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1

Acceptance Issues in Metrics Program Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software process improvement initiatives such as metrics programs have a high failure rate during their assimilation in a software organization. Social and individual issues are some of the factors affecting a program's acceptance, and lack of attention to them can have adverse consequences. Social psychology includes study of such acceptance issues in the adoption of technology in the workplace. Although

Medha Umarji; Henry Emurian

2005-01-01

2

Issues affecting the acceptance of hydrogen fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the topic of hydrogen as an alternative vehicle fuel is gaining increasing attention internationally, one significant aspect of its introduction has been given less attention than others: the public acceptance of such a new technology and fuel. After reviewing the existing literature on acceptance, risk perception and customer satisfaction, this paper describes the development of a model that illustrates

Inga Schulte; David Hart; Rita van der Vorst

2004-01-01

3

Teacher Acceptance of Behavioral Principles: An Issue of Values.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper explores three reasons for low use by teachers of behavior modification: (1) differences in assumptions concerning causality, (2) attributions of responsibility, and (3) problems in modifying the working knowledge of teachers. The implications of these issues are discussed in terms of how consultants might increase the impact of…

Rosenfield, Sylvia

1985-01-01

4

48 CFR 2446.502 - Responsibility for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...acceptance. 2446.502 Section 2446.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 2446.502 Responsibility for...

2012-10-01

5

Framing Responsibility for Political Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the influence of television news on viewers' attributions of responsibility for political issues. Televi sion's systematic reliance on episodic as opposed to thematic depic tions of political life elicits individualistic attributions of responsibil ity for national problems such as poverty and terrorism. These attributions emphasize the actions of private rather than governmen tal actors. By obscuring the

Shanto Iyengar

1996-01-01

6

Issues and problems in inferring a level of acceptable risk  

SciTech Connect

The present study addresses the formulation of risk acceptance criteria and the management of risk by goals. Risk-reduction goals are defined as the minimization of accident probabilities, minimization of maximum accident consequences, reduction of risk to levels as low as reasonably achievable, minimization of socially perceived risks, and the equitable sharing of benefits and risks. The explicit or implicit choice of risk-reduction goals themselves becomes a key to risk regulation. As a consequence, agencies that regulate risk, either directly or indirectly, should explicitly recognize and consider the impacts of the goals they adopt.

Salem, S.L.; Solomon, K.A.; Yesley, M.S.

1980-08-01

7

15 Addressing Public Acceptance Issues for Biotechnology: Experiences from Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Government of Japan has declared 22 genetically modified crops safe as food and feed. However, some Japanese consumer and environmental organizations have doubts about the safety of these crops and have protested their import and consumption as human food and livestock feed. Consumer anxiety about these issues is due partly to a lack of reliable information. The government, which

Yutaka Tabei

8

Regulatory evaluation and acceptance issues for phytotechnology projects.  

PubMed

The use of plant based systems in hazardous waste management or site clean up is growing at a rapid rate. Major hurdles to implementation will be encountered by proponents if essential regulatory policies and regulations are not understood or addressed early in the project development. Understanding the regulatory requirements or issues as they relate to innovative clean up approaches such as phytotechnologies are critical to the successful implementation and long-term monitoring of these technologies. This chapter will address the issues that regulators may have in applying phytotechnologies to site conditions or contaminants, designing phytoremediation projects, monitoring or maintaining the systems for the long-term, establishing performance criteria, and demonstrating achievement of performance goals. PMID:12674403

Flechas, Felix W; Latady, Marisa

2003-01-01

9

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting...

2009-10-01

10

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting...

2010-10-01

11

Accepting Credit Responsibility: Teacher Guide. Family Financial Education Program 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teacher's guide is for a high school unit on accepting credit responsibility, part of family financial education program which also includes a unit on managing personal income. The components of the unit, correlated with a planned instructional program in any area of economics, can be used to reinforce certain relationships and concepts which…

Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Co., Chicago.

12

College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

Fowler, Samantha R.

2009-01-01

13

College students' use of science content during socioscientific issues negotiation: Impact of evolution understanding and acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do college students evoke during SSI negotiation, (1b) what is the depth of the

Samantha R. Fowler

2009-01-01

14

College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

Fowler, Samantha R.

2009-01-01

15

User Acceptance of Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO) Services: Critical Issues Relating to Acceptance of CVO Services by Interstate Truck and Bus Drivers. Executive Summary. Task B Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Penn + Schoen Associates has been commissioned by the Federal Highway Administration to conduct a study entitled User Acceptance of Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO) Services. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate critical issues relatin...

1995-01-01

16

Conceptual Issues in Response-Time Modeling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two different traditions of response-time (RT) modeling are reviewed: the tradition of distinct models for RTs and responses, and the tradition of model integration in which RTs are incorporated in response models or the other way around. Several conceptual issues underlying both traditions are made explicit and analyzed for their consequences. We…

van der Linden, Wim J.

2009-01-01

17

Assessing Intervention Responsiveness: Conceptual and Technical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implementing an intervention responsive- ness approach to the identification of learning dis- abilities (LD) requires specification of procedures for the assessment process. In this article, the author uses examples in the literature to explore conceptual and technical issues associated with options for specifying three assessment components: the timing of the mea- surement of student response to intervention; the cri- terion

Lynn S. Fuchs

2003-01-01

18

Acceptability of intermittent handgrip contractions based on physiological response.  

PubMed

Our aim was to study physiological response and acceptability of intermittent muscle contractions. Seven male subjects performed eight isometric handgrip exercises with altered contraction-relaxation periods but identical tension-time products. Local blood flow (BF), heart rate, blood pressure, electromyography, maximal voluntary handgrip contraction (MVC), and venous concentration of potassium and lactate of both forearms were followed during and up to 24 hours after the exercises. Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of a forearm muscle was used to investigate low-frequency fatigue (LFF). Ratings of perceived exertion were recorded during exercise. LFF was associated with a decreased functional capacity, which may be explained by a net potassium loss. Recovery BF was linearly related to mean contraction intensity of the experiments. Physiological criteria for acceptability of isometric exercise are suggested, based on the absence of fatigue during exercise and the return to baseline values within four hours of the recovery period. Based on these physiological criteria, intermittent handgrip contractions at (or higher than) a mean contraction intensity of 17% MVC and continuous handgrip contractions at (or higher than) 10% MVC were considered unacceptable. PMID:8026838

Byström, S; Fransson-Hall, C

1994-03-01

19

College students' use of science content during socioscientific issues negotiation: Impact of evolution understanding and acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do college students evoke during SSI negotiation, (1b) what is the depth of the evolutionary science content reflected in college students. SSI negotiation, and (2) what is the nature of the interaction between evolution understanding and evolution acceptance as they relate to depth of use of evolution content during SSI negotiation? The Socioscientific Issues Questionnaire (SSI-Q) was developed using inductive data analysis to examine science content use and to develop a rubric for measuring depth of evolutionary science content use during SSI negotiation. Sixty upper level undergraduate biology and non-biology majors completed the SSI-Q and also the Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS: Anderson, Fisher, & Norman, 2002) to measure evolution understanding and the Measure of Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution (MATE: Rutledge & Warden, 1999) to measure evolution acceptance. A multiple regression analysis tested for interaction effects between the predictor variables, evolution understanding and evolution acceptance. Results indicate that college students primarily use science concepts related to evolution to negotiate biology-based SSI: variation in a population, inheritance of traits, differential success, and change through time. The hypothesis that the extent of one's acceptance of evolution is a mitigating factor in how evolution content is evoked during SSI negotiation was supported by the data. This was seen in that evolution was the predominant science content used by participants for each of the three SSI scenarios used in this study and used consistently throughout the three SSI scenarios. In addition to its potential to assess aspects of argumentation, a modification of the SSI-Q could be used for further study about students' misconceptions about evolution or scientific literacy, if it is defined as one's tendency to utilize science content during a decision-making process within an SSI context.

Fowler, Samantha R.

20

Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

1999-03-01

21

How Attributional Ambiguity Shapes Physiological and Emotional Responses to Social Rejection and Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined White and Black participants’ emotional, physiological, and behavioral responses to same-race or different-race evaluators, following rejecting social feedback or accepting social feedback. As expected, in ingroup interactions, the authors observed deleterious responses to social rejection and benign responses to social acceptance. Deleterious responses included cardiovascular (CV) reactivity consistent with threat states and poorer performance, whereas benign responses

Wendy Berry Mendes; Brenda Major; Shannon McCoy; Jim Blascovich

2008-01-01

22

Geologic Sequestration: An Integrated Framework for Assessing Technical, Economic, Public Acceptance, and Policy Issues  

SciTech Connect

Successful deployment of carbon capture and disposal technologies will require a thorough understanding of not only the technical risks and benefits, but also the social acceptability and policy implications of such technologies. There are a variety of approaches for evaluating the technical and economic performance of carbon capture and disposal technologies, such as geologic sequestration, but relatively few that also effectively incorporate the social and policy factors that will affect the deployment of these technologies. We present a framework that integrates knowledge about the technical performance of geological sequestration with economic considerations and public acceptability and policy formulation issues. The utility of an integrated framework is in developing a holistic understanding of the potential impacts and challenges associated with such projects, as well as in identifying opportunities for further investments. In addition, the framework supplies an intellectual construct that employs this knowledge so that stakeholders can understand the totality of this technology and make informed tradeoffs about the deployment of deep geologic carbon disposal in their community or region.

Mahasenan, N Maha; Cook, Elizabeth M.; Saripalli, Prasad

2003-09-01

23

Issues regarding the design and acceptance of intelligent support systems for reactor operators  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, factors relevant to the design and acceptance of intelligent support systems for the operation of nuclear power plants are enumerated and discussed. The central premise is that conventional expert systems which encode experiential knowledge in production rules are not a suitable vehicle for the creation of practical operator support systems. The principal difficulty is the need for real-time operation. This in turn means that intelligent support systems will have knowledge bases derived from temporally accurate plant models, inference engines that permit revisions in the search process so as to accommodate revised or new data, and man-machine interfaces that do not require any human input. Such systems will have to be heavily instrumented and the associated knowledge bases will require a hierarchical organization so as to emulate human approaches to analysis. Issues related to operator acceptance of intelligent support tools are then reviewed. Possible applications are described and the relative merits of the machine- and human-centered approaches to the implementation of intelligent support systems are enumerated. The paper concludes with a plea for additional experimental evaluations.

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

1992-10-01

24

Developing a placebo-controlled trial in surgery: Issues of design, acceptability and feasibility  

PubMed Central

Background Surgical placebos are controversial. This in-depth study explored the design, acceptability, and feasibility issues relevant to designing a surgical placebo-controlled trial for the evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic lavage for the management of people with osteoarthritis of the knee in the UK. Methods Two surgeon focus groups at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic surgeons and one regional surgeon focus group (41 surgeons); plenary discussion at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic anaesthetists (130 anaesthetists); three focus groups with anaesthetists (one national, two regional; 58 anaesthetists); two focus groups with members of the patient organisation Arthritis Care (7 participants); telephone interviews with people on consultant waiting lists from two UK regional centres (15 participants); interviews with Chairs of UK ethics committees (6 individuals); postal surveys of members of the British Association of Surgeons of the Knee (382 surgeons) and members of the British Society of Orthopaedic Anaesthetists (398 anaesthetists); two centre pilot (49 patients assessed). Results There was widespread acceptance that evaluation of arthroscopic lavage had to be conducted with a placebo control if scientific rigour was not to be compromised. The choice of placebo surgical procedure (three small incisions) proved easier than the method of anaesthesia (general anaesthesia). General anaesthesia, while an excellent mimic, was more intrusive and raised concerns among some stakeholders and caused extensive discussion with local decision-makers when seeking formal approval for the pilot. Patients were willing to participate in a pilot with a placebo arm; although some patients when allocated to surgery became apprehensive about the possibility of receiving placebo, and withdrew. Placebo surgery was undertaken successfully. Conclusions Our study illustrated the opposing and often strongly held opinions about surgical placebos, the ethical issues underpinning this controversy, and the challenges that exist even when ethics committee approval has been granted. It showed that a placebo-controlled trial could be conducted in principle, albeit with difficulty. It also highlighted that not only does a placebo-controlled trial in surgery have to be ethically and scientifically acceptable but that it also must be a feasible course of action. The place of placebo-controlled surgical trials more generally is likely to be limited and require specific circumstances to be met. Suggested criteria are presented. Trial registration number The trial was assigned ISRCTN02328576 through http://controlled-trials.com/ in June 2006. The first patient was randomised to the pilot in July 2007.

2011-01-01

25

Accepting "total and complete responsibility": new age neo-feminist violence against women.  

PubMed

Barry Konikov, a hypnotherapist, of Potentials Unlimited Inc., a Michigan-based company which produces approximately 160 Subliminal Persuasion/Self Hypnosis tapes, promises his listeners miracles. The tapes on premenstrual syndrome, abortion, and sexual abuse were analyzed. The self-hypnosis message by Konikov is dangerous for women, because his antifeminism, misogyny, and patriarchism are couched insidiously within New Age neofeminism. Under therapeutic guidance the woman listener can direct her own transformation to complete mental, physical, and spiritual well-being, and her new and improved self is so empowered as to accept total and complete responsibility to overcome the hurt about menstruation, abortion, or sexual abuse. Growth therapies such as Gestalt, guided fantasies, and bioenergetics undermine women with false promises of power. If women are so powerful, then it is their fault if they got raped, or battered, or if they have not received love, money, and inner peace. While seemingly empowering women to develop a strong sense of personal agency, Konikov ignores the patriarchal structures which intersect his women listeners' experience of menstrual discomfort, abortion, and sexual abuse. Konikov's New Age, neofeminist stance contains 4 stages of healing: responsibility, absolution, forgiveness, and resolution. Accepting responsibility for the wound next leads to absolution, and particularly absolution for men. As an example of absolution, Konikov's woman client-ex-plantation slave accepted her past-life relationship to her husband, absolved him of guild, and decided upon a divorce. The issue of absolution widens into forgiveness in the healing process, whereby Konikov wants women to hypnotize themselves therapy should be to help a woman see how her own power as an individual is inextricably bound to the collective power of women as a group. There is no doubt that the New Age neofeminist stance taken by Konikov on the tapes leaves women profoundly disempowered. PMID:12287095

Sethna, C

1992-02-01

26

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance.  

PubMed

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n=18), we used an ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids have a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well being in the social environment. PMID:23958960

Hsu, D T; Sanford, B J; Meyers, K K; Love, T M; Hazlett, K E; Wang, H; Ni, L; Walker, S J; Mickey, B J; Korycinski, S T; Koeppe, R A; Crocker, J K; Langenecker, S A; Zubieta, J-K

2013-08-20

27

10 CFR 2.603 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...review of site suitability issues in a construction permit proceeding. 2.603 Section...Connection With an Application for a Construction Permit or Combined License To Construct...Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.603 Acceptance...

2013-01-01

28

How is health a security issue? Politics, responses and issues.  

PubMed

In the closing decade of the 20th century the myriad challenges posed by infectious disease in a globalized environment began to be re-conceptualized as threats to national and human security. The most widely applied model for identifying and responding to such threats is securitization theory, as proposed by the Copenhagen School. Although its analytical framework is generally accepted, its utility remains contested; especially in non-European and non-state settings. The papers in this special edition have several aims: (1) to analyse ways by which Asian states and international organizations have identified health challenges as security threats, (2) to draw upon the securitization model as a way of understanding the full extent to which these states and international organizations have responded to the health threat, and (3) to identify areas where the theory might be strengthened so as to provide greater analytical clarity in areas of health security. This paper acts as a broad introduction to a set of papers on 'Unhealthy governance' and explores some of the key findings from the subsequent papers. PMID:20961945

Lo Yuk-ping, Catherine; Thomas, Nicholas

2010-11-01

29

Carbon Capture in Vehicles: A Review of General Support, Available Mechanisms, and Consumer Acceptance Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This survey of the feasibility of introducing carbon capture and storage (CCS) into light vehicles started by reviewing the level of international support for CCS in general. While there have been encouraging signs that CCS is gaining acceptance as a mean...

J. M. Sullivan M. Sivak

2012-01-01

30

A Technical Response to Online Marketing Research Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many marketing research agencies in Australia and New Zealand and their clients are now turning to online marketing research and as a consequence are facing a number of issues. While the Internet (Net) and its graphical interface the World Wide Web (Web) are well accepted in the United States of America, there is a slower uptake for commercial purposes in

Hossein S. Zadeh; Kenneth R Deans

31

Understanding issue complexity when building a socially responsible brand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To discuss the importance of understanding corporate social responsibility (CSR) by analysing the issues that comprise CSR. Without this understanding it will not be possible for organisations to develop responsible brands. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper draws on the existing business and marketing literature to define four aspects of issue complexity. It also draws on a range of real

Michael Jay Polonsky; Colin Jevons

2006-01-01

32

Consumer response to novel agri-food technologies: Implications for predicting consumer acceptance of emerging food technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of consumer acceptance of food technologies, and their applications, needs to be addressed early in technology development. However, whether extensive assessment of consumer acceptance is necessary for all food-related technologies a priori is uncertain. A review of studies of seven foodrelated technologies associated with different levels of public acceptance suggests that those characterised as being ‘bioactive’ raise particular

L. J. Frewer; K. Bergmann; M. Brennan; R. Lion; R. Meertens; G. Rowe; M. Siegrist; C. Vereijken

2011-01-01

33

Labour Issues and Corporate Social Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives, of diverse kinds, address the gap between current practice and what is seen as\\u000a more appropriate conduct by companies. The theory and practice of CSR is linked to how companies are defined, and the diverse\\u000a legal contexts in which they operate, which effectively determine the scope for market forces. The employment relationship\\u000a is at the heart

Richard Ennals

34

[The acceptance of personal responsibility as a criterion in assigning health care benefits. An empirical study].  

PubMed

In order to accomplish broad acceptance of priority setting in healthcare, a public debate seems essential, in particular, including the preferences of the general public. In Germany, objections to public involvement are to some extent based on the perception that individuals have an inherent personal bias and cannot represent interests other than their own. The following excerpt from a more comprehensive study reports on the acceptance of personal responsibility as a criterion for prioritizing. A mixed-methods design is used for combining a qualitative interview study and a quantitative survey representative of the German public. Both the interview study and the survey demonstrate that behavior that is harmful to one's health is generally accepted as a criterion for posteriorizing patients, mostly regardless of self interest. In addition, the interview study shows reasons for acceptance or refusal of the self-inflicted behavior criterion. PMID:20853086

Diederich, A; Schreier, M

2010-09-01

35

Focus Issue: External and Internal Regulators of Immune Responses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Innate Immunity (http://www.sciencemag.org/special/immunity), highlights the effects of viral and bacterial components on host cells, signaling pathways involved in regulating innate immune responses, and factors that modulate the functions of dendritic cells, which are required for effective adaptive immunity.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2010-01-19

36

Increasing the Frequency of Sharing, Encouraging and Accepting Responsibility through Explicit Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Based on the belief that explicit teaching of social skills to young students will better prepare them for future academic and social endeavors, this action research project evaluated the impact of a program for increasing the incidence of appropriate social skills, specifically: sharing, encouraging, and accepting responsibility among young…

Close, Jill; Kreitzer, Julie

37

Framing responsibility for political issues: The case of poverty  

Microsoft Academic Search

How people think about poverty is shown to be dependent on how the issue is framed. When news media presentations frame poverty as a general outcome, responsibility for poverty is assigned to society-at-large; when news presentations frame poverty as a particular instance of a poor person, responsibility is assigned to the individual. Similar framing effects are documented in the 1986

Shanto Iyengar

1990-01-01

38

Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

1993-10-01

39

Sucrose acceptance, discrimination and proboscis responses of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the field and the laboratory.  

PubMed

Laboratory studies in honey bees have shown positive correlations between sucrose responsiveness, division of labour and learning. We tested the relationships between sucrose acceptance and discrimination in the field and responsiveness in the laboratory. Based on acceptance in the field three groups of bees were differentiated: (1) bees that accept sucrose concentrations >10%, (2) bees that accept some but not all of the sucrose concentrations <10% and water, and (3) bees that accept water and all offered sucrose concentrations. Sucrose acceptance can be described in a model in which sucrose- and water-dependent responses interact additively. Responsiveness to sucrose was tested in the same bees in the laboratory by measuring the proboscis extension response (PER). The experiments demonstrated that PER responsiveness is lower than acceptance in the field and that it is not possible to infer from the PER measurements in the laboratory those concentrations the respective bees accepted in the field. Discrimination between sucrose concentrations was tested in three groups of free-flying bees collecting low, intermediate or high concentrations of sucrose. The experiments demonstrated that bees can discriminate between concentrations differences down to 0.2 relative log units. There exist only partial correlations between discrimination, acceptance and PER responsiveness. PMID:19148650

Mujagic, Samir; Erber, Joachim

2009-01-16

40

The acceptability of climate change in agricultural communities: comparing responses across variability and change.  

PubMed

This study examined how the terms used to describe climate change influence landholder acceptability judgements and attitudes toward climate change at the local scale. Telephone surveys were conducted with landholders from viticultural (n = 97) or cereal growing (n = 195) backgrounds in rural South Australia. A variety of descriptive and inferential statistics were used to examine the influence of human-induced climate change and winter/spring drying trend terms on adaptation responses and uncertainties surrounding climate change science. We found that the terms used to describe climate change leads to significant differences in adaptation response and levels of scepticism surrounding climate change in rural populations. For example, those respondents who accepted human induced climate change as a reality were significantly more likely to invest in technologies to sow crops earlier or increase the amount of water stored or harvested on their properties than respondents who accepted the winter/spring drying trend as a reality. The results have implications for the targeting of climate change science messages to both rural landholders and communities of practice involved in climate change adaptation planning and implementation. PMID:23246767

Raymond, Christopher M; Spoehr, John

2012-12-12

41

10 CFR 2.621 - Acceptance and docketing of application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined license proceeding. 2...Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for...application for early review of site suitability issues in a combined license...

2013-01-01

42

32 CFR 724.805 - Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant. 724.805 Section...805 Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant. (a) General guidance. (1) If any issue submitted by an applicant contains...

2013-07-01

43

On Being Responsible: Ethical Issues in Appeals to Personal Responsibility in Health Campaigns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Appeals to personal responsibility are highly prevalent in health communication campaigns, but their use entails both moral and strategic considerations. This article provides an overview of the notion of personal responsibility as a persuasive appeal in public health communication campaigns and an analysis of concomitant ethical implications. Whereas the issue of responsibility often is acknowledged by practi- tioners and scholars

Nurit Guttman; William Harris Ressler

2001-01-01

44

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). (a...a Statement of Financial Accounting Standards by the FASB, and...

2012-10-01

45

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200...principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). (a...a Statement of Financial Accounting Standards by the FASB, and...

2011-10-01

46

Novel sodium hypochlorite cleanser shows clinical response and excellent acceptability in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.  

PubMed

The intermittent use of dilute sodium hypochlorite "bleach baths" has shown efficacy as adjunctive therapy for atopic dermatitis (AD). This feasibility study evaluated the clinical response and patient acceptability of treatment with a cleansing body wash containing sodium hypochlorite in children with AD. This was a 12-week open-label feasibility study of 18 children with AD conducted in a pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic between May 2011 and July 2012. Children with moderate to severe AD, defined as an Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) score of at least 3 on a 5-point scale, who were age 6 months and older and had lesional cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus at baseline were included. Patients were instructed to wash 3 days/week for 12 weeks with the sodium hypochlorite-containing cleansing body wash. During the study period, patient's individualized topical and systemic treatment regimens were continued. Clinical response to treatment was measured using an IGA score and the percentage of body surface area (BSA) affected. Parents were also administered a retrospective questionnaire evaluating acceptability of the product. There was a statistically significant reduction in IGA score at all time points, with an overall mean reduction from baseline to final measurement using the last observation carried forward in all patients of 1.0 (p = 0.001, n = 18). Similarly the mean reduction of BSA affected was 14.8% (p = 0.005, n = 18). Parents reported that the body wash was significantly easier to use than traditional bleach baths (p < 0.001). The significant reductions in clinical disease severity scores with use of this formulation are encouraging. PMID:23617366

Ryan, Caitriona; Shaw, Richard E; Cockerell, Clay J; Hand, Shari; Ghali, Fred E

47

Suggested Management Responses to Ethical Issues Raised by Technological Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of technology raises an array of ethical issues related to work. Many of these ethical issues are old issues surfacing under new guises. Technology has not changed the issues, but technology makes the issues' analysis and application more complex. This paper identifies several new ethical issues raised by technological change: computer crime, an over-reliance on computer controlled systems,

William P. Cordeiro

1997-01-01

48

Focus Issue: Keeping the Immune Response in Check  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When exploring control of a biological system such as the inflammatory response, we often think first of mechanisms that promote activation of the system. But just as important are the signals that that modulate and terminate these processes. Unchecked recruitment and infiltration of leukocytes into tissues and the unrestrained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can lead to tissue damage and even cancer. This issue of Science’s STKE highlights studies that enhance our understanding of how pro-inflammatory signals are switched on, and--equally important--how they are switched off.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV)

2007-05-01

49

When Is It Acceptable to Make Prescriptive Statements in Educational Research Articles? Commentary on the Special Issue Papers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The commentary considers when it is acceptable to make prescriptive statements in educational research articles. It begins with a consensus view, agreeing with the analysis offered by Marley and Levin (Educational Psychology Review, 2011), that experimental evidence is necessary. Other forms of evidence are considered (e.g., observational,…

Yussen, Steven R.

2011-01-01

50

On being responsible: ethical issues in appeals to personal responsibility in health campaigns.  

PubMed

Appeals to personal responsibility are highly prevalent in health communication campaigns, but their use entails both moral and strategic considerations. This article provides an overview of the notion of personal responsibility as a persuasive appeal in public health communication campaigns and an analysis of concomitant ethical implications. Whereas the issue of responsibility often is acknowledged by practitioners and scholars as a perennial challenge in health interventions, conceptual tools for the identification of its subtle manifestations are not readily available. This article outlines a framework that contextualizes potentially paradoxical consequences of campaign appeals to personal responsibility that can be explained by the medieval allegory of the "Tragedy of the Commons," psychological attribution theory, and public health concerns regarding "blaming the victim." Practice-oriented questions are introduced to help identify ethical issues in personal responsibility appeals that can be utilized in the design and implementation of health campaigns. PMID:11405077

Guttman, N; Ressler, W H

51

Individual astringency responsiveness affects the acceptance of phenol-rich foods.  

PubMed

Sensory responses greatly vary between individuals, and individual sensory experiences influence eating behaviour. Three groups responding differently to phenolic astringent stimuli (Low Responding, LR, n=20, Medium Responding, MR, n=37 and High Responding, HR, n=20) were identified from a population of 77 subjects, based on the maintenance vs fluctuation of salivary characteristics after repeated stimulation of the masticatory and taste/somatosensory systems. The effect of LR, MR and HR status on perceived astringency and liking for phenol-containing apple, grape and carrot juices spiked with increasing tannic acid (TA) concentrations was examined. TA induced a greater increase of perceived astringency in HR, compared to MR and LR subjects. A decrease in liking for spiked juices was found in HR and to a lesser extent in MR and LR subjects. No significant differences were found comparing MR and LR groups for both astringency intensity and liking data. Liking for and familiarity with 37 food items, as well as preference for 14 phenol-rich foods and beverages, each paired with a less astringent counter-product, were also examined. An internal preference map was computed on liking scores and product subgroups were identified. An effect of LR/HR status was found for two food subgroups consisting of coffee without sugar, tea without sugar, raw chicory and milk chocolate, tea with sugar, coffee with sugar. LR subjects rated the products with the most astringency higher and those with the least astringency lower than did HR subjects. LR subjects also rated their familiarity with highly astringent products higher than did HR subjects. Thus, individual differences related to the physiological salivatory response to oral stimulations affect responses to astringent stimuli and can influence the overall acceptability of phenol-rich food items. PMID:21354451

Dinnella, Caterina; Recchia, Annamaria; Tuorila, Hely; Monteleone, Erminio

2011-02-25

52

The year 2000 issue: International action and national responsibilities  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will examine international aspects of the Year 2000 (Y2K) issue, in terms of how various countries are managing the problem and how international organizations are involved in that process. The paper notes that while international cooperation is essential in dealing with part of the problem, it is at the national level that preventive measures are undertaken and emergency services provided. Most NATO and OECD states have recognized that by now it will not be possible to find and fix all problems in software and embedded chips. Their focus, therefore, is shifting to the planning of contingency measures, that is, what to do when disruptions occur so that the physical safety of persons is protected, damage to physical assets is minimized (e.g., extensive networks of energy supplies and telecommunications), and resources for the common good are protected (e.g., water supplies). Not only is this conference timely, but the experience of various sectors can be shared to enable cross-sector comparisons to be made, for example, there might be lessons from within air transportation that might be applicable to the energy industry. In addition, while most countries have tended to focus on their national situation, this conference brings together persons from more than 25 countries, thus enabling further comparisons to be made on how other countries are pursing contingency plans. It is within this cross-sector and multinational context that international action and national responsibilities of aspects of the Y2K issue will be discussed. This presentation is in four sections. The first examines what is at risk and categorizes the kinds of disruptions likely to occur. The second presents an approach from which to understand how different countries are trying to manage the Year 2000 issue. This approach is based on a three-step process adopted by the US and other OECD countries, the most dependent on computer and electronic processing systems and large information networks. The steps are: (1) awareness and perception of the problem; (2) technical preventive measures; and (3) contingency action and consequence management. The same steps are used to examine the Y2K efforts of non-OECD countries. This presentation does not advocate a right or wrong way to deal with the issue, but uses the approach as a framework in which to understand what factors might be significant with regard to managing Year 2000 disruptions, especially at the international level. The third part of the presentation will examine the efforts of some of the relevant international governmental organizations and their activities regarding the Year 2000 issue. These organizations include the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). Understanding how these international organizations function illustrates not only their role but also their limits in dealing with Y2K issues. Member states of these organizations are ultimately responsible for dealing with the Y2K issues at the national level. This includes cooperation among national and regional or local governmental authorities and emergency services, which at the end of the day--and on the day and the day after--will be responsible for dealing with Y2K disruptions. The fourth section will explore other measures, both non-governmental and governmental, urging states to pay more attention and which might include new processes to manage disruptions. For example, some industries lobby their foreign ministries to urge other states to undertake Y2K remediation. New international collaboration regarding the safety of nuclear weapons and associated early warning systems is being established which in future may yield to positive developments in political relations. This type of example is applicable to other sectors and illustrates some of the positive outcomes or lessons learned from the Y2K issue. On an assumption that there are these positive aspects, the term ''Y2K issue'' rather than ''Y2K problem'' is o

Bosch, O

1999-07-21

53

When is It Acceptable to Make Prescriptive Statements in Educational Research Articles? Commentary on the Special Issue Papers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The commentary considers when it is acceptable to make prescriptive statements in educational research articles. It begins\\u000a with a consensus view, agreeing with the analysis offered by Marley and Levin (Educational Psychology Review, 2011), that\\u000a experimental evidence is necessary. Other forms of evidence are considered (e.g., observational, case-based, qualitative);\\u000a these are described as correlational in nature and considered to be

Steven R. Yussen

2011-01-01

54

Identification of response and timing issues at permanent European broadband stations from automated data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To tackle the ever increasing amount of available broadband seismic data from European network providers for routine analysis, manual data processing and retrieval of certain observables (e.g. dispersive traveltimes, polarisation parameters) needs to be replaced by automated processing tools. We developed an automated routine to measure inter-station phase velocity curves of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves by pairwise cross-correlating seismograms from all available permanent stations in Central and Northern Europe. Making use of path-specific reference models based on CRUST2.0, only three parameters that control the acceptable bandwidth of a given observation are required for our automated routine to identify and pick acceptable dispersion curves. As the measurements are based on the phase difference of the waveforms at two stations, the measurements are 2? ambiguous and we select the solution that is in general closest to our reference curve. While applying this routine to the entire dataset, we observe at some stations systematic deviations from the expected measurement which may not be related to wave propagation effects. These include timing and response information issues, of the latter most prominently polarity switches. As we compare wavefields that propagate in both directions between two stations, both these effects lead to distinct deviative patterns in the measurements. A polarity problem at one station, for example, leads to dispersion measurements that are offset from the reference curve with a ? offset instead of the expected 2?. Timing issues on the other hand lead to symmetric deviations (for the two propagation directions) that are in general smaller than ?. Statistical analysis of our measurements against the expected dispersion curves from our reference models allows us to construct a map of anomalous stations in Europe. Furthermore, we have also indications that some instruments may not only have phase but also amplitude issues.

Weidle, Christian; Soomro, Riaz Ahmed; Cristiano, Luigia; Meier, Thomas

2013-04-01

55

32 CFR 865.111 - Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant. 865.111 Section 865... § 865.111 Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant. (a) If an issue submitted by an applicant contains two or...

2013-07-01

56

Acceptability of the female condom in Zimbabwe: Positive but male-centred responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acceptability study of the female condom was carried out in Zimbabwe among sex workers (89), urban women attending a family planning clinic in Harare (84), and rural women (23). Their main reason for trying this new method was as protection from sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Over 50 per cent of the women in all three groups said that

Sunanda Ray; Mary Bassett; Caroline Maposhere; Portia Manangazira; Roderick Machekano; Josephine Moyo

1995-01-01

57

Interconnecting DC-Energy Systems: Responses to Technical Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Photovoltaic systems and other dc-power systems will play a role in the future by providing power in many utility systems. Realization of projected economic benefits, however, depends on resolution of technical interconnection issues such as protection, p...

D. Curtice J. B. Patton

1983-01-01

58

State subsidies induce gray jays to accept greater danger: an ecologically rational response?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of strictly rational choice assume that decision-makers evaluate options on relevant dimensions, assign fixed values\\u000a to options, and then make consistent choices based on these values. If so, recent experience would have no impact on preference.\\u000a But, recent events change an animal’s state, and preference may change accordingly. We explore how state affects willingness\\u000a to accept greater danger to

Thomas A. Waite; Andrew L. Nevai; Kevin M. Passino

2007-01-01

59

preference, acceptability, glycemic index, and insulin response to butter beans1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dried beans, because oftheir high-fiber content and low-glycemic index,areespecially suitable for diabetic diets. Most South African bean recipes contain sucrose, and since a restriction of artificial sweeteners seems desirable, replacing sucrose would be impractical. Hence, we examined the effects of 10, 20, and 30% sucrose additions to cooked dried butter beans on taste preference and acceptability in 29 diabetic patients

Hester H Vorster; Elize van Tonder; Johan P Kotz; Alexander RP Walker

60

Public relations and corporate social responsibility: Some issues arising  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper questions current assumptions about the benefits of corporate social responsibility and the claims that corporations make on behalf of their corporate social responsibility programmes. In particular, the paper suggests that the use of corporate social responsibility for public relations ends raises moral problems over the motivation of corporations. The paper cautions that the justifications which corporations employ may

Jacquie L'Etang

1994-01-01

61

Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system have received more attention at the federal level in the past 2 years than in the past three decades combined. The importance of the mental health issue is also being recognized at the state level. A number of factors have contributed to this change. They include: growing recognition…

Cocozza, Joseph J.; Skowyra, Kathleen R.

2000-01-01

62

Cold Wars and Hot Issues (management of responsibilities)  

Microsoft Academic Search

HRM research rarely focusses on ethical issues and on moral legacies embedded in employees' cultural software. Ignoring the latter can result in a failure to assess important criteria of strategic HRM policies, which should not stop at the factory door nor at the state borders. Recent HRM problems experienced in the post-communist countries are cases in point. Hidden injuries of

Slawomir Magala

2001-01-01

63

COLD WARS AND HOT ISSUES (MANAGEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

HRM research rarely focusses on ethical issues and on moral legacies embedded in employees' cultural software. Ignoring the latter can result in a failure to assess important criteria of strategic HRM policies, which should not stop at the factory door nor at the state borders. Recent HRM problems experienced in the post-communist countries are cases in point. Hidden injuries of

S. J. Magala

2001-01-01

64

LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2  

SciTech Connect

This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

Schwartz, W W

2009-11-19

65

Dying for `Enduring Freedom': Accepting Responsibility for Civilian Casualties in the War against Terrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines what moral theories are available to justify the harming of the innocent in war. Focusing on US conduct of the war against the Taliban and al-Qaeda, the article examines how far the US is responsible for the deaths of Afghan civilians. Although US actions have been justified in terms of respect for the Just War principle of

Nicholas J. Wheeler

2002-01-01

66

Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

2009-01-01

67

Individual astringency responsiveness affects the acceptance of phenol-rich foods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sensory responses greatly vary between individuals, and individual sensory experiences influence eating behaviour. Three groups responding differently to phenolic astringent stimuli (Low Responding, LR, n=20, Medium Responding, MR, n=37 and High Responding, HR, n=20) were identified from a population of 77 subjects, based on the maintenance vs fluctuation of salivary characteristics after repeated stimulation of the masticatory and taste\\/somatosensory systems.

Caterina Dinnella; Annamaria Recchia; Hely Tuorila; Erminio Monteleone

2011-01-01

68

Rotationally acceptable ocean tide models for determining the response of the oceans to atmospheric pressure fluctuations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suitably generalized, ocean tide models can be used to determine the oceans' response to atmospheric pressure forcing; but the huge range of spatial and temporal scales of that forcing limits the relevance of state-of-the-art tide modeling techniques, like data assimilation, for such determinations. With an interest in its effects on Earth's rotation, in 1998 I employed a generalized but non-assimilating

S. R. Dickman

2010-01-01

69

Alternative responses to child protective services: emerging issues and concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem: Increased calls to “do something” about child protective services (CPS) have resulted in proposals or new “paradigms” for services to at-risk or abusive families. These new paradigms call for the reform or revamping of CPS through the development of a community-based alternative response to some reports of child abuse and\\/or neglect.Method: This article reports on outcomes for 1,263 “low”

Diana J English; Tom Wingard; David Marshall; Matt Orme; Anna Orme

2000-01-01

70

Are current hydrophone low frequency response standards acceptable for measuring mechanical/cavitation indices?  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to determine the error introduced by ultrasonic hydrophones used to measure current or proposed Mechanical (MI) and Cavitation (CI) Indices, assuming that the hydrophones meet bandwidth specifications contained in US and IEC measurement standards. These indices are based on the peak rarefactional pressure, pr. Since the portion of the pressure waveform where pr occurs is dominated by low frequency components, attention was placed on the low frequency hydrophone response specifications. Both simulated and actual diagnostic pressure pulses (with center frequency fc) were subjected to single-pole high-pass filtering for a range of -3 dB cut-off frequencies (fa). The error in the indices introduced by this filtration was evaluated. At both fa = 0.5fc (the US requirement) and fa = 0.86fc (calculated from the IEC -6dB bandwidth specification at 0.5fc), results showed that errors exceeding -30% could be expected. Furthermore, to reduce errors to less than 5%, the low frequency hydrophone response should extend at least an order of magnitude below the center frequency of the pressure wave. For example, for a 3.5 MHz transducer, the hydrophone should have a lower cut-off frequency of less than 350 kHz, which at present constitutes a challenge because of the lack of commercial hydrophones calibrated below 1 MHz. PMID:8844965

Harris, G R

1996-08-01

71

46 CFR 385.34 - Responsibility for issuing solicitations for proposals or applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...34 Section 385.34 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT GRANT AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS REGULATIONS General Policies § 385.34 Responsibility for issuing...

2012-10-01

72

Hazardous waste insurance - The issue of financial responsibility  

SciTech Connect

The insurance industry is undoubtedly perceived by those outside it as monumentally conservative. Yet the industry fights hard to overcome its frequently undeserved reputation of limited imagination and failure to develop new insurance products for either the corporate or personal consumer. As new technologies bring social and economic changes in life styles, there is an ever challenging attempt by the insurance industry to keep pace with the increased amount of legislation containing financial responsibility regulations. Further, the liberal interpretations of laws and contracts by current courts contribute to additional uncertainty within the insurance underwriting community. Is the insurance industry to be criticized or applauded for its risk-taking in the 1980s. That question may not have an answer until the year 2000 and beyond. This paper examines one area in which the insurance industry has responded to a changing society in its need to share the financial burden for environmental pollution.

Tobin, M.L.

1983-03-01

73

Acceptance and utilisation of the Incident Command System in first response and allied disciplines: an Ohio study.  

PubMed

In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, an effort was made to establish a common and uniform command structure for use by the nation's first responder organisations, as well as those disciplines generally expected to assist first responders during a major incident or disaster. The result was the issuance of the National Incident Management System1 or NIMS by the US Department of Homeland Security in 2004. Included in the NIMS document was an embracing of the Incident Command System or ICS, long utilised in the fire service for the effective management of emergency response. The NIMS doctrine also identified certain allied disciplines that needed to adopt this new system for responding to major events. Some of these disciplines included specialised first response units, such as, bomb squads and hazardous materials teams. Other partner disciplines not usually associated with emergency response to include public health and public works were also included. This study will attempt to look at a single component of NIMS, specifically the Incident Command System, and measure its acceptance and utilisation by first responder organisations and selected allied disciplines in the state of Ohio. This is particularly important at this time since the US government is being forced to reduce budgets significantly and determine which laudable policies and programmes will be cut. PMID:22130340

Decker, Russell J

2011-10-01

74

42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal...AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.285 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept...

2011-10-01

75

First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012  

PubMed Central

Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be integrated as an additional tool into the response.

Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

2013-01-01

76

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10

77

Effects of prebiotic inulin-type fructans on structure, quality, sensory acceptance and glycemic response of gluten-free breads.  

PubMed

The effect of adding increasing levels of prebiotic inulin-type fructans (ITFs) (0, 4, 8, 10 and 12%) on the sensory and nutritional quality of gluten-free bread (GFB) was assessed. ITFs can provide structure and gas retention during baking, thus improving GFB quality by yielding better specific volume, softer crumb, improved crust and crumb browning with enhanced sensory acceptance. During baking, approximately one-third of the ITFs was lost. The addition of 12% ITFs to the basic formulation is required in order to obtain GFB enriched with 8% ITFs (4 g of fructans per 50 g bread serving size), levels that can provide health benefits. 12% ITFs-addition level decreased GFB glycemic index (from 71 to 48) and glycemic load (from 12 to 8). Prebiotic ITFs are a promising improver for GFB that can provide nutritional (11% dietary fiber content, low glycemic response) and functional benefits to patients with celiac disease, since ITFs are prebiotic ingredients that can also increase calcium absorption. PMID:23032642

Capriles, Vanessa D; Arêas, José A G

2012-10-03

78

Young Children's Affective Responses to Acceptance and Rejection From Peers: A Computer-based Task Sensitive to Variation in Temperamental Shyness and Gender  

PubMed Central

This study presents a novel task examining young children’s affective responses to evaluative feedback—specifically, social acceptance and rejection—from peers. We aimed to determine (1) whether young children report their affective responses to hypothetical peer evaluation predictably and consistently, and (2) whether young children’s responses to peer evaluation vary as a function of temperamental shyness and gender. Four- to seven-year-old children (N = 48) sorted pictures of unknown, similar-aged children into those with whom they wished or did not wish to play. Computerized peer evaluation later noted whether the pictured children were interested in a future playdate with participants. Participants then rated their affective responses to each acceptance or rejection event. Children were happy when accepted by children with whom they wanted to play, and disappointed when these children rejected them. Highly shy boys showed a wider range of responses to acceptance and rejection based on initial social interest, and may be particularly sensitive to both positive and negative evaluation. Overall, the playdate task captures individual differences in affective responses to evaluative peer feedback and is potentially amenable to future applications in research with young children, including pairings with psychophysiological measures.

Howarth, Grace Z.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Perez-Edgar, Koraly

2013-01-01

79

Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues  

SciTech Connect

Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

Herzenberg, C.L.

1998-09-01

80

Some Issues in Item Response Theory: Dimensionality Assessment and Models for Guessing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Currently, standardized tests are widely used as a method to measure how well schools and students meet academic standards. As a result, measurement issues have become an increasingly popular topic of study. Unidimensional item response models are used to model latent abilities and specific item characteristics. This class of models makes…

Smith, Jessalyn

2009-01-01

81

Issues in Student Suicide and Sudden Death Postvention: Best Practices in School Crisis Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent statistics indicate that a high school of 2000 students will experience an average of one student suicide every four years. This paper reviews and synthesizes relevant information on issues in school response to student suicide and sudden death. Highlighted are risk factors that school personnel can identify in suicide-prone students,…

Gilliam, Walter S.

82

Diverging responsibilities: reflections on emerging issues of responsibility in the advertising business  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose os this article is to identify ecomical and cultural dimensions of responsible business conduct in the advertising industry. The article is based on an interview study with 15 leading experts in advertising agencies in Finland. A focus in these interviews was on how the phenomenon of responsible business is understood and reflected in the advertising industry.

Nando Malmelin

2010-01-01

83

USP Responses to Comments on Stimuli Article, ''Proposed Change to Acceptance Criteria for Dissolution Performance Verification Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

* Todd L. Cecil, William Brown, Darrell R. Abernethy, William F. Koch, Roger L. Williams, USP ABSTRACT Pharmacopeial Forum 33(3) (May-June 2007) included a Stimuli article titled ''Proposed Change to Acceptance Criteria for Dissolution Performance Verification Testing.'' This Stimuli article proposed changing the form of the acceptance criteria for the Performance Verification Test (PVT) associated with USP Dissolution h711i to

Walter W. Hauck; Todd L. Cecil; William Brown; Darrell R. Abernethy; William F. Koch; Roger L. Williams

84

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents' response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions, and identify some of the issues influencing residents' perspectives and behaviour. All rural and most urban residents have an accurate knowledge of Katla, the proposed warning system and emergency response plan. Urban residents perceived the emergency response plan to be appropriate. In comparison, rural residents did not perceive the emergency response plan as appropriate. Rural residents stated that they would personally assess the situation before deciding on a course of action independent of the proposed plan. Livelihood connections and inherited knowledge affect rural residents' ability and willingness to comply with the recommended procedures. Factors such as hazard knowledge, sense of community and attachment to place indicate that rural residents are more resilient to volcanic hazards. Based on our findings we recommend that emergency management agencies consider issues such as personal responsibility, neighbourliness and community involvement and cooperation, to develop and implement more appropriate volcanic risk mitigation strategies. In light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, we provide a brief discussion on the 2010 emergency response. Although our findings are Iceland-specific, our recommendations may be applied internationally to other volcanic and disaster-prone regions.

Bird, Deanne K.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Dominey-Howes, Dale

2011-11-01

85

On Semiotics and Subjectivity: A Response to Tony Brown's "Signifying 'Students', 'Teachers', and 'Mathematics' -- A Reading of a Special Issue"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this response we address some of the significant issues that Tony Brown raised in his analysis and critique of the Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "Semiotic perspectives in mathematics education" (Saenz-Ludlow & Presmeg, Educational Studies in Mathematics 61(1-2), 2006). Among these issues are conceptualizations of…

Presmeg, Norma; Radford, Luis

2008-01-01

86

On Semiotics and Subjectivity: A Response to Tony Brown's "Signifying 'Students', 'Teachers', and 'Mathematics' -- A Reading of a Special Issue"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this response we address some of the significant issues that Tony Brown raised in his analysis and critique of the Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "Semiotic perspectives in mathematics education" (Saenz-Ludlow & Presmeg, Educational Studies in Mathematics 61(1-2), 2006). Among these issues are conceptualizations of…

Presmeg, Norma; Radford, Luis

2008-01-01

87

The social welfare function and individual responsibility: some theoretical issues and empirical evidence.  

PubMed

The literature on income distribution has attempted to evaluate different degrees of inequality using a social welfare function (SWF) approach. However, it has largely ignored the source of such inequalities, and has thus failed to consider different degrees of inequity. The literature on egalitarianism has addressed issues of equity, largely in relation to individual responsibility. This paper builds upon these two literatures, and introduces individual responsibility into the SWF. Results from a small-scale study of people's preferences in relation to the distribution of health benefits are presented to illustrate how the parameter values of a SWF might be determined. PMID:19062115

Dolan, Paul; Tsuchiya, Aki

2008-11-01

88

The role of the technology acceptance model in explaining effects of image interactivity technology on consumer responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The impact of web site interactivity on e-commerce has been emphasized in industry and empirical literature. The purpose of this paper is to focus on image interactivity technology (IIT) of a web site and apply the technology acceptance model (TAM) to examine factors influencing consumers' attitude toward an online retailer. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected from 206 respondents

Hyun-Hwa Lee; Ann Marie Fiore; Jihyun Kim

2006-01-01

89

Positive Emotional Responses to Hybridised Writing about a Socio-Scientific Issue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to understand better the role of affect in learning about socio-scientific issues (SSI), this study investigated Year 12 students' emotional arousal as they participated in an online writing-to-learn science project about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. Students wrote a series of hybridised scientific narratives, or BioStories, that integrate scientific information about biosecurity with narrative storylines, and uploaded these to a dedicated website. Throughout their participation in the project, students recorded their emotional responses to the various activities ( N = 50). Four case students were also video recorded during selected science lessons as they researched, composed and uploaded their BioStories for peer review. Analysis of these data, as well as interview data obtained from the case students, revealed that pride, strength, determination, interest and alertness were among the positive emotions most strongly elicited by the project. These emotions reflected students' interest in learning about a new socio-scientific issue, and their enhanced feelings of self-efficacy in successfully writing hybridised scientific narratives in science. The results of this study suggest that the elicitation of positive emotional responses as students engage in hybridised writing about SSI with strong links to environmental education, such as biosecurity, can be valuable in engaging students in education for sustainability.

Tomas, Louisa; Ritchie, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

90

The church's response to sexual reproductive health issues among youths: Jamaica's experience.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the response of religious denominations to sexual reproductive health issues among youths using a close-ended, structured, 32-item questionnaire and an interview. The majority (71% men, 71% women) of the respondents attended church regularly; were unmarried (92% men, 83% women); were sexually active (71% men, 45% women); used drugs (65% men, 62% women). The majority of the respondents (46% men, 63% women) were reprimanded and/or ostracized by the Church. The findings suggest that issues encompassing sexuality and drugs among youth do not resonate well with the conventional religious practice of the Church, hence a significant incidence of ostracism and the likelihood of premarital sex and drug use. PMID:20559735

Crawford, Tazhmoye V; Rawlins, Joan; McGrowder, Donovan A; Adams, Robert L

2011-03-01

91

Rare Genetic Variants and Treatment Response: Sample Size and Analysis Issues  

PubMed Central

Incorporating information about common genetic variants may help improve the design and analysis of clinical trials. For example, if genes impact response to treatment, one can pre-genotype potential participants to screen out genetically determined non-responders and substantially reduce the sample size and duration of a trial. Genetic associations with response to treatment are generally much larger than those observed for development of common diseases, as highlighted here by findings from genome-wide association studies. With the development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing, more extensive genetic information—including rare variants—is becoming available on individuals treated with drugs and other therapies. We can use this information to evaluate whether rare variants impact treatment response. The sparseness of rare variants, however, raises issues of how the resulting data should be best analyzed. As shown here, simply evaluating the association between each rare variant and treatment response one-at-a-time will require enormous sample sizes. Combining the rare variants together can substantially reduce the required sample sizes, but require a number of assumptions about the similarity among the rare variants’ effects on treatment response. We have developed an empirical approach for aggregating and analyzing rare variants that limit such assumptions and work well under a range of scenarios. Such analyses provide a valuable opportunity to more fully decipher the genomic basis of response to treatment.

Witte, John S.

2013-01-01

92

Genetic counselors' perceived responsibilities regarding reproductive issues for patients at risk for Huntington disease.  

PubMed

Research indicates that health care professionals' attitudes may affect patients' decisions regarding prenatal Huntington Disease testing, but few studies have sampled genetic counselors. In this qualitative study, genetic counselors described their experiences counseling individuals at risk for HD regarding reproductive decision-making. Five major research questions were investigated: 1) What are genetic counselor responsibilities? 2) What issues arise for patients and counselors? 3) How do counselors reconcile prenatal testing with presymptomatic testing? 4) To what extent are counselors' initial expectations of at-risk patients' beliefs and behaviors met? and 5) What advice would counselors offer to novice practitioners about working with this patient population? Fifteen genetic counselors experienced in counseling individuals at risk for HD participated in a semi-structured phone interview that yielded several themes. For example, participants identified their primary responsibility as information provision; less prevalent were psychosocial support and facilitating decision making. The most common ethical challenge was testing prenatally for HD which also results in presymptomatic testing of minors. Participants were divided about how directive to be in response to this ethical issue and about termination of a gene positive pregnancy. PMID:19851850

Hines, Karrie A; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; LeRoy, Bonnie S

2009-10-23

93

Cone penetrometer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

Boechler, G.N.

1996-09-19

94

Identification of response and timing issues at permanent European broadband stations from automated data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We apply automated two-station broadband phase velocity dispersion measurements to all available broadband data from permanent seismic stations in Europe, as available through the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA, http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/) infrastructure. As part of our quality control we detect several typical patterns in our measurements that can be related to technical problems, incorrect metadata information or uncover inconsistencies in data processing routines. These effects include timing and various response issues, most prominently erroneous response information. Our procedure is thus able to identify potentially problematic (meta)data from a large set of seismic data and offers an applicable way to increase data quality at data centers.

Weidle, C.; Soomro, R. A.; Cristiano, L.; Meier, T.

2013-09-01

95

Unresolved Issues in Scientific Sexology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of unresolved issues in sexologyresearch and practice are reviewed. Penile volumeassessment of sexual arousal has consistently provedmore sensitive than penile circumference assessment andrequires much shorter exposure to the erotic stimulieliciting the arousal, reducing the subjects' ability tomodify their responses. Failure to acknowledge this hasallowed acceptance of evidence based on penile circumference assessment that behavioraltreatments such as directed masturbation

Nathaniel McConaghy

1999-01-01

96

Optimization of a chocolate-flavored, peanut–soy beverage using response surface methodology (RSM) as applied to consumer acceptability data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimization of a chocolate-flavored, peanut–soy beverage was done using response surface methodology (RSM). Twenty-eight beverage formulations were processed by mixing three basic ingredients: peanut (X1=30.6g\\/100g–58.7g\\/100g), soy (X2=28.3g\\/100g–43.5g\\/100g), and chocolate syrup (X3=13.0g\\/100g–25.9g\\/100g). The proportions of these ingredients were obtained using a three component, constrained mixture design where the source of soy was either flour (SF) or protein isolate (SPI). Consumer acceptability

R. P. Deshpande; M. S. Chinnan; K. H. McWatters

2008-01-01

97

Student conceptualizations of the nature of science in response to a socioscientific issue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates student conceptualizations of the nature of science (NOS) and how students interpret and evaluate conflicting evidence regarding a socioscientific issue. Eighty-four high school students participated in the study by reading contradictory reports about the status of global warming and responding to questions designed to elicit ideas pertinent to the research goals. A subsample of 30 students was interviewed in order to triangulate data from the written responses. Data were analyzed using a qualitative methodological approach. The participants displayed a range of views on three distinct aspects of NOS: empiricism, tentativeness, and social embeddedness. Findings indicate that interpretation and evaluation of conflicting evidence in a socioscientific context is influenced by a variety of factors related to NOS such as data interpretation and social interactions including individuals' own articulation of personal beliefs and scientific knowledge. Implications for science teaching and learning are discussed.

Sadler, Troy D.; Chambers, William F.; Zeidler, Dana L.

2004-04-01

98

Honeybee ( Apis cerana ) Foraging Responses to the Toxic Honey of Tripterygium hypoglaucum (Celastraceae): Changing Threshold of Nectar Acceptability  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate honeybee foraging responses to toxic nectar, honey was collected from Apis cerana colonies in the Yaoan county of Yunnan Province, China, during June, when flowers of Tripterygium hypoglaucum were the main nectar source available. Pollen analysis confirmed the origin of the honey, and high-performance liquid chromatography\\u000a showed the prominent component triptolide to be present at a concentration of

K. Tan; Y. H. Guo; S. W. Nicolson; S. E. Radloff; Q. S. Song; H. R. Hepburn

2007-01-01

99

Accepting evolution.  

PubMed

Poor public perceptions and understanding of evolution are not unique to the developed and more industrialized nations of the world. International resistance to the science of evolutionary biology appears to be driven by both proponents of intelligent design and perceived incompatibilities between evolution and a diversity of religious faiths. We assessed the success of a first-year evolution course at the University of Cape Town and discovered no statistically significant change in the views of students before the evolution course and thereafter, for questions that challenged religious ideologies about creation, biodiversity, and intelligent design. Given that students only appreciably changed their views when presented with "facts," we suggest that teaching approaches that focus on providing examples of experimental evolutionary studies, and a strong emphasis on the scientific method of inquiry, are likely to achieve greater success. This study also reiterates the importance of engaging with students' prior conceptions, and makes suggestions for improving an understanding and appreciation of evolutionary biology in countries such as South Africa with an inadequate secondary science education system, and a dire lack of public engagement with issues in science. PMID:18067569

Chinsamy, Anusuya; Plagányi, Eva

2007-12-06

100

Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

2003-10-06

101

Acceptability of human risk.  

PubMed Central

This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility.

Kasperson, R E

1983-01-01

102

A discussion of the acceptable risk problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The petroleum activities on the Norwegian Continental Shelf are subject to regulations issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. One important issue in these regulations is the use of acceptance criteria, and this paper discusses some philosophical aspects of acceptance criteria for risk, and the role of statistical decision theory within safety management. Statistical decision theory has been applied in several

Jørn Vatn

1998-01-01

103

Critical Thinking and Self-Directed Learning in Adult Education: An Analysis of Responsibility and Control Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two dominant theoretical frameworks in adult education are critical thinking and self-directed learning. This article is an analysis of the fundamental premises of these constructs in an attempt to link these two frameworks in a more integrative and explanatory view of adult education than is possible through each individual concept. The article argues that responsibility and control issues are fundamental

D. R. Garrison

1992-01-01

104

REORIENTING FAMILY SERVICES: THE PROFESSIONAL RESPONSE TO SUDDEN UNEXPECTED DEATHS IN INFANCY - ISSUES AND PROTOCOLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses key service and support issues faced by families who have experienced a sudden unexplained death of an infant (SUDI), the majority of which are from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), within an environment of increasing social inequality and poor service coordination. The issues include: changes in the social and economic environments of SUDI families; the forensic focus

David Tipene-Leach; Sally Abel; Carole Everard; Riripeti Haretuku

105

Nuclear Power as an Ethical Issue: Utilitarian Ethics and Egalitarian Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the philosophical debate over the issue of nuclear power. Discussed are the utilitarian nature of the justification of nuclear power and the utilitarian approaches to the issue of nuclear power, the strengths and weaknesses of this approach, and utilitarian versus egalitarian ethics. (KR)

Hadjilambrinos, Constantine

1990-01-01

106

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a halo effect in issue management: public response to negative news about pro-social local private companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate nationality on public reactions to negative news about corporations. To explain how CSR activity works as a buffer for a negative issue of an organization, we propose a halo effect theory. This study conducted an experiment using a 2 (CSR activity vs. no CSR activity) x 2 (domestic

Seungho Cho; Yong-Chan Kim

2012-01-01

107

International Violence Against Women: U.S. Response and Policy Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In recent years, the international community has increasingly recognized international violence against women (VAW) as a significant human rights and global health issue. VAW, which can include both random acts of violence as well as sustained abuse over ...

C. R. Seelke L. Blanchfield N. M. Serafino R. Margesson T. Salaam-Blyther

2008-01-01

108

International Violence Against Women: U.S. Response and Policy Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In recent years, the international community has increasingly recognized international violence against women (VAW) as a significant human rights and global health issue. VAW, which can include both random acts of violence as well as sustained abuse over ...

L. Blanchfield L. S. Wyler N. M. Serafino R. Margesson T. Salaam-Blyther

2011-01-01

109

International Violence Against Women: U.S. Response and Policy Issues (March 31, 2008).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In recent years, the international community has increasingly recognized international violence against women (VAW) as a significant human rights and global health issue. VAW, which can include both random acts of violence as well as sustained abuse over ...

C. R. Seelke L. Blanchfield N. M. Serafino R. Margesson T. Salaam-Blyther

2008-01-01

110

A resource-based-view of the socially responsible firm: Stakeholder interdependence, ethical awareness, and issue responsiveness as strategic assets  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the resource-based view of the firm has made significant headway in explaining differences in interfirm performance. However, this perspective has not considered the social and ethical dimensions of organizational resources. This paper seeks to provide such an integration. Using Kuhn's three stage model of adaptive behavior, the resource worthiness of stakeholder management, business ethics, and issues management

Reginald A. Litz

1996-01-01

111

Baby-Crying Acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

112

Producer responsibility for e-waste management: Key issues for consideration e Learning from the Swiss experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life.

Deepali Sinha Khetriwal; Philipp Kraeuchi; Rolf Widmer

2007-01-01

113

Do Ethical Judgments Depend on the Type of Response Scale? Comparing Acceptability versus Unacceptability Judgments in the Case of Life-Ending Procedures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using Functional Measurement (Anderson, 2008), Frileux, Lelievre, Munoz Sastre, Mullet, and Sorum (2003) examined the joint impact of several key factors on lay people's judgments of the acceptability of physicians' interventions to end patients' lives. The level of acceptability was high, and the information integration rule that best described…

Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Gonzalez, Charlene; Lhermitte, Astrid; Sorum, Paul C.; Mullet, Etienne

2010-01-01

114

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

115

Legal Issues and the Supervised Internship Relationship: Who Is Responsible for What?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It easily could be argued that no single step in a sport management career path is as important and valuable as an internship. This article identifies some of the situations in an internship that raise legal issues for the university, academic program, student, and sponsoring organization. In addition, the article includes several procedural and…

Moorman, Anita M.

2004-01-01

116

Auditors' Responses to Emerging Issues: A UK Perspective on The Statutory Financial Auditor and the Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relevance of environmental issues for financial reporting and financial auditing is a matter of concern for many individual accountants and auditors, and for professional bodies and regulatory agencies in the UK and elsewhere. This paper reports on a large scale survey of audit practitioners in the UK which was part of a project funded by the Institute of Chartered

David Collison; Rob Gray

1997-01-01

117

Student Conceptualizations of the Nature of Science in Response to a Socioscientific Issue. Research Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates student conceptualizations of the nature of science (NOS) and how students interpret and evaluate conflicting evidence regarding a socioscientific issue. Eighty-four high school students participated in the study by reading contradictory reports about the status of global warming and responding to questions designed to…

Sadler, Troy D.; Chambers, William F.; Zeidler, Dana L.

2004-01-01

118

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

119

The Impact of Media Stories Concerning Health Issues on Food Product Sales : Management Planning and Responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer interest concerning the health aspects of food products has grown in recent years. Consequently, media attention to scientific studies about the beneficial or detrimental effect on consumers? health has resulted in substantial changes to the consumption of certain products. A recent CBS 60 Minutes program, The French Paradox, highlighted the health issues concerning red wine consumption. As a result,

Tim H. Dodd; Steve Morse

1994-01-01

120

Faculty Response to Ethical Issues at an American University in the Middle-East  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The objective of this study is to get feedback on faculty perception of ethical issues related to teaching, scholarship and service at a relatively new American-style university in the Middle-East. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire involving 21 scenarios with multiple choice answers was developed and distributed to all faculty…

Tabsh, Sami W.; El Kadi, Hany A.; Abdelfatah, Akmal S.

2012-01-01

121

The Value of Buddhist Responses to Issues of Overpopulation, Overconsumption, and Environmental Degradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the global population continues to increase at an alarming rate, the world, as a whole, now faces the issue of overpopulation. If the world's natural resource consumption and environmental pollution\\/destruction continue at their current pace, then the earth will eventually no longer be able to sustain all of its inhabitants. Social change is the only way to prevent this.

James Harold Hitchcock

122

Parental Responsibility for Juvenile Crime: Solution or Failure? Issue Memorandum 95-38.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The rise of parental responsibility statutes creates tension between the state's duty to respect the integrity of the family and the duty to protect children and the best interests of society. Yet, there is an ever-growing belief that something must be done to reverse the trend of juvenile crime. Parental responsibility laws have emerged as an…

Storm, Jacque

123

The Universities' Responsibilities to Society: International Perspectives. Issues in Higher Education Series. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three broad subthemes were addressed in a conference focusing on the responsibilities of universities. These were anticipating change relative to university development, the international knowledge enterprise, and academic freedom and university autonomy as prerequisite for the university meeting its responsibilities. Following an introduction,…

Neave, Guy, Ed.

124

Issues management and organizational accounts: An analysis of corporate responses to accusations of unethical business practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

When external groups accuse a business organization of unethical practices, managers of the accused organization usually offer a communicative response to attempt to protect their organization's public image. Even though many researchers readily concur that analysis of these communicative responses is important to our understanding of business and society conflict, few investigations have focused on developing a theoretical framework for

Dennis E. Garrett; Jeffrey L. Bradford; Renee A. Meyers; Joy Becker

1989-01-01

125

Regeneration in Gap Models: Priority Issues for Studying Forest Responses to Climate Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recruitment algorithms in forest gap models are examined withparticular regard to their suitability for simulating forestecosystem responses to a changing climate. The traditional formulation of recruitment is found limiting in three areas. First, the aggregation of different regeneration stages (seedproduction, dispersal, storage, germination and seedling establishment) is likely to result in less accurate predictionsof responses as compared to treating each

David T. Price; Niklaus E. Zimmermann; Peter J. van der Meer; Manfred J. Lexer; Paul Leadley; Irma T. M. Jorritsma; Jörg Schaber; Donald F. Clark; Petra Lasch; Steve McNulty; Jianguo Wu; Benjamin Smith

2001-01-01

126

Personal responsibility and obesity: a constructive approach to a controversial issue.  

PubMed

The concept of personal responsibility has been central to social, legal, and political approaches to obesity. It evokes language of blame, weakness, and vice and is a leading basis for inadequate government efforts, given the importance of environmental conditions in explaining high rates of obesity. These environmental conditions can override individual physical and psychological regulatory systems that might otherwise stand in the way of weight gain and obesity, hence undermining personal responsibility, narrowing choices, and eroding personal freedoms. Personal responsibility can be embraced as a value by placing priority on legislative and regulatory actions such as improving school nutrition, menu labeling, altering industry marketing practices, and even such controversial measures as the use of food taxes that create healthier defaults, thus supporting responsible behavior and bridging the divide between views based on individualistic versus collective responsibility. PMID:20194976

Brownell, Kelly D; Kersh, Rogan; Ludwig, David S; Post, Robert C; Puhl, Rebecca M; Schwartz, Marlene B; Willett, Walter C

127

Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?  

PubMed

The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa. PMID:21981823

Adenle, Ademola A

2011-10-08

128

Issues at the interface between ecology and toxicology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although facing many similar problems, there are differences between ecology and toxicology in the nature and aspect of some issues. Scientific challenges relate to the fundamentals of toxicology and ecology. For dose and response, the metrics of dose and response, methods for extrapolation from lab to field, generally accepted definitions of adverse effects (including definitions for health and categorization of

Lynn S McCarty

2002-01-01

129

5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence determinations. 531.409 Section... § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence determinations. (a) Responsibility...performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis for...

2009-01-01

130

5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence determinations. 531.409 Section... § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence determinations. (a) Responsibility...performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis for...

2010-01-01

131

Making nice may not matter: The interplay of crisis type, response type and crisis issue on perceived organizational responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental findings suggest limited effects for corporate social responsibility (CSR) to inoculate a company prior to a crisis. CSR may be viewed as accommodative window dressing that diminishes resources to assure corporate competence. When an accident occurs, emphasis in crisis communication on corporate ability (CA) may be more effective than CSR, especially when corporate culpability is low.

Jeesun Kim; Hyo J. Kim; Glen T. Cameron

2009-01-01

132

Acceptable practices in Ontario's forests: Differences between the public and forestry professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compare and contrast survey responses to statements about 1) environmental values, 2) agreement with forest management goals and approaches, 3) perceptions of risk, 4) trust in science and government, and 5) acceptability of forestry practices between the public and three groups of forestry professionals (government biologists, government foresters, and industry foresters) in Ontario. The survey emphasized issues surrounding forest

Robert G. Wagner; James Flynn; C. K. Mertz; Paul Slovic; Robin Gregory

1998-01-01

133

USGS issues report on responses to climate change in different watersheds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While watershed-scale responses to climate change could include reductions in snowpack and soil moisture, changes to snowmelt timing, and alterations to streamflow, those changes will vary in different U.S. water basins, according to a 16 May report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). “A key finding is that the hydrological response of the different geographical regions of the United States to potential climate change may be different, depending on the dominant physical processes of that particular region,” states the report, which includes modeling studies for 14 basins. Also considered is the tremendous amount of uncertainty present in the carbon emission scenarios and how this uncertainty propagates through the hydrologic simulations,” states the report, entitled “Integrated watershed- scale response to climate change for selected basins across the United States.”

Showstack, Randy

2012-05-01

134

Translating a Global Issue Into Local PriorityChina's Local Government Response to Climate Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides an analysis of a puzzling development among local governments in China: Climate change largely ignored as a problem in the past has suddenly become a high priority of provincial and prefectural governments. It is observed that the mandate from the central government, internalized needs, and the international market are three primary factors that transformed local governments' responses

Ye Qi; Li Ma; Huanbo Zhang; Huimin Li

2008-01-01

135

Teacher Perceptions of Issues Related to Implementation of Response to Intervention in the Regular Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although several school districts in a southern US state use a three-tiered Response to Intervention (RtI) model to supplemental core reading instruction and positively impact student achievement, the model appears to have had nominal impact. The theoretical foundation for this study is anchored in a constructivist approach to education. Three…

Bissell, Erica K.

2012-01-01

136

Going green in the service sector : Social responsibility issues, implications and implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade there has been an increasing awareness of the many ways that businesses affect the ecology of the planet. Most of the attention, however, has been directed towards activities of organizations in the manufacturing sector of the economy. Argues that service organizations have social responsibilities in the preservation of the environment, too. Presents the importance to a

Stephen J. Grove; Raymond P. Fisk; Gregory M. Pickett; Norman Kangun

1996-01-01

137

The Issue of Negative Evidence: Adult Responses to Children's Language Errors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When 16 parents' and 13 nonparents' conversations with children were examined for evidence of adults' differential responses to children's syntactic, phonological, and semantic errors, results indicated that adults tended to respond differentially to children's language mistakes, with parents showing greater sensitivity than non-parents. (RH)

Bohannon III, John Neil; Stanowicz, Laura

1988-01-01

138

Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

2002-01-01

139

SPECIAL ISSUE ON 'CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING MITIGATION ANDADAPTATION AS RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE'  

SciTech Connect

This special issue of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategiesfor Global Change (MITI) reflects a growing recognition that the globalresponse to possible impacts of climate change will include bothmitigation and adaptation (M&A). On the one hand, impacts are alreadyemerging and mitigation efforts are not progressing as rapidly as hadonce been hoped. Further, even if greenhouse gas emissions were to stopabruptly, climate change will continue because of historically committedemissions. As a result, adaptation cannot be avoided. It will beessential, and in some cases it is essential now. On the other hand, ifclimate change is significant, impacts may exceed the capacity of manydeveloping countries, natural ecosystems, and high-impact sites to adapt,which means that mitigation is equally essential.

WILBANKS, THOMAS J.; SATHAYE JAYANT; KLEIN, RICHARD J.T.

2007-05-01

140

Autism clinical trials: biological and medical issues in patient selection and treatment response.  

PubMed

Biomedical measures are critical in the initial patient-screening and -selection phases of a clinical trial in autism and related disorders. These measures can also play an important role in the assessment and characterization of response and can provide an opportunity to study underlying etiologic and pathophysiologic processes. Thus, biomedical measures, including clinical laboratory analyses, metabolic screening, and chromosomal analysis, are used to screen for potential safety-related problems, to decrease biological and genetic heterogeneity, and to define subgroups. Neurobiological measures can be examined as possible predictors, modifiers or surrogates of therapeutic response, and adverse effects. Neurobiological research measures can also be used to study mechanisms and extent of drug action and to perform baseline and longitudinal investigations of possible pathophysiologic alterations. The potential utility and desirability of specific measures are considered and the general approach to choosing measures for incorporation is discussed. PMID:14999176

Anderson, George M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Chugani, Diane C

2004-01-01

141

Response to Part II: Emerging Issues from Lesson Study Approaches in Prospective Mathematics Teacher Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter is a response to the three chapters of Fermandez & Zilliox, Murata & Pothen, and Yu based on Lesson Study at\\u000a pre-service teacher education. The chapter is structured around three dimensions: the way that Lesson Study has been implemented\\u000a in the three studies; the prospective teachers’ learning about teaching mathematics; and the main factors that framed learning.\\u000a Common

Despina Potari

142

Poor response to antiplatelet drugs. An important issue in drug-eluting stents.  

PubMed

Platelet aggregation activity is the cornerstone of the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and plays a main role in the appearance of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). This aspect has become even more important nowadays due to the use of drug-eluting stents (DES), where a proper platelet inhibition is required. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has widely demonstrated its beneficial effect in reducing MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits had also been established in short and long term treatment in patients with coronary artery disease managed with a conservative strategy. However, despite dual antiplatelet therapy an important number of patients experience new MACE related to an incomplete platelet inhibition that can be caused by the interaction of different mechanisms, not fully known at the moment. Several clinical studies suggested the significant variability in individual patient response to antiplatelet drugs to be due to the use of different laboratory tests. Moreover, other studies associated the low responsiveness status with an increased risk of recurrent cardiovascular events. Notably, resistance or reduced response to antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is a clinically relevant entity that needs to be taken into account in order to perform a proper and individualized treatment strategy. Recent antiplatelet drugs such as prasugrel and ticagrelor have appeared to be an attractive option for patients with resistance or low response to traditional therapy. In this article we review aspirin and clopidogrel resistance as a clinical entity, the different mechanisms that could be linked to treatment failure, its relation with special situations and future perspectives in this area. PMID:23173959

Del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo A; Alonso, Vivencio B; Sabán-Ruiz, José; Gómez, José L Z

2013-11-01

143

Psychologists' ethical responsibilities in the Internet-based groups: Issues, strategies, and a call for dialogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

How can psychologists participate ethically as facilitators, advisers, and peer members in Internet-base d groups? The astonishing growth of Internet technology and on-line groups has outpaced the development of formal ethical guidelines for psychologists involved in on-line groups. This article provides an initial appraisal of psychologists ' ethical responsibilities in discussion, support, and self-help groups that operate on the Internet

Keith Humphreys; Andrew Winzelberg; Elena Klaw

2000-01-01

144

How and why people accept personality feedback.  

PubMed

The present experiment examined a model and a supplementary explanation of feedback acceptance. The model consisted of inventory responding under a yea-saying response set and the explanation stated that feedback is accepted because it is accurate and persuasive. "Neurotic" and stable undergraduates (n = 120) took several personality inventories and then rated the accuracies of personality "interpretations." As predicted, the model mirrored every detail of feedback acceptance; also, the accuracy of interpretations related most simply to their acceptance and the undergraduates changed their self-perceptions in the direction of the interpretations. Contrary to predictions, individual differences in persuasibility did influence feedback acceptance. PMID:16366902

Layne, C; Ally, G

1980-10-01

145

Equilibrium responses of soil carbon to climate change: Issues of parameterization  

SciTech Connect

We use the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to investigate how assumptions about the active soil carbon at calibration sites influence estimates of global soil carbon response to climate change. When TEM is parameterized for [open quotes]1 m[close quotes] soil carbon at each of the calibration sites, it estimates global equilibrium soil carbon stocks to be 1301.5 Pg (10[sup 15] g) for contemporary climate at an atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration of 312.4 ppmv. For a 1 C[degrees] warming applied across the terrestrial biosphere, TEM estimates a soil carbon release of 42.7 Pg. In contrast, when TEM is parameterized for [open quotes]20 cm[close quotes] soil carbon, it estimates global stocks of 837.2 Pg for contemporary climate and a release of 18.8 Pg for a 1 C[degrees] warming. When we adjust the active soil layer at calibration sites so that transitions in soil carbon are smooth at ecosystem boundaries, the relative contribution of tropical ecosystems to the global response declines. We conclude that using a constant depth to define the active soil layer should be avoided.

McGuire, A.D.; Melillo, J.M.; Joyce, L.A.; Kicklighter, D.W. (Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

1994-06-01

146

Telehospice acceptance among providers: a multidisciplinary comparison.  

PubMed

Telehospice, the delivery of end-of-life care using telecommunications technologies, allows increased interaction between providers and patients. For telehospice to be successful, it must first be accepted by professionals as a useful and user-friendly method of service delivery. Existing research regarding provider acceptance of telehospice has been limited in geographic scope and has often excluded input from key members of the hospice team. This study measured telehospice acceptance in a national sample of hospice professionals from various disciplines (N = 160). Results indicate that acceptance was moderately high overall, although significant differences existed among individuals from different disciplines, with nurses and administrators generally indicating higher levels of acceptance than social workers and chaplains. Findings demonstrate that telehospice interventions will likely be more readily accepted by nursing and administrative staff members, while those employees who address primarily psychosocial issues may be reluctant to use such technology. PMID:18812614

Washington, Karla T; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Day, Michele

2008-09-23

147

Issues management and ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Issues management (IM) is becoming widely accepted in the business-and-society literature as a policy tool to enhance the social performance of corporations. Its acceptance is based on the presumption that firms have incorporated ethical norms into their decision-making process. This paper argues that IM is simply a technique to identify, analyze, and respond to social issues. It can be used

Jeanne M. Logsdon; David R. Palmer

1988-01-01

148

Linking Morphodynamic Response with Sediment Mass Balance: Issues of Scale, Geomorphic Setting, and Sampling Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sediment mass balance, or budget, is one of the most powerful and frequently used conceptual frameworks in fluvial geomorphology. Sediment budgets are used to evaluate the effects of streamflow regulation, inform the design of stream restoration projects, and anticipate the outcomes of dam removal, among other applications. In almost every case, the primary interest is the interaction between changes in the sediment budget and the morphodynamics of specific channel features that make up the components of the sediment budget. However, linkages between changes in specific morphologic features and changes in the sediment budget are not necessarily straightforward and are often poorly understood. In order for the sediment budget to be used as an effective tool, these linkages must be better quantified. A complete understanding of these linkages is usually hampered by sparse data. Measurements of morphologic change typically consist of some type of sampling scheme that requires extrapolation to the reach scale and adequate measurements of both sediment influx and efflux are rarely available. Our attempts to develop a monitoring program for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon that tracks changes in specific morphologic features, transfers in sediment storage among channel features, and changes in the sediment budget have yielded several insights: (1) changes in sediment storage can be highly localized with as much as 80% of changes in storage occurring within as little as 1% of a reach; (2) areas where large storage changes are likely may be predictable in the sense that the largest changes tend to occur in specific geomorphic settings; (3) magnitudes of changes are unpredictable because nearby features of the same general geomorphic type often respond differently due to differences in local hydraulics; (4) the morphology of a set of features at the time of measurement may be strongly affected by the antecedent flow regime, thereby confounding attempts to make comparisons among data collected under different flow regimes; and (5) even with a relatively robust topographic measurement program and rational method of extrapolation, a sediment budget based on morphologic change may be inconsistent with a flux-based mass balance. These findings illustrate the many pitfalls that exist and may result in severe bias when one attempts to reconcile the sediment budget with measured morphologic changes. Our findings are based on a data set that includes airborne lidar, aerial photogrammetry, and total station surveys for terrestrial measurements; multibeam and singlebeam sonar for bathymetric measurements; and multi-frequency acoustics for a continuous record of sediment influx and efflux. While the examples that are provided are specific to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, the observed processes apply to many bedrock canyon rivers, and the basic problem of linking morphodynamic response with the sediment budget is general to all rivers.

Grams, P. E.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Kaplinski, M. A.; Hazel, J. E.

2011-12-01

149

Dealing with global safety issues : was the response to QT-liability of non-cardiac drugs well coordinated?  

PubMed

Drug-induced torsade de pointes (TdP) is a potentially fatal iatrogenic entity. Its reporting rate in association with non-cardiac drugs increased exponentially from the early 1990s and was associated with an increasing number of new non-cardiac drugs whose proarrhythmic liability was not appreciated pre-marketing. This epidemic provoked a comprehensive global response from drug regulators, drug developers and academia, which resulted in stabilization of the reporting rate of TdP. This commentary reviews the chronology and nature of, and the reasons for, this response, examines its adequacy, and proposes future strategies for dealing with such iatrogenic epidemics more effectively. It is concluded that the response was piecemeal and lacked direction. No one entity was responsible, with the result that important contributions from regulators, industry and academia lacked coordination. While the process of dealing with QT crisis seemed to have worked reasonably well in this instance, it does not seem wise to expect the next crisis in drug development to be managed as well. Future crises will need better management and the challenge is to implement a system set up to respond globally and efficiently to a perceived drug-related hazard. In this regard, we discuss the roles of new tools the legislation has provided to the regulators and the value of an integrated expert assessment of all pre-approval data that may signal a potential safety issue in the postmarketing period. We also discuss the roles of other bodies such as the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring, CIOMS and the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). PMID:23417505

Stockbridge, Norman; Morganroth, Joel; Shah, Rashmi R; Garnett, Christine

2013-03-01

150

Response to Special Issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" Concerning "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the author's response to the six authors in the special issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" concerning her book "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy." In this response, the author focuses on some general observations that came to mind whilst reading the valuable set of…

Green, Lucy

2009-01-01

151

ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

J.C. COCHRANE; J.V. PARKER; ET AL

2001-06-01

152

ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

Cochrane, J. C. (James C.), Jr.; Parker, J. V. (Jerald V.); Hinckley, W. B. (William B.); Hosack, K. W. (Keith W.); Mills, D. (Diann); Parsons, W. M. (William Mark); Scudder, D. W. (David W.); Stokes, J. L. (John L.); Tabaka, L. J. (Leonard J.); Thompson, M. C. (M. Clark); Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; Campbell, T. N. (Timothy N.); Lancaster, D. L. (David L.); Tom, C. Y.

2001-01-01

153

Subject Acceptance of Stannous Fluoride Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Responses concerning acceptance were obtained from 370 subjects in a preventive dentistry study using stannous fluoride. The subjects were in five treatment categories; operator-applied three-agent stannous fluoride; operator-applied three-agent placebo; ...

W. R. Shiller F. P. Scola

1968-01-01

154

Affective Issues in Learning Technologies: Emotional Responses to Technology and Technology's Role in Supporting Socio-Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper focuses on some of the author's research studies over the past thirty years and places these in a wider context to reflect on research into affective issues in learning technologies over this period, and to consider whether and how the issues uncovered by research have changed as technologies have developed over time. Three issues are…

Jones, Ann

2010-01-01

155

Sonic Boom Acceptability Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory ...

K. P. Shepherd B. M. Sullivan J. D. Leatherwood D. A. Mccurdy

1992-01-01

156

Acceptance Test Driven Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The experience of XP planning for many is not a successful one. We have found that by making acceptance tests not only central\\u000a to the definition of a story but central to our process itself, they can be used to drive the entire development. This paper\\u000a describes an adaptation, or evolution to XP style planning based around acceptance testing which

Richard J. Watt; David Leigh-Fellows

157

Ethical issues in pandemic planning.  

PubMed

In the event of an influenza pandemic, many ethical issues will arise in terms of health risks, resource allocation, and management decisions. Planning decisions may be controversial, such as rationing of antivirals, resource allocation (including hospital beds and vaccinations), occupational risk, rostering of staff, responsibilities of health care workers, quarantine measures, and governance issues. A clear ethical framework is needed to enable understanding of the decision-making process and optimise acceptance of decisions by health care workers and other members of an affected community. Planning decisions need to start being examined now, and will require input from a broad group of experts: health care providers, infrastructure managers, lawyers, ethicists, public health physicians, and community members. The process will need to be open, honest and dynamic. PMID:17115958

Torda, Adrienne

2006-11-20

158

Evolving an acceptable nuclear power fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The following issues are examined: long-term safe nuclear power plant operation; acceptable nuclear waste management and, mainly, high-level waste management; and provision for long-term fissile fuel supply in a long-term nuclear fission economy. (LM)

Steinberg, M.

1986-10-01

159

Examining Social Acceptance & Rejection. FPG Snapshot #44  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This FPG Snapshot summarizes the findings of a study, published in the November 2006 issue of the "Journal of Educational Psychology," that examined whether children with disabilities are accepted or rejected by their classmates in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, the study examined two sets of related questions: (1) Are individual children…

FPG Child Development Institute, 2007

2007-01-01

160

Chapter 24: Psychosocial aspects of vaccine acceptability  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter we identify psychosocial issues that have been raised with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and review the research literature on HPV vaccine acceptability. Many women and physicians have relatively poor knowledge about HPV, but despite this, most healthcare providers are willing to recommend HPV vaccination and parents are interested in having their children vaccinated. Concerns about

Gregory D. Zimet; Nicole Liddon; Susan L. Rosenthal; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce; Betania Allen

2006-01-01

161

The Eu's Response to 9\\/11: A Case Study of Institutional Roles and Policy Processes with Special Reference to Issues of Accountability and Human Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges of 9\\/11 required a wide ranging response across all three of the broad divisions of EU policymaking competence: the economic and monetary union, common foreign and security policy and internal security. These policy divisions make up the ‘three pillars’ of the EU's political architecture. This article reviews general issues of accountability and human rights protection in the EU's

FRANK GREGORY

2005-01-01

162

Effects of Color, Format, and Severity of Issue on Response Rate of Mail Questionnaires When Respondent Population Has Some Familiarity with Sender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The effects of (1) format and color, and (2) severity of issue (freeze damage to citrus industry) on response rate of mail questionnaires is presented. Questionnaires were formatted in two different ways: a one page, legal size printed on both sides, and one sheet 11- by 17-inch size center-folded with items on three pages. Two colors were used:…

Taylor, C. L.; Summerhill, W. R.

163

Accepting space radiation risks.  

PubMed

The human exploration of space inevitably involves exposure to radiation. Associated with this exposure are multiple risks, i.e., probabilities that certain aspects of an astronaut's health or performance will be degraded. The management of these risks requires that such probabilities be accurately predicted, that the actual exposures be verified, and that comprehensive records be maintained. Implicit in these actions is the fact that, at some point, a decision has been made to accept a certain level of risk. This paper examines ethical and practical considerations involved in arriving at a determination that risks are acceptable, roles that the parties involved may play, and obligations arising out of reliance on the informed consent paradigm seen as the basis for ethical radiation risk acceptance in space. PMID:20414667

Schimmerling, Walter

2010-04-23

164

HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles: a mixed-method approach  

PubMed Central

This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles, California. We combined a qualitative research method (focus groups) with an innovative market research method (conjoint analysis). Focus groups explored social issues, concerns, barriers and motivators associated with HIV vaccine acceptability. Conjoint analysis was used to assess preferences among eight hypothetical HIV vaccines with varying attribute profiles and the impact of various attributes on acceptability. Five main themes were identified in the focus groups regarding acceptance and utilization of preventive HIV vaccines: (1) vaccine characteristics, such as efficacy, physical side-effects and cost, (2) fear of a vaccine, (3) vaccine acceptability and optimism, (4) social and family responses and (5) behavioral disinhibition. Conjoint analysis revealed HIV vaccine acceptability ranging from 7.4 (SD = 19.4) to 85.2 (SD = 24.3) across eight hypothetical vaccines. The vaccine with the highest acceptability had the following attributes: 99% efficacy, no side-effects, 10 years of protection, protects against one sub-type, free, one dose and given by injection. Vaccine efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability (51.4, p = .005), followed by side-effects (11.1, p = .005) and duration of protection (8.3, p = .005). Despite some apprehensions and concerns, Thai residents perceived an HIV vaccine as making an important contribution to society and to protecting oneself and one’s family from HIV infection. Nevertheless, acceptability of a partially efficacious vaccine may be low, suggesting the need for tailored social marketing interventions that might emphasize a collectivistic rather than an individualistic focus. Assessing HIV vaccine acceptability using a mixed-method approach is feasible with Thai residents and should lend itself to HIV vaccine research with other Asian Pacific Islander populations in the US.

Lee, Sung-Jae; Brooks, Ronald A.; Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle; Sangthong, Rassamee; Duan, Naihua

2010-01-01

165

Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: An application of the revised technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals

Panayiotis Ketikidis; Tomislav Dimitrovski; Lambros Lazuras; Peter A. Bath

2012-01-01

166

Why was Relativity Accepted?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

Brush, S. G.

167

Putting emotion into the self: a response to the 2008 Journal of Moral Education Special Issue on moral functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper takes as its starting point the Journal of Moral Education Special Issue (September, 2008, 37[3]) ‘Towards an integrated model of moral reasoning’. Although explicitly post?Kohlbergian, the authors in this Special Issue do not, I argue, depart far enough from Kohlberg’s impoverished notion of the role of the affective in moral life—or when they do so depart, they incorporate

Kristján Kristjánsson

2009-01-01

168

Nuclear power and public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

Public acceptance is a decisive factor of growing importance, although economics has been and will remain the most decisive factor in ordering new nuclear capacity. Nuclear energy can make an important contribution toward preventing and reducing the greenhouse effect. Many politicians tend to base their decisions not on facts but rather on so called public opinion and consequently to overreact in particular on environmental issues. The entire debate hinges on public confidence rather than on a lack of information. There is no 100% guarantee that technical facilities will operate completely accident-free. Therefore, standards should be harmonized, plants should be operated safely and consequences of possible accidents should be limited. There needs to be some kind of early information system between countries concerning upcoming issues as a prerequisite for acting instead of reacting, because this is an essential tool in convincing the public that they can have more confidence. Technical information alone does not answer the real questions of the public. Political, technical, and economic matters as well as public opinion are interwoven and cannot be separated from each. Therefore, the exchange of experience gained in all these sectors on an international basis must be improved.

Hirschmann, H.

1989-01-01

169

26 CFR 301.6110-6 - Written determinations issued in response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976. 301.6110-6 Section...response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976. (a) Inspection of written...request postmarked or hand delivered before November 1, 1976 and any related...

2009-04-01

170

26 CFR 301.6110-6 - Written determinations issued in response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976. 301.6110-6 Section...response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976. (a) Inspection of written...request postmarked or hand delivered before November 1, 1976 and any related...

2010-04-01

171

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision\\u000a of adequate palliative\\/end-of-life (P\\/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P\\/EOL care\\u000a often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically\\u000a examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits

Allison M Williams; Jeanette A Eby; Valorie A Crooks; Kelli Stajduhar; Melissa Giesbrecht; Mirjana Vuksan; S Robin Cohen; Kevin Brazil; Diane Allan

2011-01-01

172

Disability and the Ethical Responsibilities of the Teacher: issues arising from the case of L v Minister for Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The case of L v Minister for Education provides an excellent example of the complexity of the ethical decisions teachers are sometimes required to make. But how can we gauge the soundness of the teacher’s choices? Using this legal case as its focus, the paper will first examine issues of meta-ethics, drawing some conclusions about the ontological and epistemological

Gordon Tait

173

Toy stories, horror stories and fairy tales: the role of the media in highlighting issues of corporate responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper aims to examine the role of the media in encouraging corporate responsibility in the toy industry and question whether it acts responsibly itself in reporting in a balanced and fair way (telling toy stories) or whether it overindulges in scaremongering (telling horror stories) or in exaggerating or making false accusations (telling fairy stories). Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

Stephen P. Hogan

2007-01-01

174

Michael D. Oppenheim - Feminist Jewish Philosophy: A Response - Nashim: A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues 14:1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is an examination of the ways that feminist and feminist Jewish theorists and philosophers, in executing their perspectives and commitments—in terms of justice, gender, embodiment and relationships—offer new insights into how important philosophical issues can be understood, engaged and mediated. The point of departure is Hava Tirosh-Samuelson's insistence that while a conversation between feminist philosophy, Jewish philosophy and

Michael Oppenheim

2007-01-01

175

Radiological Characterization Issues and Success Stories for the Melton Valley Scrap Yard and Homogeneous Reactor Experiment Evaporator Response Actions  

SciTech Connect

Proper characterization is essential for assuring that wastes meet any treatment or disposal site waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In addition characterization is vital for proper preparation of shipping papers for transporting the waste for treatment or disposal. Process knowledge was inadequate for characterization of legacy waste items from two sites involved in the Melton Valley Decontamination and Decommissioning (MVD and D) project at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL): a scrap yard containing miscellaneous contaminated items, and a liquid waste evaporator used by an experimental nuclear reactor. Waste items at both sites were contaminated with Cs-137/Ba-137 m. Through the use of scaling factors, the gamma radiation associated with this radionuclide pair was used to characterize these items for proper disposal. Application of scaling factors permitted successful remediation of these sites on an accelerated schedule and avoided radiation exposure concerns associated with traditional sampling and analysis. (authors)

Patterson, J.E.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Mitchell, K.G. [Strata-G, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States); Gilpin, J.K. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01

176

Linguistic Models of FO Use, Physiological Models of FO Control, and the Issue of "Mean Response Time."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Evaluates "mean response time" (MRT), a method used in previous studies to relate physiological evidence (recordings of electromyographic activity in the cricothyroid and sternohyoid) to acoustic evidence (fundamental frequency). (Author/VWL)|

Herman, Rebecca; Beckman, Mary; Honda, Kiyoshi

1999-01-01

177

Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)|

Progressive Architecture, 1974

1974-01-01

178

Lions in the Path of Stability and Security: Oman's Response to Pressing Issues in the Middle East.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Scholars and intelligence experts have identified numerous factors that contribute to instability and insecurity in the Middle East. These factors range from large youth populations to Islamic extremism. This thesis examines responses adopted by the Sulta...

J. C. Howk

2008-01-01

179

Diagnosing Response Style Behavior by Means of a Latent-Class Factor Approach. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Gender Role Attitudes and Perceptions of Ethnic Discrimination Reexamined  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally accepted that response style behavior in survey research may seriously distort the measurement of attitudes and subsequent causal models that include attitudinal dimensions. However, there in no single accepted methodological approach in dealing with this issue. This article aims at illustrating the flexibility of a latent class factor approach in diagnosing response style behavior and in adjusting

G. B. D. Moors

2003-01-01

180

Selected College Students' Knowledge and Perceptions of Biotechnology Issues Reported in the Mass Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Agricultural communications students (n=330) were surveyed to determine their knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnology issues reported in the mass media. Although students achieved only 30% correct responses, 84% perceived their knowledge level to be average to high. Most were somewhat accepting of genetic modification for plants but less…

Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.; Dunsford, Deborah W.

2002-01-01

181

Determination of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The initial phase of the work performed during FY 1977 consisted of performing a ''scoping'' study to define issues, determine an optimal methodology for their resolution, and compile a data base for acceptable risk criteria development. The issues, spanning technical, psychological, and ethical dimensions, were categorized in seven major areas: (1) unplanned or accidental events, (2) present vs future risks,

1977-01-01

182

Public acceptance of central station power generation: a reporter's view  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public acceptance, vital to utilities planning generating expansion, comes from public perception of what issues are involved. Various levels and types of perceptions enter the issues of nuclear and central power generating expansion. Questions of growth, for example, are often motivated by a desire for social reform and a redistribution of income. Present Administration policies advocate a balanced energy mix

1978-01-01

183

Public acceptance and USCEA  

SciTech Connect

Public opinion plays a critical role in ensuring the future of nuclear energy. After the events at Three Mile Island in 1979, and more recently the Chernobyl accident, worldwide antinuclear movements surged upward. As a result, the global nuclear industry was compelled to institute education programs aimed at allaying public apprehension surrounding nuclear power. The US Council for Energy Awareness strives to disseminate information on nuclear issues in an effort to educate the public and thus create a foundation of support for this important energy option. The US Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA) is the national communications and information organization for the US commercial nuclear power industry. The organization provides a national voice for an industry whose issues are not always well understood by the public or by policy makers. It performs many functions for member companies, and offers information to the public. Included in the primary functions USCEA conducts on behalf of the nuclear industry are advertising, public and media relations, technical programs, and conferences. Worldwide, its membership is approximately 400, and includes utilities, vendors, consultants, universities, and other organizations with an interest in nuclear power.

Not Available

1993-01-01

184

Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries  

PubMed Central

Background Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS) issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. Results The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern handling of sensitive information and return of results. In all studies, signs of child abuse require reports to authorities, but this disclosure duty is not always stated in consent materials. Studies vary in whether they will return to participants results of routine tests/measures, but none inform participants about findings with unknown clinical significance. Conclusions Analysis of how cohort studies in various jurisdictions handle key ELS issues provides informative data for comparison and contrast. Consideration of these and other examples and further scholarly exploration of ELS issues provides insight on how best to address these aspects in ways that respect the well-being of participants, especially children who become research subjects at the start of their lives.

2010-01-01

185

Framing and Counterframing the Issue of Corporate Social ResponsibilityThe Communication Strategies of Nikebiz.com  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on the communication strategies that sports shoe giant Nike used to successfully protect its corporate social responsibility (CSR) reputation during the late 1990s. The article opens with a brief discussion of CSR and its critical importance to transnationals such as Nike. The opening also includes four research questions guiding this study. The article then discusses why frame

Randall L. Waller; Roger N. Conaway

2011-01-01

186

Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

2011-01-01

187

Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

2011-01-01

188

Dear Friends, This issue of the Monitor focuses on the Responsible Media Messages piece of the Teen Pregnancy Puzzle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our guest writers present responses to this media culture that address individuals and families. MOAPPP Board member, Mala Thao, brings us an account of a wonderful project focused on girls developing positive media messages; David Walsh, Ph.D., founder of the National Institute on Media and the Family, writes about concrete steps parents can take to create \\

Brigid Riley; Sally W. Pillsbury; Michael D. Resnick; Deborah Watts; Noya Woodrich; Nance Alexander; Steve Fillbrandt; Briana Franzmeier; Jerry Gallivan; Elizabeth Grant; Walter C. Gray; Bettina Hoye; Qamar Ibrahim; Rachel Johnson; Heather Kilgore; Anne McInerney; Dana O'Connor; Chris Reif; Charles Crutchfield; Bob Diamond; M. D. Robbin Frazier; Yusef Mgeni; Nancy Nelson

2006-01-01

189

Female Administrator Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of women in educational administration is declining, despite official efforts to end sex discrimination. Women are hampered on the way to obtaining an adequate education, finding roadblocks from sex bias in elementary readers to discrimination in graduate programs; are considered responsible for home and children even when working full…

Pawlitschek, Elizabeth Ann

190

International Responses to Iranian Nuclear Defiance: The Non-Aligned Movement and the Issue of Non-Compliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the responses of the non-nuclear-weapon states (NNWS) to Iran's violation of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), focusing on the stance adopted by members of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In February 2006, key NAM members voted to refer Iran to the UN Security Council in a move that stunned Iranian diplomats,

Tanya Ogilvie-White

2007-01-01

191

Examining the relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, victim blame, homophobia, gender roles, and ambivalent sexism.  

PubMed

The relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, attitudes toward gay men, a series of gender role and sexism measures, victim blame and assault severity were investigated. It was predicted that men would display more negative, stereotypical attitudes than women and that male rape myth endorsement would be related to, and predicted by, the other attitude and attribution scales. Respondents comprised 323 undergraduates (146 males and 177 females) from a large University in the Northwest of England. Results broadly conformed to predictions, with men generally more negative than women, and male rape myth acceptance significantly related to female rape myth acceptance, negative attitudes about gay men, gender role attitudes, and victim blame. Furthermore, male rape myth acceptance was predicted by female rape myth acceptance, gender attitudes, and victim blame. Methodological issues and implications for future work and those working with victims are discussed. PMID:22550150

Davies, Michelle; Gilston, Jennifer; Rogers, Paul

2012-04-30

192

Freedom in responsibility: a response.  

PubMed

This paper is a critical response to Elisabeth Gräb-Schmidt's article "Freedom in responsibility: On the relevance of 'sin' as hermeneutic guiding principle in bioethical decision making." Gräb-Schmidt's chief contention is that ethics begins with anthropology, and that moral responsibility is thereby grounded within a set of given limits. Freedom is distorted into sin when these limits are transgressed. My principal complaint is that her account of the relationship between freedom and sin is grounded in a tragic ontology. Alternatively, I contend that anthropology is grounded in Christology in which freedom is a gift of the Spirit. Consequently, sin is not so much tragic as it marks a refusal of humans to accept their divine election. The issues of human cloning and embryonic stem-cell research are used to exemplify what difference these respective differences might make in a process of moral deliberation. PMID:16266968

Waters, Brent

2005-08-01

193

Simulating smokers' acceptance of modifications in a cessation program.  

PubMed

Recent research has underscored the importance of assessing barriers to smokers' acceptance of cessation programs. This paper illustrates the use of computer simulations to gauge smokers' response to program modifications which may produce barriers to participation. It also highlights methodological issues encountered in conducting this work. Computer simulations were based on conjoint analysis, a consumer research method which enables measurement of smokers' relative preference for various modifications of cessation programs. Results from two studies are presented in this paper. The primary study used a randomly selected sample of 218 adult smokers who participated in a computer-assisted phone interview. Initially, the study assessed smokers' relative utility rating of 30 features of cessation programs. Utility data were used in computer-simulated comparisons of a low-cost, self-help oriented program under development and five other existing programs. A baseline version of the program under development and two modifications (for example, use of a support group with a higher level of cost) were simulated. Both the baseline version and modifications received a favorable response vis-à-vis comparison programs. Modifications requiring higher program costs were, however, associated with moderately reduced levels of favorable consumer response. The second study used a sample of 70 smokers who responded to an expanded set of smoking cessation program features focusing on program packaging. This secondary study incorporate in-person, computer-assisted interviews at a shopping mall, with smokers viewing an artist's mock-up of various program options on display. A similar pattern of responses to simulated program modifications emerged, with monetary cost apparently playing a key role. The significance of conjoint-based computer simulation as a tool in program development or dissemination, salient methodological issues, and implications for further research are discussed. PMID:1738813

Spoth, R

194

Acceptance, Conditionals, and Belief Revision  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper bridges the gap between comparative belief structures, such as those induced by probability measures, and logical\\u000a representations of accepted beliefs. We add, to natural properties of comparative belief relations, some conditions that ensure\\u000a that accepted beliefs form a deductively closed set. It is shown that the beliefs accepted by an agent in all contexts can\\u000a always be described

Didier Dubois; Hélène Fargier; Henri Prade

2002-01-01

195

Beyond acceptable risk: On the social acceptability of technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social acceptability of large-scale technologies depends upon a wide range of things, some related to safety and economics, but also some factors of cultural, social and psychological significance. However, many risk analysts assume that public opposition to technologies is mostly due to unfounded fears of their risks and, that there can exist quantitative criteria of “acceptable risk” that could

Harry J. Otway; DETLOF VON WINTERFELDT

1982-01-01

196

Human immune responses to vaccines in the first year of life: biological, socio-economic and ethical issues - a viewpoint.  

PubMed

Human newborns are vulnerable to infectious diseases that account for majority of the morbidity and mortality, particularly in first year of life. Vaccines have become the most effective public health intervention strategy to curtail the prevalence of these infectious diseases. Although vaccines against a number of diseases exist, there are no vaccines against many other diseases that commonly affect children. The adequate assessment of immune responses to vaccines is an important step in the development of vaccines. However, a number of biological and "non-medical" socio-economic and ethical factors could influence either the administration and/or evaluation of vaccines in infants. Recognition and understanding of these determinants are crucial in planning interventions and for logical interpretations of results. PMID:22728219

Ota, M O C; Idoko, O T; Ogundare, E O; Afolabi, M O

2012-06-19

197

Using contextual issues among African Americans and Latinos in Orange County, California to inform a community response.  

PubMed

This is one of two papers in this volume to report on the result of the Care System Assessment Demonstration (CSAD) Project conducted in Orange County, California. Latino and African American residents of Orange County who were aware of being HIV positive but who were not in care were targeted for this assessment. The basic questions were: Why are these people not in care? and What can we do to get them into care? The project used selected Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE) methods (described in chapter 5) to retrieve information from HIV-positive Latinos and African Americans both in and out of care, cultural experts, service providers, and administrators to find the answers. Latinos and African Americans who were out of care responded in the most similar ways, of all the groups of respondents. PMID:17938470

Watson, Mary M

2007-08-01

198

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of the local public, we put some effort in informing interested people, media, politicians on all l

Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

2009-04-01

199

Issue Paper  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Food and Drug Administration Department of Health and Human Services Issue Paper I. Issue Overview ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/newsevents

200

Do I Have to Learn Something New? Mental Models and the Acceptance of Replacement Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Few studies in technology acceptance have explicitly addressed the acceptance of replacement technologies, technologies that replace legacy ones that have been in use. This article explores this issue through the theoretical lens of mental models. We contend that accepting replacement technologies entails both mental model maintenance and mental…

Zhang, Wei; Xu, Peng

2011-01-01

201

Towards Designing m-Learning Systems for Maximal Likelihood of Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

So far, in the field of m-learning the issue of technology acceptance has been largely overlooked. We apply the Technology Acceptance Model to consider the requirements for a generic m-learning system that would maximize the likelihood of its acceptance, and conclude that such a system should rely on the existing infrastructure and mobile device ownership. We back this conclusion by

ALEXEI TRETIAKOV

2008-01-01

202

Do I Have to Learn Something New? Mental Models and the Acceptance of Replacement Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few studies in technology acceptance have explicitly addressed the acceptance of replacement technologies, technologies that replace legacy ones that have been in use. This article explores this issue through the theoretical lens of mental models. We contend that accepting replacement technologies entails both mental model maintenance and mental…

Zhang, Wei; Xu, Peng

2011-01-01

203

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper\\u000a discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural\\u000a selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness\\u000a of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution

Paul Thagard; Scott Findlay

2010-01-01

204

Modeling of User Acceptance of Consumer E-Commerce Website  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As the consumer e-commerce market grows intensively competitive, the capability of a website to capture consumers and to be\\u000a accepted has been recognized as a critical issue. The user acceptance of a website not only brings immediate business opportunities,\\u000a it also casts great impact on future return and loyalty buildup of the consumer. This paper is intended to explore the

Rui Chen

2005-01-01

205

Statistical issues in radiation dose-response analysis of employees of the nuclear industry in Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Poisson regression methods are used to describe dose-response relations for cancer mortality for a subcohort of 28,347 white male radiation workers. Age specific baseline rates are described using both internal and external (US white male) rates. Regression analyses are based on an analytic data structure (ADS) that consists of a table of observed deaths, expected deaths, and person-years at risk for each combination of levels of seven risk factors. The factors are socioeconomic status, length of employment, birth cohort, age at risk, facility, internal exposure, and external exposure. Each observation in the ADS consists of the index value of each of the stratifying factors, the observed deaths, the expected deaths, the person-years, and the ten year lagged average cumulative dose. Regression diagnostics show that a linear exponential relative risk model is not appropriate for these data. Results are presented using a main effects model for factors other than external radiation, and an excess relative risk term for cumulative external radiation dose.

Frome, E.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Watkins, J.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States). Center for Epidemiologic Research

1997-11-01

206

An empirical investigation of student acceptance of course websites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The World Wide Web (WWW) is the future in teaching and learning. This paper uses the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) constructs of usefulness and ease of use to assess university students’ acceptance of course websites as an effective learning tool. A survey instrument was distributed to 450 undergraduate students and a total of 403 usable responses were obtained. Exploratory and

Hassan M. Selim

2003-01-01

207

Assessing E-Learning Acceptance by University Students in Thailand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study is to assess e-learning acceptance by students, using data collected from 377 students at three public universities in Thailand. Using the "E-learning Acceptance Measure" (Teo, 2010b), participants gave their responses to 21 statements on three factors hypothesised to measure e-learning: tutor quality, perceived usefulness,…

Teo, Timothy; Wong, Su Luan; Thammetar, Thapanee; Chattiwat, Wisa

2011-01-01

208

Student Acceptance of Mobile Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile devices with Internet capabilities and applications have dramatically increased the convenience of accessing information for community college students. This study uses technology acceptance theory as a theoretical framework to examine the determinants associated with community college students’ behavioral intention to use of mobile learning and mobile library resources. The acceptance of mobile learning by students and educators is critical

Robin Lee Donaldson

2011-01-01

209

Accepters and rejecters of counseling  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 samples of probationary male students (N = 60, N = 56) were invited to group counseling. An analysis of their personality test scores revealed significant differences between accepters and rejecters, with rejecters more nonconforming in 1 sample and accepters more nonconforming in the other.

Harriett A. Rose; Charles F. Elton

1968-01-01

210

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-06-01

211

5 CFR 2601.204 - Conditions for acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS STATUTORY GIFT ACCEPTANCE AUTHORITY...responsibilities or official duties in a fair and objective manner, or would...

2013-01-01

212

49 CFR 1103.30 - Acceptance of employment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public § 1103.30 Acceptance of employment. (a) The practitioner must...

2011-10-01

213

Academic integrity: "accepted," "in press," or unacceptable?  

PubMed

In this issue, Grimm and Maxfield report the results of an analysis of the outcomes of manuscripts listed as "provisionally accepted," "accepted," "in press," and "submitted" on applications to a university radiology residency program. Their surprising finding that one-third of manuscripts listed as "accepted" or "in press" were not published two years after being included on an application raises questions about the reasons for these discrepancies.The authors of this commentary argue that one explanation for these findings is that some applicants deliberately misrepresented facts in order to be seen as more attractive candidates. After examining the professionalism implications of the study by Grimm and Maxfield, the authors offer recommendations for addressing lapses in students' professionalism early on. They recommend that medical school admissions and teaching faculty establish clear and unshakable expectations that untruths will not be tolerated regardless of the difficult administrative challenges that may ensue. Further, medical school admissions committees should select entrance criteria that reward collaborative behaviors and honesty in addition to academic achievement. The authors encourage more longitudinal, systematic analyses of potential fabrications in residency applications, with the goal of fostering a culture of trust in medicine. PMID:24072129

Mushlin, Stuart B; Katz, Joel T

2013-11-01

214

25 CFR 115.410 - What types of identification will the BIA or OTFM accept as âverifiable photo identificationâ?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...identification will the BIA or OTFM accept...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL...FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts...identification will the BIA or OTFM accept...license; (b) A government-issued...

2013-04-01

215

Special Issue: In Google's Broad Wake: Taking Responsibility for Shaping the Global Digital Library. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Number 250  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"ARL" is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). "ARL" reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff and users; higher…

Johnson, Richard K.

2007-01-01

216

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14

217

Patient responses to genetic information: studies of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes identify issues for use of genetic testing in nephrology practice  

PubMed Central

Advances in the genetic basis of kidney disease may mean that genetic testing is increasingly important in reducing disease morbidity and mortality among patients. However, there is little research examining patient responses to genetic information for Mendelian and common kidney diseases. Existing research on kidney and other hereditary cancer syndromes can inform three major issues relevant to the nephrology context: (1) how patients understand their risk of disease following genetic counseling and testing; (2) their emotional responses to the information; and (3) their uptake of recommended risk-reducing strategies. Prior research suggests that genetic counseling and testing may improve patient understanding of genetics, but patients still might not fully understand the meaning of their results for disease risk. Genetic counseling and testing does not appear to result in long-term negative emotional effects among patients who carry mutations or those who do not. Finally, while genetic counseling and testing may improve adherence to recommended screening strategies, adherence varies substantially across different risk-reduction options. Previous research also suggests that computer-based interventions might be a useful adjunct to genetic counseling approaches. Examining whether and how these prior findings relate to the context of hereditary kidney disease is an important area for future research.

Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; McBride, Colleen M.

2010-01-01

218

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-01-01

219

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: Issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-06-01

220

The 1984 Snowbird Report: future issues in computer science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This workshop reports that no core description of computer science is universally accepted. A model of the discipline must emphasize global issues over isolated objectives, cooperation over competition.

1985-01-01

221

Gender Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This issue of "Coordinators' Notebook" focuses on gender issues in early childhood. The first article, "Both Halves of the Sky: Gender Socialization in the Early Years," focuses on the arguments that have led to an international call for increased participation of girls in education, an introduction to studies which map young children's…

Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

1997-01-01

222

The Busing Issue: A Legal or an Ethical Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To understand the moral or ethical issue involved in the busing affair, this discussion begins with the early fifties, a time when segregated schools were morally and legally accepted. In the early fifties, the "separate but equal position" tried unsuccessfully to equalize the education of whites and blacks. A few years later the busing of black…

Hogges, Ralph; Hogges, Lilia

223

Factors Associated With Acceptance and Decline of Client Gift Giving  

Microsoft Academic Search

Client gift giving is an interesting interpersonal event, and scholars have considered the ethical and clinical complexities involved in receiving gifts from clients. Attention to the cultural relations of client gift giving invites a more nuanced discussion of psychologists’ decisions to accept or decline client gifts. In recognition of how cultural issues affect the therapeutic relationship, the American Psychological Association

Chris Brown; Heather B. Trangsrud

2008-01-01

224

Email consultations in health care: 2--acceptability and safe application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Email may have an important role in augmenting and facilitating communication between patients and healthcare professionals. 1 In this article we summarise the evidence describing public and professional attitudes to using email in routine clinical care and explore issues relating to ensuring such use is safe. Specifically, we aim to answer three questions: x How acceptable is email consulting to

Josip Car; Aziz Sheikh

2004-01-01

225

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin's theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that…

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-01-01

226

Acceptable risks: occupational health in the nuclear industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis examines the risk of working in the nuclear power industry. It reviews the history of the industry, government regulatory activities, and current scientific evidence of the health effects of radiation exposure. A discussion of current controversies over reduction in exposure limits is presented along with an analysis of the issues and problems associated with determinations of acceptable workplace

1980-01-01

227

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): An Overview for Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) offers school counsellors a practical and meaningful approach to helping students deal with a range of issues. This is achieved through encouraging psychological flexibility through the application of six key principles. This article describes our introduction to ACT, ACT's application to children and…

Bowden, Tim; Bowden, Sandra

2012-01-01

228

Knowledge, attitudes towards and acceptability of genetic modification in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic modification remains a controversial issue. The aim of this study is to analyse the attitudes towards genetic modification, the knowledge about it and its acceptability in different application areas among German consumers. Results are based on a survey from spring 2005. An exploratory factor analysis is conducted to identify the attitudes towards genetic modification. The identified factors are used

Inken B. Christoph; Maike Bruhn; Jutta Roosen

2008-01-01

229

Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens…

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-01-01

230

E-confidence: Offer and acceptance in online contracting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online contracting, as a focal point of electronic commercial transactions, has been developing since the 1990s. Recent international legislation, namely the 2005 United Nations Convention on the Use of Electronic Communications in International Contracts (the UN Convention) is a significant legal achievement. However, the validity and effectiveness of electronic offer and acceptance is still an issue for debate. This paper

Faye Fangfei Wang

2008-01-01

231

What are Acceptable Flood Risks in Caravan Parks?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Defining acceptable flood risks in caravan parks is no easy task, given the different perspectives brought to the table by the various stakeholders. This paper presents a model of how one Council is addressing the complex issues on a risk management basis. Six principles are outlined, and two draft prescriptive planning matrices are presented, which effectively summarise one collaborative view

Stephen Yeo; Daniela Heubusch; Drew Bewsher; Paul Grech; Martin Bergs; Kelie Lowe; Anisul Huq; John Murtagh

232

Safety issues in hydrogen transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to assess the properties (physical, chemical and combustion), safety, and storage issues related to hydrogen, so that the public will accept hydrogen with the same degree of confidence, and in no-less terms as the fossil fuels currently in use. A wide comparison is drawn between the physical properties of hydrogen, alcohol and fossil fuels.

E. U. Ubong

2003-01-01

233

Ethical issues in transplant surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of organ transplantation spans 50 years and issues regarding what is ethically acceptable in clinical practice have arisen. In the early days, many pioneers were criticized for offering the hope of prolonging the life of very ill patients when effective clinical transplantation was not established. Barnard (Cape Town, South Africa) did the first heart transplant in 1967 and

Phil Dyer; Keith Rigg

2006-01-01

234

Controversial Issues in Learning Disability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author discusses controversial issues in the field of learning disabilities (LD). Among topics addressed are conflicting definitions of LD and the impact of the operational definition accepted by the US Government; etiological questions concerning the separation of neurological, environmental, and emotional factors; approaches used in…

Sapir, Selma C.

235

Ethical Issues of Military Leadership.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

I would like to emphasize four pressing ethical issues for leaders in the military establishment to consider. The first is the danger posed by the acceptance of various forms of 'ethical relativism,' or the blurring of right from wrong. It appears obvious...

K. D. Johnson

1974-01-01

236

Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

Borja, Rhea R.

2005-01-01

237

Current issues in adolescent immunization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the December 2006 Fondation Mérieux International Scientific Symposium, the current state of adolescent immunization is reviewed with a focus on the policy and programmatic issues that impact the acceptability, initiation, and successful implementation. Key questions are identified with proposed strategies to help achieve successful adolescent immunization programs. The role of current vaccines targeted to adolescents, such as those

Loretta Brabin; David P. Greenberg; Luc Hessel; Randall Hyer; Bernard Ivanoff; Pierre Van Damme

2008-01-01

238

Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

Borja, Rhea R.

2005-01-01

239

Does expressed acceptance reflect genuine attitudes? A bogus pipeline study of the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of a person with AIDS.  

PubMed

The present study examined whether expressed acceptance of a person with AIDS reflects genuine acceptance or a desire to appear to be accepting. Theory and research on the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of stigmatized people provided the framework for investigating this question. After writing about death or another aversive topic, participants indicated their acceptance of a target with AIDS while connected to physiological equipment that they believed could detect lies (bogus pipeline) or was simply measuring physiological responses to participation in the study. As predicted, participants in the mortality salience/bogus pipeline condition indicated significantly less acceptance of the target with AIDS than participants in the other three conditions, suggesting that acceptance of a person with AIDS is at least partially a result of wanting to appear to be accepting, without necessarily genuinely accepting someone with AIDS. PMID:22468415

Grover, Kristin W; Miller, Carol T

240

Issues management made easier  

SciTech Connect

Increases in ES&H compliance issues within the past few years have necessitated a formal process by which DOE facilities address these issues. In May 1991, ANL-W implemented the ANL-W Issues Management System (IMS) to facilitate the management of compliance issues and scheduling of corrective action plans with limited resources. The central focus of this process is a computer database, Integrated Resource Management System (IRMS), which allows quick retrieval of compliance information, organization of compliance issues based on a risk-based prioritization methodology, and tracking of corrective action plans. Without the IRMS, the ANL-W Issues Management System would have been difficult to administer and manage. ANL-W has used the IRMS for both audit preparation and audit response, most noticeably the preparation and subsequent response to the 1991 Tiger Team audit. The IRMS was used to track ANL-W Self-Assessment corrective action plans, provide instant information to Tiger Team members regarding Self-Assessment findings, produce prioritized lists of Tiger Team concerns for developing corrective action plans, and track Tiger Team corrective action plans. Status reports to senior, laboratory management regarding the Tiger Team corrective action plan are produced based on information provided by the IRMS. This paper discusses the criteria used for selecting the IRMS, implementation of the Issues Management System using the IRMS, lessons learned, and the future evolution of the IRMS.

Brownson, L.

1993-10-01

241

Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids  

SciTech Connect

The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

Frey, P.R.; Kisner, R.A.

1982-04-01

242

Using Web-Based and Paper-Based Questionnaires for Collecting Data on Fertility Issues Among Female Childhood Cancer Survivors: Differences in Response Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Web-based questionnaires have become increasingly popular in health research. However, reported response rates vary and response bias may be introduced. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether sending a mixed invitation (paper-based together with Web-based questionnaire) rather than a Web-only invitation (Web-based questionnaire only) results in higher response and participation rates for female childhood cancer survivors filling out a questionnaire on fertility issues. In addition, differences in type of response and characteristics of the responders and nonresponders were investigated. Moreover, factors influencing preferences for either the Web- or paper-based version of the questionnaire were examined. Methods This study is part of a nationwide study on reproductive function, ovarian reserve, and risk of premature menopause in female childhood cancer survivors. The Web-based version of the questionnaire was available for participants through the Internet by means of a personalized user name and password. Participants were randomly selected to receive either a mixed invitation (paper-based questionnaire together with log-in details for Web-based questionnaire, n = 137) or a Web-only invitation (log-in details only, n = 140). Furthermore, the latter group could request a paper-based version of the questionnaire by filling out a form. Results Overall response rates were comparable in both randomization groups (83% mixed invitation group vs 89% in Web-only invitation group, P = .20). In addition, participation rates appeared not to differ (66% or 90/137, mixed invitation group vs 59% or 83/140, Web-only invitation group, P =.27). However, in the mixed invitation group, significantly more respondents filled out the paper-based questionnaire compared with the Web-only invitation group (83% or 75/90 and 65% or 54/83, respectively, P = .01). The 44 women who filled out the Web-based version of the questionnaire had a higher educational level than the 129 women who filled out the paper-based version (P = .01). Furthermore, the probability of filling out the Web-based questionnaire appeared to be greater for women who were allocated to the Web-only invitation group (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.31 - 6.21), were older (OR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 - 1.15), had a higher educational level (OR high vs low = 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 - 0.52), or were students (OR employed vs student = 3.25, 95% CI 1.00 - 10.56). Conclusions Although overall response as well as participation rates to both types of invitations were similar, adding a paper version of a questionnaire to a Web-only invitation resulted in more respondents filling out the paper-based version. In addition, women who were older, had a higher level of education, or were students, were more likely to have filled out the Web-based version of the questionnaire. Given the many advantages of Web-based over paper-based questionnaires, researchers should strongly consider using Web-based questionnaires, although possible response bias when using these types of questionnaires should be taken into account. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2922; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=2922 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/5zRRdMrDv)

Overbeek, Annelies; van der Pal, Helena J; Versluys, A. Birgitta; Bresters, Dorine; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline

2011-01-01

243

The MAGNEX large acceptance spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The main features of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer are described. It has a quadrupole + dipole layout and a hybrid detector located at the focal plane. The aberrations due to the large angular (50 msr) and momentum (+- 13%) acceptance are reduced by an accurate hardware design and then compensated by an innovative software ray-reconstruction technique. The obtained resolution in energy, angle and mass are presented in the paper. MAGNEX has been used up to now for different experiments in nuclear physics and astrophysics confirming to be a multipurpose device.

Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Carbone, D. [Universita di Catania, via S.Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, via S.Sofia 62, 95125, Catania (Italy); Foti, A. [Universita di Catania, via S.Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Catania, via S.Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy)

2010-03-01

244

Measuring parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain: a preliminary validation of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report.  

PubMed

Parent perceptions of and responses to pain have been identified as important factors in understanding pain-related disability among children and adolescents with chronic pain. The ability to accept chronic pain rather than focus on ways to avoid or control it has been linked to positive outcomes in chronic pain research. To examine parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain, the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report (CPAQ-P), was developed and administered to 195 parents of children with persistent pain evaluated in a multidisciplinary pain clinic. Analyses support the internal consistency of the CPAQ-P (?=.89) and 1-month stability estimates were acceptable for the total scale score (?=.72), and results suggest some responsivity to change. Exploratory factor analysis identified a 2-factor model with 4 items removed from the original 20-item measure. Confirmatory factor analysis strongly supported the modified version. For construct validity, parent beliefs about child acceptance were negatively correlated with parent pain catastrophizing and parent fear of pain. Greater acceptance was also negatively associated with protective parent responses to pain. These results support the CPAQ-P as a promising measure for assessing parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain and reinforce the importance of the social context and parental influence on child functioning. PMID:21783324

Simons, Laura E; Sieberg, Christine B; Kaczynski, Karen J

2011-07-23

245

Developing environmentally acceptable desalination projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing an environmentally acceptable desalination project has the following overall benefits: protection of the environment, minimize planning approval time-scales, minimize time for arranging funding or reaching “financial close” and minimizing overall construction time-scales. This can be achieved if the developer recognizes that the project will be environmentally “driven” from site identification to decommissioning and as such develop a project strategy

Paramjit Mahi

2001-01-01

246

Mindfulness and self-acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present article will focus on the cognitive theory of mindfulness and its importance in achieving unconditional self-acceptance. The goal of the mindful perspective is to increase cognitive flexibility and to thereby increase behavioral flexibility and the ability to adapt to one’s current environment in a meaningful manner. Empirical evidence spanning four decades attests to the beneficial effects of a

Shelley H. Carson; Ellen J. Langer

2006-01-01

247

SMAA - Stochastic multiobjective acceptability analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stochastic multiobjective acceptability analysis (SMAA) is a multicriteria decision support technique for multiple decision makers based on exploring the weight space. Inaccurate or uncertain input data can be represented as probability distributions. In SMAA the decision makers need not express their preferences explicitly or implicitly; instead the technique analyses what kind of valuations would make each alternative the preferred one.

Risto Lahdelma; Joonas Hokkanen; Pekka Salminen

1998-01-01

248

Consumer acceptance of wireless finance  

Microsoft Academic Search

M-commerce has been heralded repeatedly as the new service frontier of the millennium. Present market reality, however, seems to be less optimistic. Therefore, the current study explores the factors contributing to the adoption of mobile services in a context of wireless finance. The technology acceptance model was used as a point of departure. For this study, perceived cost, system quality

Mirella Kleijnen; Martin Wetzels; Ko de Ruyter

2004-01-01

249

Technology acceptability for medical assistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research we examine the age-specific acceptance motives of medical assistive technologies assessing the general openness of using these technologies as well as estimating potential barriers, which may impede a successful rollout. 122 respondents (20 - 80 years) participated in a survey, in which they were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of medical assistive

Martina Ziefle; Wiktoria Wilkowska

2010-01-01

250

Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco`s facility.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1996-02-12

251

Decision modeling and acceptance criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is partly tutorial by presenting well known classical decision theory in a slightly untraditional form, but it does also present thinking and results that have not been published in the engineering literature before. The paper introduces the mathematical modeling basis for rational formulation of decision criteria and public acceptance criteria connected to risk analysis of technical operations that

Ove Ditlevsen

2003-01-01

252

LANL measurements verification acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of SNM diversion/theft is a major concern to organizations charged with control of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Verification measurements are used to aid in the detection of SNM losses. The acceptance/rejection criteria for verification measurements are dependent on the facility-specific processes, the knowledge of the measured item, and the measurement technique applied. This paper will discuss some of the LANL measurement control steps and criteria applied for the acceptance of a verification measurement. The process involves interaction among the facility operations personnel, the subject matter experts of a specific instrument/technique, the process knowledge on the matrix of the measured item, and the measurement-specific precision and accuracy values. By providing an introduction to a site-specific application of measurement verification acceptance criteria, safeguards, material custodians, and SNM measurement professionals are assisted in understanding the acceptance/rejection process for measurements and their contribution of the process to the detection of SNM diversion.

Chavez, D. M. (David M.)

2001-01-01

253

Dissolution test acceptance sampling plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) general monograph provides a standard for dissolution compliance with the requirements as stated in the individual USP monograph for a tablet or capsule dosage form. The acceptance rules recommended by USP have important roles in the quality control process. The USP rules and their modifications are often used as an industrial lot release sampling plan, where

Yi Tsong; Thomas Hammerstrom; Karl Lin; Ting Eng Ong

1995-01-01

254

Cost effective computerized decision support: tracking caregiver acceptance at the point of care.  

PubMed Central

We implemented a computerized decision support tool to standardize the administration of supplemental oxygen (O2) therapy in the acute care (non-ICU) hospital setting. Caregiver acceptance of the computerizeds oxygen therapy protocol (COTP) instructions was measured to determine the clinical performance of the computerized decision support tool. 49.6% of instructions generated were followed by the clinical caregiver, and 16.8% of instructions generated were explicitly acknowledged by the user through the COTP computer interface. Despite this low caregiver response rate, significant favorable changes in the administration of oxygen were observed. This paper is focused on the issues of general importance the caregiver response rate raises for the implementation and clinical use of computerized decision support tools, including: (1) limitations of the user interface and (2) inherent difficulty in changing long-standing practice patterns.

Wallace, C. J.; Metcalf, S.; Zhang, X.; Kinder, A. T.; Greenway, L.; Morris, A. H.

1995-01-01

255

Unresolved issues in scientific sexology.  

PubMed

A number of unresolved issues in sexology research and practice are reviewed. Penile volume assessment of sexual arousal has consistently proved more sensitive than penile circumference assessment and requires much shorter exposure to the erotic stimuli eliciting the arousal, reducing the subjects' ability to modify their responses. Failure to acknowledge this has allowed acceptance of evidence based on penile circumference assessment that behavioral treatments such as directed masturbation can increase the ability of sex offenders to be heterosexually aroused and aversive therapy can reduce their deviant urges whereas penile volume assessment indicates these procedures are ineffective. A randomized controlled trial of relapse prevention versus no treatment for sex offenders found more treated than untreated subjects reoffended after a mean follow-up period of 4 years. Researchers and therapists accepted that a post hoc statistical manipulation of the results provided evidence of a treatment effect. Subsequently it has been recommended that randomized controlled evaluations of treatments of sex offenders be abandoned. Meta-analysis of outcome studies has been used uncritically. The majority of men and women who report homosexual feelings and/or behavior report predominant heterosexual feelings and behavior and do not identify as homosexual. These consistent findings remain ignored. Studies of the etiology and development of homosexuality and heterosexuality treat them as distributed categorically rather than dimensionally and investigate only self-identified homosexuals and heterosexuals. With this methodology the predominantly heterosexual majority are excluded or misclassified. The belief that the European concept of the homosexual is a late 19th-century invention is based on an inadequate reading of literature. Limitations of the DSM classification of sexual and gender identity disorders are pointed out. The validity of self-report of sexual behavior has been questioned on the basis that men report a markedly higher average number of sexual partners than women. Possible sex differences in reporting the number of partners who are of the same sex, casual, or perpetrators or victims of sexual coercion and child abuse have not been taken into account. Failure of sexology to progress due to lack of resolution of conflicting issues may contribute to the low impact factor of its journals. PMID:10553492

McConaghy, N

1999-08-01

256

Training and information technology issue, 2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of the May-June issue is on training and information technology. Major articles\\/reports in this issue include: Communicating effectively, by Alain Bucaille, AREVA; Reputation management, by Susan Brisset, Bruce Power; Contol room and HSI modernization guidance, by Joseph Naser, EPRI; How far are we from public acceptance, by Jennifer A. Biedscheid and Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions LLC; Spent

Agnihotri; Newal

2005-01-01

257

Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

Peterson, T. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

1995-12-01

258

Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma  

SciTech Connect

This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

Peterson, T.

1995-12-01

259

Newspaper Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special issue includes "The Microfilming of Newspapers: An Overview" (Thomas Bourke); "United States Newspaper Program: Progress and Propsects" (Larry Sullivan); "The Preservation of Canadian Newspapers" (Mary Jane Starr); "Current Filming of the New York Times at UMI" (Kenneth Tillman); and "The Cooperative Africana Microform Project" (Ray…

Bourke, Thomas A.; And Others

1986-01-01

260

This Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces a theme issue that describes studies which have been conducted on teaching as persuasion and discusses key ideas and concepts that have emerged from these studies, attempting to arrange these ideas and concepts into a coherent theory of learning as a process of change and teaching as a process of persuasion. (SM)

Murphy, P. Karen, Ed.

2001-01-01

261

Sanskrit Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

1971-01-01

262

EMERGING ISSUES  

EPA Science Inventory

In order to better fulfill its mission under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement for the restoration and maintenance of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem GLNPO has funded strategic or emerging issues of basin-wide importance: ...

263

Addressing Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

Schoebel, Susan

1991-01-01

264

Acceptance of suicide in Moscow  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Attitudes concerning the acceptability of suicide have been emphasized as being important for understanding why levels of\\u000a suicide mortality vary in different societies across the world. While Russian suicide mortality levels are among the highest\\u000a in the world, not much is known about attitudes to suicide in Russia. This study aims to obtain a greater understanding about\\u000a the levels and

Tanya JukkalaIlkka; Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

2011-01-01

265

Assessing Mindfulness and Experiential Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The Guest House, a poem by Rumi (translated by Barks & Moyne, 1997) that has been utilized in mindfulness-based therapeutic approaches (e.g.,\\u000a Roemer & Orsillo, 2002; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002), conveys the essence of mindfulnessandexperiential acceptance.\\u000a Such a “stance” stands in sharp contrast to the approach that many of us take toward our thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations,\\u000a particularly

Jennifer Block-Lerner; Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault; Matthew T. Tull

266

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-01-01

267

Making Agents Acceptable to People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because ever more powerful intelligent agents will interact with people in increasingly sophisticated and important ways,\\u000a greater attention must be given to the technical and social aspects of how to make agents acceptable to people [4], p. 51]. The technical challenge is to devise a computational structure that guarantees that from the technical standpoint\\u000a all is under control. We want

Jeffrey M. Bradshaw; Patrick Beautement; Maggie R. Breedy; Larry Bunch; Sergey V. Drakunov; Paul J. Feltovich; Robert R. Hoffman; Renia Jeffers; Matthew Johnson; Shriniwas Kulkarnt; James Lott; Anil K. Raj; Niranjan Suri; Andrzej Uszok

268

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

269

76 FR 20042 - Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement and Terminating Proceeding  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Drug Enforcement Administration [Docket No. 08-16] Four Seasons Distributors, Inc.; Order Accepting Settlement Agreement...Enforcement Administration, issued an Order to Show Cause to Four Seasons Distributors, Inc. (Respondent), of Belleville,...

2011-04-11

270

Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

Wang, Zhihuan

271

Exploring the Acceptance of Video Games in the Classroom by Secondary School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a path-model to examine and predict student acceptance of videogames, based on the technology acceptance model, is proposed, discussed and empirically tested. Special attention is given to the gender and experience issues. According to this model, the intention of students to use video games in the classroom is affected directly by a number of factors: the relative

Jeroen BOURGONJON; Martin VALCKE

272

Information Communication Technologies in the Classroom: Expanding TAM to Examine Instructor Acceptance and Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Studies show that use of computer-based information communication technologies (ICTs) can have positive impacts on student motivation and learning. The present study examines the issue of ICT adoption in the classroom by expanding the Technology Acceptance Model to identify factors that contribute to teacher acceptance and use of these…

Huntington, Heidi; Worrell, Tracy

2013-01-01

273

HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles: a mixed-method approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles, California. We combined a qualitative research method (focus groups) with an innovative market research method (conjoint analysis). Focus groups explored social issues, concerns, barriers and motivators associated with HIV vaccine acceptability. Conjoint analysis was used to assess preferences among eight hypothetical HIV vaccines with varying attribute profiles

Sung-Jae Lee; Ronald A. Brooks; Peter A. Newman; Danielle Seiden; Rassamee Sangthong; Naihua Duan

2008-01-01

274

Consumers' Acceptance of Biometric Identification Technology in Financial Services - First Findings and Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the context of financial trans actions such as cash withdrawal at ATMs and EFTPOS payments, cardholder identification and verification are crucial issues. The paper investigates the acceptance of biometrics, in particular iris - scanning, as alternative methods for secure transactions. Ba sed on established technology acceptance models, the conceptual research model includes psychological constructs such as perceived risk, perceived

Monika Koller

275

Modeling Patients' Acceptance of Provider-delivered E-health  

PubMed Central

Objective: Health care providers are beginning to deliver a range of Internet-based services to patients; however, it is not clear which of these e-health services patients need or desire. The authors propose that patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health can be modeled in advance of application development by measuring the effects of several key antecedents to e-health use and applying models of acceptance developed in the information technology (IT) field. Design: This study tested three theoretical models of IT acceptance among patients who had recently registered for access to provider-delivered e-health. Measurements: An online questionnaire administered items measuring perceptual constructs from the IT acceptance models (intrinsic motivation, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness/extrinsic motivation, and behavioral intention to use e-health) and five hypothesized antecedents (satisfaction with medical care, health care knowledge, Internet dependence, information-seeking preference, and health care need). Responses were collected and stored in a central database. Results: All tested IT acceptance models performed well in predicting patients' behavioral intention to use e-health. Antecedent factors of satisfaction with provider, information-seeking preference, and Internet dependence uniquely predicted constructs in the models. Conclusion: Information technology acceptance models provide a means to understand which aspects of e-health are valued by patients and how this may affect future use. In addition, antecedents to the models can be used to predict e-health acceptance in advance of system development.

Wilson, E. Vance; Lankton, Nancy K.

2004-01-01

276

Energy policy and public acceptance: current and future directions  

SciTech Connect

This review of literature concerning the attitudinal and behavioral aspects of public acceptance of energy leans toward issues of socio-economic and environmental impacts. The articles reviewed are divided into two groups. The first classification involves the distinction between attitude surveys and case studies. The second classification concerns whether the issues at hand are generic or site-specific in nature. For the attitude studies, the classification divides those surveys concerned with general issues of energy policy from those focusing upon the impacts of a particular technology upon a specific locale. For the case studies, this distinction separates the studies involving national intervenors from the reports on local resistance to siting decisions. The majority of the case studies and articles reviewed focus on nuclear and coal energy facility-siting decisions, because these are what much of the current debate concerns. A few studies are related to water resources development where many of the same siting issues arise. 32 references.

Curry, M.G.; Greene, M.; Lindell, M.K.

1977-05-01

277

Axelrod model: accepting or discussing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agents building social systems are characterized by complex states, and interactions among individuals can align their opinions. The Axelrod model describes how local interactions can result in emergence of cultural domains. We propose two variants of the Axelrod model where local consensus is reached either by listening and accepting one of neighbors' opinion or two agents discuss their opinion and achieve an agreement with mixed opinions. We show that the local agreement rule affects the character of the transition between the single culture and the multiculture regimes.

Dybiec, Bartlomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

2012-10-01

278

Procedures and acceptance criteria for PAS-1 cask inspections  

SciTech Connect

The procedures and acceptance criteria that comprise this document were prepared to support a one-time test to certify two PAS-1 casks in accordance with US Department of Energy Certificate of Compliance US A/9184/B(U), which was issued in 1998. The specific inspections addressed in this document are the visual weld inspection and a dimensional inspection of the primary containment vessel.

Mercado, J.E.

1998-09-09

279

A full-acceptance detector for the SSC  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, I will describe very briefly the cartoon of a full-acceptance detector as presented in the expression of interest, along with some of the basic features and technical difficulties. I will describe some theoretical-physics spinoffs emergent from the preparation of the EoI, which bear on general issues relevant to hadron spectroscopy. I review very briefly the capability of the detector for spectroscopy per se. The final section is devoted to concluding remarks.

Bjorken, J.D.

1991-11-01

280

Gender issues and multiple sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gender-related issues in multiple sclerosis include the important and widely accepted clinical observations that men are less\\u000a susceptible to the disease than women and also that disease activity in multiple sclerosis is decreased during late pregnancy.\\u000a This article reviews mechanisms underlying each of these clinical observations and discusses the role of sex hormones in each.\\u000a Specifically, the protective role of

Rhonda R. Voskuhl

2002-01-01

281

Traffic Calming: A Social Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Substantial urban growth fueled by a strong economy often results in heavy traffic thus making streets less hospitable. Traffic calming is one response to the pervasiveness of the automobile. The issues concern built environments and involve multiple actors reflecting different interests. The issues are rarely technical and involve combinations…

Crouse, David W.

2004-01-01

282

Why do they go? Empirical evidence of employees' motives for seeking or accepting relocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses one of the shortcomings apparent in previous research on expatriate job-transfers, namely the lack of exploratory, empirical groundwork into the motives of expatriates to seek or accept international assignments. The relocatee population of a large German MNC was surveyed for their motives to seek or accept their transfer, using an open-response format. Responses were content analysed in

Thomas Hippler

2009-01-01

283

Radioactive waste acceptance team and generator interface yields successful implementation of waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project has developed a successful Low Level Waste Shipping Program in compliance with the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325, Revision 1. This shipping program is responsible for the successful disposal of more than 4 million cubic feet of Low Level Waste over the past decade. The success of the Fernald Low Level Waste Shipping Program is due to the generator program staff working closely with the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program Team to achieve win/win situations. The teamwork is the direct result of dedicated, proactive professionals working together toward a common objective: the safe disposition of low level radioactive waste. The growth and development of this program has many lessons learned to share with the low level waste generating community. The recognition of reciprocal interests enables consistently high annual volumes of Fernald waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site without incident. The large volumes successfully disposed serve testimony to the success of the program which is equally important to all Nevada Test Site and Fernald stakeholders. The Fernald approach to success is currently being shared with other low-level waste generators through DOE-NV sponsored outreach programs. This paper introduces examples of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation contributions to the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program outreach initiatives. These practices are applicable to other low level waste disposal programs whether federal, commercial, domestic or international.

Rowe, J.G. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Griffin, W.A.; Rast, D.M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01

284

Predicting the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems.  

PubMed

The strong prevalence of human error as a crash causation factor in motorcycle accidents calls for countermeasures that help tackling this issue. Advanced rider assistance systems pursue this goal, providing the riders with support and thus contributing to the prevention of crashes. However, the systems can only enhance riding safety if the riders use them. For this reason, acceptance is a decisive aspect to be considered in the development process of such systems. In order to be able to improve behavioural acceptance, the factors that influence the intention to use the system need to be identified. This paper examines the particularities of motorcycle riding and the characteristics of this user group that should be considered when predicting the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems. Founded on theories predicting behavioural intention, the acceptance of technologies and the acceptance of driver support systems, a model on the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems is proposed, including the perceived safety when riding without support, the interface design and the social norm as determinants of the usage intention. Since actual usage cannot be measured in the development stage of the systems, the willingness to have the system installed on the own motorcycle and the willingness to pay for the system are analyzed, constituting relevant conditions that allow for actual usage at a later stage. Its validation with the results from user tests on four advanced rider assistance systems allows confirming the social norm and the interface design as powerful predictors of the acceptance of ARAS, while the extent of perceived safety when riding without support did not have any predictive value in the present study. PMID:23200440

Huth, Véronique; Gelau, Christhard

2012-04-05

285

7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance. 1210.323 Section 1210.323 Agriculture Regulations of the Department...Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person nominated...

2012-01-01

286

Surface moisture measurement system acceptance testing work plan  

SciTech Connect

This work plan addresses testing of the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The purpose of this plan is to define the scope of work, identify organizational responsibilities, describe test control requirements, and provide estimated costs and schedule associated with acceptance testing.

Ritter, G.A.

1996-01-01

287

Energetic Device Qualification and Lot Acceptance Test Requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aerospace and defense communities have required a variety of tests for qualification and lot acceptance of energetic devices. Many of these test requirements have been developed through the years as a response to past failures. Most of these tests were developed when the firing systems contained large mechanical components and the energetic devices used a hot wire initiating mechanism.

Barry T. Neyer

288

A study of users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biometric authentication methods are being increasingly used for many types of applications. Since such methods necessitate humans to interact with a device, effective implementation requires consideration of the perceptions and responses of end users. Towards this goal, we present in this paper a modality-independent evaluation methodology to study users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems. It is based on the

Mohamad El-Abed; Romain Giot; Baptiste Hemery; Christophe Rosenberger

2010-01-01

289

Border Security: Consular Identification Cards Accepted within United States, but Consistent Federal Guidance Needed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several state and local government agencies and financial institutions accept consular identification (CID) cards, which are issued by foreign governments to their citizens living abroad. Mexico issued more than 2.2 million CID cards in 2002-2003 and Guat...

2004-01-01

290

USMC Environmental and Corrosion Control Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Marine Corps (USMC) Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPAC) Program is responsible for corrosion control issues for all ground vehicles and support equipment. In this role, the CPAC Program addresses issues through three main areas: Appl...

A. Sheetz

2010-01-01

291

Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

Higgins, Chris

2012-01-01

292

Risk acceptance criteria for temporary phases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The full life cycle approach to risk acceptance is proposed as the basis for establishing of acceptance criteria for the temporary phases, i.e., onshore and offshore construction as well as installation. The background for such criteria is discussed, as well as evaluations that may be used to formulate risk acceptance criteria in the construction and installation phases. The criteria are

J. E. Vinnem

1996-01-01

293

Issues in workforce composition analysis  

SciTech Connect

An issue of paramount interest to US industry is the supply and quality of human resources available for this country`s scientific and technological activities. The changing composition of the workforce and the responsibility that an organization has to assure equal opportunity, give rise to various issues. This paper discusses some of the issues associated with the scientific and technical workforce. Specifically, it explores some of the questions pertaining to workforce composition and measures of workforce composition. This paper should be useful to those responsible for personnel policies.

Koeck, D.C.; Rogers, J.D.

1996-05-01

294

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01

295

The ethical dimension of terahertz and millimeter-wave imaging technologies: security, privacy, and acceptability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terahertz and millimeter-wave imaging technologies, wherever they are applied to human beings, generate problems with the "naked" body. Security issues thus inevitably lead to ethical questions of privacy and intimacy. Less apparent but no less important are other issues such as discrimination and the question of reducing this problem through post processing of data; scalability; questions of controlling the controllers; questions of proliferation. Ethical research alone can not provide acceptability. However, ultimately innovative technologies will not achieve widespread and sustainable acceptance without a fundamental clarification of the ethically relevant issues.

Ammicht Quinn, R.; Rampp, B.

2009-05-01

296

Managing people with mental health presentations in emergency departments--a service exploration of the issues surrounding responsiveness from a mental health care consumer and carer perspective.  

PubMed

Mainstreaming of mental health services (MHS) within the Australian medical system has generated a fundamental transformation in the way consumers and carers access emergency MHS. People present to the Emergency Department (ED) with many health issues which can often include the management of their mental illness, physical co morbidity, or substance use. This paper discusses the issues surrounding access to EDs for clients, families and staff in the context of presentations for mental health problems at a southern metropolitan hospital in Victoria. The pilot project utilised focus groups with mental health care consumers and carers to collaboratively focus on and document the mental health client's 'journey of care' in the ED. There is evidence to suggest from this project that the ED mental health client journey needs continuous improvement and evaluation. PMID:22947687

Morphet, Julia; Innes, Kelli; Munro, Ian; O'Brien, Anthony; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Reed, Fiona; Kudinoff, Teresa

2012-07-20

297

Vaginal contraceptive film gains wider acceptance.  

PubMed

In US health departments and family planning clinics, women are beginning to accept vaginal contraceptive film more widely. Further, direct sales of this method, which is also distributed over the counter, has increased. In fact, in 1991, vaginal contraceptive film was the top selling contraceptive in pharmacies. This 2.5 sq. inch water-soluble film is impregnated with nonoxynol-9. The woman uses her finger to insert the folded square as close as possible to the cervix 5-60 minutes before intercourse. If the time between acts of intercourse is greater than 1 hour, she must insert another square. After it dissolves, it is a firm gel removed by vaginal and cervical fluids. The company realizes that its relatively high cost (about $3.59 for 3 films) prevents some family planning providers from offering the film. It has tried to cut costs by not using extra packaging material and by manufacturing it in the US instead of ain England. A manager of the family planning clinic at R.E. Thomason County Hospital in El Paso, Texas, notes that user compliance is higher with the vaginal contraceptive film than foam. In fact, patients at the Planned Parenthood League of Middlesex County, New Jersey, favor the film because it is less messy than foam. Teenagers in El Paso prefer the film because of the privacy issue and gives them more control to protect themselves from pregnancy. A worker at the New Jersey clinic recommends the film as a backup method for women beginning to use oral contraceptives. She also suggests to patients requesting condoms to also use the film. The company makes the same recommendation. Yet, family planning workers note that some women cannot convince partners to use the condom. 90% of patients at the El Paso clinic are Hispanic, and they tend to not accept condom use. Some providers suggest using 2 applications of the film to defend against sexually transmitted diseases, but there is no evidence that double application actually does so. PMID:12317927

1992-09-01

298

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU...Supplement No. 3 to Part 745âForeign Authorized Agencies Responsible...respective zones. Board of Foreign Trade, Ministry of Economic Affairs, 1 Hukou St.,...

2013-01-01

299

The clinical pain acceptance Q-sort: A tool for assessment and facilitation of pain acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topic of pain acceptance can be clinically difficult to raise in a respectful way. This article introduces a method of managing the topic of pain acceptance in daily clinical practice: The clinical pain acceptance Q-sort. The Q-sort procedure comprises 13 small cards with printed statements concerning pain acceptance on the one side, score numbers on the other side. The

Peter la Cour

2012-01-01

300

The meaning and process of pain acceptance. Perceptions of women living with arthritis and fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Within the past 10 years, cognitive-behavioural pain management models have moved beyond the traditional focus on coping strategies and perceived control over pain, to incorporate mindfulness-and acceptance-based approaches. Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live life despite pain. Acceptance is associated with lower levels of pain, disability and psychological distress. Relatively little is known, however, about how patients arrive at a state of acceptance without the aid of therapy. OBJECTIVES: To explore personal definitions of acceptance and the factors that facilitate or hinder acceptance. METHODS: Eleven focus groups, involving a total of 45 women with arthritis and fibromyalgia, were conducted. RESULTS: The qualitative analysis revealed that, while the women rejected the word ‘acceptance’, they did agree with the main components of existing research definitions. The women’s responses revealed that acceptance was a process of realizations and acknowledgements, including realizing that the pain was not normal and help was needed, receiving a diagnosis, acknowledging that there was no cure and realizing that they needed to redefine ‘normal’. Diagnosis, social support, educating self and others, and self-care were factors that promoted acceptance. Struggling to retain a prepain identity, negative impacts on relationships, others not accepting their pain and the unspoken message that the pain was ‘all in their head’ were barriers to acceptance. CONCLUSION: The implications of these findings, distinctions between the diagnostic groups and recommendations regarding how health professionals can facilitate the process of acceptance are discussed.

LaChapelle, Diane L; Lavoie, Susan; Boudreau, Ainsley

2008-01-01

301

Critical issues in using the common mixture toxicity models concentration addition or response addition on species sensitivity distributions: a theoretical approach.  

PubMed

The risk of chemical mixtures to ecosystems is often assessed by applying the model of concentration addition or response addition combined with species sensitivity distribution (SSD) curves. Mixture effect predictions have been shown to be consistent only when these models are applied for a single species, however, and not with several species simultaneously aggregated to SSDs. The more stringent procedure for mixture risk assessment would hence be to apply first the concentration addition or response addition models to each species separately and, in a second step, to combine the results to construct an SSD for a mixture. Unfortunately, this methodology is not applicable in most cases because the large data sets it requires are usually unavailable. Based on theoretical data sets generated, the authors aimed to characterize the difference that can exist between these 2 methodologies. Results show that the use of concentration addition on SSD directly may lead to underestimations of the mixture concentration affecting 5% or 50% of species, especially when substances present a large standard deviation in ecotoxicity data constructing their SSD. The application of response addition can lead to over- or underestimations, depending mainly on the slope of the dose–response curves of the individual species. When assessing the risk of mixtures, one must therefore keep in mind this source of error when applying concentration addition or response addition to SSDs directly. PMID:23804417

Gregorio, Vincent; Chèvre, Nathalie; Junghans, Marion

2013-10-01

302

Consumer acceptance of genetically modified potaoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Slow consumer acceptance has inhibited the market for genetically modified (GM) potato products. Logistic growth functions\\u000a were used to model market development patterns for three comparable products — diet sodas, frozen potatoes and microwave ovens.\\u000a Predictions of GMpotato acceptance were based on averages for the comparable products. The model predicts that consumer acceptance\\u000a will be in the introduction stage of

Joseph F. Guenthner

2002-01-01

303

40 CFR 161.70 - Acceptable protocols.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES General Provisions § 161.70 Acceptable protocols. The Agency has published Pesticide...

2013-07-01

304

49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person...

2012-10-01

305

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2013-01-01

306

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2012-01-01

307

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2012-01-01

308

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2013-01-01

309

Access to Physicians' Services for Medicare Beneficiaries. ASPE Issue Brief.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This issue brief summarizes recent trends in: a) the degree to which physicians accept new Medicare and privately insured patients; and b) Medicare beneficiaries access to care before and after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act.

2013-01-01

310

Changes in Capacity Among Local Coordinated Community Response Coalitions (CCRs) Supported by the DELTA Program. Journal of Family Social Work, vol. 13, issue 4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using survey data collected from coordinated community responses (CCRs), which are community coalitions funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancements and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) Program, this article reports on improvements in internal capacity and external supports that affect ability to prevent intimate partner violence.

Pamela J. Cox; Daniel M. Finkelstein; Victoria E. Perez; Margo L. Rosenbach

2010-01-01

311

What Would Dewey Say? Channeling Dewey on the Issue of Specificity of Epistemic Beliefs--A Response to Muis, Bendixen, and Haerle (2006)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this response to Muis et al. (2006), I draw on the writings of Dewey to explore three critical questions. The first question is what is gained or what is lost when the study of epistemology moves from philosophy to psychology and eventually to educational practice? The second asks whether the primary question under examination should be "if"…

Alexander, Patricia A.

2006-01-01

312

Response  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast food companies like Siam Burger that participate in health awareness campaigns create a conflict of interest between\\u000a the social responsibility of promoting health and the business interest of increasing sales through marketing strategies like\\u000a advertising. Alternative options of raising health awareness without mitigating the involvement of fast food companies either\\u000a by denying advertisements or having a third party foundation

Sarah Jane Toledano; Leonardo D. de Castro

2007-01-01

313

Digital forensics and the issues of identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of what we consider to be the identity of a person has become increasingly complex as we have made ever greater use of the facilities and services that have been made available by developing technologies and the Internet. In the past people normally had one identity, while in the current environment it is acceptable to maintain separate ‘identities’

Andrew Jones; Thomas Martin

2010-01-01

314

Health insurance does not guarantee access to primary care: a national study of physicians' acceptance of publicly insured patients.  

PubMed

The roles of reimbursement and other predictors that affect physicians' willingness to accept publicly insured continuing care patients were examined in a national survey. The response rate was 47%. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents were accepting new patients. Forty-two percent of these physicians were willing to accept new continuing care patients insured by Medicaid, 70% reported accepting those paying by Medicare assignment, and 85% said they accept patients covered by Medicare plus balance-billing payments. Low reimbursement was the strongest predictor for lack of acceptance. The results suggest that systems of multitiered reimbursement are associated with diminished access for patients insured in the lower tiers. PMID:7562126

Cykert, S; Kissling, G; Layson, R; Hansen, C

1995-06-01

315

Consumer acceptance of irradiated food: theory and reality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For years most consumers have expressed less concern about food irradiation than other food processing technologies. Attitude studies have demonstrated that when given science-based information, from 60% to 90% of consumers prefer the advantages irradiation processing provides. When information is accompanied by samples, acceptance may increase to 99%. Information on irradiation should include product benefits, safety and wholesomeness, address environmental safety issues, and include endorsements by recognized health authorities. Educational and marketing programs should now be directed toward retailers and processors. Given the opportunity, consumers will buy high quality, safety-enhanced irradiated food.

Bruhn, Christine M.

1998-06-01

316

Foundational issues in evolution education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a great need for effective evolution education. This paper reviews some of the evidence that demonstrates that need and analyzes some of the foundational semantic, epistemological, and philosophical issues involved. This analysis is used to provide a functional understanding of the distinction between science and non-science. Special emphasis is placed the scientific meaning of the terms theory, hypothesis, fact, proof, evidence, and truth, focusing on the difference between religious belief and acceptance of a scientific theory. Science is viewed as theologically neutral and as not mutually exclusive from religion. Finally, a number of practical recommendations to the classroom biology teacher are presented.

Smith, Mike U.; Siegel, Harvey; McInerney, Joseph D.

1995-01-01

317

Testing Zaller’s Reception and Acceptance Model in an Intense Election Campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper provides a test of Zaller’s reception and acceptance model. The theory describes conditions under which a political\\u000a message is received, and, if received, accepted or rejected. The study deals with the 1988 Canadian election that was fiercely\\u000a fought over one central issue, the Free Trade Accord with the United States. We use the 1988 Canadian Election Study campaign

Agnieszka Dobrzynska; André Blais

2008-01-01

318

Parent's Acceptance of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Behavior and Communication Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to examine what parents find as acceptable treatment options for children with behavior problems in a communication disorders population. Parents' acceptability of seven treatment options, including positive reinforcement, time-out, response cost, spanking, overcorrection, differential attention, and medication were…

Boothe, Jennifer L.; Borrego, Joaquin

2004-01-01

319

Acceptance of Spousal Death: The Factor of Time in Bereaved Older Adults' Search for Meaning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Response to the death of a spouse was examined by focusing on acceptance, which was conceptualized as both a process and an outcome. Grounded theory was applied to analyze the experience of 15 bereaved Hong Kong Chinese older adults. The main theme that emerged was time. Acceptance of spousal death was found to be related to the search for…

Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Chan, Cecilia L. W.

2011-01-01

320

Understanding the Influence of Emotions and Reflection upon Multi-Source Feedback Acceptance and Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduction: Receiving negative performance feedback can elicit negative emotional reactions which can interfere with feedback acceptance and use. This study investigated emotional responses of family physicians' participating in a multi-source feedback (MSF) program, sources of these emotions, and their influence upon feedback acceptance and…

Sargeant, Joan; Mann, Karen; Sinclair, Douglas; Van der Vleuten, Cees; Metsemakers, Job

2008-01-01

321

The acceptability of ending a patient's life  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To clarify how lay people and health professionals judge the acceptability of ending the life of a terminally ill patient. Design: Participants judged this acceptability in a set of 16 scenarios that combined four factors: the identity of the actor (patient or physician), the patient's statement or not of a desire to have his life ended, the nature of the action as relatively active (injecting a toxin) or passive (disconnecting life support), and the type of suffering (intractable physical pain, complete dependence, or severe psychiatric illness). Participants: 115 lay people and 72 health professionals (22 nurse's aides, 44 nurses, six physicians) in Toulouse, France. Main measurements: Mean acceptability ratings for each scenario for each group. Results: Life ending interventions are more acceptable to lay people than to the health professionals. For both, acceptability is highest for intractable physical suffering; is higher when patients end their own lives than when physicians do so; and, when physicians are the actors, is higher when patients have expressed a desire to die (voluntary euthanasia) than when they have not (involuntary euthanasia). In contrast, when patients perform the action, acceptability for the lay people and nurse's aides does not depend on whether the patient has expressed a desire to die, while for the nurses and physicians unassisted suicide is more acceptable than physician assisted suicide. Conclusions: Lay participants judge the acceptability of life ending actions in largely the same way as do healthcare professionals.

Guedj, M; Gibert, M; Maudet, A; Munoz, S; Mullet, E; Sorum, P

2005-01-01

322

Heavy Metal, Religiosity, and Suicide Acceptability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on data taken from the General Social Survey that found a link between "heavy metal" rock fanship and suicide acceptability. Finds that relationship becomes nonsignificant once level of religiosity is controlled. Heavy metal fans are low in religiosity, which contributes to greater suicide acceptability. (Author/JDM)|

Stack, Steven

1998-01-01

323

Educational Professionals' Knowledge and Acceptance of Evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to determine if we could identify a cadre of educational professionals with sufficient knowledge and acceptance of biological evolution to objectively evaluate the merits of the emerging discipline of evolutionary educational psychology. Members of APA and AERA were recruited to complete surveys measuring demographic characteristics, evolution knowledge (specifically natural selection), and evolution acceptance. We tested a model

Louis S. Nadelson; Gale M. Sinatra

324

Genres Across Cultures: Types of Acceptability Variation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One can ask four questions about genre validity across cultures. Does a certain form or configuration occur in the culture in question? Is it acceptable? If acceptable, is it in practice preferred? Is it recommended by prescriptive authorities? This paper reports the results of an attempt to answer these questions empirically by testing the…

Shaw, Philip; Gillaerts, Paul; Jacobs, Everett; Palermo, Ofelia; Shinohara, Midori; Verckens, J. Piet

2004-01-01

325

Beyond technology acceptance: understanding consumer practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To critically examine the current definitions of key constructs of the technology acceptance model (TAM) in a consumer technology-based service. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Two qualitative research studies were undertaken that encouraged consumers to reflect upon their text message (short message service – SMS) behaviour. Findings – The research highlights the inadequacy of a concentration on simple acceptance of technology

Steve Baron; Anthony Patterson; Kim Harris

2006-01-01

326

Explaining consumer acceptance of handheld Internet devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerging mobile commerce (m-commerce) technology promises exciting possibilities for marketplace exchanges, but expected benefits to consumers as well as businesses await an understanding of consumer acceptance of this technology. Borrowing the technology acceptance model (TAM) from the work environment, we apply it to the consumer context (c-TAM) and extend it by incorporating both utilitarian and hedonic aspects of technology

Gordon II Bruner; Anand Kumar

2005-01-01

327

Examining User Acceptance of Mobile Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incentives may affect users' behavior. It is critical to study how users' perception and intention are affected by the incentives. This study presents an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) that integrates incentives into TAM to investigate what determines user mobile commerce acceptance. We apply this model to the case of a GPS-based taxi-dispatching system. Preliminary data analysis illustrates that TAM

Zhengchuan Xu; Chenghong Zhang; Hong Ling

2008-01-01

328

Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.  

PubMed

Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development. PMID:22416723

Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

2011-10-20

329

Acceptability of urban transport pricing strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several research projects all over the world have considered transport pricing measures and policies as promising attempts to solve urgent traffic problems in urban areas. One important precondition for the successful implementation of pricing strategies is public acceptability. However, empirical findings have shown that the acceptability of such strategies is low. Until now economists have been looking for reasons for

Jens Schade; Bernhard Schlag

2003-01-01

330

Hanford Site liquid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the waste acceptance criteria for liquid waste managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). These waste acceptance criteria address the various requirements to operate a facility in compliance with applicable environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This document also addresses the sitewide miscellaneous streams program.

LUECK, K.J.

1999-09-11

331

Job offer acceptance behavior and reinforcement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigated the effects of a positive reinforcement program on a hypothesized indicator of dissonance (college seniors rescinding a job offer acceptance after previously accepting) in 2 companies. 196 Ss were provided reinforcement from the firm they decided to join, while another 196 Ss received no reinforcement. Ss receiving reinforcement rescinded job offers at a significantly lower rate than Ss not

John M. Ivancevich; James H. Donnelly

1971-01-01

332

Acceptability of Interventions for Childhood Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a case description methodology, this study examined the effects of behavior problem severity, intervention type. and subject race on mothers' acceptability ratings of five interventions used to treat childhood depression. Results indicated that (a) all psychological (behavioral or cognitive-behavioral) interventions were rated more acceptable than pharmacological treatment; (b) among the psychological interventions, the social skills intervention was the least

Kenneth J. Tarnowski; Susan J. Simonian; Paula Bekeny; Angela Park

1992-01-01

333

Explaining Consumer Acceptance of Online Digital Music  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to explain consumer acceptance of online digital music. The extended technology acceptance model (TAM), incorporated with user's perception of enjoyment and risks and moral intensity, was tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and assessed and modified by structural equation model (SEM). The findings indicate that perceived ease of use is positively related to perceived usefulness and perceived

Chun-Hsiung Liaoa; Chung-Wang Tsou; Yu-Chi Kao

334

Personality as a moderator of monitoring acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organizational efforts at monitoring employee activity must be perceived as respecting privacy and fairness. However, even when monitoring systems are designed to do so, employees might not be willing to accept and use monitoring technologies. This study examined whether personality moderated the relationship between workplace monitoring system characteristics, fairness, privacy and acceptance. Six hundred and twenty-two participants were asked to

David Zweig; Jane Webster

2003-01-01

335

Personality as a moderator of monitoring acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organizational efforts at monitoring employee activity must be perceived as respecting privacy and fairness. However, even when monitoring systems are designed to do so, employees might not be willing to accept and use monitoring technologies. This study exam- ined whether personality moderated the relationship between workplace monitoring system characteristics, fairness, privacy and acceptance. Six hundred and twenty-two participants were asked

David Zweig; Jane Webster

336

New Product Development Under Channel Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

In channel structures characterized by a powerful retailer (e.g., Wal-Mart, Home Depot), the dominant retailer's acceptance of a manufacturer's new product often determines the success of the new offering. Focusing on a manufacturer in such a market, we develop an approach to positioning and pricing a new product that directly incorporates the retailer's acceptance criteria into the development process. Our

Lan Luo; P. K. Kannan; Brian T. Ratchford

2007-01-01

337

Acceptance of plate tectonic theory by geologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do scientific theories come to be accepted? What roles do age, education, type of employment, area of specialization, and familiarity with relevant literature play in the acceptance of theories? The present study was designed to provide preliminary answers to these questions with respect to the theory of plate tectonics and to give direction to a more extensive study of

Matthew H. Nitecki; J. L. Lemke; Howard W. Pullman; Markes E. Johnson

1978-01-01

338

Locus of Control and Social Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To further validate the locus of control (LOC) construct and to counterbalance the present tendency in LOC literature to downgrade the external LOC personality, the relationship between LOC and social acceptance or popularity was examined. It was hypothesized that a relationship exists between LOC and social acceptance; and secondly, that a high…

Stein, Emily

339

Risk acceptance criteria for temporary phases  

SciTech Connect

The full life cycle approach to risk acceptance is proposed as the basis for establishing of acceptance criteria for the temporary phases, i.e., onshore and offshore construction as well as installation. The background for such criteria is discussed, as well as evaluations that may be used to formulate risk acceptance criteria in the construction and installation phases. The criteria are focused on personnel safety. Environmental spill protection and protection of assets are also addressed, but less extensively. Fatal accident rate or average individual risk values are used to express tolerable personnel safety, whereas the acceptability of exposure of the investment is expressed in terms of acceptable probabilities of accidents with significant effect on the project time schedule, i.e., the possibility to delay significantly the start-up of the production phase. The approach is based on an ALARP principle.

Vinnem, J.E. [Elf Petroleum Norge, Stavanger (Norway)

1996-08-01

340

Accounting for unprotected sex: stories of agency and acceptability.  

PubMed

Based on the idea that risks are knowable, calculable and preventable, dominant social scientific and health promotion discourses foster an image of individual risk control and responsibility. The presentation of the self is a moral enterprise. Accounts of unprotected sex by HIV positive people who have the potential to transmit HIV to their sexual partners can be particularly morally charged. Drawing on 73 depth qualitative interviews with HIV positive people and their sexual partners, this paper explores how the interview accounts of unprotected sex can illuminate the way in which the self is presented within the context of situated norms of risk acceptability and moral responsibility. We identify two forms of account: stories of agency; and stories of acceptability. Stories of agency tend to deny agency and abdicate individual responsibility given the circumstances, and were also a key feature of accounts in which the sexual partners of HIV positive people were placed at risk of HIV transmission. Categories of appeal included the denial of agency as a consequence of: risk calculus and condom accidents; alcohol and drug effects; powerlessness and coercion; and forces of nature. By contrast, stories of acceptability tend to justify unprotected sex as acceptable. Categories of appeal included: HIV positive concordance; and commitment in relationships. Other forms of justification included: alter responsibility; and intentional HIV transmission. We conclude that accounts of risk management are risk managed. We call for greater attention by social scientists to the way in which accounts are constructed, and in particular, to 'anti-rational' forms of explanation within accounts. PMID:12144136

Rhodes, Tim; Cusick, Linda

2002-07-01

341

Predictingthe use of web-based information systems: self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growing reliance on computerized systems and increasing rapidity of the introduction of new technologies, user acceptance of technology continues to be an important issue. Drawingupon recent findings in information systems, human computer interaction, and social psychology, the present research extends the technology acceptance model by incorporatingthe motivation variables of self-efficacy, enjoyment, and learningg oal orientation in order to

Mun Y. Yi

342

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21

343

Who is Responsible? Adolescents' Acceptance of Theoretical Child Abuse Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Surveyed 447 adolescents to determine which model of child abuse was most consistent with their beliefs, attitudes, and opinions. Results indicated that their views were most closely aligned with the psychopathological model, followed by the ecological model. Subjects maintained that parental psychological factors and victim characteristics…

Roscoe, Bruce; And Others

1985-01-01

344

The adolescent response to pregnancy: Accepting the reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research literature on adolescent pregnancy indicates a relationship between early prenatal care and positive pregnancy outcomes, yet fewer than half of pregnant teenagers seek prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. Although social support theory speculates that there should be a relationship between support and health outcomes, available studies do not reflect the processes by which pregnant adolescents

Elsa Meyer Tansey

1991-01-01

345

Response of the Ganges dispersal system to climate change: a source-to-sink view since the last interstade  

Microsoft Academic Search

The forcing of sediment dispersal systems by climate is widely accepted, but there remains disagreement on the general responses to climate change such as, how resulting signals propagate downstream and, ultimately, how they are preserved in the stratigraphic record. Towards a better understanding of these issues, this paper presents a comprehensive overview of Ganges dispersal system behavior since the last

Steven L. Goodbred

2003-01-01

346

When to say "yes" and when to say "no": boundary issues for hospice palliative care volunteers.  

PubMed

A total of 79 hospice palliative care volunteers from 2 community-based hospice programs responded to a 27-item Boundary Issues Questionnaire that was specifically developed for this study. Volunteers were asked to indicate whether or not they considered each item (eg, "Lend personal belongings to a patient or family," "Agree to be a patient's power of attorney," "Attend/go into a patient's medical appointment") to be something they should not do and to indicate whether or not they have ever done it. On the basis of the volunteers' responses, the authors distinguished between "definite boundary issues" (things volunteers should never do, for example, "Accept money from a patient or family"), "potential boundary issues" (things volunteers should stop and think twice about doing, for example, "Accept a gift from a patient or family"), and "questionable boundary issues" (things volunteers should be aware of doing, for example, "Give your home phone number to a patient or family"). The implications of these findings for training volunteers are discussed and the need for clear and unambiguous organizational policies and procedures to preserve boundaries is stressed. Without clear policies, etc, community-based hospice programs may be putting themselves at legal risk. PMID:21317131

Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Gibbon, Laura; Schmidt-Chamberlain, Kirsten

2011-02-10

347

Acceptance Test Plan for the Bench Test Equipment Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment S169, Revision A.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The test plan outlines the acceptance testing including sequence of testing, responsibilities, and scope of tests for the bench test equipment for the ultraviolet spectrometer experiment. The BTE is classified as mission support equipment. (Author)

S. D. Baran

1971-01-01

348

Genetically modified animals: ethical issues.  

PubMed

The method of ethical analysis is reviewed and applied to questions relating to the unintended consequences, ownership, and metaphysical significance of genetically modified animals. The question of how genetics and recombinant DNA discoveries have an impact on human understanding of the moral community and the limits of acceptable action are emphasized. The potential for genetically modified animals presents a challenge to implicit norms for defining these boundaries. Four philosophical responses to this challenge are reviewed: fundamentalism, conventionalism, dualism, and naturalism. The naturalist response is most consistent with contemporary biology, but it also entails that animals have limited moral significance. PMID:11653153

Thompson, Paul B

1993-01-01

349

Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance  

PubMed Central

Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence.

D'Amico, Domenico; Tepper, Stewart J

2008-01-01

350

Religiosity, fear of death and suicide acceptability.  

PubMed

The present research was an attempt to test two hypotheses derived from a recently proposed social psychological model of suicide: The acceptability of suicide is a decreasing function of religiosity and fear of death. Questionnaire data were collected for 205 undergraduates at a midwestern university in 1978. The questionnaire included several measures of religiosity, a factor analysis multidimensional fear of death scale, and a suicide acceptability scale. Results, showing that all of the religiosity measures and certain types of fear of death were significantly related to the acceptability of suicide, supported to the hypotheses under examination. PMID:473289

Hoelter, J W

1979-01-01

351

Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Waste Management Center; McCurley, R.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Institute

1997-12-31

352

Consumer Acceptance of Foods Lower in Sodium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To assess the magnitude of sodium reduction that can be made without significantly hanging the perception of saltiness and acceptability of a broad range of common food tems. The investigation was carried out in two phases. Military and civilian volunteer...

S. O. Adams O. Maller A. V. Cardello

1995-01-01

353

7 CFR 1207.323 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.323 Acceptance. Each person selected by the...

2012-01-01

354

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any person selected as a committee member or...

2013-01-01

355

7 CFR 1250.330 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Egg Board § 1250.330 Acceptance. Any person appointed by the Secretary as a...

2012-01-01

356

7 CFR 1205.326 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.326 Acceptance. Any person selected by the Secretary as...

2012-01-01

357

New Holder Acceptance Letter (Holder's Official STATIONERY ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text VersionHOLDER TRANSFER LETTER. No Cover (Transmittal) Letter necessary. ... Letters from the US Agent are not accepted for Holder Transfer Letters. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/developmentapprovalprocess

358

7 CFR 930.26 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF MICHIGAN, NEW YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, OREGON, UTAH, WASHINGTON, AND WISCONSIN Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 930.26 Acceptance. Each person...

2013-01-01

359

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

1999-05-01

360

7 CFR 1210.323 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.323 Acceptance. Each person...

2013-01-01

361

Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery systems under health care reform are outlined. It is argued that the exclusive focus on health care financing reform fails to include obstacles to effective mental health service delivery in rural areas, which should focus on issues of availability, accessibility, and acceptability, as well as financing and accountability. Characteristics of rural

Michael B. Blank; Jeanne C. Fox; David S. Hargrove; Jean T. Turner

1995-01-01

362

Transgender Children: Clinical and Ethical Issues in Prepubertal Presentations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author, a co-founder and the Director of the Gender & Sexuality Psychosocial Program at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., discusses clinical issues and interventions for prepubertal children with atypical gender development. He describes developmental issues related to concepts of gender for preadolescent children. The importance of working within the family system and helping the family to accept

Edgardo Menvielle

2009-01-01

363

An issue-charged first year for AHA's Davidson.  

PubMed

Reclassification and reform were major issues in Richard Davidson's first year as president of the American Hospital Assn. Those issues, as well as a litany of other budget and legislative battles, promise to rank among his biggest challenges during his second year in office. He's cleared the first hurdle in the reform battle--finding a plan most AHA members can accept. PMID:10160862

Wagner, L; Burda, D

1992-07-27

364

Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software  

SciTech Connect

This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled.

CREA, B.A.

2000-10-25

365

Parental Acceptance of HPV Vaccine in Peru: A Decision Framework  

PubMed Central

Objective and Method Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer affecting women worldwide and it is an important cause of death, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) and can be prevented by HPV vaccine. The challenge is to expand vaccine availability to countries where it is most needed. In 2008 Peru’s Ministry of Health implemented a demonstration project involving 5th grade girls in primary schools in the Piura region. We designed and conducted a qualitative study of the decision-making process among parents of girls, and developed a conceptual model describing the process of HPV vaccine acceptance. Results We found a nonlinear HPV decision-making process that evolved over time. Initially, the vaccine’s newness, the requirement of written consent, and provision of information were important. If information was sufficient and provided by credible sources, many parents accepted the vaccine. Later, after obtaining additional information from teachers, health personnel, and other trusted sources, more parents accepted vaccination. An understanding of the issues surrounding the vaccine developed, parents overcome fears and rumors, and engaged in family negotiations–including hearing the girl’s voice in the decision-making process. The concept of prevention (cancer as danger, future health, and trust in vaccines) combined with pragmatic factors (no cost, available at school) and the credibility of the offer (information in the media, recommendation of respected authority figure) were central to motivations that led parents to decide to vaccinate their daughters. A lack of confidence in the health system was the primary inhibitor of vaccine acceptance. Conclusions Health personnel and teachers are credible sources of information and can provide important support to HPV vaccination campaigns.

Bartolini, Rosario M.; Winkler, Jennifer L.; Penny, Mary E.; LaMontagne, D. Scott

2012-01-01

366

Georges Bank: the legal issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientists believe that spills or discharges from oil drilling operations at Georges Bank, an extremely productive commercial fishery area in New England, could adversely affect fishery operations, especially if eggs or larvae are exposed to significant hydrocarbon pollution. Legal issues regarding the lease sale, including USDI's responsibility to protect commercial fisheries interests and to consider management alternatives that would protect

Finn

1980-01-01

367

Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders` final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology`s field test; stakeholders` principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Peterson, T.S.

1995-12-01

368

WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-02-17

369

Methylmercury risk assessment issues  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

Lipfert, F.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Saroff, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-07-01

370

Chiara Lubich's 1977 Templeton Prize Acceptance Speech: Case Study in the Mystical Narrative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Illuminates Kenneth Burke's characteristics of a mystical rhetoric as they issue from "purpose" as a dominant dramatistic element. Offers a case study in mystical rhetoric by identifying the essential qualities of a mystical narrative and demonstrating how these qualities operate in Chiara Lubich's 1977 Templeton Prize Acceptance Speech. (SR)|

Cali, Dennis D.

1993-01-01

371

An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

2008-01-01

372

Effects of consumer characteristics on their acceptance of online shopping: Comparisons among different product types  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous electronic commerce (EC) studies have found that consumer characteristics are important when considering issues related to the acceptance of online shopping. However, most studies have focused on a single product or similar products. The effects of different product types have been relatively neglected. Previous studies have limited the generalizability of their results to a few products at best. To

Jiunn-Woei Lian; Tzu-Ming Lin

2008-01-01

373

The motivational and control structure underlying the acceptance of adaptive museum guides - An empirical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance of adaptive museum guides raises important issues stemming from both the nature of the scenario (museum visit) and the very kind of technological approach adopted (adaptivity). As to the former, museum guides play a utilitarian role in a hedonic scenario; at present, however, it is not clear how this reflects on the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for

Fabio Pianesi; Ilenia Graziola; Massimo Zancanaro; Dina Goren-bar

2009-01-01

374

A gap between acceptance and knowledge of herbal remedies by physicians: The need for educational intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

: BACKGROUND: The unprecedented global increase in the use of herbal remedies is set to continue apace well into the foreseeable future. This raises important public health concerns, especially as it relates to safety issues including adverse effects and herb-drug interactions. Most Western-trained physicians are ignorant of the risks and benefits of this healthcare modality and assessment of acceptance and

Yuri N Clement; Arlene F Williams; Kristi Khan; Tricia Bernard; Savrina Bhola; Maurice Fortuné; Oneil Medupe; Kerry Nagee; Compton E Seaforth

2005-01-01

375

Trust in governance and the acceptance of genetically modified food in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assumes that trust is a major issue in the interaction between government, citizens and societal organizations. The central question in this paper relates to the specific determinants of public trust. A survey study is reported (n = 1019) which focuses on the role of trust in the acceptance of genetically modified (GM) food. Our expectation was that three

Jan Gutteling; Lucien Hanssen; Veer van der Neil; Erwin Seydel

2006-01-01

376

Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

2013-01-01

377

Current IT Issues, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

2004-01-01

378

References to racial issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the readiness with which the issue of race comes to the minds of ordinary Americans—the “accessibility” of racial issues—by assessing the frequency with which ordinary Americans refer to racial issues when talking about politics. Explicitly racial issues have declined dramatically in accessibility among the general public over the past thirty years. Coinciding with the decrease in the

Michael G. Hagen

1995-01-01

379

Special Issue on \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

As 'social and ethical issues' becomes a recurring phrase in the community paying attention to nanotechnology research, a crucial question becomes: what counts as a social and ethical issue? A typical list includes privacy, environmental health and safety, media hype, and other apparently unrelated issues. This article surveys those issues and suggests that concerns about fundamental concepts of ethics, such

Bruce V. Lewenstein

380

Rights & Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This theme issue guides teachers and students to annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with topics related to rights and responsibilities. Sidebar features discuss animal rights, handling money responsibly, and taking responsibility for the environment. (Contains Three…

Online-Offline, 2000

2000-01-01

381

Defining "Acceptable Risk" for Earthquakes Worldwide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The greatest and most rapidly growing earthquake risk for mortality is in developing countries. Further, earthquake risk management actions of the last 50 years have reduced the average lethality of earthquakes in earthquake-threatened industrialized countries. (This is separate from the trend of the increasing fiscal cost of earthquakes there.) Despite these clear trends, every new earthquake in developing countries is described in the media as a "wake up" call, announcing the risk these countries face. GeoHazards International (GHI) works at both the community and the policy levels to try to reduce earthquake risk. GHI reduces death and injury by helping vulnerable communities recognize their risk and the methods to manage it, by raising awareness of its risk, building local institutions to manage that risk, and strengthening schools to protect and train the community's future generations. At the policy level, GHI, in collaboration with research partners, is examining whether "acceptance" of these large risks by people in these countries and by international aid and development organizations explains the lack of activity in reducing these risks. The goal of this pilot project - The Global Earthquake Safety Initiative (GESI) - is to develop and evaluate a means of measuring the risk and the effectiveness of risk mitigation actions in the world's largest, most vulnerable cities: in short, to develop an earthquake risk index. One application of this index is to compare the risk and the risk mitigation effort of "comparable" cities. By this means, Lima, for example, can compare the risk of its citizens dying due to earthquakes with the risk of citizens in Santiago and Guayaquil. The authorities of Delhi and Islamabad can compare the relative risk from earthquakes of their school children. This index can be used to measure the effectiveness of alternate mitigation projects, to set goals for mitigation projects, and to plot progress meeting those goals. The preliminary results suggest that the comparisons of the participating cities are easily understood, and defensible. The evaluation of the sources of El Salvador's risk, made before the January 13th earthquake, pointed to the vulnerability made visible by the earthquake: earthquake-induced landslides, and difficulties with emergency response.

Tucker, B.

2001-05-01

382

Pain management: a regulatory issue.  

PubMed

Pain is a significant public health issue in the United States, and pain management has serious implications for the regulation of healthcare professionals. Pain management is recognized as important and integral to the practice of nursing. This article describes the legal and regulatory framework for pain management and identifies 4 specific regulatory issues. The public protection responsibility of boards of nursing is complicated by the need to appropriately concentrate on investigative, educational, and disciplinary work of the boards while not interfering with safe, effective pain management nursing care. Proactive board functions are suggested to support boards in maintaining this balance. PMID:18813085

Brekken, Shirley A; Sheets, Vickie

383

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01

384

Differences in HIV vaccine acceptability between genders  

PubMed Central

The development of safe and efficacious preventive HIV vaccines offers the best long-term hope of controlling the AIDS pandemic. Nevertheless, suboptimal uptake of safe and efficacious vaccines that already exist suggest that HIV vaccine acceptability cannot be assumed, particularly among communities most vulnerable to HIV. The present study aimed to identify barriers and motivators to future HIV vaccine acceptability among low socioeconomic, ethnically diverse men and women in Los Angeles County. Participants completed a cross-sectional survey assessing their attitudes and beliefs regarding future HIV vaccines. Hypothetical HIV vaccine scenarios were administered to determine HIV vaccine acceptability. Two-sided t-tests were performed, stratified by gender, to examine the association between vaccine acceptability and potential barriers and motivators. Barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability differed between men and women. For women, barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability were related to their intimate relationships (p <0.05), negative experiences with health care providers (p <0.05) and anticipated difficulties procuring insurance (p <0.01). Men were concerned that the vaccine would weaken the immune system (p <0.005) or would affect their HIV test results (p <0.05). Motivators for women included the ability to conceive a child without worrying about contracting HIV (p <0.10) and support from their spouse/significant other for being vaccinated (p <0.10). Motivators for men included feeling safer with sex partners (p <0.05) and social influence from friends to get vaccinated (p <0.005). Family support for HIV immunization was a motivator for both men and women (p <0.10). Gender-specific interventions may increase vaccine acceptability among men and women at elevated risk for HIV infection. Among women, interventions need to focus on addressing barriers due to gendered power dynamics in relationships and discrimination in health care. Among men, education that addresses fears and misconceptions about adverse effects of HIV vaccination on health and the importance of vaccination as one component of integrated HIV prevention may increase vaccine acceptability.

Kakinami, Lisa; Newman, Peter A.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Duan, Naihua

2010-01-01

385

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-07-15

386

Draft EIS issues on LES centrifuge plant  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposal by Louisiana Energy Services (LES) to construct and operate a uranium enrichment facility in Claiborne Parish, La., near the town of Homer, about 50 miles northeast of the city of Shreveport. The draft EIS concludes that the facility can be built and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment.

Not Available

1994-01-01

387

Psychological issues in relocation: Response to change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusion Although nearly all individuals will find relocation at least minimally stressful and will experience some stress related symptoms such as emotional reactivity, irritability, and exhaustion, those who find ways to establish security and meaning in their new situation within a reasonable time (2 to 6 months) will suffer less turmoil. The coping strategies that individuals employ will vary; people

Marcia S. Hausman; James R. Reed

1991-01-01

388

The gratuitous form of acceptance as the pathway to the resolution of substance abuse (Acceptance)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the second of two articles about substance abuse and the discussion of acceptance as a two-pronged description of human thinking, with the primary care physician the intended audience. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper is about the presumption of acceptance as an enabler of the learned addiction-oriented life style. Findings – According

David H. Cook

2010-01-01

389

Family Issues in the Workplace: Are Students on Track?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employees attempting to balance careers and families have made family issues a major concern in the workplace. Equity issues arise, however, for employees who do not have family responsibilities. In this study, the authors sought to determine whether students' and employees' perceptions of family issues differed in their responses to nine statements. Two-tailed t tests revealed significant differences between students

Karen K. Waner; Janet K. Winter; Ronald G. Breshears

2005-01-01

390

Family Issues In the Workplace: Are Students On Track  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Employees attempting to balance careers and families have made family issues a major concern in the workplace. Equity issues arise, however, for employees who do not have family responsibilities. In this study, the authors sought to determine whether students' and employees' perceptions of family issues differed in their responses to nine…

Waner, Karen K.; Winter, Janet K.; Breshears, Ronald G.

2005-01-01

391

Tongue-palate contact of perceptually acceptable alveolar stops.  

PubMed

Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of /t/, 13 /d/ and 11 /n/) to those produced by eight typical children (32 /t/, 24 /d/ and 16 /n/). The results showed that children with SSD had significantly higher percent contact than the typical children for target /t/; the difference for /d/ and /n/ was not significant. Children with SSD generally showed more contact in the posterior central area of the palate than the typical children. The results suggested that broader tongue-palate contact is a general articulatory feature for children with SSD and its differential effect on error perception might be related to the different articulatory requirements. PMID:23489342

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-04-01

392

Sensory acceptability of chocolate with inulina  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to study the influence of inulin on the sensory characteristics of chocolate. Three types of chocolate (milk, hazelnut and rice) where sucrose was replaced by inulin and fructose were studied in comparison to corresponding ordinary chocolates. A questionnaire between eighty diabetics and fifty-two random consumers showed that the chocolate with inulin was well accepted.

Terezija GOLOB; Jasna BERTONCELJ; Mojca JAMNIK

393

FBC: Gaining acceptance. [Fluidized Bed Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This article addresses the growing acceptance of fluidized bed combustion as a technology appropriate for use in dual-purpose power plants. The article reviews projects for cogeneration in California, a demonstration plant sponsored by the US Department of Energy in Ohio (this plant also incorporates combined cycle operation), and an electric power/greenhouse project in Pennsylvania.

Gawlicki, S.M.

1991-04-01

394

Textbook Websites: User Technology Acceptance Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared with course management software (e.g. Blackboard and WebCT), the content and technology offered by a textbook website (TBW) is relatively costless to universities and professors, and is a potentially valuable tool that can be leveraged to help students learn course material. The present study uses the extended Technology Acceptance Model…

Jonas, Gregory A.; Norman, Carolyn Strand

2011-01-01

395

Acceptance of Swedish e-health services  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.

Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

2010-01-01

396

Satellite Power System (SPS) Public Acceptance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to develop a preliminary perspective on the public acceptability of the Solar Satellite Power System (SPS) Program, and a means to monitor it. A literature review and informal contacts with interest groups likely to take a po...

A. Bachrach

1978-01-01

397

37 CFR 1.803 - Acceptable depository.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Invention Disclosures Deposit of Biological Material § 1.803 Acceptable...Exist independent of the control of the depositor; (iii...minimize the risk of losing biological material deposited with it...deposit only certain kinds of biological material, specify such...

2013-07-01

398

Consumer acceptance of nutrigenomics based personalised nutrition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nutrigenomics is a new and promising development in nutritional science which aims to understand the fundamental molecular processes affected by foods. Despite general agreement on its promise for better understanding diet¿health relationships, less consensus exists among experts on the potential of spin-offs aimed at the consumer such as personalised nutrition. Research into consumer acceptance of such applications is scarce. The

A. Ronteltap; Trijp van J. C. M; R. J. Renes

2009-01-01

399

Effect of Speech Transformation on Impostor Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the effect of voice transformation on automatic speaker recognition system performance. We focus on increasing the impostor acceptance rate, by modifying the voice of an impostor in order to target a specific speaker. This paper is based on the following idea: in several applications and particularly in forensic situations, it is reasonable to think that some organizations

Driss Matrouf; J.-F. Bonastre; C. Fredouille

2006-01-01

400

Acceptance of sugar reduction in flavored yogurt.  

PubMed

To investigate what level of sugar reduction is accepted in flavored yogurt, we conducted a hedonic test focusing on the degree of liking of the products and on optimal sweetness and aroma levels. For both flavorings (strawberry and coffee), consumers preferred yogurt containing 10% added sugar. However, yogurt containing 7% added sugar was also acceptable. On the just-about-right scale, yogurt containing 10% sugar was more often described as too sweet compared with yogurt containing 7% sugar. On the other hand, the sweetness and aroma intensity for yogurt containing 5% sugar was judged as too low. A second test was conducted to determine the effect of flavoring concentration on the acceptance of yogurt containing 7% sugar. Yogurts containing the highest concentrations of flavoring (11% strawberry, 0.75% coffee) were less appreciated. Additionally, the largest percentage of consumers perceived these yogurts as "not sweet enough." These results indicate that consumers would accept flavored yogurts with 7% added sugar instead of 10%, but 5% sugar would be too low. Additionally, an increase in flavor concentration is undesirable for yogurt containing 7% added sugar. PMID:23871368

Chollet, M; Gille, D; Schmid, A; Walther, B; Piccinali, P

2013-07-17

401

Retained gas sampler system acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance test results for the Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) obtained in the 306E laboratory are reported. The RGSS will be utilized to retrieve and analyze samples from the Hanford flammable gas watch-list tanks to determine the quantity and chemistry of gases confined within the waste.

Cannon, N.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-18

402

Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-09-15

403

Usability and Acceptability of Biometric Security Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biometric security systems are receiving a lot of attention because of the potential to increase the accuracy and reliability of identification and authentication functions, especially in border-crossing and military applications. A lot of research has been done to assess the performance of biometric systems, with an emphasis on false acceptances and rejections. Much less research has been done on the

Andrew S. Patrick

2004-01-01

404

Natural hazard losses and acceptable risk criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The criteria for the definition of acceptable risk to the lives of members of a society (commonly called societal risk) resulting from exposure to natural hazards are based in most countries on the frequency and characteristics of industrial accidents, e.g., nuclear power plants. However, historical records indicate that the frequency of natural hazard events is much higher than those involved

M. Khaleghy Rad; S. G. Evans; F. Nadim; S. Lacasse

2009-01-01

405

Consumer Acceptance of a New Fast Food  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cowpeas are a nutritious legume, but their consumption in the U.S. is limited. Akara is a popular West African food made form cowpea and has potential for extending the use of dry cowpeas in the U.S. markets. The study used survey data of 267 teenagers to assess Akara's acceptability by American teenagers as a fast food alternative. An ordered probit

Sukant K. Misra; Stanley M. Fletcher; Kay H. McWatters

1996-01-01

406

Minimum Risk Acceptance Sampling Plans: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the first acceptance sampling plans have been developed almost 80 years ago, a number of selection principles have emerged. The majority of these principles is characterized by the fact that they look upon producer and consumer as two opposing parties. However, in many occasions, e.g., in final inspection, producer and consumer represent the same party and, therefore, the used

K. Subramani

2004-01-01

407

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28

408

W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

Joshi, A.W.

1997-06-10

409

Auditor Liability and Client Acceptance Decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accounting profession has raised concerns that excessive liability exposure renders audit firms unwilling to provide audit services to risky clients, limiting the prospective clients' ability to raise external capital. In this paper we address this concern in a model where the auditor evaluates the riskiness of the client before accepting the client engagement. We consider a setting where a

Volker Laux; D. Paul Newman

2010-01-01

410

Acceptance Inspection for Audio Cassette Recorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of inspections for cassette recorders that can be performed to assure that the devices are acceptable is described. The inspections can be completed in 20 minutes and can be performed by instructional personnel. The series of inspection procedures includes tests of the intelligibility of audio, physical condition, tape speed, impulse…

Smith, Edgar A.

411

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF WASTEWATER SLUDGE ON LAND  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this paper is to discuss the acceptance of municipal wastewater sludge on land in the United States. Application to land has been an economical disposal method for cities and a means of increasing soil productivity. Use of land for sludge disposal is increasing. ...

412

Siting policy for an acceptable nuclear future  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is an outgrowth of studies aimed at devising an acceptable nuclear energy system for the United States. It is argued that a nuclear siting policy leading to a few, large concentrated sites is preferable in the long run to the present policy which could lead to many dispersed sites. Such a policy could be implemented incrementally if requirements

C. C. Burwell; M. J. Ohanian; A. M. Weinberg

1979-01-01

413

Development of risk acceptance and moral valuation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The relationship between acceptability of risk and moral valuation of risky activities was investigated in children, 10-16 years old. It was found that all age groups exhibited a strong correlation between the two dimensions of risky activities. Older chi...

L. Sjoeberg G. Torell

1991-01-01

414

Review of Recent Treatment Acceptability Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With recent increases in the use of positive approaches to treatment for individuals with developmental disabilities, it seems appropriate to review the variables that have been found to influence the acceptability of various treatments. Programmatic treatments for problematic behaviors that incorporate primarily positive (reinforcement)…

Carter, Stacy L.

2007-01-01

415

Generator acceptance test and inspection report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing.

Johns, B.R.

1997-07-24

416

The acceptability of active euthanasia in China.  

PubMed

Active euthanasia has been discussed in China from 1980. Some investigations show that many people, especially medical workers, accept active euthanasia. Active euthanasia is not yet legally permissible in China but research in ethics and public views will promote developments in this direction. PMID:8377620

Hu, P

1993-01-01

417

14 CFR Sec. 2-1 - Generally accepted accounting principles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Generally accepted accounting principles. Sec. 2-1 Section...2-1 Generally accepted accounting principles. (a) The accounting...based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Persons...

2010-01-01

418

14 CFR Sec. 2-1 - Generally accepted accounting principles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Generally accepted accounting principles. Sec. 2-1 Section...2-1 Generally accepted accounting principles. (a) The accounting...based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Persons...

2009-01-01

419

An Exploratory Study of Alignment Issues of IT Acceptance with Professionals in a Project Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The information technology (IT) literature has demonstrated a link with business performance and effectiveness when IT and business objectives are aligned. However, project settings and joint-venture projects in particular, challenge the way alignment has been conceptualized, exposing other sources of alignment. Projects require a quick diffusion of IT to many different stakeholders with different individual and group interests representing many

Vernon Bachor; Mike Chiasson

2004-01-01

420

Research and issues in using anatomical dolls  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anatomical dolls have emerged as a promising, but controversial tool in child sexual abuse investigations to assist young children in describing what has happened to them. However, research on issues of doll usage by professionals, structuring the doll interviews and interpreting children's responses to the dolls has been lacking. The Anatomical Doll Project was designed to address these issues

Barbara W. Boat; Mark D. Everson

1988-01-01

421

Animal Experimentation: Issues for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the extent to which issues related to animal experimentation are in conflict and proposes choices that might least comprise them. These issues include animal well-being, human well-being, self-interest of science, scientific validity and responsibility, progress in biomedical and behavioral science, and the future quality of medical care.…

Zola, Judith C.; And Others

1984-01-01

422

Issues in Year-Round Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author presents a discussion of the current and historical issues surrounding the year-round school movement, the responses of school administrators to the issues, and the data reported by administrators who are currently conducting or have previously conducted extended or year-round school programs. In his discussion, the author deals with…

Richmond, Mossie J., Jr.

423

Animal Experimentation: Issues for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines the extent to which issues related to animal experimentation are in conflict and proposes choices that might least comprise them. These issues include animal well-being, human well-being, self-interest of science, scientific validity and responsibility, progress in biomedical and behavioral science, and the future quality of medical…

Zola, Judith C.; And Others

1984-01-01

424

This Issue: Realizing Reform in School Mathematics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduces a theme issue on the reform of school mathematics education. Articles in this issue describe: some of the many questions that have arisen from the call to reform of school mathematics; the response to the call from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; and some recent research findings. (SM)|

Pape, Stephen J.; Owens, Douglas T.; McNeal, Betsy

2001-01-01

425

Developing an Acceptability Assessment of Preventive Dental Treatments  

PubMed Central

Objectives Early childhood caries (ECC) is very prevalent among young Hispanic children. ECC is amenable to a variety of preventive procedures, yet many Hispanic families underutilize dental services. Acceptability research may assist in health care planning and resource allocation by identifying patient preferences among efficacious treatments with the goal of improving their utilization. The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a culturally competent acceptability assessment instrument, directed toward the caregivers of young Hispanic children, for five preventive dental treatments for ECC and (b) to test the instrument's reliability and validity. Methods An instrument of five standard treatments known to prevent ECC was developed, translated, reviewed by focus groups, and pilot tested, then tested for reliability. The instrument included illustrated cards, brief video clips, and samples of the treatments and was culturally appropriate for low-income Hispanic caregivers. In addition to determining the acceptability of the five treatments individually, the treatments were also presented as paired comparisons. Results Focus groups and debriefing interviews following the pilot tests established that the instrument has good face validity. The illustrated cards, product samples, and video demonstrations of the five treatments resulted in an instrument possessing good content validity. The instrument has good to excellent test–retest reliability, with identical time 1–time 2 responses for each of the five treatments 92 percent of the time (range 87 to 97 percent), and the same treatment of the paired comparisons preferred 75 percent of the time (range 61 to 90 percent). Conclusions The acceptability instrument described is reliable and valid and may be useful in program planning efforts to identify and increase the utilization of preferred ECC preventive treatments for target populations.

Hyde, Susan; Gansky, Stuart A.; Gonzalez-Vargas, Maria J.; Husting, Sheila R.; Cheng, Nancy F.; Millstein, Susan G.; Adams, Sally H.

2012-01-01

426

Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Behavioral Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report directly addresses three issues: (1) consumer adoption of energy-efficient retrofits of existing buildings; (2) the role of energy efficiency in purchase decisions regarding new and used homes; and (3) consumer response to financial incentives...

1986-01-01

427

Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

International terrorism has long been recognized as a serious foreign and domestic security threat. This issue brief examines international terrorist actions and threats and the U.S. policy response. Available policy options range from diplomacy, internat...

R. Perl

2004-01-01

428

Acceptability of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination among adult men  

PubMed Central

Objectives HPV vaccine acceptability was examined as part of a cohort study of HPV infection among adult males. Methods Between July 2004 and June 2007, 445 adult males aged ?18 years were enrolled primarily from a university-based population. A structured questionnaire addressed HPV vaccine awareness, attitudes, and intention to be vaccinated. Results Overall, 69% of men reported that they were likely or very likely to be vaccinated against HPV if a prophylactic vaccine were available. Men most frequently cited side effects (69%), efficacy (65%), and safety (63%) as the major factors that would influence their decision to be vaccinated against HPV. Issues of vaccine costs and efficacy were important considerations for men of vaccine-eligible ages (18–26 years). Men who cited cost as a major factor in their HPV vaccine decisions and those indicating cost as a potential barrier had greater intention to be vaccinated. Heterosexual men had less intention to be vaccinated compared to men who have sex with men. Conclusion Acceptability of HPV vaccination among males is generally high. Costs and sexual history may influence vaccine utilization.

Hernandez, BY; Wilkens, LR; Thompson, PS; Shvetsov, YB; Goodman, MT; Ning, L; Kaopua, L

2010-01-01

429

Adding positive reinforcement in justice settings: Acceptability and feasibility  

PubMed Central

Although contingency management (CM) approaches are among the most promising methods for initiating drug abstinence (S. T. Higgins, S. M. Alessi, & R. L. Dantona, 2002; S. T. Higgins, S. H. Heil, & J. P. Lussier, 2004), adoption and implementation of CM protocols into treatment programs are both challenging and infrequent. In criminal justice agencies, where roughly 70% of clients report substance abuse issues (F. S. Taxman, K. L. Cropsey, D. W. Young, & H. Wexler, 2007), CM interventions are virtually nonexistent. The Justice Steps (JSTEPS) study uses a longitudinal, mixed-method design to examine the implementation of a CM-based protocol in five justice settings. This article presents qualitative data collected during Phase 1 of the JSTEPS project regarding the acceptability and feasibility of CM in these justice settings. The study finds a level of acceptability (find CM tolerable) and feasibility (find CM suitable) within justice agencies, but with some challenges. These challenges are reflected in the following: (a) incorporating too many desired target behaviors into CM models; (b) facing intraorganizational challenges when designing CM systems; and (c) emphasizing sanctions over rewards despite the evidence-base for positive reinforcers. These findings have implications for advancing the dissemination, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based treatments (and CM in particular) in criminal justice settings.

Rudes, Danielle S.; Taxman, Faye S.; Portillo, Shannon; Murphy, Amy; Rhodes, Anne; Stitzer, Maxine; Luongo, Peter F.; Friedmann, Peter D.

2013-01-01

430

Optimal and acceptable technical facilities involving risks.  

PubMed

Economic cost-benefit optimization of technical facility requires suitable "life saving cost" and/or an appropriate acceptance criterion if human life and limb are at risk. Traditionally, acceptance criteria implicit in codes of practice, standards, or regulations for well-defined fields of application are calibrated against past and present practice. This is all but satisfying. It is unclear whether present rules are already optimal. Extrapolations into new fields of application are extremely difficult. Direct cost-benefit analysis is proposed as an alternative. Based on the recently proposed "life quality index" (LQI), a rational acceptance criterion and so-called life saving cost are derived. The classical life quality index is reviewed, modified, and imbedded in modern economics theory. The results are then applied to technical facilities. The relation between optimization and the LQI-based acceptance criterion is discussed. The relevant economics literature is reviewed with respect to discount rates applicable for long-term investments into risk reduction. They should be as low as possible according to a recent mathematical result. Modern economic growth theory decomposes the output growth rate into the rate of time preference of consumption and the rate of economical growth multiplied by the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption. It is found that the rate of time preference of consumption should be a little larger than the long-term population growth rate. The public benefit rate (output growth rate) on the other hand should be smaller than the sum of the population growth rate and the long-term growth rate of a national economy, which is around 2% for most industrial countries. Accordingly, the rate of time preference of consumption is about 1%, which is also intergenerationally acceptable from an ethical point of view. Given a certain output growth rate there is a corresponding maximum financial interest rate in order to maintain nonnegativity of the objective function at the optimum. Finally, a simple demonstration example is added. PMID:15209938

Rackwitz, Ruediger

2004-06-01

431

Social Perception of Rape: How Rape Myth Acceptance Modulates the Influence of Situational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study assessed the role of rape myth acceptance (RMA) and situational factors in the perception of three different rape scenarios (date rape, marital rape, and stranger rape). One hundred and eighty-two psychology undergraduates were asked to emit four judgements about each rape situation: victim responsibility, perpetrator responsibility,…

Frese, Bettina; Moya, Miguel; Megias, Jesus

2004-01-01

432

In this Issue: Inflammation.  

PubMed

We live in a microbial world and are often confronted with infection and injury. Inflammation, the response that is unleashed to ward off these insults, has long been familiar to us. Indeed, the words that we still use to describe inflammation -redness and swelling with heat and pain -were coined in the first century A.D. by the Roman physician Cornelius Celsus: rubor et tumor cum calore et dolore. The word inflammation itself comes from the Latin inflammare: to set on fire. Research has taken us a long way from this first description of the overt symptoms of inflammation 2000 years ago to our current understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways that mediate the inflammatory process, regulate it, and lead to its resolution. We now know that inflammation can come in many forms and modalities depending on the context in which it is triggered, the trigger itself, and the tissues involved. Furthermore, we appreciate the contribution of inflammation to cancer and to chronic afflictions like neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. In this year's Special Review Issue, we bring together Review articles and Essays that survey our current knowledge of inflammation and provide perspectives on the key questions and challenges ahead. We would like to thank the distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make this issue timely, comprehensive,and thought provoking. We hope that this collection of articles will be informative and inspiring, as we now harness the tools of modern biology in the continued effort to understand :"the old flame". PMID:20361418

Rivas, Fabiola

2010-03-19

433

Accreditation and Technology Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Accreditation issues raised by the use of educational technology not being substantially different from those raised during the decade of the seventies by the nontraditional education movement, there are several lessons about accreditation issues which ar...

J. W. Miller

1981-01-01

434

Resource quality or competition: why increase resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics?  

PubMed

Some animal species increase resource acceptance rates in the presence of conspecifics. Such responses may be adaptive if the presence of conspecifics is a reliable indicator of resource quality. Similarly, these responses could represent an adaptive reduction in choosiness under high levels of scramble competition. Although high resource quality and high levels of scramble competition should both favor increased resource acceptance, the contexts in which the increase occurs should differ. In this paper, we tested the effect of social environment on egg-laying and aggressive behavior in the walnut fly, Rhagoletis juglandis, in multiple contexts to determine whether increased resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics was better viewed as a response to increased host quality or increased competition. We found that grouped females oviposit more readily than isolated females when provided small (low-quality) artificial hosts but not when provided large (high-quality) artificial hosts, indicating that conspecific presence reduces choosiness. Increased resource acceptance was observed even when exposure to conspecifics was temporally or spatially separate from exposure to the resource. Finally, we found that individuals showed reduced aggression after being housed in groups, as expected under high levels of scramble competition. These results indicate that the pattern of resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics may be better viewed as a response to increased scramble competition rather than as a response to public information about resource quality. PMID:22479135

Davis, Jeremy M; Nufio, César R; Papaj, Daniel R

2011-04-29

435

[Neuroethics: ethical issues in neurosciences].  

PubMed

Neuroethics is a field of bioethics on the ethical challenges of advances in neuroscience. Born in the early 2000s, neuroethics is considering a number of issues raised by the opportunities created by advances in knowledge and techniques in the field of neurology and psychiatry. In fact, what we learn about brain functions allows us to potentially influence our behavior and our actions, and questions human nature, freedom and individual responsibility, and even the place of morality in our society. PMID:23789494

Crozier, Sophie

2013-05-01

436

Ethical issues for parents of extremely premature infants.  

PubMed

Evidence suggests that NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) parents with an baby born at the threshold of viability do not always receive sufficient counselling during an emergency admission and as a consequence, are not well-informed to accept withdrawal of treatment or quality of life decisions. As prospective parents are not educated earlier in pregnancy about extreme premature delivery, crucial information and counselling explaining neonatal issues is only offered to labouring women during their emergency admission. As a result, most have difficulty understanding the risks and benefits of baby's treatment and therefore rely heavily on the perinatal physician to take responsibility for the initial treatment. However, this lack of understanding often leaves parents disadvantaged, as many are left unprepared to participate objectively in quality of life decisions. According to recent research, morbidity figures remain relatively high with one in five survivors at risk of a long-term disability. This shows that some parents will still be confronted by ethical decision of whether or not to continue treatment, and this may not be apparent until days after treatment has been established. As recent research has shown, parents do, in fact, want increased involvement in the decision-making process regarding their child's treatment. Therefore, it has been argued, that parents should be provided with information earlier in pregnancy to familiarise themselves with quality of life issues which they may encounter as the NICU parents of an extremely premature infant. PMID:18416707

Schroeder, Judith

2008-05-01

437

The politics and science behind GMO acceptance.  

PubMed

The question of nutritional quality has arisen in the International Community over the last few years along with other important issues such as population aging, multipopulation societies, and political conflicts. The nutritional issue is questioned both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is well known that the planet faces enormous problems with food that is available. Nowadays 20% of the population consumes approximately 80% of the produced energy and natural resources. During the last 15 years, a series of food scares and crises (BSE, dioxin, foot and mouth disease, bird flu) have seriously undermined public confidence in food producers and operators and their capacity to produce safe food. As a result, food safety has become a top priority of the European legislative authorities. Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) is the new food safety concern which despite the intense reactions from Non Governmental Organizations and consumer organizations have entered our lives with inadequate legislative measures to protect consumers from their consumption. The GMO issue will be the issue for discussion in the long run not only for the European Community but also for the international community as far as scientific, economical, political, ideological, ethical, and human issues are concerned. These issues are discussed in this paper along with a case of study of GM fish. PMID:17457721

Varzakas, Theodoros H; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Baltas, Haralambos

2007-01-01

438

Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

NONE

1996-09-01

439

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01

440

Strategies for Fostering HPV Vaccine Acceptance  

PubMed Central

Vaccines that protect against infection with the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) commonly associated with cervical cancer (HPV 16 and 18) and genital warts (HPV 6 and 11) are expected to become available in the near future. Because HPV vaccines are prophylactic, they must be administered prior to exposure to the virus, ideally during preadolescence or adolescence. The young age of the target vaccination population means that physicians, parents, and patients will all be involved in the decision-making process. Research has shown that parents and patients are more likely to accept a vaccine if it is efficacious, safe, reasonably priced, and recommended by a physician.Widespread education of physicians, patients, and parents about the risks and consequences of HPV infection and the benefits of vaccination will be instrumental for fostering vaccine acceptance.

Gonik, Bernard

2006-01-01

441

BAS: Balanced Acceptance Sampling of Natural Resources.  

PubMed

To design an efficient survey or monitoring program for a natural resource it is important to consider the spatial distribution of the resource. Generally, sample designs that are spatially balanced are more efficient than designs which are not. A spatially balanced design selects a sample that is evenly distributed over the extent of the resource. In this article we present a new spatially balanced design that can be used to select a sample from discrete and continuous populations in multi-dimensional space. The design, which we call balanced acceptance sampling, utilizes the Halton sequence to assure spatial diversity of selected locations. Targeted inclusion probabilities are achieved by acceptance sampling. The BAS design is conceptually simpler than competing spatially balanced designs, executes faster, and achieves better spatial balance as measured by a number of quantities. The algorithm has been programed in an R package freely available for download. PMID:23844595

Robertson, B L; Brown, J A; McDonald, T; Jaksons, P

2013-07-11

442

Space debris, remarks on current legal issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A legal definition of space debris must take into consideration its consequences on the legal status of the object. For the purpose of mitigation of space debris at the time of the launch, any object launched in outer pace will turn sooner or later into a space debris. For liability purposes, a definition of a "space object " is more useful that the notion of "space debris". It must be sure that every space debris is considered as a space objet according to the liability convention. At the end and certainly a more difficult issue is the qualification of a space object as a space debris when it will be technically feasible to remove it. The question of the property of the debris or object should be important. States are responsible and liable for space debris. According to article VI and VII of the Outer Space Treaty, they must authorise and control any national space activity and make sure these activities will not be conducted against the law. In the case of an accident and excepting the use of nuclear power sources, the main problem lies on damage in outer space to other spacecraft. In that case, the victim must prove a fault. According with the lack of precise rules it should be difficult. It should be necessary to precise the law applicable to space debris. At the domestic level, rules must be taken to prevent space debris through an assessment of risk within the licensing process. At the international level, the principle of an obligation to mitigate debris should be clearly accepted. Some general rules should be useful to avoid breach of competition between commercial actors. The adoption of a clear and precise code of conduct should be of great help because it would determine the good launching States' behaviour and greatly helps the judge appreciating the proof of a fault in case of an accident.

Kerrest, Armel

2001-10-01

443

Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.

Keck, R.D.

1998-02-03

444

Breathing air trailer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller`s location.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1996-02-12

445

Experience and acceptability of emergency hormonal contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The study was designed to evaluate the experience and acceptability of emergency hormonal contraception service for inner-city women in Planned Parenthood clinics.Methods: In 1995, emergency hormonal contraception was introduced as a new service in three clinics of New York City’s Planned Parenthood that served low-income women. Shortly after inception of this service, the agency undertook a survey to investigate

Enayat Hakim-Elahi; Vicki Breitbart

1998-01-01

446

Food Acceptance and Genetic Variation in Taste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine if individuals who taste 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP), one marker of genetic variation in taste, as exceptionally bitter can also perceive sugars as sweeter, other bitters as more intense, and dietary fats as more creamy and\\/or viscous than do individuals who taste PROP as weakly bitter. This study examined the association between genetic variation in taste and acceptance for

VALERIE B DUFFY; LINDA M BARTOSHUK

2000-01-01

447

Early Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE.Our goal was to evaluate the effects of breastfeeding and dietary experi- ences on acceptance of a fruit and a green vegetable by 4- to 8-month-old infants. METHODS.Forty-five infants, 44% of whom were breastfed, were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 treatment groups. One group was fed green beans, and the other was fed green beans and then peaches at

Catherine A. Forestell; Julie A. Mennella

2007-01-01

448

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

DOE Order 435.1 requires that each treatment, storage, and\\/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic (TRU) waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets

A. K. MCDOWELL; G. C. TRINER

2002-01-01

449

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and\\/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the

Ellefson

1998-01-01

450

Dyadic interactions in accepted and rejected children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty same-sex dyads were separated into three groups (accepted, rejected, and mixed status) on the basis of their scores on the likability and rejection scales of the Pupil Evaluation Inventory [Pekarik, E.,et al. (1976).Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 4, 83–97]. These dyads participated in a 10-min videotaped interaction which was separated into three segments: waiting period, cooperative task, and conversational

Susan Phillips Keane; Anthony J. Conger; Joyce Vogel

1984-01-01

451

43 CFR 3206.10 - What must I do for BLM to issue a lease?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false What must I do for BLM to issue a lease? 3206.10 Section 3206.10 Public...Issuance § 3206.10 What must I do for BLM to issue a lease? Before BLM issues any lease, you must: (a) Accept all...

2012-10-01

452

Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons  

SciTech Connect

There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

Miyadera, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurennoy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, A J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

453

Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

Dzenitis, J M

2006-12-12

454

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

455

Issues in Ecology, Issue 02: Ecosystem Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report defines ecosystem services as a strategy for the conservation of biodiversity. The production of ecosystem goods as it relates to the generation and maintenance of biodiversity is described. Ecosystem services such as flood and drought mitigation, services supplied by soil, pollination, pest control, and seed dispersal are described. Threats to ecosystem services are discussed, as well as their aesthetic, intellectual, and spiritual values. Issues in Ecology is an ongoing series of reports designed to present major ecological issues in an easy-to-read manner. This Issue summarizes the consensus of a panel of scientific experts based on the information that was current and available at the time of its publication in 1997.

Alexander, Susan

2010-02-16

456

Psychological issues in IVF.  

PubMed

The role of psychological factors in IVF is complex. Psychological issues intertwine with physical ones, often with additive effects. The very diagnosis of infertility is likely to cause stress. In addition, the many investigations and procedures may have compounded distress. There are probably a small number of patients in whom psychological factors may induce infertility. But in the majority, psychological factors may exacerbate infertility and influence the patient's and partner's responses. Mental, sexual, marital and social adjustment may all be affected. The procedure of IVF is likely to have a further impact. A pilot study of couples entering an IVF programme revealed the women to be highly anxious and to conform strongly to feminine stereotypes. Many had received psychiatric help in the past. The idiopathic group appeared to cope less well with stress and had higher anxiety and neuroticism scores. Follow-up revealed that IVF had a profound impact on many of the women. Most had received no counselling in the interim. In those who completed questionnaires at follow-up, a differential effect was observed between the organic and idiopathic groups. State anxiety fell in the idiopathic group but so did marital adjustment. The clinician is advised to incorporate consideration of the psychological aspects of IVF into every aspect of the programme. The addition of a psycho-social team may assist the gynaecologist in this and help the couple to make an optimal adjustment. PMID:3833441

Dennerstein, L; Morse, C

1985-12-01

457

Acceptance criteria for urban dispersion model evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors suggested acceptance criteria for rural dispersion models' performance measures in this journal in 2004. The current paper suggests modified values of acceptance criteria for urban applications and tests them with tracer data from four urban field experiments. For the arc-maximum concentrations, the fractional bias should have a magnitude <0.67 (i.e., the relative mean bias is less than a factor of 2); the normalized mean-square error should be <6 (i.e., the random scatter is less than about 2.4 times the mean); and the fraction of predictions that are within a factor of two of the observations (FAC2) should be >0.3. For all data paired in space, for which a threshold concentration must always be defined, the normalized absolute difference should be <0.50, when the threshold is three times the instrument's limit of quantification (LOQ). An overall criterion is then applied that the total set of acceptance criteria should be satisfied in at least half of the field experiments. These acceptance criteria are applied to evaluations of the US Department of Defense's Joint Effects Model (JEM) with tracer data from US urban field experiments in Salt Lake City (U2000), Oklahoma City (JU2003), and Manhattan (MSG05 and MID05). JEM includes the SCIPUFF dispersion model with the urban canopy option and the urban dispersion model (UDM) option. In each set of evaluations, three or four likely options are tested for meteorological inputs (e.g., a local building top wind speed, the closest National Weather Service airport observations, or outputs from numerical weather prediction models). It is found that, due to large natural variability in the urban data, there is not a large difference between the performance measures for the two model options and the three or four meteorological input options. The more detailed UDM and the state-of-the-art numerical weather models do provide a slight improvement over the other options. The proposed urban dispersion model acceptance criteria are satisfied at over half of the field experiments.

Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

2012-05-01

458

Consumer e-shopping acceptance: Antecedents in a technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study integrates e-shopping quality, enjoyment, and trust into a technology acceptance model (TAM) to understand consumer acceptance of e-shopping. Online surveys with college students (n=298) were conducted. E-shopping quality for apparel products consists of four dimensions: web site design, customer service, privacy\\/security, and atmospheric\\/experiential. A structural equation model reveals that e-shopping quality determines perceptions of usefulness, trust, and enjoyment,

Sejin Ha; Leslie Stoel

2009-01-01

459

Intent to accept and acceptance of herpes testing in adolescents and young adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:Understanding the intention–behaviour association with HSV-2 testing is important because it can inform interventions that might be needed to support an effective HSV-2 control programme. This study aims to understand attitudinal, symptomatic and historical precursors to intent to accept, and acceptance of, HSV-2 testing.Methods:The sample included 900 individuals recruited from four sites located in two US cities. Participants completed self-report

N C Kelly; G D Zimet; M C Aalsma; D I Bernstein; J D Fortenberry; S L Rosenthal

2009-01-01

460

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14

461

SIMULATION BASED ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR UNMANNED GROUND VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance testing is considered a final stage of validation, and performing acceptance tests of an actual UGV system can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, this paper discusses simulation based acceptance testing for UGVs, which can significantly reduce the time and cost of the acceptance test. In this paper, both dynamic and static simulation models are developed, and the results from

Hyo Jong Lee; A. Galip Ulsoy

2009-01-01

462

Consumer Acceptance of Personal Information and Communication Technology Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

In today's information and communication technol- ogy (ICT)-enabled service economy, there is great interest in digital service management. While the extant technology acceptance re- search has mainly studied user acceptance of various ICTs, there is a dearth of research on consumer acceptance of personal ICT services. In this paper, we extend the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

James Y. L. Thong; Viswanath Venkatesh; Xin Xu; Se-Joon Hong; Kar Yan Tam

2011-01-01

463

European public acceptance of euthanasia: socio-demographic and cultural factors associated with the acceptance of euthanasia in 33 European countries.  

PubMed

In many European countries, the last decade has been marked by an increasing debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions in medical practice. Growing public sensibility to a 'right to die' for terminally ill patients has been one of the main constituents of these debates. Within this context, we sought to describe and compare acceptance of euthanasia among the general public in 33 European countries. We used the European Values Study data of 1999-2000 with a total of 41125 respondents (63% response rate) in 33 European countries. The main outcome measure concerned the acceptance of euthanasia (defined as 'terminating the life of the incurably sick', rated on a scale from 1 to 10). Results showed that the acceptance of euthanasia tended to be high in some countries (e.g. the Netherlands, Denmark, France, Sweden), while a markedly low acceptance was found in others (e.g. Romania, Malta and Turkey). A multivariate ordinal regression showed that weaker religious belief was the most important factor associated with a higher acceptance; however, there were also socio-demographic differences: younger cohorts, people from non-manual social classes, and people with a higher educational level tended to have a higher acceptance of euthanasia. While religious belief, socio-demographic factors, and also moral values (i.e. the belief in the right to self-determination) could largely explain the differences between countries, our findings suggest that perceptions regarding euthanasia are probably also influenced by national traditions and history (e.g. Germany). Thus, we demonstrated clear cross-national differences with regard to the acceptance of euthanasia, which can serve as an important basis for further debate and research in the specific countries. PMID:16537097

Cohen, Joachim; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bilsen, Johan; Deboosere, Patrick; van der Wal, Gerrit; Deliens, Luc

2006-03-14

464

Acceptance in behavior therapy: Understanding the process of change  

PubMed Central

Acceptance is integral to several cutting-edge behavior therapies. However, several questions about acceptance remain to be clearly answered. First, what does acceptance look like, and can it be observed and measured? Second, what are the behavioral principles involved in the promotion of acceptance? Third, when is acceptance indicated or contraindicated as a therapeutic goal? The current paper attempts to clarify answers to these questions. The goal is to provide a conceptualization of the what, how, and when of acceptance that is accessible to behavior analysts, both to promote our understanding of acceptance as a behavioral phenomenon and to facilitate its empirical study and therapeutic utility.

Cordova, James V.

2001-01-01

465

Focus Issue: Coping with Cellular Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Organisms constantly face potential damage from internal and external sources, thus necessitating signaling cascades that couple specific cellular stresses to the appropriate responses. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the signaling pathways that are activated by and that mediate responses to diverse types of stresses.

Wei Wong (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2009-11-10

466

Natural hazard losses and acceptable risk criteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The criteria for the definition of acceptable risk to the lives of members of a society (commonly called societal risk) resulting from exposure to natural hazards are based in most countries on the frequency and characteristics of industrial accidents, e.g., nuclear power plants. However, historical records indicate that the frequency of natural hazard events is much higher than those involved in industrial hazards and their consequences are far greater. We find that the risk from natural hazards is unacceptable in the current risk criteria framework, i.e., they are an unacceptable risk with respect to the acceptable risk criteria based on the frequency and consequences of industrial accidents. According to a definition of risk, there are two main components; first, the probability of occurrence of the hazard and second, the consequence of the hazard. The occurrence of industrial accident events (hazard) can be controlled to a large extent in contrast to that of natural hazards. However, we can control natural hazard risk, in some cases by engineering solutions to control hazard and by reducing the consequences of the events by mitigating, risk management, warning and monitoring techniques. With reference to natural hazards reducing risk is mainly effected by reducing consequences. The FN-curve is a tool commonly used in societal risk assessment. It is built on a series of frequency-loss data associated with a particular process in a given period of time. It is also used to set acceptable risk criteria for countries or sub-national jurisdictions, by defining slopes and intercepts for plots of a particular (or group of) processes. The intercept of the acceptable risk curve is usually arbitrarily defined in the order of 10-7-10-1 deaths per year, and the slope criteria is based on an adopted aversion factor of the society to accident and disaster losses.The imposed slope criteria is usually between -1 and -2 whereas the slope of FN-curves based on real natural disaster data is <-1. Efforts have been made to make FN-curves more practical since there have been persistent difficulties in interpreting the curves dating back to their initial use in the 1960s. To this end we introduce a normalization procedure to the consequence part of the FN-curve. This involves taking N, number of fatalities and dividing N by the population exposed to the event. Since the population of regions are different, different societal risk results from differential exposure. We illustrate the use of the normalized consequence approach by analyzing losses from natural hazards in 32 European countries derived from the EM-DAT database. We examine historical losses in relation to acceptable risk criteria and find that risks defined in the modified FN curves far exceed those defined in industrial-accident-based acceptable risk criteria in current European use.

Khaleghy Rad, M.; Evans, S. G.; Nadim, F.; Lacasse, S.

2009-12-01

467

Ethical issues in dementia  

PubMed Central

The growing number of individuals affected by dementia will intensify the ethical issues that emerge in clinical practice and research, issues early in disease relate to genetic testing, use of medications in mildly affected persons, and diagnostic disclosure. Research issues relate to appropriate informed consent processes, conflict of interests, and research design issues, such as the use of placebos and the use of biological tissues, in the later stages of disease concern about appropriate therapeutic goals and end-of-life care is appropriate.

Whitehouse, Peter J.

2000-01-01

468

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

Gravois, Melanie

2007-06-27

469

Acceptable workloads for three common mining materials.  

PubMed

A series of psychophysical lifting studies was conducted to establish maximum acceptable weights of lift (MAWL) for three supply items commonly handled in underground coal mines (rock dust bags, ventilation stopping blocks, and crib blocks). Each study utilized 12 subjects, all of whom had considerable experience working in underground coal mines. Effects of lifting in four postures (standing, stooping under a 1.5 m ceiling, stooping under a 1.2 m ceiling, and kneeling) were investigated together with four lifting conditions (combinations of lifting symmetry and lifting height). The frequency of lifting was set at four per min, and the task duration was 15 min. Posture significantly affected the MAWL for the rock dust bag (standing MAWL was 7% greater than restricted postures and kneeling MAWL was 6.4% less than stopped); however, posture interacted with lifting conditions for both of the other materials. Physiological costs were found to be significantly greater in the stooped postures compared with kneeling for all materials. Other contrasts (standing versus restricted postures, stooping under 1.5 m ceiling versus stopping under 1.2 m ceiling) did not exhibit significantly different levels of energy expenditure. Energy expenditure was significantly affected by vertical lifting height; however, the plane of lifting had little influence on metabolic cost. Recommended acceptable workloads for the three materials are 20.0 kg for the rock dust bag, 16.5 kg for the ventilation stopping block, and 14.7 kg for the crib block. These results suggest that miners are often required to lift supplies that are substantially heavier than psychophysically acceptable lifting limits. PMID:1387078

Gallagher, S; Hamrick, C A

1992-09-01

470

Analysis of five-year trends in self-reported language preference and issues of item non-response among Hispanic persons in a large cross-sectional health survey: implications for the measurement of an ethnic minority population  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Significant differences in health outcomes have been documented among Hispanic persons, the fastest-growing demographic segment of the United States. The objective of this study was to examine trends in population growth and the collection of health data among Hispanic persons, including issues of language preference and survey completion using a national health survey to highlight issues of measurement of

William S Pearson; William S Garvin; Earl S Ford; Lina S Balluz

2010-01-01

471

The indicator performance estimate approach to determining acceptable wilderness conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using data from a study conducted in the Cranberry Wilderness Area of West Virginia, United States, this paper describes how a modified importance—performance approach can be used to prioritize wilderness indicators and determine how much change from the pristine is acceptable. The approach uses two key types of information: (1) indicator importance, or visitor opinion as to which wilderness indicators have the greatest influence on their experience, and (2) management performance, or the extent to which actual indicator conditions exceed or are within visitor expectations. Performance was represented by calculating indicator performance estimates (IPEs), as defined by standardized differences between actual conditions and visitor preferences for each indicator. The results for each indicator are then presented graphically on a four-quadrant matrix for objective interpretation. Each quadrant represents a management response: keep up the good work, concentrate here, low priority, or possible overkill. The technique allows managers to more systematically and effectively utilize information routinely collected during the limits of acceptable change wilderness planning process.

Hollenhorst, Steven; Gardner, Lisa

1994-11-01

472

The acceptability and preference for the psychological treatment of PTSD.  

PubMed

The acceptability and preference of psychological treatments is important in understanding patient treatment seeking, choice, engagement and attrition and possibly treatment response in health care. The acceptability of, and preference for, 14 different types of psychological treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were investigated in a student population through invitation to participate in a web-based survey. Respondents were asked to rate each treatment on 10 scales and to rank the treatments in order of preference. Respondents were also asked whether they would seek treatment themselves, recommend treatment to friends and family, feel stigmatised by suffering from PTSD, had any prior knowledge of the treatments and if this had been positive or negative and whether they had a history of psychological problems or treatment. A total of 330 respondents completed the survey. A past or current history of psychological problems and treatment was surprisingly high. Almost all respondents indicated that they would seek or recommend treatment in spite of high levels of stigmatisation. Factor analysis of the 10 scales indicated two factors: Endorsement and Discomfort. Rank ordering on preference and Endorsement scores was highly consistent. The highly preferred and endorsed treatments involved cognitive therapy, exposure or psycho-education in spite of high levels of discomfort anticipated with exposure. Treatments involving new technologies, EMDR and psychodynamic psychotherapy received the lowest Endorsement and preference. There was a modest influence of prior knowledge of a treatment. PMID:16460671

Tarrier, Nicholas; Liversidge, Tom; Gregg, Lynsey

2006-02-03

473

New approaches in the derivation of acceptable daily intake (ADI)  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for estimating human health risks from exposure to threshold-acting toxicants in water or food, such as those established by the U.S. EPA, the FDA, the NAS, the WHO and the FAO, consider only chronic or lifetime exposure to individual chemicals. These methods generally estimate a single, constant daily intake rate which is low enough to be considered safe or acceptable. The intake rate is termed the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Two problems with the approach have been recognized. The first problem is that the method does not readily account for the number of animals used to determine the appropriate 'no-observed-effect-level' (NOEL). The second problem with the current approach is that the slope of the dose-response curve of the critical toxic effect is generally ignored in estimating the ADI. The report illustrates both a revised approach to estimate ADIs with all toxicity data which includes methods for partial lifetime assessment, and novel methods for ADI estimation with quantal or continuous toxicity data. The latter method addresses to a degree the common problems with the current approach.

Dourson, M.L.

1986-01-01

474

THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

Christina B. Behr-Andres

2001-10-01

475

The use of uncertainty estimates of test results in comparisons with acceptance limits  

Microsoft Academic Search

When a test is performed in order to qualify a material or a product for a certain use, the result is generally compared with\\u000a an acceptance limit. The test result has an uncertainty which should be estimated and stated (e.g. in accordance with GUM).\\u000a Very often this is not the case. Further, discussions often arise on the issue of how

H. Andersson

2002-01-01

476

Predictions and acceptance criteria for K Reactor startup and power ascension  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to consolidate all the work performed on the predictions and acceptance criteria for the K Reactor Startup and Power Ascension Test Program. All results reported in this document are referenced to technical documents. This report consolidates the results of several technical reports previously issued. The technical background of the results can be found in the references given in this document.

Bond, R.A., Jr.

1991-06-01

477

Public Acceptance of Geological Disposal of Carbon Dioxide and Radioactive Waste: Similarities and Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Public acceptance of geological disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and that of radioactive waste (RW) are fundamentally different problems because of the history, scale and nature of the\\u000a two issues. CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is a technology in its infancy with no full-scale commercial application and there are only a handful\\u000a of full-scale storage projects globally. CO2 storage is

David M. Reiner; William J. Nuttall

478

Treatment Acceptability of Behavioral Interventions for Children: An Assessment by Mothers of Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the acceptability of six child management interventions as rated by 20 mothers of children actually referred for treatment of a disruptive behavior disorder. Positive reinforcement, response cost, differential attention, time-out, overcorrection, and spanking were evaluated using the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form. Positive reinforcement was rated as a more acceptable treatment technique than response cost, time-out, differential attention,

Melanie L. Jones; Sheila M. Eyberg; Christina D. Adams; Stephen R. Boggs

1998-01-01

479

Examinee Issues in CAT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perspective of the examinee during the administration of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) is discussed, focusing on issues of test development. Item review is the first issue discussed. Virtually no CATs provide the opportunity for the examinee to go back and review, and possibly change, answers. There are arguments on either side of the…

Wise, Steven L.

480

Multicultural Issues in Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The professional literature provides ample evidence that individuals with autism exhibit a myriad of unusual social, communication, and behavioral patterns of interactions that present challenges to their families and service providers. However, there is a dearth of quality works on multicultural issues regarding autistic spectrum disorders. In this article, we explore issues surrounding autism and multiculturalism, with the intent not

TinaTaylor Dyches; Lynn K. Wilder; Richard R. Sudweeks; Festus E. Obiakor; Bob Algozzine

2004-01-01

481

Gene Therapy: Ethical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

To discern the ethical issues involved incurrent gene therapy research, to explore theproblems inherent in possible future genetherapies, and to encourage debate within thescientific community about ethical questionsrelevant to both, we surveyed American Societyof Human Genetics scientists who engage inhuman genetics research. This study of theopinions of U.S. scientific experts about theethical issues discussed in the literature ongene therapy contributes

Isaac Rabino

2003-01-01

482

Orbital debris issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision,

D. J. Kessler

1985-01-01

483

Issues in Gifted Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four papers address issues of identification, secondary program alternatives, guidance to develop creativity, and needed research in gifted education. In the first paper, "Some Creative Dimensions to the Issue of Identification," E. Torrance analyzes the problem of idntifying and cultivating creative giftedness in an unfavorable national climate.…

Gallagher, James J.; And Others

484

Yellowstone Resources and Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park online book is a compendium of concise information about the park's history, natural and cultural resources, issues, and major areas. Chapters, which are downloadable as PDF files, focus on the history of the park, the yellowstone ecosystem, geology, life in extreme heat (as in the hot springs), vegetation, fire in yellowstone, wildlife, and park issues.

Park, Yellowstone N.

485

News and Issues, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the three 2002 issues of a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the poverty rate of young children and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter issue includes the following articles: (1) "NCCP [National Center for Children in Poverty] Responds to New…

Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

2002-01-01

486

Issue Brief on Diversity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past year, the Diversity Committee of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Board worked with the Board and the Issues Committee Chair to develop an issue brief addressing diversity, its impact on the membership and the wider community that is served by the work of DDD, resulting in recommendations that will influence policy…

Division on Developmental Disabilities, Council for Exceptional Children (NJ1), 2013

2013-01-01

487

News and Issues, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is comprised of the three 2002 issues of a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the poverty rate of young children and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter issue includes the following articles: (1) "NCCP [National Center for Children in Poverty] Responds to New…

Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

2002-01-01

488

Poverty + Hunger = Global Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Geography teachers can use mathematics to teach fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students about critical global issues. Five sample problems concerning population, poverty, waste, the arms race, and hunger are presented. The global issue related to each problem is discussed, and the solution and mathematical skill are provided. (RM)|

Schwartz, Richard H.

1983-01-01

489

Surrogacy: the psychological issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surrogate motherhood arrangements have increased in recent years and yet the practice remains controversial. The present paper evaluates the limited available research evidence. Issues discussed include: psychological stressors associated with surrogacy, attitudes towards the practice, motives of surrogate and commissioning couple and issues pertaining to their relationship, the question of the surrogate relinquishing the child to the commissioning couple and

R. J. Edelmann

2004-01-01

490

Preface: ISBB Special Issue  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This special issue is published for the International Society of Biocatalysis and Biotechnology (ISBB). The ISBB special issue is devoted to all areas of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology in which biological systems are developed and/or used for the provision of commercial goods or serv...

491

Summary Of Identification Of Rrgulatory Acceptability Of Enhanced Attenuation Categories  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents once introduced to the subsurface are a persistent contaminant. Though many types of active treatments have been developed and deployed to treat contaminated sites, most sites will ultimately incorporate the use of passive treatments into the remediation process. A process favored by many is the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation that relies on the natural attenuation processes occurring within the system to remediate the contaminants. However, it is likely there will be instances where the natural attenuation processes will be insufficient to reduce the level of contamination to acceptable levels in an acceptable span of time. Rather than redeploying source treatments, the Department of Energy along with the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) are developing the concept of Enhanced Attenuation (EA). An enhancement is any type of intervention that might be implemented in a source-plume system that increases the magnitude of attenuation by natural processes beyond that which occurs without intervention. Enhanced Attenuation is the result of applying an enhancement or intervention technique that will sustainably manipulate a natural attenuation process leading to an increased reduction in mass flux of contaminants. Efforts are moving forward along several fronts in developing this concept. This effort is a follow-on to initial discussions with site owners, regulators and stakeholder organizations in the development of the concepts of Enhanced Attenuation, the use of mass balance to evaluate the stability of a waste site/groundwater plume, and identification of tools that will support characterization and monitoring efforts for MNA and EA treatments. Those discussions are documented in the report titled ''Summary Document of Workshops for Hanford, Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site as part of the Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation for Chlorinated Solvents-DOE Alternative Project for Technology Acceleration'' (WSRC, 2003). The objective of this report is to document the May 12th, 2005 deliberations of the ITRC Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics team. The purpose of these deliberations was to identify issues related to regulatory acceptability of the different categories of processes/technologies that may be considered enhancements.

Vangelas, K

2006-01-04

492

Ethical issues in child and adolescent psychiatry.  

PubMed Central

This paper concerns the special ethical problems in child and adolescent psychiatry which relate to the child as a developing being. Two themes are discussed--the sense of responsibility in the child, and the therapist's responsibility towards the child. As a background to understanding the former, ideas on moral and cognitive development are reviewed. The therapist's responsibility is discussed in relation to different styles of therapy and the ethical issues they raise. The article concludes with a number of suggested ethical principles.

Green, J; Stewart, A

1987-01-01

493

Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

494

Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

2000-07-01

495

Multicultural Issues in Deafness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book considers, from both educational and cultural perspectives, the needs of children with deafness from African American, American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Island families. The text calls for a child-centered curriculum based on a fundamental acceptance of differences in communication and interpretation. Section I presents the…

Christensen, Kathee M., Ed.; Delgado, Gilbert L., Ed.

496

Words matter: a qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionals  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals have an important role to play in the management of obesity, but may be unsure how to raise weight issues with patients. The societal stigma associated with excess weight means that weight status terms may be misunderstood, cause offence and risk upsetting patient-professional relationships. This study investigated the views of people who were overweight or obese on the acceptability of weight status terms and their potential to motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. Methods A qualitative study comprising 34 semi-structured interviews with men and women in their mid-to-late 30s and 50s who were overweight or obese and had recently been informed of their weight status. Thematic framework analysis was conducted to allow the systematic comparison of views by age, gender and apparent motivation to lose weight. Results Although many people favoured 'Overweight' to describe their weight status, there were doubts about its effectiveness to motivate weight loss. Terms including 'BMI' ('Body Mass Index') or referring to the unhealthy nature of their weight were generally considered acceptable and motivational, although a number of men questioned the validity of BMI as an indicator of excess weight. Participants, particularly women, felt that health professionals should avoid using 'Fat'. Whilst response to 'Obese' was largely negative, people recognised that it could be appropriate in a health consultation. Some younger people, particularly those who appeared motivated to lose weight, felt 'Obese' could encourage weight loss, but it was also clear the term could provoke negative emotions if used insensitively. Conclusions Although most people who are overweight or obese accept that it is appropriate for health professionals to discuss weight issues with patients, there is great variation in response to the terms commonly used to describe excess weight. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to discussing weight status: some men and younger people may appreciate a direct approach, whilst others need to be treated more sensitively. It is therefore important that health professionals use their knowledge and understanding to select the terms that are most likely to be acceptable, but at the same time have most potential to motivate each individual patient.

2011-01-01

497