground swimming pools (a parental high-risk group) was offered a course of formal first aid instruction. Nine per cent attended the offered training course. The time commitment involved in traditional courses (eight training nights spread over four weeks) is not a deterrent, the same percentage accepting such courses as that who accept a course of one night's instruction. Cost is an important deterrent factor, consumer resistance rising over 15 cost units (one cost unit = the price of a loaf of bread). The level of competent first aid training within the community can be raised by (a) keeping to traditional course content, but (b) by ensuring a higher acceptance rate of first aid courses by a new approach to publicity campaigns, to convince prospective students of the real worth of first aid training. Questions concerning who should be taught first aid, and factors influencing motivation, are discussed. PMID:7213253

  11. 21 CFR 820.86 - Acceptance status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acceptance status. 820.86 Section 820.86 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.86 Acceptance status. Each manufacturer shall identify by suitable means the acceptance status of product, to indicate the conformance or...

  12. 21 CFR 820.86 - Acceptance status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance status. 820.86 Section 820.86 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.86 Acceptance status. Each manufacturer shall identify by suitable means the acceptance status of product, to indicate the conformance or...

  13. LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : : I 1'' LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results NO. ATM 886 PAGE 1 REV. NO. OF 3 Aerospace Acceptance Test for the LRRR Astronaut Trainer. The Acceptance Plan used for this test is Internal Memorandum;.· :- I NO. REV. NO· ATM 886 LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results PAGE 2 OF 3 DATE May 8, 1970

  14. Animal issues and society.

    PubMed

    Grabau, J H

    1993-05-01

    Animal use topics are sensitive issues today. Animal uses issues are often presented as black and white or 'we' are right and 'they' are wrong. This is clearly demonstrated in the available literature from most organizations. Topics presented will include: delineation of issues and concerned groups; examples of animal issues in education and agriculture; the terrorist issue; examples of animal issues/sportsman issues; examples of political and legislative impact; and examples of biomedical and toxicology animal use issues. PMID:8516774

  15. Acceptability of identification bracelets for hospital inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cleopas, A; Kolly, V; Bovier, P; Garnerin, P; Perneger, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether hospitalised patients would agree to wear an identification bracelet and whether patient acceptability is improved by more detailed explanations or by using a code instead of a name on the bracelet. Design: Patient survey that tested two variables in a randomised factorial design. Explanations about identification bracelets were given (a) with or without examples of situations where patient identification may be important, and (b) with the patient name or an anonymous code appearing on the bracelet. Setting: Swiss teaching hospital where wearing of identification bracelets was not systematic. Participants: Adult patients discharged from hospital (n = 1411). Main outcome measures: Patients' responses to the questions: (a) should the hospital introduce a compulsory identification bracelet? and (b) would the patient agree to wear such a bracelet? Results: Globally, 83.9% of patients thought that the hospital should introduce bracelets and 90.2% stated that they would agree to wear one. Providing examples increased support for both the hospital policy (87.9% v 79.2%, p<0.001) and personal acceptance (92.2% v 88.1%, p = 0.015). Whether or not the bracelet carried the patient's name or an anonymous code did not influence patient choice. Conclusions: The majority of patients were in favour of wearing an identification bracelet during their hospital stay. This proportion increased significantly when an explanation based on examples of the consequences of incorrect patient identification had been provided. PMID:15465937

  16. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  17. Acceptability of reactors in space

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1981-04-01

    Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

  18. Acceptability of reactors in space

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

  19. Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1990-01-30

    The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

  20. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" promotes emergency exercises as an effective way to validate school safety plans. Simulations of emergency situations, or emergency exercises, are integral to a sound school safety plan. They offer opportunities for district and schools to…

  1. Ethical Issues Involving the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Mary V.

    The Internet is a network of networks, sharing the same protocol and linking universities, research communities, businesses, and individuals world wide. In this new global information infrastructure, all citizens need to understand the power and pitfalls of the technology in order to function as responsible members. This paper discusses issues

  2. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of ERCMExpress presents the topic "Schools Respond to Infectious Disease." Every year, schools confront a range of infectious diseases such as chicken pox, lice, ringworm and seasonal influenza. In response, faculty and staff work together to control the outbreak, quell fears and dispel rumors. For example, school administrators may…

  3. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" introduces the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF), a free public service that provides information on planning, designing, funding, building, improving and maintaining safe, healthy, high-performance schools. NCEF is…

  4. Energy Management Issued: June 2010

    E-print Network

    budget. Facilities Management pays the utility providers for the campus usage in four main areas: steamEnergy Management Policy Issued: June 2010 Revised: Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration Policy Contact: Director of Facilities Management gary.bowersock@is.mines.edu Page 1 of 5 1

  5. ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ECRM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter "ERCMExpress" provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. Many nontraditional schools across the United States, such as storefront schools, rural schools, and alternative education facilities, face challenges in…

  6. EQUILIBRIUM AND FLUX SURFACE ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF NCSX

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    EQUILIBRIUM AND FLUX SURFACE ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF NCSX A. REIMAN,*a S. HIRSHMAN,b S. HUDSON,a D-5608 Received October 17, 2005 Accepted for Publication January 13, 2006 Equilibrium issues encountered on equilibrium mag- netic islands. Significant improvements have been made to the VMEC equilibrium code to deal

  7. Parent's Acceptance of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Behavior and Communication Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boothe, Jennifer L.; Borrego, Joaquin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine what parents find as acceptable treatment options for children with behavior problems in a communication disorders population. Parents' acceptability of seven treatment options, including positive reinforcement, time-out, response cost, spanking, overcorrection, differential attention, and medication were…

  8. 48 CFR 801.670-1 - Issuing bills of lading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Issuing bills of lading... Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-1 Issuing bills of lading. The authority to issue bills of lading... employee may issue a bill of lading or otherwise procure transportation services for goods unless...

  9. 48 CFR 801.670-1 - Issuing bills of lading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuing bills of lading... Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-1 Issuing bills of lading. The authority to issue bills of lading... employee may issue a bill of lading or otherwise procure transportation services for goods unless...

  10. 13 CFR 124.503 - How does SBA accept a procurement for award through the 8(a) BD program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under the 8(a) BD program. (g) Basic Ordering Agreements (BOAs). A Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) is not a contract under the FAR. See 48 CFR 16.703(a). Each order to be issued under the BOA is an... BOA in addition to offering and accepting the BOA itself. (1) SBA will not accept for award on a...

  11. This is an Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the Royal Society of Chemistry peer review process and has been

    E-print Network

    Sharma, Vivek

    process and has been accepted for publication. Accepted Manuscripts are published online shortly afterMatter View Article Online View Journal This article can be cited before page numbers have been issued, to do-4307. 3 Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami-gun

  12. Public participation in environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pilot, J.

    1998-12-31

    The need for public participation in environmental issues has grown in the past five years. The Responsible Care{reg_sign} Program, developed by the chemical industry, as well as government requirements for citizens` input into regulatory review have initiated public committees for environmental management issues. This paper will discuss three programs that have been implemented in Ontario to assist in public participation in environmental issues covering the following: 1. Great Waste Management Debate held in co-operation with Government, Boards of Trade, Industry, and Youth; 2. Public Liaison committee for Ontario`s Resource Recovery -- Waste to Energy Facility operating in the Region of Peel, the role they have played in its operation with the community; and 3. Brampton Environmental Community Advisory Panel, initiated by the Brampton Chemical Association`s need under Responsible Care for a public program to address concern related to company`s environmental issues in the community. As Chair of all three Committees, the paper will cover the benefits of the committees for public input and review of environmental issues related to environmental management.

  13. Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share Compartir Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work America's work force has changed in the last ... while also balancing the traditional parenting responsibilities. 1 Work-related health challenges facing women Women face different ...

  14. Four Republican Presidential Candidates Debate Educational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity and Excellence, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides the transcript of a September 1987 debate on educational issues between Republican presidential candidates Jack Kemp and Pierre du Pont. Interspersed throughout the transcript are written responses to questions submitted to additional candidates Robert Dole and George Bush. (BJV)

  15. Apollo experience report environmental acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, C. H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Environmental acceptance testing was used extensively to screen selected spacecraft hardware for workmanship defects and manufacturing flaws. The minimum acceptance levels and durations and methods for their establishment are described. Component selection and test monitoring, as well as test implementation requirements, are included. Apollo spacecraft environmental acceptance test results are summarized, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  16. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a) Section... either— (i) Achieved commercial market acceptance; or (ii) Been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  17. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 2911... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance. The... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  18. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  19. Television station acceptance of AIDS prevention PSAs and condom advertisements.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, A M; Wicks, J L

    1998-01-01

    AIDS is a fatal, though preventable disease with more than 56,000 new cases reported in 1996 alone. Condom advertisements and AIDS public service announcements (AIDS PSAs) can help prevent the spread of AIDS, but these AIDS PSAs often contain controversial subject matter and are thus rejected for broadcast by television stations. It is for this reason why a large-scale national mail survey was conducted. The survey, which examined the impact of personal ethical considerations of television station management on AIDS acceptance decisions in the US, was based on five hypothetical questions. It used questionnaires mailed to television station managers. Responses were received from 364 stations, yielding a 40.63% response rate. Significant results were found related to the impact of personal ethical concerns of television managers on AIDS acceptance decision. Most stations were unlikely to accept condom or safe sex advertisements but were more likely to accept generic AIDS messages. These findings pose a dilemma for public health officials, which include the high cost of television advertisements and the difficulty in choosing a creative execution type. The most effective approach would be to appeal to sales managers to run the advertisements since they are important for the community and serve the public interest. PMID:12295801

  20. Flight Crew Workload, Acceptability, and Performance When Using Data Comm in a High-Density Terminal Area Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. Michael; Baxley, Brian T.; Adams, Cathy A.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Latorella, Kara A.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This document describes a collaborative FAA/NASA experiment using 22 commercial airline pilots to determine the effect of using Data Comm to issue messages during busy, terminal area operations. Four conditions were defined that span current day to future flight deck equipage: Voice communication only, Data Comm only, Data Comm with Moving Map Display, and Data Comm with Moving Map displaying taxi route. Each condition was used in an arrival and a departure scenario at Boston Logan Airport. Of particular interest was the flight crew response to D-TAXI, the use of Data Comm by Air Traffic Control (ATC) to send taxi instructions. Quantitative data was collected on subject reaction time, flight technical error, operational errors, and eye tracking information. Questionnaires collected subjective feedback on workload, situation awareness, and acceptability to the flight crew for using Data Comm in a busy terminal area. Results showed that 95% of the Data Comm messages were responded to by the flight crew within one minute and 97% of the messages within two minutes. However, post experiment debrief comments revealed almost unanimous consensus that two minutes was a reasonable expectation for crew response. Flight crews reported that Expected D-TAXI messages were useful, and employment of these messages acceptable at all altitude bands evaluated during arrival scenarios. Results also indicate that the use of Data Comm for all evaluated message types in the terminal area was acceptable during surface operations, and during arrivals at any altitude above the Final Approach Fix, in terms of response time, workload, situation awareness, and flight technical performance. The flight crew reported the use of Data Comm as implemented in this experiment as unacceptable in two instances: in clearances to cross an active runway, and D-TAXI messages between the Final Approach Fix and 80 knots during landing roll. Critical cockpit tasks and the urgency of out-the window scan made the additional head down time to respond to Data Comm messages undesirable during these events. However, most crews also stated that Data Comm messages without an accompanying audio chime and no expectation of an immediate response could be acceptable even during these events.

  1. Methylmercury risk assessment issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Saroff, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

  2. ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 Genes and disease

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    influences on 25 diseases, and to study the genetics of learning in children and individuals' responses to or protect them from common diseases such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coronary heart disease. #12ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 FUNDING Genes and disease In this issue... FUNDING AND UPDATES 2­5 Project

  3. Acceptance of Cancer in Patients Diagnosed with Lung, Breast, Colorectal and Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    RELIGIONI, Urszula; CZERW, Aleksandra; DEPTA?A, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ability to accept illness is a major issue in the life of a person with cancer. Acceptance of disease is simultaneously conducted at two levels: the emotional and cognitive-behavioral one. It is consequential to cancer affecting numerous aspects of patient’s life, i.e. the physical, mental, social and the spiritual area. The aim of the study was to verify the influence of socioeconomic factors on acceptance of illness in patients suffering from breast, lung, colorectal and prostate carcinoma. Methods: The study included 902 patients treated on an outpatient basis at the Center of Oncology, the Maria Sk?odowska-Curie Institute in Warsaw, in the year 2013. The Paper and Pencil Interview (PAPI) technique was applied. The questionnaire comprised basic demographic questions (socioeconomic factors) and Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS) test estimating the level of disease acceptance in patients. Results: Prostate carcinoma patients scored highest (30, 39), whereas lung carcinoma patients scored lowest (23, 17) concerning illness acceptance according to the AIS scale. In all cases, linear dependence between the net income-per-household-member and the AIS score could be observed. Another diversification factor in the case of prostate carcinoma patients was the level of education. Yet one more dependence could be observed between the level of illness acceptance and chemotherapy over the course of past twelve months. Conclusion: The degree of disease acceptance is subject to a type of carcinoma. Patient income is an economic factor significantly affecting the acceptance of illness score. PMID:26587478

  4. Chores and Responsibility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not learn to accept responsibility. In unstructured home environments, or in families that are very permissive and where little is expected of children, youngsters are losing out on some valuable learning experiences, and their development of a sense of responsibility and initiative may ...

  5. Study on Influencing Factor Analysis and Application of Consumer Mobile Commerce Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoguang; Lv, Tingjie

    Mobile commerce (MC) refers to e-commerce activities carried out using a mobile device such as a phone or PDA. With new technology, MC will be rapidly growing in the near future. At the present time, what factors making consumer accept MC and what MC applications are acceptable by consumers are two of hot issues both for MC providers and f or MC researchers. This study presents a proposed MC acceptance model that integrates perceived playfulness, perceived risk and cost into the TAM to study which factors affect consumer MC acceptance. The proposed model includes five variables, namely perceived risk, cost, perceived usefulness, perceived playfulness, perceived ease of use, perceived playfulness. Then, using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to calculate weight of criteria involved in proposed model. Finally, the study utilizes fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to evaluate MC applications accepted possibility, and then a MC application is empirically tested using data collected from a survey of MC consumers.

  6. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01...acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general...203.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...initial HUD acceptance or renewal of acceptance of a Plan...Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  7. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01...acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general...203.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...initial HUD acceptance or renewal of acceptance of a Plan...Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  8. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01...acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general...203.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...initial HUD acceptance or renewal of acceptance of a Plan...Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  9. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01...acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general...203.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...initial HUD acceptance or renewal of acceptance of a Plan...Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  10. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01...acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general...203.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...initial HUD acceptance or renewal of acceptance of a Plan...Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  11. Cue Set Stimulation as a Factor in Human Response Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petelle, John L.

    The hypotheses that there will be a significant difference (1) in the number of responses generated according to economic issues, (2) in the number of responses generated according to social issues, (3) in the number of responses generated between the category of economic issues and the category of social issues, (4) in cue ranking by response

  12. DISPOSABLE CANISTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Garrett

    2001-07-30

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide the bases for defining the preclosure limits on radioactive material releases from radioactive waste forms to be received in disposable canisters at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, this calculation will provide the basis for criteria to be included in a forthcoming revision of the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) that limits releases in terms of non-isotope-specific canister release dose-equivalent source terms. These criteria will be developed for the Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) standard canister, the Multicanister Overpack (MCO), the naval spent fuel canister, the High-Level Waste (HLW) canister, the plutonium can-in-canister, and the large Multipurpose Canister (MPC). The shippers of such canisters will be required to demonstrate that they meet these criteria before the canisters are accepted at the MGR. The Quality Assurance program is applicable to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of DSNF and is performed using procedure AP-3.124, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to procedure QAP-2-0, Control of Activities, which has been superseded by AP-2.21Q, Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to the requirements of DOE/RW/0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 2000). This work is also prepared in accordance with the development plan titled Design Basis Event Analyses on DOE SNF and Plutonium Can-In-Canister Waste Forms (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This calculation contains no electronic data applicable to any electronic data management system.

  13. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been fully edited. Content may change prior to final publication. Citation information: DOI

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    . According to a general survey [1], in United States, buildings are responsible for around 38% of the total carbon dioxide emissions; 71% of the total electrical energy consumption; 39% of the total energy usage the total energy consumption in different buildings. Also, conventional buildings are not with too many

  14. Inert wastes -- A live issue

    SciTech Connect

    Molus, P.; Rieley, D.; Sherlock, G.; Walmsley, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper demonstrates why one county council in the UK has adopted a very proactive position towards inert waste and its reuse and recycling, and how that council is attempting to increase the use of this material. It describes how Babtie has worked with Berkshire County Council and gives an outline of Berkshire and the County`s responsibilities. The environmental/planning issues affecting minerals and waste in Berkshire and the approach the Council is adopting via policy documents and its role as a corporate body are discussed. The actions of the County Council are described with regard to increasing the reuse and recycling of inert wastes on the road network and the roles of specifications and contractors. The impact of some of the more relevant issues (markets, practical issues, planning, and supply and demand) is assessed.

  15. Current IT Issues, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

  16. Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-30

    This one of NASA`s sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Acceptability of HIV self-testing: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of HIV testing and counselling services remains low in risk groups around the world. Fear of stigmatisation, discrimination and breach of confidentiality results in low service usage among risk groups. HIV self-testing (HST) is a confidential HIV testing option that enables people to find out their status in the privacy of their homes. We evaluated the acceptability of HST and the benefits and challenges linked to the introduction of HST. Methods A literature review was conducted on the acceptability of HST in projects in which HST was offered to study participants. Besides acceptability rates of HST, accuracy rates of self-testing, referral rates of HIV-positive individuals into medical care, disclosure rates and rates of first-time testers were assessed. In addition, the utilisation rate of a telephone hotline for counselling issues and clients` attitudes towards HST were extracted. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (HST had been offered effectively to study participants and had been administered by participants themselves) and demonstrated universally high acceptability of HST among study populations. Studies included populations from resource poor settings (Kenya and Malawi) and from high-income countries (USA, Spain and Singapore). The majority of study participants were able to perform HST accurately with no or little support from trained staff. Participants appreciated the confidentiality and privacy but felt that the provision of adequate counselling services was inadequate. Conclusions The review demonstrates that HST is an acceptable testing alternative for risk groups and can be performed accurately by the majority of self-testers. Clients especially value the privacy and confidentiality of HST. Linkage to counselling as well as to treatment and care services remain major challenges. PMID:23924387

  18. Space Station Engineering Design Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, Duane T.; Boehm, Barry W.; Debra, Daniel B.; Green, C. Cordell; Henry, Richard C.; Maycock, Paul D.; Mcelroy, John H.; Pierce, Chester M.; Stafford, Thomas P.; Young, Laurence R.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom topics addressed include: general design issues; issues related to utilization and operations; issues related to systems requirements and design; and management issues relevant to design.

  19. Patients' reasons for accepting a free community pharmacy asthma service.

    PubMed

    Kaae, Susanne; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2015-10-01

    Background Challenges in recruiting patients at the pharmacy counter for cognitive services have been observed, hampering development in this area. To overcome this barrier, insight into the patient perspective is crucial to understanding their lack of appreciation of the services. However, very few studies have been conducted so far to explore why patients accept or decline offers of cognitive services at the pharmacy counter. Objective To explore patients' reasons for accepting a particular cognitive service (the Inhaler Technique Assessment Service) a service intended to detect inhalation technique errors. The service is reimbursed by the Danish state and takes approximately 10 min. Setting Ten community pharmacies located in different regions of Denmark, including the center and suburbs of Copenhagen. Method Two types of interviews were conducted: long and short semi-structured interviews with 24 patients suffering mainly from asthma and COPD. Researchers from Copenhagen University conducted 11 long interviews and pharmacy internship students from Copenhagen University carried out 13 short interviews. The interviews were analyzed using descriptive analysis. Main outcome measure Patients' perceived needs of an inhalation counseling service as well as their motivation for accepting the service, including their accounts of how the service was orally offered by staff. Results The majority of participants were used to using inhaler devices. The participants felt, for several reasons, little need of an inhaler service and seldom noticed the precise way the service was offered. Patients did not seem to accept the service expecting personal benefits. First timers appeared to accept the service to learn how to use the device correctly, whereas experienced users appeared to accept the ITAS to be helpful to staff or to learn more about health issues in general or were convinced by individual employees who showed a special interest in the participant receiving the service. Privacy problems were felt by several participants. Conclusion The patients felt little need for the inhaler counseling service. Patients however accepted the service for various reasons of which the feeling how staff showing an interest in helping them seemed especially convincing. PMID:26021739

  20. Acceptance test for an integrated library system

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, N.P.; Nook, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    How do you verify that the computerized system you choose for your library will perform in the manner and with the reliability that you expect. The answer is to perform a rigorous acceptance test which has been described in your contract with the system vendor. Formal acceptance, which is the library's agreement that the vendor has fulfilled the contract, should be preceded by a well-defined and thorough acceptance test period.

  1. 7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

  2. 7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

  3. 7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

  4. 7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

  5. 7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

  6. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  7. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  8. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  9. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  10. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  11. 7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each...

  12. 7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each...

  13. 7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each...

  14. 7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each...

  15. 7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each...

  16. Graduate Scholarships Guidelines and Responsibilities

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    Graduate Scholarships Guidelines and Responsibilities For Students Holding A Graduate Scholarship. Acceptance of an offer of financial aid (such as a graduate scholarship, fellowship, traineeship that a copy of this Resolution should accompany every scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, and assistantship

  17. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.S.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders` final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology`s field test; stakeholders` principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. Social Perception of Rape: How Rape Myth Acceptance Modulates the Influence of Situational Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frese, Bettina; Moya, Miguel; Megias, Jesus

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the role of rape myth acceptance (RMA) and situational factors in the perception of three different rape scenarios (date rape, marital rape, and stranger rape). One hundred and eighty-two psychology undergraduates were asked to emit four judgements about each rape situation: victim responsibility, perpetrator responsibility,…

  19. An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

    2008-01-01

    National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

  20. Emotional and Social Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ...

  1. Post-Adolescent Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    COPING & HEALING CARING FOR A CHILD: POST-ADOLESCENT ISSUES As your child reaches adulthood, there will be different issues and considerations to contend with. These may include restrictions on choice of ...

  2. Issues in Peer Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawamura, Mark H.

    2001-01-01

    Based on concerns raised at a workshop at the Southern California College of Optometry, addresses critical issues in the process of peer review of faculty teaching and possible alternatives to these issues as applied to an optometric institution. (EV)

  3. What! Teach Issues!?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapoport, Faye

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how to incorporate the teaching of issues as well as natural history into environmental education to build environmentally aware citizens. Describes several issues-oriented curriculums which all use direct student participation in environmental conservation. (NEC)

  4. Enzyme Reactions and Acceptability of Plant Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, James K.

    1984-01-01

    Provides an overview of enzyme reactions which contribute to the character and acceptability of plant foods. A detailed discussion of polyphenoloxidase is also provided as an example of an enzyme which can markedly affect the character and acceptability of such foods. (JN)

  5. Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development. PMID:22416723

  6. 12 CFR 250.164 - Bankers' acceptances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bankers' acceptances. 250.164 Section 250.164 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM MISCELLANEOUS INTERPRETATIONS Interpretations § 250.164 Bankers' acceptances. (a) Section 207 of the Bank Export Services Act (title II of Pub. L....

  7. 48 CFR 411.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 411.103... ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 411.103 Market... accordance with FAR 11.103(a), the market acceptability of their items to be offered. (b) The...

  8. 48 CFR 3011.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 3011.103 Section 3011.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND... Developing Requirements Documents 3011.103 Market acceptance. (a) Contracting officers may act on behalf...

  9. Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

    E-print Network

    Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement Surfaces for Tire/Pavement Noise Designation: CPSCP PP 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011) National Concrete Pavement Technology Center 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 Ames, IA 50010 #12;PP 1-1 CPSCP Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

  10. Heavy Metal, Religiosity, and Suicide Acceptability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Reports on data taken from the General Social Survey that found a link between "heavy metal" rock fanship and suicide acceptability. Finds that relationship becomes nonsignificant once level of religiosity is controlled. Heavy metal fans are low in religiosity, which contributes to greater suicide acceptability. (Author/JDM)

  11. Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT

    E-print Network

    Metscher, Brian

    Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT doi: 10.3906/yer-0910-44 Growth Rate. Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences [Turkish J. Earth Sci.] (2011) [in press]. This PDF file is an early version of a manucript accepted for publication in Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences

  12. 78 FR 41078 - Acceptance of Concurrent Jurisdiction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... National Park Service Acceptance of Concurrent Jurisdiction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Concurrent Jurisdiction. SUMMARY: On behalf of the United States, the National Park Service has accepted concurrent legislative jurisdiction from the State of Michigan over lands and waters...

  13. 78 FR 8189 - Acceptance of Concurrent Jurisdiction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... National Park Service Acceptance of Concurrent Jurisdiction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Concurrent Jurisdiction. SUMMARY: On behalf of the United States, the National Park Service has accepted concurrent legislative jurisdiction from the State of Washington over lands and...

  14. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  15. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

  16. Contemporary American Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Bill; And Others

    This nine-week unit from a junior high American government curriculum covers the following topics: (1) What are the current issues in our physical and social environment?; (2) How do we investigate and evaluate issues?; and (3) What contemporary issues in my physical or social environment do I want to investigate? Students are required to do…

  17. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  18. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  19. Resource quality or competition: why increase resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics?

    PubMed Central

    Nufio, César R.; Papaj, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Some animal species increase resource acceptance rates in the presence of conspecifics. Such responses may be adaptive if the presence of conspecifics is a reliable indicator of resource quality. Similarly, these responses could represent an adaptive reduction in choosiness under high levels of scramble competition. Although high resource quality and high levels of scramble competition should both favor increased resource acceptance, the contexts in which the increase occurs should differ. In this paper, we tested the effect of social environment on egg-laying and aggressive behavior in the walnut fly, Rhagoletis juglandis, in multiple contexts to determine whether increased resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics was better viewed as a response to increased host quality or increased competition. We found that grouped females oviposit more readily than isolated females when provided small (low-quality) artificial hosts but not when provided large (high-quality) artificial hosts, indicating that conspecific presence reduces choosiness. Increased resource acceptance was observed even when exposure to conspecifics was temporally or spatially separate from exposure to the resource. Finally, we found that individuals showed reduced aggression after being housed in groups, as expected under high levels of scramble competition. These results indicate that the pattern of resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics may be better viewed as a response to increased scramble competition rather than as a response to public information about resource quality. PMID:22479135

  20. Issues Management: End of First Decade Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.; Cousino, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that issues management is a robust contribution to the public relations discipline. Offers additional rationale for empowering public relations practitioners by involving them in strategic planning, making them responsible for issue scanning and monitoring, integrating their advice into standards of corporate social responsibility, and…

  1. Disability and stigma: how Japanese educators help parents accept their children's differences.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Misa; Haight, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this report, part of a larger ethnographic study, the authors examined the support Japanese elementary school educators provide to parents of children with relatively mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and high-functioning autism. Conditions that affect children's learning and behaviors are widespread, but cultures vary in responses to children with such difficulties and their families. In many cultures, disability remains a sensitive issue due to lingering stigma. Japan's recent implementation of special education services for children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities provided a unique context in which to examine otherwise taken-for-granted beliefs and practices related to disability. Participant observations in a Japanese elementary school and individual interviews with educators and parents suggest that parents' sensitivity to other people's "eyes," or stigma, can be an obstacle to their acceptance of their children's need for special education, permission for their children to receive services, and collaboration with educators. Educators supported parents through a steadfast focus on emotional support, communication, relationship building, and partnerships. Japanese practices and adults' reflections on stigma provide a broader context for international, school, and other social workers to reflect on their own beliefs and practices with families of children with disabilities. PMID:24640228

  2. Defining Acceptable Levels for Ecological Indicators: An Approach for Considering Social Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Robyn L.; Watzin, Mary C.; Manning, Robert E.

    2007-03-01

    Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components.

  3. Treatment Acceptability of Behavioral Interventions for Children: An Assessment by Mothers of Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melanie L.; Eyberg, Sheila M.; Adams, Christina D.; Boggs, Stephen R.

    1998-01-01

    Study assesses the acceptability of six child-management interventions as rated by mothers (N=20) of children referred for treatment for a disruptive-behavior disorder. Positive reinforcement was rated as a more acceptable treatment than response time, time-out, differential attention, overcorrection, and spanking. Results validate findings of…

  4. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-06-14

    This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

  5. Consumer Acceptance of Dry Dog Food Variations

    PubMed Central

    Donfrancesco, Brizio Di; Koppel, Kadri; Swaney-Stueve, Marianne; Chambers, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Pet owners evaluated dry dog food samples available in the US market. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner’s overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Abstract The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US market were evaluated by pet owners. In this study, consumers evaluated overall liking, aroma, and appearance liking of the products. Consumers were also asked to predict their purchase intent, their dog’s liking, and cost of the samples. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner’s overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products. PMID:26480043

  6. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  7. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  8. Approaches to acceptable risk: a critical guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fischhoff, B.; Lichtenstein, S.; Slovic, P.; Keeney, R.; Derby, S.

    1980-12-01

    Acceptable-risk decisions are an essential step in the management of technological hazards. In many situations, they constitute the weak (or missing) link in the management process. The absence of an adequate decision-making methodology often produces indecision, inconsistency, and dissatisfaction. The result is neither good for hazard management nor good for society. This report offers a critical analysis of the viability of various approaches as guides to acceptable-risk decisions. This report seeks to define acceptable-risk decisions and to examine some frequently proposed, but inappropriate, solutions. 255 refs., 22 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. Management issues in automated audit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

  10. Judging social issues: difficulties, inconsistencies, and consistencies.

    PubMed

    Turiel, E; Hildebrandt, C; Wainryb, C

    1991-01-01

    The three studies reported in this Monograph examine high school and college students' reasoning about the issues of abortion, homosexuality, pornography, and incest. The studies stemmed from previous research on reasoning in the "prototypical" moral, social conventional, and personal domains. We postulated that abortion, homosexuality, pornography, and incest are nonprototypical issues. We expected that reasoning about nonprototypical and prototypical issues would differ and that reasoning about nonprototypical issues would be inconsistent and involve ambiguities in informational assumptions. Two groups were preselected in Study 1, those who negatively and those who positively evaluated the nonprototypical issues. Assessments were made of criterion judgments (evaluations, rule contingency, and generalizability) and justifications regarding moral, personal, and nonprototypical issues. The groups differed in judgments about the nonprototypical issues but not the moral issues. Both groups gave noncontigent and generalized judgments about moral issues, with justifications of justice and rights. Subjects who evaluated nonprototypical acts negatively used varied and often inconsistent configurations of criterion judgments. Responses coded for general reasoning types often entailed juxtapositions of prescriptive judgments and assertions of personal choice. Subjects who evaluated nonprototypical acts positively judged that they should be legal and nongeneralized and gave justifications based on personal choice. Using similar procedures, Study 2 was conducted with practicing Catholics attending parochial high schools. The findings paralleled those of Study 1, including a split among subjects in their evaluations of the nonprototypical issues. The results suggested a bidirectional relation between individual judgments and group positions. The findings of Studies 1 and 2 suggested that variations in evaluations and judgments about the nonprototypical issues were associated with variations in ambiguously held informational assumptions. Study 3 examined the role of such informational assumptions. It was found that assumptions associated with judgments about abortion and homosexuality were ambiguous and inconsistently applied. Thus, we propose that ambiguity around assumptions is a central component of the nonprototypicality of these issues. PMID:1766444

  11. Computer Access: Selected Legal Issues Affecting Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sermersheim, Michael D.

    This pamphlet analyzes some of the legal issues colleges and universities face in regard to faculty and student access to computers and the World Wide Web, evaluates current legal developments, and offers guidelines for developing policies for computer access. It examines sample acceptable-use standards, procedures for suspending or terminating a…

  12. Ethical Issues in Withholding Care from Severely Handicapped Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby

    1981-01-01

    Ethical issues are examined that involve withholding medical treatment from severely handicapped infants. Although current laws do not sanction euthanasia, severely handicapped infants are often assisted in dying. Discussion includes society's apparent acceptance of this practice and several solutions to the problems. (Author)

  13. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  14. Gas characterization system software acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-02-27

    This document details the Software Acceptance Testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  15. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-03-28

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  16. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.25 Acceptance. Each person to be selected by the Secretary as a...

  17. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.25 Acceptance. Each person to be selected by the Secretary as a...

  18. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.25 Acceptance. Each person to be selected by the Secretary as a...

  19. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.25 Acceptance. Each person to be selected by the Secretary as a...

  20. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.25 Acceptance. Each person to be selected by the Secretary as a...

  1. 24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

  2. 24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

  3. 24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

  4. 24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

  5. 24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability. (a) The...

  6. 37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable depository. (a) A deposit shall...

  7. 37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable depository. (a) A deposit shall...

  8. 37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable depository. (a) A deposit shall...

  9. 37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable depository. (a) A deposit shall...

  10. 37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable depository. (a) A deposit shall...

  11. Investigation of Variables Associated with Vaccine Acceptance

    E-print Network

    Black, Lora L.

    2011-12-31

    Abstract The current study investigated the relationship between the Health Belief Model (HBM) framework, social variables, personality factors, and H1N1 flu vaccine acceptance. Four hundred thirty two undergraduate students completed online...

  12. 7 CFR 922.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.25 Acceptance....

  13. 7 CFR 922.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.25 Acceptance....

  14. 7 CFR 922.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.25 Acceptance....

  15. 7 CFR 922.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.25 Acceptance....

  16. 7 CFR 922.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.25 Acceptance....

  17. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  18. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  19. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  20. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  1. 7 CFR 932.32 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.32 Acceptance. Any person selected by the...

  2. 7 CFR 1205.326 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.326 Acceptance. Any person selected by the Secretary as...

  3. 7 CFR 1205.326 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.326 Acceptance. Any person selected by the Secretary as...

  4. 7 CFR 1205.326 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.326 Acceptance. Any person selected by the Secretary as...

  5. 75 FR 44046 - Noise Exposure Map Acceptance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Acceptance ACTION: Notice...its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Philadelphia Division...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is June 1, 2010. FOR FURTHER...

  6. Modeling gap acceptance at freeway merges

    E-print Network

    Lee, Gunwoo

    2006-01-01

    This thesis develops a merging model that captures the gap acceptance behavior of drivers that merge from a ramp into a congested freeway. Merging can be classified into three types: normal, forced and cooperative lane ...

  7. Risk Perception and the Public Acceptance of Drones.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Reece A; Greer, Dominique A; Greer, Duncan G; Mehta, Amisha M

    2015-06-01

    Unmanned aircraft, or drones, are a rapidly emerging sector of the aviation industry. There has been limited substantive research, however, into the public perception and acceptance of drones. This article presents the results from two surveys of the Australian public designed to investigate (1) whether the public perceive drones to be riskier than existing manned aviation, (2) whether the terminology used to describe the technology influences public perception, and (3) what the broader concerns are that may influence public acceptance of the technology. We find that the Australian public currently hold a relatively neutral attitude toward drones. Respondents did not consider the technology to be overly unsafe, risky, beneficial, or threatening. Drones are largely viewed as being of comparable risk to that of existing manned aviation. Furthermore, terminology had a minimal effect on the perception of the risks or acceptability of the technology. The neutral response is likely due to a lack of knowledge about the technology, which was also identified as the most prevalent public concern as opposed to the risks associated with its use. Privacy, military use, and misuse (e.g., terrorism) were also significant public concerns. The results suggest that society is yet to form an opinion of drones. As public knowledge increases, the current position is likely to change. Industry communication and media coverage will likely influence the ultimate position adopted by the public, which can be difficult to change once established. PMID:25689883

  8. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  9. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  10. Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software

    SciTech Connect

    CREA, B.A.

    2000-10-25

    This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled.

  11. In this issue: transplant immunology and transplant biology.

    PubMed

    Jiga, Lucian P; Oltean, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation faces an unprecedented shortage of organs available for transplantation, resulting in longer waiting times and transplant candidates on the waiting list dying before getting a transplant. This dramatic situation triggered the search for new approaches and innovations to increase the donor pool, such as extending the acceptance criteria concerning donor age or organ transplantation across blood group barriers. Herein, leading experts detailed the immunological and molecular concepts behind the successful clinical translation of these strategies. Organ rejection remains a constant challenge and transplantation tolerance is still elusive as the current paradigm aims for immunosuppression rather than immune modulation. Two contributions in this issue review two different molecular paradigms in harnessing the immunologic response after transplantation. The interplay between the intestinal innate and adaptive immunity is particularly intricate and the intestine remains the organ with the highest rate of acute rejection after transplantation. Experts in the field summarized both time-honored and recent knowledge in intestinal preservation and tolerance in intestinal transplantation with potential for further basic and translational research. PMID:24833285

  12. ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM

    E-print Network

    Brown, Sally

    ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM COMPOSTING An Issue Paper for the: Climate Action Reserve.......................................................................................................................................17 3.0 Scientific Uncertainty

  13. PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J.

    1990-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1) SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain''--research on duct injection; (2) Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option''--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3) Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''--PETC's efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4) Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment''--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  14. PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J.

    1990-03-01

    This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4)``Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment``--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

  15. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  16. Examinee Issues in CAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.

    The perspective of the examinee during the administration of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) is discussed, focusing on issues of test development. Item review is the first issue discussed. Virtually no CATs provide the opportunity for the examinee to go back and review, and possibly change, answers. There are arguments on either side of the…

  17. ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEINBERG, MEYER

    THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THREE PROMINENT ISSUES OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN EDUCATION--UNEQUAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES, ACADEMIC FREEDOM, AND THE TEACHER AS A PROFESSIONAL WORKER. THE FIRST OF THESE ISSUES IS EXAMINED UNDER THE RUBRICS OF (1) THE GOALS OF INTEGRATION, (2) THE SEPARATION OF EDUCATION FROM INTEGRATION, (3) COMPENSATORY EDUCATION, (4)…

  18. Issues in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    The primary purpose of this book is to present the critical issues in pupil transportation that will confront pupil transportation supervisors in local school districts. The following issues are discussed: (1) demands for extended service from community pressure groups; (2) reductions in budget requests by governing bodies; (3) unrest among driver…

  19. Issue Brief on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Division on Developmental Disabilities, Council for Exceptional Children (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    During the past year, the Diversity Committee of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Board worked with the Board and the Issues Committee Chair to develop an issue brief addressing diversity, its impact on the membership and the wider community that is served by the work of DDD, resulting in recommendations that will influence policy…

  20. HRD Issues in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) issues in Asia. "The Japanese Human Resource Development System" (Kiyoe Harada) provides a comprehensive model of the Japanese HRD system based on the current state of the art, including management practices and issues and trends in Japanese HRD. "Structured…

  1. Charter School Funding Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Stephen D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses current issues in the funding of charter schools: (1) inter-district inequalities; (2) intra-district inequalities; (3) inadequate spending; and (4) special needs funding. Explores four additional issues related to the core identity of charter schools and the nature of their students. Devotes extra attention to charter schools in…

  2. Preface: ISBB Special Issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue is published for the International Society of Biocatalysis and Biotechnology (ISBB). The ISBB special issue is devoted to all areas of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology in which biological systems are developed and/or used for the provision of commercial goods or serv...

  3. Ethical issues in microbiology.

    PubMed

    Desikan, P; Chakrabarti, A; Muthuswamy, V

    2011-01-01

    Ethical issues facing microbiologists could be considered in two parts. The first relates to the way the ethical issues during their laboratory work. The second pertains to ethical issues on the data/reports they generate for the patients or in research. In both segments, there is pressure to perform, which is exerted by both, the community, as well as peers. It has therefore become increasingly necessary to recognize the facts that unethical actions might be a frequent reality. Since some of these activities generate serious ethical concerns, both in practice and research, it is necessary for microbiologists to be aware and equipped to meet these issues in a prepared and measured way. In an attempt to highlight this requirement, this article outlines the important ethical issues and guidelines relevant to the field of Microbiology. PMID:22120789

  4. Media Discourse on the Social Acceptability of Fecal Transplants.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Kim H; O'Doherty, Kieran C; Secko, David M

    2015-10-01

    Advances in human microbiome research have generated considerable interest in elucidating the role of bacteria in health and the application of microbial ecosystem therapies and probiotics. Fecal transplants involve the introduction of gut microbes from a healthy donor's stool to the patient and have been documented as effective for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) and some other gastrointestinal disorders. However, the treatment has encountered regulatory hurdles preventing widespread uptake. We examined dominant representations of fecal transplants in Canadian media and found that fecal transplants are often represented as being inherently disgusting or distasteful (the "ick factor"). This "ick factor" is used to construct different messages about the treatment's social acceptability and legitimacy. We conclude that an over-emphasis on the "ick factor" constrains public discourse from a more nuanced discussion of the social challenges, scientific concerns, and regulatory issues surrounding the treatment. PMID:25595150

  5. 255 Agreements, not 293 Unresolved Issues, on the Proposed High-Level Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, B. W.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is an independent regulatory agency whose mission is to ensure that public health, safety, and the environment are protected when nuclear materials are used. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) authorized NRC to develop licensing criteria for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC is also required by the NWPA to interact with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the potential license applicant, prior to the submission of a potential license application. Finally, the NWPA requires NRC to provide preliminary comments on "...the extent to which the at-depth site characterization analysis and waste form proposal for such site seem to be sufficient for inclusion in any application by the Secretary for licensing of such site as a repository" to DOE for inclusion in any DOE site recommendation. In November 2001 NRC published the final licensing criteria and provided the Secretary of Energy with the NRC's preliminary comments regarding a possible geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. NRC's comments were subsequently included in a site recommendation made by the Secretary of Energy, and approved by the President, in February 2002. NRC's preliminary comments reflect many years of extensive pre-licensing interaction among the NRC staff, DOE, and various stakeholders. NRC staff engaged DOE in an issue resolution process on key technical issues and identified additional information that DOE would need to provide in any license application. As part of the issue resolution process NRC also obtained DOE's agreement to provide acceptable responses to the requests for information by the time of any license application. The issue resolution agreements, which totaled 293, have been characterized as being unresolved issues. However, NRC's preliminary comments (these and NRC's issue resolution agreements with DOE are available at our website, noted below) and the text of the issue resolution agreements do not support this characterization. Approximately two-thirds of the 293 agreements were requests for documentation in a quality-assurance-approved document, of information that DOE already had, or had plans to obtain, but had not yet documented. As of March 1, 2002, 38 of the original 293 agreements have been completed. This means that the DOE has submitted the information they agreed to provide, NRC has reviewed the information and found that the information acceptably addresses the technical topic that required the additional information. The issue resolution process and representative agreements will be explained in the presentation.

  6. Different Perspectives on Technology Acceptance: The Role of Technology Type and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arning, Katrin; Ziefle, Martina

    Although eHealth technologies offer an enormous potential to improve healthcare, the knowledge about key determinants of acceptance for eHealth technology is restricted. While the underlying technology of eHealth technologies and Information and Communication technology (ICT) is quite similar, utilization contexts and using motives are quite different. In order to explore the role of technology type on acceptance, we contrasted central application characteristics of both technology types using the scenario technique. A questionnaire was administered (n = 104) measuring individual variables (age, gender) and attitudes regarding an eHealth application (blood sugar meter) in contrast to an ICT device (Personal Digital Assistant, PDA). Older users basically approved the utilization of health-related technologies and perceived lower usability barriers. In addition, we identified main utilization motives of eHealth technology and technology-specific acceptance patterns, especially regarding issues of data safety in the eHealth context. Effects of age and gender in acceptance ratings suggest a differential perspective on eHealth acceptance. Finally, practical interventions were derived in order to support eHealth device design and to promote acceptance of eHealth technology.

  7. Harz/Vesper: Acceptance Research with Logical Relations and Pragma-Dialectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We use two different theories for our research on the acceptance of carbon capture and storage (CCS), geothermal energy and shale gas: logical relations and pragma-dialectics. With the theory of logical relations we can describe the structure of the terminus "acceptance" as a three-place or more relationship. We use the Newtonian binominal coefficients order to reflect on the complexity of the concept of acceptance. We are exploring relations between citizens, politicians, scientists, businesses and technologies. The technological-philosophical reflection on the topic "Determinants for acceptance of new technologies" concerns the issues of "Trust", "Security" as well as "Interest and Use" as the essential constituents of acceptance. Trust: Politicians, scientists and entrepreneurs need to understand themselves as advocates of acceptance. Acceptance is not automatic but requires a great effort and continuous personal commitment, as you want to secure acceptance not only for the short-term but for the long-term. The confidence curve follows a hysteresis loop as known from the magnetization of materials: It requires a significant effort. If the existing trust is lost due to erroneous communication or incorrect political action, the restoration effort is significantly greater. Citizens need to understand themselves as being asked for acceptance and as actively influencing the shapes of their life. They may not feel as victims or sufferers from technological developments but should have a realistic feeling of being able to influence - in fact - anything. "Openness creates openness." (H.-J. Bullinger) Security: The advocate promoting acceptance must take into account the security needs of the citizens with regard to the technologies which are supposed to be accepted. Even irrational fears are actual fears that can prevent acceptance. Interests and Goals of Usage: The advocate promoting acceptance must - sincerely and publicly - express his interest in the use and goals of the new technology. Politics must focus on the majority's needs. Businesses must openly commit themselves to their interest in maximizing profit by using the new technologies. Science must contribute to the effective and independent function of the technologies and claim true statements about them. Using the pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation we define "acceptance" in terms of the "acceptance of a standpoint" as an outcome of the protagonist's attempt to justify the "acceptability of a standpoint". The pragma-dialectical ideal model of critical discussion provides a number of norms for a dialectical discussion process leading to the "acceptance of a standpoint". These norms make a systematic analysis of accomplishments and flaws within a critical exchange possible. One of these norms is the sound use of argument schemes which connect a standpoint with an argument. An arguer using the argument scheme of pragmatic argumentation presents the desirable or undesirable consequences of a certain action to back up the (un)acceptability of the standpoint. Critical questions are used to reveal the (in)correct use of pragmatic argumentation. We argue that accomplishments and flaws in the pragmatic argumentation of the four parties observed are closely related to the acceptance of the technology CCS.

  8. 14 CFR 21.502 - Acceptance of articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Acceptance of articles. 21.502 Section 21.502 Aeronautics...Acceptance of Aircraft Engines, Propellers, and Articles for Import § 21.502 Acceptance of articles. An article (including an...

  9. 14 CFR 21.502 - Acceptance of articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Acceptance of articles. 21.502 Section 21.502 Aeronautics...Acceptance of Aircraft Engines, Propellers, and Articles for Import § 21.502 Acceptance of articles. An article (including an...

  10. 14 CFR 21.502 - Acceptance of articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Acceptance of articles. 21.502 Section 21.502 Aeronautics...Acceptance of Aircraft Engines, Propellers, and Articles for Import § 21.502 Acceptance of articles. An article (including an...

  11. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  12. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  13. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  14. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  15. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  16. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  17. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  18. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  19. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  20. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  1. Would You Do That? Understanding Social Acceptance of Gestural Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Sriram

    concern regarding the social acceptance of these interaction techniques. In this paper we begin that influence gestures' social acceptance including culture, time, interaction type and the user's position [Personal Computing]: Miscellaneous. General Terms Design, Human Factors. Keywords Social acceptance

  2. Preliminary evaluation of an analog procedure to assess acceptability of intimate partner violence against women: the Partner Violence Acceptability Movie Task

    PubMed Central

    Gracia, Enrique; Rodriguez, Christina M.; Lila, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    Acceptability of partner violence against women is a risk factor linked to its perpetration, and to public, professionals’ and victims’ responses to this behavior. Research on the acceptability of violence in intimate partner relationships is, however, limited by reliance solely on self-reports that often provide distorted or socially desirable accounts that may misrepresent respondents’ attitudes. This study presents data on the development and initial validation of a new analog task assessing respondents’ acceptability of physical violence toward women in intimate relationships: the Partner Violence Acceptability Movie Task (PVAM). This new analog task is intended to provide a more implicit measure of the acceptability of partner violence against women. For this analog task, clips were extracted from commercially available films (90-s segments) portraying partner violence. Two independent samples were used to develop and evaluate the PVAM: a sample of 245 undergraduate students and a sample of 94 male intimate partner violence offenders. This new analog task demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Results also indicated adequate construct validity. Both perpetrators and undergraduates scoring high in the PVAM also scored higher in self-reported justifications of partner abuse. Perpetrators of partner violence scored significantly higher in acceptability of partner violence than the undergraduate sample (both male and female students), and male students scored higher than females. These preliminary results suggest that the PVAM may be a promising tool to assess the acceptability of violence in intimate partner relationships, highlighting the need to consider alternatives to self-report to evaluate potential beliefs about partner violence. PMID:26528220

  3. Alternatives to DRGs: research issues.

    PubMed

    Siegel, C; Alexander, M J; Goodman, A B

    1985-01-01

    Legislative mandates for the development of prospective payment methodologies for reimbursing inpatient care have spurred the psychiatric community into its own independent effort, applying both clinical and service research, to develop schemes which are fair to psychiatric patients, their providers and payers. Many of the issues involved in the development of an equitable prospective payment system (PPS) for psychiatric care are not new to the field, namely, problems of limited diagnostic accuracy, a limited knowledge of the outcomes of clearly defined treatment protocols, and a lack of integration, efficiency and efficacy in a highly differentiated service system. The research community needs to respond to these problems in the context of cost containment with an awareness that its response will influence care for psychiatric patients for the remainder of this century. In this paper, we will describe the background issues that have brought the psychiatric community to the present point in its response to PPS, and discuss some of the research problems posed by the need for a PPS with the right incentives for clinical effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:3939556

  4. Training and information technology issue, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2005-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on training and information technology. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Communicating effectively, by Alain Bucaille, AREVA; Reputation management, by Susan Brisset, Bruce Power; Contol room and HSI modernization guidance, by Joseph Naser, EPRI; How far are we from public acceptance, by Jennifer A. Biedscheid and Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions LLC; Spent fuel management options, by Brent W. Dixon and Steven J. Piet, Idaho National Laboratory; Industry Awards; A secure energy future for America, by George W. Bush, President, United States of America; Vision of the future of nuclear energy, by Anne Lauvergeon, AREVA; and, Plant profile: strategy for transition to digital, TXU Power.

  5. ISSUES IN NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Mattoon, C.M.; Oblozinsky,P.

    2010-04-30

    We review neutron cross section covariances in both the resonance and fast neutron regions with the goal to identify existing issues in evaluation methods and their impact on covariances. We also outline ideas for suitable covariance quality assurance procedures.We show that the topic of covariance data remains controversial, the evaluation methodologies are not fully established and covariances produced by different approaches have unacceptable spread. The main controversy is in very low uncertainties generated by rigorous evaluation methods and much larger uncertainties based on simple estimates from experimental data. Since the evaluators tend to trust the former, while the users tend to trust the latter, this controversy has considerable practical implications. Dedicated effort is needed to arrive at covariance evaluation methods that would resolve this issue and produce results accepted internationally both by evaluators and users.

  6. The Impact of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alexithymia on Judgments of Moral Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One’s own emotional response toward a hypothetical action can influence judgments of its moral acceptability. Some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit atypical emotional processing, and moral judgments. Research suggests, however, that emotional deficits in ASD are due to co-occurring alexithymia, meaning atypical moral judgments in ASD may be due to alexithymia also. Individuals with and without ASD (matched for alexithymia) judged the moral acceptability of emotion-evoking statements and identified the emotion evoked. Moral acceptability judgments were predicted by alexithymia. Crucially, however, this relationship held only for individuals without ASD. While ASD diagnostic status did not directly predict either judgment, those with ASD did not base their moral acceptability judgments on emotional information. Findings are consistent with evidence demonstrating that decision-making is less subject to emotional biases in those with ASD. PMID:26375827

  7. Failing Boys? Issues in Gender and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Debbie, Ed.; Elwood, Jannette, Ed.; Hey, Valerie, Ed.; Maw, Janet, Ed.

    Issues surrounding boys'"underachievement" have been at the center of public debate about education and the raising of standards in recent years. Media and political responses to the "problem of boys" have tended to be simplistic, partial, and owe more to quick fixes than investigation and research. This book provides a detailed, nuanced case…

  8. Legal Issues in Teacher Preparation and Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazard, William R.; And Others

    Legal issues in teacher preparation and certification are discussed from three perspectives of relevance to educators. First, the legal responsibilities of preservice and inservice teachers in relation to pupils and other participants in the school setting are scrutinized and the controversies surrounding collective negotiations, corporal…

  9. Racial Issues in Education: Real or Imagined?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutte, Gloria S.; McCoy, Barbara

    Multicultural growth in teachers is measured through their level of cultural self-awareness, their emotional response to difference, their mode of cultural interaction, and whether their teaching approach is ethnocentric or multicultural. Overt racial issues in education include racial differences in standardized testing, gifted and remedial…

  10. Diversity Issues in the Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihsen, Susanne; Gebauer, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    Teaching engineering studies students about diversity issues as part of the curriculum in engineering programs is an essential part of preparing the students for their professional life. By teaching them what this is and what it means for their (professional) lives sensitises them towards more responsibility. The idea is to connect diversity…

  11. the infinite Volume2Issue2

    E-print Network

    Herr, Hugh

    SOIL REMEDIATION PROJECT #12;on the Gulf Coast When Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans and coastalthe infinite Spring2007 Volume2Issue2 #12;MAKING IT HAPPEN FESTIVAL LIFT HOUSE PROJECT Katrina Re Mississippi on August 29, 2005, the MIT community response was immediate and produc- tive. The MIT fund

  12. Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: Issues, Methods, and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    This collection of 12 papers was presented at a 1987 conference at which speakers presented personal perspectives on institutional effectiveness. Papers are organized under three major headings: "Managing Quality: Methods and Outcomes,""Institutional Response," and "Special Issues." Titles include: (1) "Managing the Meaning of Institutional…

  13. Compliance Issues Facing Practices.

    PubMed

    Krouse, Alex T

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare fraud enforcement has increased exponentially over the past few years. Practice groups have seen increased enforcement specifically from the federal government. It has never been more important to ensure everyone in your organization understands the various compliance issues and the risks they present. This article highlights the top compliance issues to help your practice groups understand the risks related to healthcare fraud. Once everyone in your organization understands these issues, you can work toward developing effective compliance programs to limit the risks. PMID:26182708

  14. PREPRINT, ACCEPTED TO SPECIAL ISSUE IEEE TAC, TCAS-I 1 Bistable biological systems: a characterization

    E-print Network

    Chaves, Madalena

    . Two well known systems that exhibit bistability are analyzed in this framework: the lac operon lac operon in the bacteria Escherichia coli, a group of genes which are repressed in the presence@ist.uni-stuttgart.de. Bistable behavior has been experimentally detected at the single cell level (for example, the lac operon

  15. Acceptance of wearable technology by people with Alzheimer's disease: issues and accommodations.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Edward L; Mahoney, Diane F

    2010-09-01

    The increasing number of cognitively impaired older adults who exhibit wandering tendencies raises safety concerns. The purpose of the current study was to research the State-of the-Art in Wearable Technologies for persons with Alzheimer's Disease and identify challenges unique to this population and lessons learned. Inclusion criteria specified systems/devices that completed laboratory testing and were commercially available for usage by community-based Alzheimer's family caregivers. Methods included a series of Internet product searches and telephone interviews with related corporate representatives and participant's referrals. Results indicated many products in development or academic research use but only a limited number were available that met the study criteria. The interviews with key informants revealed features necessary to consider when making products to be worn by persons with cognitive impairment. In conclusion, there is no ideal solution and opportunities remain for marketplace innovations and for addressing the challenges associated with balancing safety and security. PMID:20702501

  16. Children with health issues.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Mark A; Chung, Paul J; Vestal, Katherine D

    2011-01-01

    All children, even the healthiest, have preventive and acute health care needs. Moreover, a growing number of children are chronically ill, with preventive, acute, and ongoing care needs that may be much more demanding than those for healthy children. Because children are unable to care for themselves, their parents are expected to provide a range of health care services without which the current health care system for children would not function. Under this "shadow health care system," parents or parent surrogates often need to be with the child, a requirement that can create difficulties for working parents, particularly for those whose children are chronically ill. How federal, state, and employer policies and practices mesh with the child health care needs of families is therefore a central issue in any discussion about work and family balance. In this article Mark Schuster, Paul Chung, and Katherine Vestal describe the health care needs of children; the essential health care responsibilities of parents; the perspective of employers; and the existing network of federal, state, and local family leave benefits that employed parents can access. They also identify current gaps in policies that leave unmet the needs of both parents and their employers. The authors suggest the outlines of a national family leave policy that would protect the interests of parents and employers. In essence, such a policy would build on the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, which gives some workers time off with no advance notice required and no loss of job or health insurance. But it would also include elements of California's Paid Family Leave Insurance, which expands coverage to more workers and provides partial pay during leave. Employers could be given some financial protections as well as protections against employee fraud and abuse. Such a policy, the authors conclude, would help to provide security to parents, minimize effects on employers, raise societal expectations for family-friendly work environments, and help maintain the parental shadow system of care on which health care professionals depend. PMID:22013630

  17. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ellefson, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

  18. Measuring Technology Acceptance Level of Turkish Pre-Service English Teachers by Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmizi, Özkan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate technology acceptance of prospective English teachers by using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in Turkish context. The study is based on Structural Equation Model (SEM). The participants of the study from English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe, Gazi and Baskent Universities. The participants…

  19. 2013 UCI Applicants/Acceptances to Medical School Institution Applied Accepted BCPM CUM VR PS BS

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Uniformed Service University of Health Sci. 50 2 University of Alabama School of Medicine 42 2 University2013 UCI Applicants/Acceptances to Medical School Institution Applied Accepted BCPM CUM VR PS BS Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 312 7 3.89 3.88 10.3 12.5 11.6 34.5 Saint Louis University School

  20. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  1. Development on inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The response of radioactive material transportation packages to mechanical accident loadings can be more accurately characterized by non-linear dynamic analysis than by the ``Equivalent dynamic`` static elastic analysis typically used in the design of these packages. This more accurate characterization of the response can lead to improved package safety and design efficiency. For non-linear dynamic analysis to become the preferred method of package design analysis, an acceptance criterion must be established that achieves an equivalent level of safety as the currently used criterion defined in NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6 (NRC 1978). Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting a study of possible acceptance criteria to meet this requirement. In this paper non-linear dynamic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress, strain, and strain-energy-density will be discussed. An example package design will be compared for each of the design criteria, including the approach of NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6.

  2. Medical Issues: Orthopedics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment than a “stander” with contractures. The Musculoskeletal Team As with all medical issues in SMA, decisions ... problems should be made with an interdisciplinary healthcare team, who can evaluate all aspects of the situation. ...

  3. Cogeneration Operational Issues 

    E-print Network

    Williams, M.

    1985-01-01

    important, however, are the operational Issues which impact the utility and the cogenerator. This paper addresses the utility perspective in regard to possible impact of cogeneration systems on utility service to other customer, safety and substation...

  4. Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    Pregnancy - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society ... Living Well with MS Family and Relationships Pregnancy Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues Tahirah Diagnosed in 2003 Share ...

  5. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  6. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  7. Benefits of a European Project on Diagnostics of Highly Pathogenic Agents and Assessment of Potential “Dual Use” Issues

    PubMed Central

    Grunow, Roland; Ippolito, G.; Jacob, D.; Sauer, U.; Rohleder, A.; Di Caro, A.; Iacovino, R.

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance exercises and networking on the detection of highly infectious pathogens (QUANDHIP) is a joint action initiative set up in 2011 that has successfully unified the primary objectives of the European Network on Highly Pathogenic Bacteria (ENHPB) and of P4-laboratories (ENP4-Lab) both of which aimed to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and response capabilities of laboratories directed at protecting the health of European citizens against high consequence bacteria and viruses of significant public health concern. Both networks have established a common collaborative consortium of 37 nationally and internationally recognized institutions with laboratory facilities from 22 European countries. The specific objectives and achievements include the initiation and establishment of a recognized and acceptable quality assurance scheme, including practical external quality assurance exercises, comprising living agents, that aims to improve laboratory performance, accuracy, and detection capabilities in support of patient management and public health responses; recognized training schemes for diagnostics and handling of highly pathogenic agents; international repositories comprising highly pathogenic bacteria and viruses for the development of standardized reference material; a standardized and transparent Biosafety and Biosecurity strategy protecting healthcare personnel and the community in dealing with high consequence pathogens; the design and organization of response capabilities dealing with cross-border events with highly infectious pathogens including the consideration of diagnostic capabilities of individual European laboratories. The project tackled several sensitive issues regarding Biosafety, Biosecurity and “dual use” concerns. The article will give an overview of the project outcomes and discuss the assessment of potential “dual use” issues. PMID:25426479

  8. Soft Determinism plus Awareness Equals Shared Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseve, Ronald J.

    1971-01-01

    This article seeks to present a viable resolution of one of the perennial ideological issues in counseling: determinism versus human freedom. The dilemma has bearing on the related professional issue of client and counselor responsibility. (Author)

  9. Usability and Acceptability Studies of Conversational Virtual Human Curry Guinn1

    E-print Network

    in response to user input. Users interact with the virtual characters via voice, mouse, menu, and/or keyboardUsability and Acceptability Studies of Conversational Virtual Human Technology Curry Guinn1 characters with whom the user interacts via natural language and who exhibit emotional, social, gestural

  10. Religious and Nonreligious Spirituality in Relation to Death Acceptance or Rejection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Meanings of religious and nonreligious spirituality are explored, with implications for death acceptance, death rejection, and life extension. In the first of two exploratory studies, 16 elders low on intrinsic religiosity were compared with 116 elders high in religiosity; they differed both in qualitative responses and on death attitudes. In the…

  11. submitted to Medical Physics accepted for publication on Sep 2, 2009

    E-print Network

    Jost, Jürgen

    submitted to Medical Physics accepted for publication on Sep 2, 2009 Liquid crystal display displays have been replaced almost exclusively with liquid crystal devices (LCDs) the assessment as advances in LCD technology lead to shorter response times. Keywords: liquid crystal display, temporal

  12. Social and Emotional Competencies: Contributions to Young African-American Children's Peer Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Maureen

    2001-01-01

    Explored the relation between measures of emotional competence, behavioral regulation, and general social competence and African American preschoolers' peer acceptance and popularity. Found that gender, emotional knowledge, emotion regulation, and themes of violence in response to hypothetical situations of interpersonal conflict were strongly…

  13. Current Zoology 58 (6): 791796, 2012 Received Feb. 4, 2012; accepted Feb. 21, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Blumstein, Daniel T.

    Current Zoology 58 (6): 791­796, 2012 Received Feb. 4, 2012; accepted Feb. 21, 2012. Corresponding author. E-mail: marmots@ucla.edu © 2012 Current Zoology Response of brown anoles Anolis sagrei selection can result in reduced anti-predator re- sponse following loss of predators [Current Zoology 58 (6

  14. 46 CFR 162.060-12 - Use and acceptance of existing test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-12 Use and acceptance of existing test data. (a) A manufacturer whose ballast water management... requirements under 46 CFR 159.010-3 and 159.010-5(a) at the time of such work. It is the responsibility of...

  15. Improving Communicative Competence with "Clickers": Acceptance/Attitudes among Nigerian Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the predictive power of teachers' perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU), behavioural intention (BI) to use personal response system (PRS) and computer experience (CE) on teachers' acceptance and attitude towards using PRS in improving communicative competence in the classroom where English is taught…

  16. The following is an editorial response to Alan Sokal's claim, in Lingua Franca, that his article, published in the current issue of Social Text, is a parody, and that he intended this hoax as a critique of science

    E-print Network

    Sokal, Alan

    of science studies. Sokal's articles and further commentary can be found at The Sokal Affair. Science Wars Sokal's article, and apologize to our readers, and to those in the science studies or cultural studiesThe following is an editorial response to Alan Sokal's claim, in Lingua Franca, that his article

  17. State-Sponsored, Tax-Advantaged College Savings Plans: A Study of Their Impact on Contemporary Understanding of the Public-Versus-Private Responsibility To Pay for Higher Education Issue. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Andrew Paul

    State-sponsored, tax-advantaged college savings programs (prepaid tuition plans, college savings trusts, and college savings bonds) have proliferated since 1994. This study, which examined 160 documents from 44 states, focuses on their effect on policy, and on the debate over public-versus-private responsibility to pay for higher education, as…

  18. Top 10 IT Issues, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2006 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  19. It Top-10 Issues 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Barbara I.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of IT issues to be presented each year, conducted a Web-based survey in December 2005 to identify the five of thirty-one IT issues in each of four areas: (1) issues that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to increase in significance; (3)…

  20. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance. 920.25 Section 920.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  1. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptance. 920.25 Section 920.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  2. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance. 920.25 Section 920.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  3. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptance. 920.25 Section 920.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  4. 7 CFR 920.25 - Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance. 920.25 Section 920.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  5. Workaholism, Health, and Self-Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Christine M.; Zhang, Naijian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between workaholism, perceived parental workaholism, self-acceptance, psychological well-being, and physical symptoms among 347 college students. Statistically significant relationships were found between college students' perceived parental workaholism and their own workaholism. Also, relationships between…

  6. AIR CLEANING FOR ACCEPTABLE INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses air cleaning for acceptable indoor air quality. ir cleaning has performed an important role in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems for many years. raditionally, general ventilation air-filtration equipment has been used to protect cooling coils ...

  7. 7 CFR 1788.50 - Acceptable sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptable sureties. 1788.50 Section 1788.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS...

  8. 7 CFR 1788.50 - Acceptable sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptable sureties. 1788.50 Section 1788.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS...

  9. 48 CFR 1311.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 1311.103 Section 1311.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 1311.103...

  10. 48 CFR 811.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 811.103 Section 811.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 811.103...

  11. 48 CFR 2811.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Market acceptance. 2811.103 Section 2811.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Competition and Acquisition Planning DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 2811.103 Market...

  12. 48 CFR 611.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 611.103 Section 611.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 611.103 Market...

  13. 48 CFR 1011.103 - Market Acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market Acceptance. 1011.103 Section 1011.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 1011.103...

  14. Pakistani English: Acceptability and the Norm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgardner, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Examined the language attitudes of Pakistani journalists, teachers, and university students between 1987 and 1992, finding that although the British model of English still has considerable influence in the former colony, a Pakistani norm is beginning to emerge and become more acceptable. (22 references) (MDM)

  15. CAREER PLANS Geographical Breakdown of Accepted Jobs

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    1 CAREER PLANS Geographical Breakdown of Accepted Jobs Mid-Atlantic (including Philadelphia): 73 employment indicated the source of their job offer. Current or prior employer, not related to field placement/internship employer where you completed field placement/internship 13% Faculty Contact 16% Contact from a family

  16. LRRR{300) Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Plan

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : :- . I LRRR{300) Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Plan MO. ATM-943 PAGIE 1 REV. HO. OF el) Astronaut Trainer. Prepared by: O").l. ~· ~~ H. W. Geiss #12;,- ' CREW ENGINEERING LR3 (300) Astronaut provides a means of recording the activities associated with the deployment of the LR3 (300) Astronaut

  17. 48 CFR 3011.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Market acceptance. 3011.103 Section 3011.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting...

  18. 48 CFR 3011.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Market acceptance. 3011.103 Section 3011.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and...

  19. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  20. PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF WASTEWATER SLUDGE ON LAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the acceptance of municipal wastewater sludge on land in the United States. Application to land has been an economical disposal method for cities and a means of increasing soil productivity. Use of land for sludge disposal is increasing. ...