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1

Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary  

SciTech Connect

On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

NONE

1995-03-01

2

Issues in Differential Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Differential response (DR), also referred to as alternative response (AR), family assessment response (FAR), or multiple track response, was developed to incorporate family-centered, strengths-based practices into child protective services (CPS), primarily by diverting lower risk families into an assessment track rather than requiring the…

Hughes, Ronald C.; Rycus, Judith S.; Saunders-Adams, Stacey M.; Hughes, Laura K.; Hughes, Kelli N.

2013-01-01

3

Evaluation of the Acceptance of Audience Response System by Corporations Using the Technology Acceptance Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this research is to explore enterprises' acceptance of Audience Response System (ARS) using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The findings show that (1) IT characteristics and facilitating conditions could be external variables of TAM. (2) The degree of E-business has positive significant correlation with behavioral intention of employees. (3) TAM is a good model to predict and explain IT acceptance. (4) Demographic variables, industry and firm characteristics have no significant correlation with ARS acceptance. The results provide useful information to managers and ARS providers that (1) ARS providers should focus more on creating different usages to enhance interactivity and employees' using intention. (2) Managers should pay attention to build sound internal facilitating conditions for introducing IT. (3) According to the degree of E-business, managers should set up strategic stages of introducing IT. (4) Providers should increase product promotion and also leverage academic and government to promote ARS.

Chu, Hsing-Hui; Lu, Ta-Jung; Wann, Jong-Wen

4

Invited Commentary on "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ronald Hughes and his colleagues have written a groundbreaking article on child welfare's use of differential response. Their research addresses the matter from a "lessons learned" and "ways to improve" approach. Our comments focused on three key issues: (1) the importance of evidence-based practice; (2) the recognition…

Vaughan-Eden, Viola; Vandervort, Frank E.

2013-01-01

5

Some Issues in Free Response Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes an investigation of applications and issues in free response (FR) testing during 1989. It draws on ideas from the results of the National Educational Longitudinal Study 1988 (NELS:88) field test, a seminar series at the Educational Testing Service (ETS), working papers prepared for several FR testing applications, and…

Pollack, Judith M.

6

How Attributional Ambiguity Shapes Physiological and Emotional Responses to Social Rejection and Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined White and Black participants’ emotional, physiological, and behavioral responses to same-race or different-race evaluators, following rejecting social feedback or accepting social feedback. As expected, in ingroup interactions, the authors observed deleterious responses to social rejection and benign responses to social acceptance. Deleterious responses included cardiovascular (CV) reactivity consistent with threat states and poorer performance, whereas benign responses

Wendy Berry Mendes; Brenda Major; Shannon McCoy; Jim Blascovich

2008-01-01

7

Awareness and Acceptance of Biotechnology Issues among Youth, Undergraduates, and Adults  

E-print Network

To be successful both domestically and internationally, biotechnology must establish an acceptable position in the sociopolitical framework. This United States (US) study assessed levels of awareness and acceptance of biotechnology issues among youth (n = 283), undergraduate students (n = 330), and adults (n = 166). The percentage of adults who were aware of how biotechnology would affect food, health, and the environment was almost three times that of youth respondents. It was concluded that consumer groups would most likely be impacted by accurate, unbiased agricultural biotechnology information delivered through the Internet and newspapers that originates from reliable, accessible, and science-based sources. Key words: adolescents, adult, biotechnology, consumer, genetically modified, GM, undergraduates, youth. Producers and consumers view the potential of genetically modified (GM) crops from different perspectives. From the producers ’ perspective, an increase in acceptance has resulted in increased production of GM crops. For example, between 1995 and 2001, the share of US soybean, cotton, and corn acreage planted to GM varieties increased from a negligible amount to over 70 % for soybeans, 56 % for cotton, and 26 % for corn (Huffman, Rousu, Shogren, & Tegene, 2003). According to another report by industry-backed International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech applications (2003), seven million farmers in 18 countries grew GM crops on 167.2 million acres in 2003, compared with six million farmers in 16 countries on 145.2 million acres in 2002, for an approximate increase of 22 million acres. From the consumer perspective, domestic and international studies of consumer acceptance reveal a mismatch of acceptance with production. This mismatch potentially threatens the future of agricultural biotechnology and limits options for addressing world food shortages.

unknown authors

8

Developing a placebo-controlled trial in surgery: Issues of design, acceptability and feasibility  

PubMed Central

Background Surgical placebos are controversial. This in-depth study explored the design, acceptability, and feasibility issues relevant to designing a surgical placebo-controlled trial for the evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic lavage for the management of people with osteoarthritis of the knee in the UK. Methods Two surgeon focus groups at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic surgeons and one regional surgeon focus group (41 surgeons); plenary discussion at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic anaesthetists (130 anaesthetists); three focus groups with anaesthetists (one national, two regional; 58 anaesthetists); two focus groups with members of the patient organisation Arthritis Care (7 participants); telephone interviews with people on consultant waiting lists from two UK regional centres (15 participants); interviews with Chairs of UK ethics committees (6 individuals); postal surveys of members of the British Association of Surgeons of the Knee (382 surgeons) and members of the British Society of Orthopaedic Anaesthetists (398 anaesthetists); two centre pilot (49 patients assessed). Results There was widespread acceptance that evaluation of arthroscopic lavage had to be conducted with a placebo control if scientific rigour was not to be compromised. The choice of placebo surgical procedure (three small incisions) proved easier than the method of anaesthesia (general anaesthesia). General anaesthesia, while an excellent mimic, was more intrusive and raised concerns among some stakeholders and caused extensive discussion with local decision-makers when seeking formal approval for the pilot. Patients were willing to participate in a pilot with a placebo arm; although some patients when allocated to surgery became apprehensive about the possibility of receiving placebo, and withdrew. Placebo surgery was undertaken successfully. Conclusions Our study illustrated the opposing and often strongly held opinions about surgical placebos, the ethical issues underpinning this controversy, and the challenges that exist even when ethics committee approval has been granted. It showed that a placebo-controlled trial could be conducted in principle, albeit with difficulty. It also highlighted that not only does a placebo-controlled trial in surgery have to be ethically and scientifically acceptable but that it also must be a feasible course of action. The place of placebo-controlled surgical trials more generally is likely to be limited and require specific circumstances to be met. Suggested criteria are presented. Trial registration number The trial was assigned ISRCTN02328576 through http://controlled-trials.com/ in June 2006. The first patient was randomised to the pilot in July 2007. PMID:21338481

2011-01-01

9

Accepting "total and complete responsibility": new age neo-feminist violence against women.  

PubMed

Barry Konikov, a hypnotherapist, of Potentials Unlimited Inc., a Michigan-based company which produces approximately 160 Subliminal Persuasion/Self Hypnosis tapes, promises his listeners miracles. The tapes on premenstrual syndrome, abortion, and sexual abuse were analyzed. The self-hypnosis message by Konikov is dangerous for women, because his antifeminism, misogyny, and patriarchism are couched insidiously within New Age neofeminism. Under therapeutic guidance the woman listener can direct her own transformation to complete mental, physical, and spiritual well-being, and her new and improved self is so empowered as to accept total and complete responsibility to overcome the hurt about menstruation, abortion, or sexual abuse. Growth therapies such as Gestalt, guided fantasies, and bioenergetics undermine women with false promises of power. If women are so powerful, then it is their fault if they got raped, or battered, or if they have not received love, money, and inner peace. While seemingly empowering women to develop a strong sense of personal agency, Konikov ignores the patriarchal structures which intersect his women listeners' experience of menstrual discomfort, abortion, and sexual abuse. Konikov's New Age, neofeminist stance contains 4 stages of healing: responsibility, absolution, forgiveness, and resolution. Accepting responsibility for the wound next leads to absolution, and particularly absolution for men. As an example of absolution, Konikov's woman client-ex-plantation slave accepted her past-life relationship to her husband, absolved him of guild, and decided upon a divorce. The issue of absolution widens into forgiveness in the healing process, whereby Konikov wants women to hypnotize themselves therapy should be to help a woman see how her own power as an individual is inextricably bound to the collective power of women as a group. There is no doubt that the New Age neofeminist stance taken by Konikov on the tapes leaves women profoundly disempowered. PMID:12287095

Sethna, C

1992-02-01

10

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance.  

PubMed

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n=18), we used an ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids have a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well being in the social environment. PMID:23958960

Hsu, D T; Sanford, B J; Meyers, K K; Love, T M; Hazlett, K E; Wang, H; Ni, L; Walker, S J; Mickey, B J; Korycinski, S T; Koeppe, R A; Crocker, J K; Langenecker, S A; Zubieta, J-K

2013-11-01

11

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance  

PubMed Central

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n = 18), we used a ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids play a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG, and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula, and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well-being in the social environment. PMID:23958960

Hsu, David T; Sanford, Benjamin J; Meyers, Kortni K; Love, Tiffany M; Hazlett, Kathleen E; Wang, Heng; Ni, Lisong; Walker, Sara J; Mickey, Brian J; Korycinski, Steven T; Koeppe, Robert A; Crocker, Jennifer K; Langenecker, Scott A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

2013-01-01

12

How Attributional Ambiguity Shapes Physiological and Emotional Responses to Social Rejection and Acceptance  

PubMed Central

The authors examined White and Black participants’ emotional, physiological, and behavioral responses to same-race or different-race evaluators, following rejecting social feedback or accepting social feedback. As expected, in ingroup interactions, the authors observed deleterious responses to social rejection and benign responses to social acceptance. Deleterious responses included cardiovascular (CV) reactivity consistent with threat states and poorer performance, whereas benign responses included CV reactivity consistent with challenge states and better performance. In intergroup interactions, however, a more complex pattern of responses emerged. Social rejection from different-race evaluators engendered more anger and activational responses, regardless of participants’ race. In contrast, social acceptance produced an asymmetrical race pattern—White participants responded more positively than did Black participants. The latter appeared vigilant and exhibited threat responses. Discussion centers on implications for attributional ambiguity theory and potential pathways from discrimination to health outcomes. PMID:18211177

Mendes, Wendy Berry; McCoy, Shannon; Major, Brenda; Blascovich, Jim

2008-01-01

13

A Quantitative Assessment of the Factors that Influence Technology Acceptance in Emergency Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional models for studying user acceptance and adoption of technology focused on the factors that identify and tested the relationships forged between the user and the technology in question. In emergency response, implementing technology without user acceptance may affect the safety of the responders and citizenry. Integrating the factors…

Seiter, Thomas C.

2012-01-01

14

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications Educational Aspects,  

E-print Network

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications ­ Educational Aspects, August 2005 Revised May 2006 Selected eHealth Applications, Cyprus (2) Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Cyprus (3) Ministry of Health, Cyprus

Pitsillides, Andreas

15

Pharmacogenetics Ethical Issues Response of the Wellcome Trust  

E-print Network

Pharmacogenetics ­ Ethical Issues Response of the Wellcome Trust 1 Pharmacogenetics - Ethical susceptibility factors, and our ability to employ pharmacogenetics approaches to enhance the development and safe;Pharmacogenetics ­ Ethical Issues Response of the Wellcome Trust 2 funders are working to ensure that the wider

Rambaut, Andrew

16

On the choice of acceptance radius in free-response observer performance studies  

PubMed Central

Objectives Choosing an acceptance radius or proximity criterion is necessary to analyse free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) observer performance data. This is currently subjective, with little guidance in the literature about what is an appropriate acceptance radius. We evaluated varying acceptance radii in a nodule detection task in chest radiography and suggest guidelines for determining an acceptance radius. Methods 80 chest radiographs were chosen, half of which contained nodules. We determined each nodule's centre. 21 radiologists read the images. We created acceptance radii bins of <5 pixels, <10 pixels, <20 pixels and onwards up to <200 and 200+ pixels. We counted lesion localisations in each bin and visually compared marks with the borders of nodules. Results Most reader marks were tightly clustered around nodule centres, with tighter clustering for smaller than for larger nodules. At least 70% of readers' marks were placed within <10 pixels for small nodules, <20 pixels for medium nodules and <30 pixels for large nodules. Of 72 inspected marks that were less than 50 pixels from the centre of a nodule, only 1 fell outside the border of a nodule. Conclusion The acceptance radius should be based on the larger nodule sizes. For our data, an acceptance radius of 50 pixels would have captured all but 2 reader marks within the borders of a nodule, while excluding only 1 true-positive mark. The choice of an acceptance radius for FROC analysis of observer performance studies should be based on the size of larger abnormalities. PMID:22573302

Haygood, T M; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C; Li, S; Marom, E M; McEntee, M F; Itani, M; Evanoff, M; Chakraborty, D

2013-01-01

17

Responding to "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes's article represents an important effort to critically examine the foundation of thought and empirical evidence associated with the rise in prominence of differential response (DR) within child welfare systems throughout the United States. The insights and criticisms offered are an important…

Perry, Robin Ernest

2013-01-01

18

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented,  

E-print Network

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination.This article has been accepted

Huang, Jianwei

19

Moral Reasoning and Homosexuality: The Acceptability of Arguments about Lesbian and Gay Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores preferences for different types of moral arguments when thinking about moral dilemmas concerning lesbian and gay issues. Presents data collected from student questionnaires (n=545) at British universities. Shows that respondents do not apply moral reasoning consistently and do not favor human rights reasoning when thinking about…

Ellis, Sonja J.

2002-01-01

20

Acceptance of Mass Customization of Apparel: Merchandising Issues Associated With Preference for Product, Process, and Place  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of our research was to examine apparel merchandising issues associated with mass customization. A questionnaire was developed to explore preferences for mass customization product, process, and place that have the potential of affecting success of a mass customization program. The questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 131 college students. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests,

Seung-Eun Lee; Grace I. Kunz; Ann Marie Fiore; J. R. Campbell

2002-01-01

21

DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS RESPONSE AND HIGH-  

E-print Network

DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS is known about how to design checklists well, especially new forms of computer-aided checklists; experts produce most existing designs in an ad-hoc manner. In response, we introduce the Dynamic Procedure aids

Klemmer, Scott

22

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL 1  

E-print Network

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL 1 A Risk-Constrained Project Portfolio

Dixon, Juan

23

Response Some Burning Issues in Research on Health Behavior Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

This response to five excellent commentaries is intended to clarify some issues in research on health behavior change that appear to be ambiguous or con- troversial, such as the debate about stage models versus continuum models or the search for moderators and mediators. The assumption of stages can be useful, but the quest for truly existing stages is considered fruitless

Ralf Schwarzer

24

Avoiding the midnight phone calls: Establishing reasonable noise criteria and designing for acceptable community response  

SciTech Connect

Surprises can be expected during commissioning of any new facility, including power plants. One surprise is threats of legal action from neighbors about noise emissions. While some noise emission solutions can be implemented after commissioning of the facility as needed, many facility designers are not aware that noise impact can be accurately predicted during development. Mitigation can then be implemented with an eraser instead of a jackhammer. Noise emissions can be a particularly sensitive issue with surrounding property owners when a facility is constructed close to residential and commercial land uses. This is particularly so because the facility will be relatively quiet in the period between completion of construction and commissioning. The first night that the plant is in operation, the acoustical environment to which the community has become adapted may change drastically. This is a particularly troublesome because in most instances little attention has been given to planning plant noise emissions. Two situations are common: the jurisdiction has no criteria for acceptable noise; or there is a single State noise criterion that is applied to all conditions, rural and urban alike. Compliance with a regulation does not guarantee community acceptance. In this paper, we demonstrate how community acceptance of power plant noise emissions can be predicted based on a thorough knowledge of existing sound levels, both day and night, enumeration of plant sound sources, and the type of surrounding land use and building construction. We develop examples of noise emission criteria for two environments and compare the degree of noise control needed for the same plant constructed in a rural vs an urban setting. Finally, based on these comparisons, we recommend a strategy for establishing noise emission criteria and a method to incorporate noise control which optimizes capital and operating cost vs. degree of mitigation.

Erdreich, J.; Clark, E.M. [Ostergaard Acoustical Associates, West Orange, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31

25

Mothers' and Fathers' Responsive Problem Solving with Early Adolescents: Do Gender, Shyness, and Social Acceptance Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the extent to which youths' (n = 231) shyness and social acceptance in preadolescence were associated with parents' responsive problem solving 1 year later after controlling for initial levels of parents' problem solving. Teachers (n = 176) completed assessments of youths' shyness and social acceptance, and parents (n = 231 married…

Miller, Scott R.; Brody, Gene H.; Murry, Velma M.

2010-01-01

26

Focus Issue: Keeping the Immune Response in Check  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When exploring control of a biological system such as the inflammatory response, we often think first of mechanisms that promote activation of the system. But just as important are the signals that that modulate and terminate these processes. Unchecked recruitment and infiltration of leukocytes into tissues and the unrestrained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can lead to tissue damage and even cancer. This issue of Science’s STKE highlights studies that enhance our understanding of how pro-inflammatory signals are switched on, and--equally important--how they are switched off.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science's STKE REV)

2007-05-01

27

Suggested Management Responses to Ethical Issues Raised by Technological Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of technology raises an array of ethical issues related to work. Many of these ethical issues are old issues surfacing under new guises. Technology has not changed the issues, but technology makes the issues' analysis and application more complex. This paper identifies several new ethical issues raised by technological change: computer crime, an over-reliance on computer controlled systems,

William P. Cordeiro

1997-01-01

28

Beyond the Transboundary River: Issues of Riparian Responsibilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The issues of riparian countries sharing transboundary waters spans decades, and has been greatly strengthened by its collaboration with partner agencies. International cooperation on shared water resources is critical, especially in water scarce regions experiencing the impacts of over-consumption and pollution. Where, river basins are transboundary, this requires regular and structured consultation, coordination and cooperation among all states sharing the catchment. Rapid and unsustainable development of river basins and their wetlands has led to the disruption of natural hydrological cycles. In many cases this has resulted in greater frequency and severity of flooding, drought and pollution. Appropriate transnational planning, protection and allocation of water to wetlands are essential to avoid disaster and enable these ecosystems to continue to provide important goods and services to local communities. Integrated river basin management takes into account policies and measures for the multifunctional use of rivers on a catchment scale and associated institutional changes. The implementation of these involves a number of steps such as definition of aim, construction of conceptual model, selection of variables, comparison with selection criteria, database assessment, and indicator selection division of tasks and responsibilities for river basin management with regard to the development of indicators, data collection, and their application in decision-making. This work presents issues pertaining to the pressure to the river, the state of the river ecosystem, the impact to goods and services provided by the river, and the societal response.

Parhi, P. K.; Sankhua, R. N.

2013-11-01

29

Identification of response and timing issues at permanent European broadband stations from automated data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To tackle the ever increasing amount of available broadband seismic data from European network providers for routine analysis, manual data processing and retrieval of certain observables (e.g. dispersive traveltimes, polarisation parameters) needs to be replaced by automated processing tools. We developed an automated routine to measure inter-station phase velocity curves of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves by pairwise cross-correlating seismograms from all available permanent stations in Central and Northern Europe. Making use of path-specific reference models based on CRUST2.0, only three parameters that control the acceptable bandwidth of a given observation are required for our automated routine to identify and pick acceptable dispersion curves. As the measurements are based on the phase difference of the waveforms at two stations, the measurements are 2? ambiguous and we select the solution that is in general closest to our reference curve. While applying this routine to the entire dataset, we observe at some stations systematic deviations from the expected measurement which may not be related to wave propagation effects. These include timing and response information issues, of the latter most prominently polarity switches. As we compare wavefields that propagate in both directions between two stations, both these effects lead to distinct deviative patterns in the measurements. A polarity problem at one station, for example, leads to dispersion measurements that are offset from the reference curve with a ? offset instead of the expected 2?. Timing issues on the other hand lead to symmetric deviations (for the two propagation directions) that are in general smaller than ?. Statistical analysis of our measurements against the expected dispersion curves from our reference models allows us to construct a map of anomalous stations in Europe. Furthermore, we have also indications that some instruments may not only have phase but also amplitude issues.

Weidle, Christian; Soomro, Riaz Ahmed; Cristiano, Luigia; Meier, Thomas

2013-04-01

30

Individualism, acceptance and differentiation as attitude traits in the public's response to vaccination  

PubMed Central

The attitude of the general public to vaccination was evaluated through a survey conducted on a representative sample of the Israeli population (n = 2,018), in which interviewees were requested to express their standpoints regarding five different vaccination programs. These included: pandemic influenza vaccination, seasonal influenza vaccination, travel vaccines, Human Papilloma Virus vaccine and childhood vaccinations. Analysis of the responses reveal three major attitude traits: a) acceptance, characterized by the opinion that targets should be vaccinated; b) individualism, characterized by the opinion that vaccination should be left to personal choice; and c) differentiation, characterized by the tendency to express different attitudes when addressing different vaccination programs. Interestingly, direct opposition to vaccination was found to be a minor attitude trait in this survey. Groups within the population could be defined according to their tendency to assume these different attitudes as Acceptors, Judicious-acceptors, Differentiators, Soft-individualists, and Hard-individualists. These groups expressed different standpoints on all five vaccination programs as well as on other health recommendations, such as screening for early detection of cancer. Attitude traits could be also correlated, to a certain extent, with actual compliance with vaccination programs. Interestingly, attitudes to vaccination were not correlated with social profiles related to income or education, although younger individuals exhibited higher degrees of individualism and differentiation. Taken together, all this is in accordance with the current social settings, underlining the individual's tendency for critical evaluation and self-stirring. This should be taken into consideration by health authorities involved in vaccination programs. PMID:22894959

Velan, Baruch; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Ziv, Arnona; Yagar, Yaakov; Kaplan, Giora

2012-01-01

31

The level of confidence and responsibility accepted by Australian radiation therapists in developing plans and implementing treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to assess (i) how confident Radiation Therapists (RTs) are in developing a series of plans that have increasing levels of difficulty, and (ii) the level of responsibility that they are willing to accept in relation to these treatments being implemented without the Radiation Oncologist (RO) reviewing or countersigning the plan. A self-administered questionnaire was designed

S. E. Dempsey; M. Burr

2009-01-01

32

Computer game associating self-concept to images of acceptance can reduce adolescents' aggressiveness in response to social rejection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience of social rejection can lead to an aggressive response. However, the ability to maintain a sense of social connection may reduce the likelihood of this type of response. We tested a computer-based intervention designed to use simple learning principles to boost the sense of social connection and acceptance. Adolescents aged 9–15 (n=138) first completed a conditioning game on

Mark W. Baldwin; Jodene R. Baccus; Marina Milyavskaya

2010-01-01

33

IMPROVING WILLINGNESS-TO-ACCEPT RESPONSES USING ALTERNATE FORMS OF COMPENSATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this project is to design a pilot survey to investigate why surveys that ask willingness-to-accept compensation questions so often yield unreliable data and whether respondents would find alternate modes of compensation (specifically, public goods) more acceptab...

34

UN RESPONSABLE HIERARCHIQUE PEUT-IL ACCEPTER QU'UN SALARIE SE FORME EN E-LEARNING ?  

E-print Network

1 UN RESPONSABLE HIERARCHIQUE PEUT-IL ACCEPTER QU'UN SALARIE SE FORME EN E-LEARNING ? Ewan Oiry LEST ­ CNRS, UMR 6123, Université de la Méditerranée, France ewan.oiry@wanadoo.fr RESUME Le e-learning caractéristique ne nous semble toutefois pas avoir été suffisamment pris en compte. Un salarié en e-learning se

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

State subsidies induce gray jays to accept greater danger: an ecologically rational response?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of strictly rational choice assume that decision-makers evaluate options on relevant dimensions, assign fixed values\\u000a to options, and then make consistent choices based on these values. If so, recent experience would have no impact on preference.\\u000a But, recent events change an animal’s state, and preference may change accordingly. We explore how state affects willingness\\u000a to accept greater danger to

Thomas A. Waite; Andrew L. Nevai; Kevin M. Passino

2007-01-01

36

Public Acceptance of Wildland Fire and Fuel Management: Panel Responses in Seven Locations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wildland fire affects both public and private resources throughout the United States. A century of fire suppression has contributed to changing ecological conditions and accumulated fuel loads. Managers have used a variety of approaches to address these conditions and reduce the likelihood of wildland fires that may result in adverse ecological impacts and threaten communities. Public acceptance is a critical component of developing and implementing successful management programs. This study examines the factors that influence citizen support for agency fuel reduction treatments over time—particularly prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study examining resident beliefs and attitudes regarding fire management and fuels treatments in seven states: Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Utah, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The study was implemented in two phases over a 6-year period using mail surveys to residents of communities adjacent to federal lands in each location. Questions replicated measures from the original project as well as some new items to allow a more in-depth analysis of key concepts. The study design enables comparisons over time as well as between locations. We also assess the factors that influence acceptance of both prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. Findings demonstrate a relative stability of attitudes toward fuels management approaches over time and suggest that this acceptance is strongly influenced by confidence in resource managers and beliefs that the treatments would result in positive outcomes.

Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; McCaffrey, Sarah; Bennett, James

2014-09-01

37

A Publication of Oregon State University and the HHMI-NWNET Now accepting submissions for the next issue of  

E-print Network

to Replicate, Purify, and Use a Mutant RNA Virus to Study the Antiviral Defense Response in Plants...............................................9 Context-Dependent Influence of an Invasive Plant, EuphorbiaesulaMolecularCharacterizationofEquineSynovialFluid...........16 Understanding Expression of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Proteins (GALLS) Required for Gene Transfer

Escher, Christine

38

Corporate social responsibility: issues for human resource development professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent human resource development (HRD) scholarship has called for greater focus on social responsibility and ecological sustainability. The purpose of this article is to explore the engagement of HRD professionals in corporate social responsibility (CSR), examining one central question: how do HRD professionals perceive their roles and challenges in implementing CSR in organizations that claim CSR to be a key

Tara Fenwick; Laura Bierema

2008-01-01

39

Addressing criminality in childhood: is responsivity the central issue?  

PubMed

The responsivity principle is the third element of the now well-established risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model of offender rehabilitation. Accruing evidence suggests it is often sacrificed in intervention programs. We aim to demonstrate the central importance of this principle when designing offender interventions by describing the results of a successful, highly responsive intervention for very young children (aged 7 upward) who have offended. A small slice of the offending population as a whole, child offenders are nevertheless tomorrow's serious, violent, and prolific lawbreakers, yet little is understood about what reduces their risk. Recent developments on responsivity are reviewed, before presenting the evaluation indicating significant and sustained drops in risk of recidivism. In-program factors such as the nature and dosage of interventions are examined, alongside outcome data. The article discusses how RNR and other models might apply to this particularly young and underresearched age group. PMID:23070956

Nee, Claire; Ellis, Tom; Morris, Paul; Wilson, Amy

2013-11-01

40

A locomotive with a steering wheel: Response plan design issues  

SciTech Connect

Developing response plans for highly stochastic events is a challenging project. Emergency response planners must decide whether to spend their time developing a large number of plans in an effort to anticipate a wide variety of hazard behaviors or develop a smaller number of plants, assuming that hazard behavior is relatively predictable across a given span of time. Regardless of which approach is taken, planners must also decide on the degree of detail to which each plan is written. Should the plans be highly detailed so as to provide a more accurate assessment of the total response time and resources required, even at the risk of plan inflexibility, or should flexible, ``generic`` response plans be developed at the risk of underestimating time and resource demands? The use of risk analysis has suggested that a compromise is possible.

Atkinson, G.S. [Innovative Emergency Management, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1995-12-31

41

LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2  

SciTech Connect

This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

Schwartz, W W

2009-11-19

42

A call for responsibility in ethical issues for IS professionals  

SciTech Connect

In recent years there has been increased interest in the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of persons in the business world. Public abhorrence of questionable behavior of politicians, the savings and loan scandal and insider trading violations are just a few examples of many problems in business and professional life. A 1992 study by the Josephson Institute of Ethics involving 9,000 young people and adults revealed alarmingly low ethical characteristics in American institutions. Ferrell and Fraedrick have concluded that {open_quotes}business ethics is one of the most important concerns in today`s business world.{close_quote} A few professional organizations have tried to comprehend the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of their constituents. Vittrell has studied the frequency of ethical behavior for management information specialists. Martin and Peterson have examined the ethical issues of insider trading. Fimbel and Burstein have investigated the ethical values of technology professionals. Thornburg made use of a survey concerning the ethical beliefs and practices of human resources professionals. On a preliminary basis, these studies indicate the various ethical issues and uncertainties which are problematic for members of the various professions. Most business people are ethical segregationists, that is they tend to segregate their ethical values into one type of behavior for business and another type of behavior away from business. Managers accused of unethical behavior respond with, III am not that type of person. I am active in my church, in community affairs, a good family man, and so on.

Palmiter, C.W.

1994-12-31

43

Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

2009-01-01

44

Gender Mainstreaming and Corporate Social Responsibility: Reporting Workplace Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the potential and actual contribution of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to gender equality in a framework of gender mainstreaming (GM). It introduces GM as combining technical systems (monitoring, reporting, evaluating) with political processes (women’s participation in decision-making) and considers the ways in which this is compatible with CSR agendas. It examines the inclusion of gender equality criteria

Kate Grosser; Jeremy Moon

2005-01-01

45

The Awakening Cortisol Response: Methodological Issues and Significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The awakening cortisol response (ACR) is a discrete and distinctive part of the cortisol circadian cycle. In healthy adults salivary free cortisol concentrations increase by between 50 and 160% in the first 30 min immediately post-awakening (approximate average increase of 9 nmol\\/l, range 4 - 15 nmol\\/l, estimated to be equivalent to about three secretory episodes). However there are no

A. Clow; L. Thorn; P. Evans; F. Hucklebridge

2004-01-01

46

Organizational responses to environmental issues: oil refining companies and air pollution  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the range of responses by 10 oil refining firms to social issues as these issues evolve from an emerging concern about air pollution by a small, localized segment of the public to widespread public support for federal legislation and regulation. Four components of response indicate response type: statements by top management in the form of corporate policies and mentions of the issue in annual reports; assignment of staff responsibility for the issue; technical activities which incorporate a concern about the issue; and political and legal actions related to the issue. The study analyzes these four components of response for each firm over the 35-year period, 1945-1980. The study found that companies did vary in their responses, in particular on the timing of the corporate policy, the amount of attention to air pollution in annual reports, timing of assignment of responsibility at the corporate and refining department management staff levels, and the degree of voluntary actions to reduce emissions at refineries in California, Texas, and Pennsylvania. The data related to political and legal actions was not sufficient to categorize firms.

Logsdon, J.M.

1983-01-01

47

What Responsibilities Should Teachers Accept? Stirling Educational Seminar Papers No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five value-laden levels of increasing responsibility are outlined as criteria applied to teacher's own activities; students' overt classroom behavior; comprehension and attitudes; abilities acquired by students; and future characteristics of students. Knowledge available to a teacher and working conditions influence level choice more than teacher…

McIntyre, Donald

1979-01-01

48

Will These Trees "Ever" Bear Fruit? A Response to the Special Issue on Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors articulate objections to the organization of the recent special issue on student engagement and respond in detail to three criticisms leveled in that issue. Situating their response relative to longstanding calls to make research more relevant to practice, they argue that the validity critique inappropriately focuses on criterion…

McCormick, Alexander C.; McClenney, Kay

2012-01-01

49

Hazardous waste insurance - The issue of financial responsibility  

SciTech Connect

The insurance industry is undoubtedly perceived by those outside it as monumentally conservative. Yet the industry fights hard to overcome its frequently undeserved reputation of limited imagination and failure to develop new insurance products for either the corporate or personal consumer. As new technologies bring social and economic changes in life styles, there is an ever challenging attempt by the insurance industry to keep pace with the increased amount of legislation containing financial responsibility regulations. Further, the liberal interpretations of laws and contracts by current courts contribute to additional uncertainty within the insurance underwriting community. Is the insurance industry to be criticized or applauded for its risk-taking in the 1980s. That question may not have an answer until the year 2000 and beyond. This paper examines one area in which the insurance industry has responded to a changing society in its need to share the financial burden for environmental pollution.

Tobin, M.L.

1983-03-01

50

Rotationally acceptable ocean tide models for determining the response of the oceans to atmospheric pressure fluctuations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suitably generalized, ocean tide models can be used to determine the oceans' response to atmospheric pressure forcing; but the huge range of spatial and temporal scales of that forcing limits the relevance of state-of-the-art tide modeling techniques, like data assimilation, for such determinations. With an interest in its effects on Earth's rotation, in 1998 I employed a generalized but non-assimilating

S. R. Dickman

2010-01-01

51

December 2002 Issue #13 2002 SULFUR RESPONSES AND THE WISCONSIN ALFALFA SULFUR  

E-print Network

December 2002 Issue #13 ­ 2002 SULFUR RESPONSES AND THE WISCONSIN ALFALFA SULFUR SURVEY 1/ K to applied sulfur fertilizer in northern and western Wisconsin on lighter textured, low organic matter soils and Kelling, 1987). More recently, crop consultants and others have reported seeing sulfur responses on soils

Balser, Teri C.

52

42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal...AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.285 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept...

2010-10-01

53

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10

54

First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012  

PubMed Central

Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be integrated as an additional tool into the response. PMID:24147164

Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

2013-01-01

55

Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues  

SciTech Connect

Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

Herzenberg, C.L.

1998-09-01

56

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS 1  

E-print Network

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final) SYSTEMS 1 The LUT-SR Family of Uniform Random Number Generators for FPGA Architectures David B. Thomas, as the process of constructing a generator for a given parameterization is time consuming, in terms of both

Luk, Wayne

57

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION 1  

E-print Network

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final Challenges for the Electric Power Industry and Climate Change Lisa M. Beard, Member, IEEE, Judith B. Cardell power industry, related to global climate change. The technical challenges arise from: 1) impacts

Dobson, Ian

58

Some Issues in Item Response Theory: Dimensionality Assessment and Models for Guessing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Currently, standardized tests are widely used as a method to measure how well schools and students meet academic standards. As a result, measurement issues have become an increasingly popular topic of study. Unidimensional item response models are used to model latent abilities and specific item characteristics. This class of models makes…

Smith, Jessalyn

2009-01-01

59

Reader-Response to Dr. Seuss: Middle School Students and Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated to what extent average middle school students were able to perceive the social issues embedded in literature by Dr. Seuss. Seventy-four seventh-grade students responded to five Dr. Seuss stories in free-writing exercises, response worksheets, and question worksheets. Results showed that the majority of students (approximately…

Cobb, Susan M.

60

Tropical Cyclone Atmospheric Forcing for Ocean Response Models: Approaches and Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specification of tropical cyclone atmospheric forcing for ocean response models is described with emphasis on methods that are currently actively applied in basins rich in in- situ, airborne and remotely sensed meteorological data. We emphasize approaches and critical issues addressed in more detail in this workshop's special session on Tropical Meteorology. Five alternative wind fields developed for Gulf of

V. J. Cardone; A. T. Cox

61

Honeybee (Apis cerana) foraging responses to the toxic honey of Tripterygium hypoglaucum (Celastraceae): changing threshold of nectar acceptability.  

PubMed

To investigate honeybee foraging responses to toxic nectar, honey was collected from Apis cerana colonies in the Yaoan county of Yunnan Province, China, during June, when flowers of Tripterygium hypoglaucum were the main nectar source available. Pollen analysis confirmed the origin of the honey, and high-performance liquid chromatography showed the prominent component triptolide to be present at a concentration of 0.61 mug/g +/- 0.11 SD. In cage tests that used young adult worker bees, significantly more of those provided with a diet of T. hypoglaucum honey mixed with sugar powder (1:1) died within 6 d (68.3%) compared to control groups provided with normal honey mixed with sugar powder (15.8%). Honeybees were trained to visit feeders that contained honey of T. hypoglaucum (toxic honey) as the test group and honey of Vicia sativa or Elsholtzia ciliata as control groups (all honeys diluted 1:3 with water). Bees preferred the feeders with normal honey to those with toxic honey, as shown by significantly higher visiting frequencies and longer imbibition times. However, when the feeder of normal honey was removed, leaving only honey of T. hypoglaucum, the foraging bees returned to the toxic honey after a few seconds of hesitation, and both visiting frequency and imbibition time increased to values previously recorded for normal honey. Toxic honey thus became acceptable to the bees in the absence of other nectar sources. PMID:18058178

Tan, K; Guo, Y H; Nicolson, S W; Radloff, S E; Song, Q S; Hepburn, H R

2007-12-01

62

Errant corporations, diffuse responsibilities, and the environment: ethical issues in the Orica case study.  

PubMed

The papers in this volume deal with various aspects of the HCB legacy at the Orica plant at Botany. Whether explicitly or implicitly, they are concerned with questions of ethics; with the just distribution of burdens and benefits; with just processes for disposing of dangerous industrial waste; and with a just custodianship of the Botany environment. These ethical issues illustrate the difficulty of securing corporate accountability, and the elusiveness of responsibility within organisations. This paper reflects on some of the issues for ethics raised by the Orica case and their significance for corporate ethics. PMID:18762363

Grace, Damian

2009-04-01

63

Case vignette: child abuse or acceptable cultural norms -- child psychiatrist's response; ethical issues in culturally relevant interventions; cultural contexts.  

PubMed

Three families from the nation of the Gambia have become socially acquainted in the greater Metropolis area where they have relocated from their native country. All three families have preadolescent daughters. None of the girls has as yet undergone the ritual "female circumcision" commonly practiced in their native country. Five of the six parents think it would be a good idea to hold such a ritual ceremony in Metropolis next month. The sixth parent is uneasy about the procedure and wonders if it is appropriate anyway. The parent comes to talk with you, a physician or mental health professional, about this. The parent describes concerns about the procedure and the practice in general, but notes that some groups in the United States do "similar things," referring to the ritual circumcision of Jewish boys at 8 days of age. The parent adds that if the procedure is not possible in the United States, it could be done in the Gambia when the family returns there on holiday. Discussants were asked for their opinions regarding advice to the parent's ethical obligations (especially in the case of mandated reporting of suspected child abuse). PMID:11660019

Brant, Renée; Wyatt, Gail Elizabeth; Martin, Tony

1995-01-01

64

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents' response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions, and identify some of the issues influencing residents' perspectives and behaviour. All rural and most urban residents have an accurate knowledge of Katla, the proposed warning system and emergency response plan. Urban residents perceived the emergency response plan to be appropriate. In comparison, rural residents did not perceive the emergency response plan as appropriate. Rural residents stated that they would personally assess the situation before deciding on a course of action independent of the proposed plan. Livelihood connections and inherited knowledge affect rural residents' ability and willingness to comply with the recommended procedures. Factors such as hazard knowledge, sense of community and attachment to place indicate that rural residents are more resilient to volcanic hazards. Based on our findings we recommend that emergency management agencies consider issues such as personal responsibility, neighbourliness and community involvement and cooperation, to develop and implement more appropriate volcanic risk mitigation strategies. In light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, we provide a brief discussion on the 2010 emergency response. Although our findings are Iceland-specific, our recommendations may be applied internationally to other volcanic and disaster-prone regions.

Bird, Deanne K.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Dominey-Howes, Dale

2011-11-01

65

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for  

E-print Network

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In early 2009 the FWS removed the published 1988 and 1996 wetland plant lists from their National Wetland

US Army Corps of Engineers

66

On Semiotics and Subjectivity: A Response to Tony Brown's "Signifying 'Students', 'Teachers', and 'Mathematics' -- A Reading of a Special Issue"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this response we address some of the significant issues that Tony Brown raised in his analysis and critique of the Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "Semiotic perspectives in mathematics education" (Saenz-Ludlow & Presmeg, Educational Studies in Mathematics 61(1-2), 2006). Among these issues are conceptualizations of…

Presmeg, Norma; Radford, Luis

2008-01-01

67

Genetic Counselors’ Perceived Responsibilities Regarding Reproductive Issues for Patients at Risk for Huntington Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research indicates that health care professionals’ attitudes may affect patients’ decisions regarding prenatal Huntington\\u000a Disease testing, but few studies have sampled genetic counselors. In this qualitative study, genetic counselors described\\u000a their experiences counseling individuals at risk for HD regarding reproductive decision-making. Five major research questions\\u000a were investigated: 1) What are genetic counselor responsibilities? 2) What issues arise for patients and

Karrie A. Hines; Patricia McCarthy Veach; Bonnie S. LeRoy

2010-01-01

68

The Church’s Response to Sexual Reproductive Health Issues Among Youths: Jamaica’s Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the response of religious denominations to sexual reproductive health issues among youths using a close-ended,\\u000a structured, 32-item questionnaire and an interview. The majority (71% men, 71% women) of the respondents attended church regularly;\\u000a were unmarried (92% men, 83% women); were sexually active (71% men, 45% women); used drugs (65% men, 62% women). The majority\\u000a of the respondents

Tazhmoye V. Crawford; Joan Rawlins; Donovan A. McGrowder; Robert L. Adams

2011-01-01

69

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents’ response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigates residents’ knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all\\u000a rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted\\u000a in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions,\\u000a and identify some of the issues influencing

Deanne K. Bird; Guðrún Gísladóttir; Dale Dominey-Howes

70

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating various aspects of DR programs. This paper also describes the various technical aspects of the DRAS including its interfaces and major modes of operation. This includes how the DRAS supports automating such Utility/Customer interactions as automated DR bidding, automated DR event handling, and finally real-time pricing.

Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-10-01

71

By registering for courses at University of Cincinnati, I accept responsibility for payment by the due date of all university charges assessed to my student account, including tuition and fees and late payment fees. I fully accept this debt as my personal  

E-print Network

aid to meet the balance by the established deadline, I may be charged late payment fees, IBy registering for courses at University of Cincinnati, I accept responsibility for payment payment fees. I fully accept this debt as my personal financial responsibility. I acknowledge that non

Franco, John

72

Positive Emotional Responses to Hybridised Writing about a Socio-Scientific Issue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to understand better the role of affect in learning about socio-scientific issues (SSI), this study investigated Year 12 students' emotional arousal as they participated in an online writing-to-learn science project about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. Students wrote a series of hybridised scientific narratives, or BioStories, that integrate scientific information about biosecurity with narrative storylines, and uploaded these to a dedicated website. Throughout their participation in the project, students recorded their emotional responses to the various activities ( N = 50). Four case students were also video recorded during selected science lessons as they researched, composed and uploaded their BioStories for peer review. Analysis of these data, as well as interview data obtained from the case students, revealed that pride, strength, determination, interest and alertness were among the positive emotions most strongly elicited by the project. These emotions reflected students' interest in learning about a new socio-scientific issue, and their enhanced feelings of self-efficacy in successfully writing hybridised scientific narratives in science. The results of this study suggest that the elicitation of positive emotional responses as students engage in hybridised writing about SSI with strong links to environmental education, such as biosecurity, can be valuable in engaging students in education for sustainability.

Tomas, Louisa; Ritchie, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

73

The church's response to sexual reproductive health issues among youths: Jamaica's experience.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the response of religious denominations to sexual reproductive health issues among youths using a close-ended, structured, 32-item questionnaire and an interview. The majority (71% men, 71% women) of the respondents attended church regularly; were unmarried (92% men, 83% women); were sexually active (71% men, 45% women); used drugs (65% men, 62% women). The majority of the respondents (46% men, 63% women) were reprimanded and/or ostracized by the Church. The findings suggest that issues encompassing sexuality and drugs among youth do not resonate well with the conventional religious practice of the Church, hence a significant incidence of ostracism and the likelihood of premarital sex and drug use. PMID:20559735

Crawford, Tazhmoye V; Rawlins, Joan; McGrowder, Donovan A; Adams, Robert L

2011-03-01

74

The glial response to intracerebrally delivered therapies for neurodegenerative disorders: is this a critical issue?  

PubMed Central

The role of glial cells in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) is now well established (as is discussed in other reviews in this special issue of Frontiers in Neuropharmacology). What is less clear is whether there are changes in these same cells in terms of their behavior and function in response to invasive experimental therapeutic interventions for these diseases. This has, and will continue to become more of an issue as we enter a new era of novel treatments which require the agent to be directly placed/infused into the CNS such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), cell transplants, gene therapies and growth factor infusions. To date, all of these treatments have produced variable outcomes and the reasons for this have been widely debated but the host astrocytic and/or microglial response induced by such invasively delivered agents has not been discussed in any detail. In this review, we have attempted to summarize the limited published data on this, in particular we discuss the small number of human post-mortem studies reported in this field. By so doing, we hope to provide a better description and understanding of the extent and nature of both the astrocytic and microglial response, which in turn could lead to modifications in the way these therapeutic interventions are delivered. PMID:25071571

Cicchetti, Francesca; Barker, Roger A.

2014-01-01

75

The effects of container design and stair climbing on maximal acceptable lift weight, wrist posture, psychophysical, and physiological responses in wafer-handling tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the high level of automation in semiconductor manufacturing processes, many manual operations are still involved in the workplace. Due to inadequate human–machine interface design, stairs are frequently used to help operators perform wafer-handling tasks. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of climbing stairs and carrying wafer containers (pods) on psychophysical responses (maximal acceptable weight of lift—MAWL, and

Hsiu-Chen Chung; Mao-Jiun J. Wang

2001-01-01

76

Author Version (accepted, Journal of Neuro-Oncology) Impact of MRI head placement on glioma response assessment  

E-print Network

by Macdonald et at. [6], are still at the core of the revised criteria recommended by the Response Assessment with the largest tumor component for the manual cross-diameter measurement. Both low and high-grade glioma can have operator intervention and are usu- ally based on automated landmark or atlas alignment. However

Reuter, Martin

77

Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo  

PubMed Central

Background Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. Method An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. Results A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. Conclusions This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change. PMID:24929563

2014-01-01

78

32 CFR 724.805 - Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...guidance. (1) If any issue submitted by an applicant contains two or more clearly separate issues, the NDRB should respond...receives the full change in discharge requested (or a more favorable change), that fact shall be noted...

2010-07-01

79

32 CFR 724.805 - Response to items submitted as issues by the applicant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...guidance. (1) If any issue submitted by an applicant contains two or more clearly separate issues, the NDRB should respond...receives the full change in discharge requested (or a more favorable change), that fact shall be noted...

2011-07-01

80

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a halo effect in issue management: public response to negative news about pro-social local private companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate nationality on public reactions to negative news about corporations. To explain how CSR activity works as a buffer for a negative issue of an organization, we propose a halo effect theory. This study conducted an experiment using a 2 (CSR activity vs. no CSR activity) x 2 (domestic

Seungho Cho; Yong-Chan Kim

2012-01-01

81

Nuclear Power as an Ethical Issue: Utilitarian Ethics and Egalitarian Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the philosophical debate over the issue of nuclear power. Discussed are the utilitarian nature of the justification of nuclear power and the utilitarian approaches to the issue of nuclear power, the strengths and weaknesses of this approach, and utilitarian versus egalitarian ethics. (KR)

Hadjilambrinos, Constantine

1990-01-01

82

Acceptability of human risk.  

PubMed Central

This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

Kasperson, R E

1983-01-01

83

RESPONSE TO ISSUES AND DATA SUBMISSIONS ON THE CARCINOGENICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)  

EPA Science Inventory

The scientific debate over the potential carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. his document reviews the issues considered by the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addendum to the Health Assessmen...

84

A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues  

E-print Network

There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

Shapira, Yoav

2006-01-01

85

Internet Censorship Issues for Teacher-Librarians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes and critiques emerging issues about Internet access in schools and school libraries. Discusses software products for filtering and rating expressive content on the Internet, reader-response-theory implications for filtering and rating Internet content, ambiguities, and the role of school librarians and acceptable-use policies. (AEF)

Schrader, Alvin

1999-01-01

86

Producer responsibility for e-waste management: Key issues for consideration e Learning from the Swiss experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life.

Deepali Sinha Khetriwal; Philipp Kraeuchi; Rolf Widmer

2007-01-01

87

An issue of trust: state corruption, responsibility and greenhouse gas emissions This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-print Network

.frame@smithschool.ox.ac.uk Received 7 September 2009 Accepted for publication 24 December 2009 Published 11 January 2010 Online issues. To date, cumulative emissions have been disproportionately from the developed world, while of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic

Kammen, Daniel M.

88

The Impact of Media Stories Concerning Health Issues on Food Product Sales : Management Planning and Responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer interest concerning the health aspects of food products has grown in recent years. Consequently, media attention to scientific studies about the beneficial or detrimental effect on consumers? health has resulted in substantial changes to the consumption of certain products. A recent CBS 60 Minutes program, The French Paradox, highlighted the health issues concerning red wine consumption. As a result,

Tim H. Dodd; Steve Morse

1994-01-01

89

The Value of Buddhist Responses to Issues of Overpopulation, Overconsumption, and Environmental Degradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the global population continues to increase at an alarming rate, the world, as a whole, now faces the issue of overpopulation. If the world's natural resource consumption and environmental pollution\\/destruction continue at their current pace, then the earth will eventually no longer be able to sustain all of its inhabitants. Social change is the only way to prevent this.

James Harold Hitchcock

90

Ethical Issues in the Music Industry Response to Innovation and Piracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current conflict between the recording industry and a portion of its customers who are involved in illicit copying of music files arose from innovations involving the compression and electronic distribution of files over the internet. This paper briefly describes some of the challenges faced by the recording industry, and examines some of the ethical issues that arise in various

Robert F. Easley

2005-01-01

91

The Significance of International Issues and Responsibilities in the Contemporary Work of Student Affairs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the acceleration of international communication and political integration, it is becoming increasingly important for student affairs leaders to know about international trends and issues affecting higher education. Author provides an overview of the increasing internationalization of student services in higher education and examines why…

Dalton, Jon C.

1999-01-01

92

Student Conceptualizations of the Nature of Science in Response to a Socioscientific Issue. Research Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates student conceptualizations of the nature of science (NOS) and how students interpret and evaluate conflicting evidence regarding a socioscientific issue. Eighty-four high school students participated in the study by reading contradictory reports about the status of global warming and responding to questions designed to…

Sadler, Troy D.; Chambers, William F.; Zeidler, Dana L.

2004-01-01

93

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

94

The Significance of International Issues and Responsibilities in the Contemporary Work of Student Affairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why is it important for student affairs leaders to know about international trends and issues affecting higher education and the work of student affairs? What significance do these matters have for the practical tasks of student affairs leadership today? What are the benefits of increased international travel and involvement for the development of student affairs professionals? How will the forces

Jon C. Dalton

1999-01-01

95

Earth House: Nurturing a creative response to sustainability issues - a live project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Earth House Project presents an abstracted idea of our planet as a house or home to communicate to children the importance of the issues challenging us now. The key instrument of this idea being one that young children can relate to in that the home is the cherished necessity of human existence and something to be cared for. Earth

Ian Standen; Rachel Grainger

96

GATS and Educational Services: Issues for India Response in WTO Negotiations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the auspices of WTO, negotiations on liberalization of trade in services are expected to begin soon. One agenda at the negotiating table will be trade in educational services. Trade in educational services is too important an issue for India, and, a thorough homework needs to be done before we make any commitments at the negotiating table. In this context,

Satish Y. Deodhar

97

Responses to Issues Raised about Validity, Bias, and Fairness in High-Stakes Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We are pleased that our article prompted this series of four commentaries and that we have this opportunity to respond. We address each in turn. Duckworth and Kaufman and Agars discussed, respectively, two broad issues concerning the validity of selection systems, namely, the expansion of the predictor domain to include noncognitive predictors of…

Sackett, Paul R.; Borneman, Matthew J.; Connelly, Brian S.

2009-01-01

98

Legal Issues and the Supervised Internship Relationship: Who Is Responsible for What?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It easily could be argued that no single step in a sport management career path is as important and valuable as an internship. This article identifies some of the situations in an internship that raise legal issues for the university, academic program, student, and sponsoring organization. In addition, the article includes several procedural and…

Moorman, Anita M.

2004-01-01

99

Legal Issues: Student-on-Student Sexual Harassment: What Are Schools' Responsibilities?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the issue of student-on-student sexual harassment in legislation and litigation to determine the effects of the law on school districts. School districts are urged to fashion a student-on-student sexual harassment policy, provide inservice training, investigate complaints of harassment, and take action to resolve sexual…

Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis

2000-01-01

100

Issues management and organizational accounts: An analysis of corporate responses to accusations of unethical business practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

When external groups accuse a business organization of unethical practices, managers of the accused organization usually offer a communicative response to attempt to protect their organization's public image. Even though many researchers readily concur that analysis of these communicative responses is important to our understanding of business and society conflict, few investigations have focused on developing a theoretical framework for

Dennis E. Garrett; Jeffrey L. Bradford; Renee A. Meyers; Joy Becker

1989-01-01

101

Leadership Roles and Communication Issues in Partially Distributed Emergency Response Software Development Teams: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergencies often require inter- organizational and\\/or international coordination for effective planning and response. Therefore, planning and response teams are often configured as partially distributed teams. A partially distributed team (PDT) is a virtual team, in which some sub-groups are collocated, yet the subgroups are dispersed from each other, and communication between them is primarily by electronic media. We describe a

Linda Plotnick; Rosalie J. Ocker; Starr Roxanne Hiltz; Mary Beth Rosson

2008-01-01

102

Waste prevention — an issue of shared responsibility for UK producers and consumers: policy options and measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1994 EU Packaging Directive placed obligations on various parties in the ‘packaging chain’ and was the first example in Europe of ‘producer responsibility’. The responsibility, however, ceases at the point of selling the (packaged) product and it seems unlikely that the UK will meet mandatory recovery and recycling targets by 2001. Other waste stream directives are also directed at

Chris Coggins

2001-01-01

103

The Universities' Responsibilities to Society: International Perspectives. Issues in Higher Education Series. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three broad subthemes were addressed in a conference focusing on the responsibilities of universities. These were anticipating change relative to university development, the international knowledge enterprise, and academic freedom and university autonomy as prerequisite for the university meeting its responsibilities. Following an introduction,…

Neave, Guy, Ed.

104

Personal responsibility and obesity: a constructive approach to a controversial issue.  

PubMed

The concept of personal responsibility has been central to social, legal, and political approaches to obesity. It evokes language of blame, weakness, and vice and is a leading basis for inadequate government efforts, given the importance of environmental conditions in explaining high rates of obesity. These environmental conditions can override individual physical and psychological regulatory systems that might otherwise stand in the way of weight gain and obesity, hence undermining personal responsibility, narrowing choices, and eroding personal freedoms. Personal responsibility can be embraced as a value by placing priority on legislative and regulatory actions such as improving school nutrition, menu labeling, altering industry marketing practices, and even such controversial measures as the use of food taxes that create healthier defaults, thus supporting responsible behavior and bridging the divide between views based on individualistic versus collective responsibility. PMID:20194976

Brownell, Kelly D; Kersh, Rogan; Ludwig, David S; Post, Robert C; Puhl, Rebecca M; Schwartz, Marlene B; Willett, Walter C

2010-01-01

105

Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?  

PubMed Central

The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa. PMID:21981823

2011-01-01

106

A research program to facilitate resolution of ecological issues affecting the use of dispersants in marine oil spill response  

SciTech Connect

The use of dispersants in oil spill response in the US remains a controversial environmental topic. At the center of this controversy is a lack of confidence in the available data to evaluate the effects of dispersants on local biota. The main reasons that many of the attempts around the country to resolve concerns over dispersant use have been unsuccessful are that they have either (1) failed to focus on the true issues of concern; (2) collected laboratory (and sometimes field) data which cannot be effectively applied in decision-making; or (3) failed to effectively communicate information to the participants in the decision process. These issues can be addressed by a research program intentionally designed to examine issues in an ecosystem context and which focuses on information dissemination and communication, which are the central themes of the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC) initiative. The MSRC environmental program contains four elements: improved use and synthesis of existing information, improved methods for laboratory toxicity evaluations and interpretation, development of a realistic mesocosm testing program, and field experiments to correlate laboratory and mesocosm data to real world situations. This paper describes the rationale for the program and the progress made over the first two and one-half years.

Aurand, D. [Marine Spill Response Corp., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-06-01

107

Baby-Crying Acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

108

Teacher Perceptions of Issues Related to Implementation of Response to Intervention in the Regular Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several school districts in a southern US state use a three-tiered Response to Intervention (RtI) model to supplemental core reading instruction and positively impact student achievement, the model appears to have had nominal impact. The theoretical foundation for this study is anchored in a constructivist approach to education. Three…

Bissell, Erica K.

2012-01-01

109

A Critical Appraisal of Issues in Differential Response: Moving the Field Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reaction article highlights areas of agreement and disagreement with the study conducted by Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes on the current state of research and practice in differential response (DR). Overall, we agree with several of the arguments put forth by Hughes et al. regarding the limitations of DR research and the…

Winokur, Marc A.; Gabel, George

2013-01-01

110

Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

2002-01-01

111

Guidelines on Student Rights and Responsibilities: As Issued by the Alaska Department of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document has four stated purposes: (1) to conform with Alaska state regulations requiring the establishment of guidelines on student rights and responsibilities; (2) to bring forth critical points of law in this area; (3) to provide examples of inappropriate policy; and (4) to provide local school districts with the criteria the state will…

Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Office of Planning and Research.

112

5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence determinations. 531.409 Section... § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence determinations. (a) Responsibility...performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis for...

2010-01-01

113

Response to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention for autism-An umbrella approach to issues critical to treatment individualization.  

PubMed

Integrating knowledge across the disciplines of genetics, neurological, and behavioral science targets, so far, early identification of children with autism and thus early access to intervention. Cross-discipline collaboration might be substantially improve treatment efficacy via individualized treatment based on the child and family needs, consistency across treatment providers and careful planning of skill curricula, setting and techniques. This paper documents the current state of five main issues critical to treatment individualization where cross-discipline collaboration is warranted: (1) developmental timing, (2) treatment intensity, (3) heterogeneity in treatment response, (4) program breath and flexibility, and (5) formats of treatment provision. PMID:24866707

Fava, Leonardo; Strauss, Kristin

2014-12-01

114

SPECIAL ISSUE ON 'CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING MITIGATION ANDADAPTATION AS RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE'  

SciTech Connect

This special issue of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategiesfor Global Change (MITI) reflects a growing recognition that the globalresponse to possible impacts of climate change will include bothmitigation and adaptation (M&A). On the one hand, impacts are alreadyemerging and mitigation efforts are not progressing as rapidly as hadonce been hoped. Further, even if greenhouse gas emissions were to stopabruptly, climate change will continue because of historically committedemissions. As a result, adaptation cannot be avoided. It will beessential, and in some cases it is essential now. On the other hand, ifclimate change is significant, impacts may exceed the capacity of manydeveloping countries, natural ecosystems, and high-impact sites to adapt,which means that mitigation is equally essential.

WILBANKS, THOMAS J.; SATHAYE JAYANT; KLEIN, RICHARD J.T.

2007-05-01

115

The many faces of malingering and participant response strategies: new methodologies in the Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ).  

PubMed

Four studies created malingering and response bias scales for a new test battery, the Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ). In the first calibration study, a new approach to identifying fake good and fake bad respondents was outlined. In Study 2, this scale was cross validated in a within-subjects design that also found only weak correlations between the scales of the ACIQ and measures of social desirability. The third study developed a method violator scale (one who responds randomly to the content of the scales due to carelessness, low IQ, etc.). It was tested by Monte Carlo and empirical studies. The fourth study combined the two cross validation studies to offer clear cutoffs for the practitioner. These studies successfully led to the creation of malingering and response bias scales for the ACIQ and also introduced new methods that could be adapted to other instruments. PMID:24846785

Fugett, April; Thomas, Stuart W; Lindberg, Marc A

2014-01-01

116

Postural responses and effector factors in persons with unexplained falls: results and methodologic issues.  

PubMed

Automatic postural responses and effector factors were examined in 10 persons with unexplained falls after clinical examination and 24 older controls. Fallers were more unstable than controls on clinical tests of balance (20% of fallers vs 79.2% of controls were able to stand on one foot (P less than .005), 40% of fallers and 100% of controls were stable while turning in place (P less than .001), postural stress test median score was 12 for fallers and 20 for controls (P less than 0.001). We found prolonged tibialis anterior latency (fallers 158.8 +/- 23.7, controls 143.2 +/- 15.7 milliseconds, P = 0.03), marked losses in ankle strength (dorsiflexion: faller 3.2 +/- 2.9, controls 8.9 +/- 4.2 foot-pounds, P less than 0.001; plantarflexion: fallers 7.9 +/- 5.3, controls 21.4 +/- 11.1 foot-pounds, P less than 0.001), and decreases in range of motion (ankle plantarflexion: fallers 29.2 +/- 7.0, controls 37.8 +/- 12.4 degrees, P = 0.02). Gastrocnemius latency and electromyographic (EMG) measures of sequence showed no differences between fallers and controls. Sequence measures were not symmetric between the lower extremities in either fallers or controls. In this population of persons with unexplained falls who demonstrated substantial impairments in functional balance, effector factors appear more impaired than automatic postural responses. Alternatively, contemporary analysis of automatic postural responses may require further development before it can be useful to study balance problems in older persons. PMID:2005334

Studenski, S; Duncan, P W; Chandler, J

1991-03-01

117

Tobacco industry use of corporate social responsibility tactics as a sword and a shield on secondhand smoke issues.  

PubMed

The tobacco industry has used corporate social responsibility tactics to improve its corporate image with the public, press, and regulators who increasingly have grown to view it as a merchant of death. There is, however, an intractable problem that corporate social responsibility efforts can mask but not resolve: the tobacco industry's products are lethal when used as directed, and no amount of corporate social responsibility activity can reconcile that fundamental contradiction with ethical corporate citizenship. This study's focus is to better understand the tobacco industry's corporate social responsibility efforts and to assess whether there has been any substantive change in the way it does business with regard to the issue of exposure to secondhand smoke. The results show that the industry has made no substantial changes and in fact has continued with business as usual. Although many of the tobacco companies' tactics traditionally had been defensive, they strove for a way to change to a more offensive strategy. Almost without exception, however, their desire to appear to be good corporate citizens clashed with their aversion to further regulation and jeopardizing their legal position, perhaps an irreconcilable conflict. Despite the switch to offense, in 2006 a federal judge found the companies guilty of racketeering. PMID:20122118

Friedman, Lissy C

2009-01-01

118

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2014-07-01

119

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2013-07-01

120

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2012-07-01

121

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2010-07-01

122

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2011-07-01

123

Stream Macroinvertebrate Response Models for Bioassessment Metrics: Addressing the Issue of Spatial Scale  

PubMed Central

We developed independent predictive disturbance models for a full regional data set and four individual ecoregions (Full Region vs. Individual Ecoregion models) to evaluate effects of spatial scale on the assessment of human landscape modification, on predicted response of stream biota, and the effect of other possible confounding factors, such as watershed size and elevation, on model performance. We selected macroinvertebrate sampling sites for model development (n?=?591) and validation (n?=?467) that met strict screening criteria from four proximal ecoregions in the northeastern U.S.: North Central Appalachians, Ridge and Valley, Northeastern Highlands, and Northern Piedmont. Models were developed using boosted regression tree (BRT) techniques for four macroinvertebrate metrics; results were compared among ecoregions and metrics. Comparing within a region but across the four macroinvertebrate metrics, the average richness of tolerant taxa (RichTOL) had the highest R2 for BRT models. Across the four metrics, final BRT models had between four and seven explanatory variables and always included a variable related to urbanization (e.g., population density, percent urban, or percent manmade channels), and either a measure of hydrologic runoff (e.g., minimum April, average December, or maximum monthly runoff) and(or) a natural landscape factor (e.g., riparian slope, precipitation, and elevation), or a measure of riparian disturbance. Contrary to our expectations, Full Region models explained nearly as much variance in the macroinvertebrate data as Individual Ecoregion models, and taking into account watershed size or elevation did not appear to improve model performance. As a result, it may be advantageous for bioassessment programs to develop large regional models as a preliminary assessment of overall disturbance conditions as long as the range in natural landscape variability is not excessive. PMID:24675770

Waite, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

2014-01-01

124

Stream macroinvertebrate response models for bioassessment metrics: addressing the issue of spatial scale  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We developed independent predictive disturbance models for a full regional data set and four individual ecoregions (Full Region vs. Individual Ecoregion models) to evaluate effects of spatial scale on the assessment of human landscape modification, on predicted response of stream biota, and the effect of other possible confounding factors, such as watershed size and elevation, on model performance. We selected macroinvertebrate sampling sites for model development (n = 591) and validation (n = 467) that met strict screening criteria from four proximal ecoregions in the northeastern U.S.: North Central Appalachians, Ridge and Valley, Northeastern Highlands, and Northern Piedmont. Models were developed using boosted regression tree (BRT) techniques for four macroinvertebrate metrics; results were compared among ecoregions and metrics. Comparing within a region but across the four macroinvertebrate metrics, the average richness of tolerant taxa (RichTOL) had the highest R2 for BRT models. Across the four metrics, final BRT models had between four and seven explanatory variables and always included a variable related to urbanization (e.g., population density, percent urban, or percent manmade channels), and either a measure of hydrologic runoff (e.g., minimum April, average December, or maximum monthly runoff) and(or) a natural landscape factor (e.g., riparian slope, precipitation, and elevation), or a measure of riparian disturbance. Contrary to our expectations, Full Region models explained nearly as much variance in the macroinvertebrate data as Individual Ecoregion models, and taking into account watershed size or elevation did not appear to improve model performance. As a result, it may be advantageous for bioassessment programs to develop large regional models as a preliminary assessment of overall disturbance conditions as long as the range in natural landscape variability is not excessive.

White, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

2014-01-01

125

Research Lasers and Air Traffic Safety: Issues, Concerns and Responsibilities of the Research Community  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of outdoor use of lasers relative to air traffic has become a diverse and dynamic topic. During the past several decades, the use of lasers in outdoor research activities have increased significantly. Increases in the outdoor use of lasers and increases in air traffic densities have changed the levels of risk involved. To date there have been no documented incidents of air traffic interference from research lasers; however, incidents involving display lasers have shown a marked increase. As a result of the national response to these incidents, new concerns over lasers have arisen. Through the efforts of the SAE G-10T Laser Safety Hazards Subcommittee and the ANSI Z136.6 development committee, potential detrimental effects to air traffic beyond the traditional eye damage concerns have been identified. An increased emphasis from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Center for Devices and Radiological Hazards (CDRH), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) along with increased concern by the public have resulted in focused scrutiny of potential hazards presented by lasers. The research community needs to rethink the traditional methods of risk evaluation and application of protective measures. The best current approach to assure adequate protection of air traffic is the application of viable hazard and risk analysis and the use of validated protective measures. Standards making efforts and regulatory development must be supported by the research community to assure that reasonable measures are developed. Without input, standards and regulations can be developed that are not compatible with the needs of the research community. Finally, support is needed for the continued development and validation of protective measures.

Nessler, Phillip J., Jr.

1998-01-01

126

EDITORIAL Obesity – An “Acceptable  

E-print Network

Modern society has placed a high premium on good health, a lean body, and comeliness. As a nation we eat better, exercise more, and seek a healthier lifestyle to achieve physical well being. A national consensus seems to exist that a well-proportioned body is a thing of beauty. It is no wonder, therefore, that obesity, a caricature of the beautiful body, has been responsible for ridicule and social ostracism. Not only have obese persons been subject to ridicule, but that ridicule has been socially acceptable. Witness the many cartoons, movies, plays, and books where an overweight person has been made the object of mockery, often without any gesture of sympathy to counterbalance the prejudice. Ridicule of another human being for being obese, or for any other reason, is insensitive and unjustified. Concern about obesity should

Michael S. Kavic

127

Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

128

Response to Special Issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" Concerning "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to the six authors in the special issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" concerning her book "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy." In this response, the author focuses on some general observations that came to mind whilst reading the valuable set of…

Green, Lucy

2009-01-01

129

UGV acceptance testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and

Jeffrey A. Kramer; Robin R. Murphy

2006-01-01

130

OTM Machine Acceptance: In the Arab Culture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Basically, neglecting the human factor is one of the main reasons for system failures or for technology rejection, even when important technologies are considered. Biometrics mostly have the characteristics needed for effortless acceptance, such as easiness and usefulness, that are essential pillars of acceptance models such as TAM (technology acceptance model). However, it should be investigated. Many studies have been carried out to research the issues of technology acceptance in different cultures, especially the western culture. Arabic culture lacks these types of studies with few publications in this field. This paper introduces a new biometric interface for ATM machines. This interface depends on a promising biometrics which is odour. To discover the acceptance of this biometrics, we distributed a questionnaire via a web site and called for participation in the Arab Area and found that most respondents would accept to use odour.

Rashed, Abdullah; Santos, Henrique

131

Public Acceptance of Management Actions and Judgments of Responsibility for the Wolves of the Southern Greater Yellowstone Area: Report to Grand Teton National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction Wolves of Grand Teton National Park and the Greater Yellowstone Area Gray wolves (Canis lupus) appeared in Grand Teton National Park (GRTE) in October of 1998, two years after being reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Since that time, five packs have been within the GRTE borders - Gros Ventre Pack, Nez Perce Pack, Yellowstone Delta Pack, Teton Pack, and Green River Pack (Table 1). Wolves in the Greater Yellowstone Area are increasing and spreading out geographically (USFWS and others, 2004). This dispersion was demonstrated recently by the death of a 2-year-old female wolf from the Swan Lake pack on I-70 in Colorado (June 7, 2004; http://mountain-prairie.USFWS.gov/pressrel /04-43.htm). The organization of wolf packs in the GYA is dynamic and highly structured. In 2003, for example, a wolf from the Teton Pack joined with the Green River Pack, and several young wolves left the Teton Pack and moved south (USFWS and others, 2004). Pack size (averaging five to ten members) is dependent on hunting efficiency, which depends on prey size, type, and density. Each pack defends home ranges of several hundred square miles. The social structure of the pack is based on a breeding pair (an alpha male and female). Other wolves in the pack can be categorized as betas (males and/or females second in rank to the alphas), subordinates, pups, and occasional omegas (outcasts). Because generally only the alpha pair breeds, subordinate wolves of reproductive age must disperse from their packs and form new associations in order to breed. (http://www.nps.gov/grte/wolf/biolo.htm). The reintroduced wolves are classified by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as "nonessential experimental" under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act. The recovery criteria for the GYA wolves were met in 2002 for removing the wolves from the Endangered Species List (30 or more breeding pairs). Currently, the USFWS manages wolf populations in the GYA until delisting occurs. After delisting, state Fish and Wildlife Services in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming will be responsible for managing wolves. Each state must submit a wolf management plan to the USFWS which then must be approved before management shifts occur. As of this writing, the process of delisting the wolves in the state of Wyoming is ongoing. However, the reclassification of wolves nationwide was completed on April 1, 2003. Wolves outside of YNP changed in status from endangered to threatened. The wolves classified in the experimental nonessential population did not change in status (USFWS and others, 2004). This classification of experimental nonessential population allows for flexibility in management decisions concerning the wolves (Smith and others, 2004). For example, control actions in the GYA included trapping and radio-collaring four wolves; intensive monitoring; increasing riders on grazing allotments; harassing wolves with rubber bullets, cracker shells, and lights; moving livestock to different pastures; and issuing four shoot on-sight permits. When non-lethal control methods were not effective, wolves were killed in an attempt to prevent further livestock depredations (USFWS and others, 2004; Table 1). At the same time that wolf numbers are rising, human population statistics in the GRTE area are also rising. The population of Teton County, Wyoming in 1990 was just over 11,000 people; today that number has increased to approximately 19,000 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2005). park visitation for GRTE has been substantial over the last several years with an average visitation of 2.5 million visitors (NPS, 2004a). Furthermore, land ownership surrounding GRTE and the establishment of grazing rights within park boundaries are problem areas for wolf-human interactions due to livestock depredation. With increasing numbers of visitors, residents, and livestock it is reasonable to assume that conflicts are going to increase also. In 1950, GRTE was expanded to in

Taylor, Jonathan G.; Johnson, S. Shea; Shelby, Lori B.

2005-01-01

132

Affective Issues in Learning Technologies: Emotional Responses to Technology and Technology's Role in Supporting Socio-Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on some of the author's research studies over the past thirty years and places these in a wider context to reflect on research into affective issues in learning technologies over this period, and to consider whether and how the issues uncovered by research have changed as technologies have developed over time. Three issues are…

Jones, Ann

2010-01-01

133

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS 1  

E-print Network

and April 14, 2014; accepted April 20, 2014. This paper was recommended for publication by Associate Editor sponsored by MARCO and DARPA). This work was also supported by Grant NSF-IIP- 0742304, Grant NSF-OIA-1028009, Grant ARL MAST-CTA W911NF-08-2- 0004, Grant ARL RCTA W911NF-10-2-0016, and Grant NSF-DGE-0966142. N

Pappas, George J.

134

Effectiveness and Patient Acceptance of Halcinonide 0.1% Cream in 216g Jars for Large-area Steroid-responsive Dermatoses  

PubMed Central

When treating patients with extensive dermatitis, total body surface area affected must be considered when prescribing topical medication. Halcinonide 0.1% cream, a class 2 topical corticosteroid, is now available in a 216g jar. This large size is convenient and cost effective for patients with large-area dermatoses. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy and patient acceptance of halcinonide in 216g jars for the treatment of large-area dermatoses. Design: This study was an open-label, noncomparator trial evaluating the clinical outcomes and acceptability of halcinonide in 216g jars. Halcinonide was prescribed twice daily for up to 28 days. Measurement: Severity of dermatoses was based on investigator observations at the baseline visit and again after 28 days. Patient satisfaction was evaluated based on a questionnaire completed at the conclusion of the study. Results: Total enrollment was 40 patients. Dermatoses affected an average of 12 percent body surface area. At baseline, all patients exhibited dermatoses rated as severe or moderate. Nearly half of patients were completely cleared or almost cleared by 28 days, with all patients noting at least some improvement. Most patients agreed that they liked the way the product spread on the skin (94.7%), and more than 80 percent found that it was neither sticky nor greasy. In more than 90 percent of cases, the investigator reported that halcinonide provided a shorter duration of therapy versus triamcinolone one-pound jars. Conclusion: Halcinonide 0.1% cream in 216g jars is effective and convenient for patients with large-area dermatoses. PMID:21532875

2011-01-01

135

Sonic boom acceptability studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

1992-01-01

136

Cross-National Perspectives on Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parental acceptance-rejection theory (PARTheory) is a theory of socialization that seeks to predict and explain major causes, consequences, and other correlates of parental acceptance-rejection worldwide. In effect, the theory searches for verifiable universals in parent-child relations insofar as these universals relate to issues surrounding perceived parental acceptance-rejection. In this article, we focus on four major issues within the theory. First,

Ronald P. Rohner; Abdul Khaleque; David E. Cournoyer

2004-01-01

137

ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

Cochrane, J. C. (James C.), Jr.; Parker, J. V. (Jerald V.); Hinckley, W. B. (William B.); Hosack, K. W. (Keith W.); Mills, D. (Diann); Parsons, W. M. (William Mark); Scudder, D. W. (David W.); Stokes, J. L. (John L.); Tabaka, L. J. (Leonard J.); Thompson, M. C. (M. Clark); Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; Campbell, T. N. (Timothy N.); Lancaster, D. L. (David L.); Tom, C. Y.

2001-01-01

138

The Eu's Response to 9\\/11: A Case Study of Institutional Roles and Policy Processes with Special Reference to Issues of Accountability and Human Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges of 9\\/11 required a wide ranging response across all three of the broad divisions of EU policymaking competence: the economic and monetary union, common foreign and security policy and internal security. These policy divisions make up the ‘three pillars’ of the EU's political architecture. This article reviews general issues of accountability and human rights protection in the EU's

FRANK GREGORY

2005-01-01

139

Issues affecting the measurement of disturbance response patterns in herbaceous vegetation – A test of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 'intermediate disturbance hypothesis' (IDH) predicts maximum species diversity at intermediate levels of disturbance. Disturbance levels are measured by intensity or frequency of disturbance or by the time since disturbance. The IDH has been tested over a wide range of studies and communities with results either accepting or rejecting the hypothesis. The objectives of this study were to determine how

J. Li; W. A. Loneragan; J. A. Duggin; C. D. Grant

2004-01-01

140

Predicting perceived racism and acceptance of negative behavioral intergroup responses: Validating the JLS in a college and community sample of Blacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study provides a replication and extension of the validity of a measure of anti-White attitudes in Blacks. A college and community sample of Black participants completed the recently developed Johnson–Lecci Scale (JLS) and subsequently made responses to scenarios involving ambiguously racist behavior, direct confrontation with a perceived racist, and Black anti-White discrimination. The results indicated that Black intergroup

James D. Johnson; Len Lecci; Janet Swim

2006-01-01

141

Text recycling: acceptable or misconduct?  

PubMed

Text recycling, also referred to as self-plagiarism, is the reproduction of an author's own text from a previous publication in a new publication. Opinions on the acceptability of this practice vary, with some viewing it as acceptable and efficient, and others as misleading and unacceptable. In light of the lack of consensus, journal editors often have difficulty deciding how to act upon the discovery of text recycling. In response to these difficulties, we have created a set of guidelines for journal editors on how to deal with text recycling. In this editorial, we discuss some of the challenges of developing these guidelines, and how authors can avoid undisclosed text recycling. PMID:25127654

Harriman, Stephanie; Patel, Jigisha

2014-01-01

142

Effects of Internal Rhetoric on Management Response to External Issues: How Corporate Culture Failed the Asbestos Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Demonstrates how corporate culture stifled adaptive efforts of strategic planners, operations managers, industrial hygienists, and issue monitors in the asbestos industry thereby leading it to the brink of bankruptcy. (MG)

Heath, Robert L.

1990-01-01

143

Air Call-Accept  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We've all had our hands in the dishwater when an important call comes in. The Air Call-Accept application gives users the ability to just wave their hand across the proximity sensor, and voila: the call is accepted. It's quite useful for people who are driving around quite a bit, though others will certainly find it efficacious. This version is compatible with devices running Android 1.6 and newer.

2013-08-15

144

Food Authenticity, Technology and Consumer Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traceability and authenticity issues have gained increasing prominence in food markets and create both opportunities and challenges for the food industry in providing credible information to consumers. Internal molecular tagging is an emerging technology with the potential to deliver traceability and authenticity assurances. A key question for the food industry in adopting new technologies is consumer acceptance. This paper explores

Jill E. Hobbs; Jill McDonald; Jing Zhang

2012-01-01

145

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1  

E-print Network

22 with a genetic algorithm optimization. It was shown that the inductive element plays an important role for the peak enhancement of the frequency response. Small signal modeling based on fundamental equations (e.g., the Poisson equation and the semiconductor transport equa- tions) is a fundamental

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

146

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS 1  

E-print Network

of encapsulated molecules are developed. These microcapsules uniquely embed miniature actuators in their liq- uid-responsive hydrogel. I. INTRODUCTION CONTROLLED encapsulation and release of biological and chemical agents applications, ranging from food and pharma- ceutical industries to inkless paper [1]­[4]. Particularly, liquid

Hong, Wei

147

OnlineTED.com - a novel web-based audience response system for higher education. A pilot study to evaluate user acceptance  

PubMed Central

Background and aim: Audience response (AR) systems are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education. However, high costs and complexity of conventional AR systems often limit their use. Here we present a novel AR system that is platform independent and does not require hardware clickers or additional software to be installed. Methods and results: “OnlineTED” was developed at Technische Universität München (TUM) based on Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) with a My Structured Query Language (MySQL)-database as server- and Javascript as client-side programming languages. “OnlineTED” enables lecturers to create and manage question sets online and start polls in-class via a web-browser. Students can participate in the polls with any internet-enabled device (smartphones, tablet-PCs or laptops). A paper-based survey was conducted with undergraduate medical students and lecturers at TUM to compare "OnlineTED" with conventional AR systems using clickers. "OnlineTED" received above-average evaluation results by both students and lecturers at TUM and was seen on par or superior to conventional AR systems. The survey results indicated that up to 80% of students at TUM own an internet-enabled device (smartphone or tablet-PC) for participation in web-based AR technologies. Summary and Conclusion: “OnlineTED” is a novel web-based and platform-independent AR system for higher education that was well received by students and lecturers. As a non-commercial alternative to conventional AR systems it may foster interactive teaching in undergraduate education, in particular with large audiences. PMID:24575156

Kuhbeck, Felizian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

2014-01-01

148

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision\\u000a of adequate palliative\\/end-of-life (P\\/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P\\/EOL care\\u000a often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically\\u000a examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits

Allison M Williams; Jeanette A Eby; Valorie A Crooks; Kelli Stajduhar; Melissa Giesbrecht; Mirjana Vuksan; S Robin Cohen; Kevin Brazil; Diane Allan

2011-01-01

149

Acceptable Use of UNSW Information and Communication  

E-print Network

, download, store or transmit material, which infringes copyright, such as music files, movies, videos etc in a legal, ethical and responsible manner. This policy is supported by the Acceptable Use of Information.2 Legal, Ethical and Responsible Use of ICT Resources The University requires users to use ICT and ICT

New South Wales, University of

150

Diagnosing Response Style Behavior by Means of a Latent-Class Factor Approach. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Gender Role Attitudes and Perceptions of Ethnic Discrimination Reexamined  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally accepted that response style behavior in survey research may seriously distort the measurement of attitudes and subsequent causal models that include attitudinal dimensions. However, there in no single accepted methodological approach in dealing with this issue. This article aims at illustrating the flexibility of a latent class factor approach in diagnosing response style behavior and in adjusting

G. B. D. Moors

2003-01-01

151

Why was Relativity Accepted?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

Brush, S. G.

152

Accepted Manuscript Correspondence  

E-print Network

Accepted Manuscript Correspondence Recently discovered properties of aspirin may be doubly helpful of aspirin may be doubly helpful in bipolar disorders, Medical Hypotheses (2014), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10 Letter Recently discovered properties of aspirin may be doubly helpful in bipolar disorders Running title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

Freedom in responsibility: a response.  

PubMed

This paper is a critical response to Elisabeth Gräb-Schmidt's article "Freedom in responsibility: On the relevance of 'sin' as hermeneutic guiding principle in bioethical decision making." Gräb-Schmidt's chief contention is that ethics begins with anthropology, and that moral responsibility is thereby grounded within a set of given limits. Freedom is distorted into sin when these limits are transgressed. My principal complaint is that her account of the relationship between freedom and sin is grounded in a tragic ontology. Alternatively, I contend that anthropology is grounded in Christology in which freedom is a gift of the Spirit. Consequently, sin is not so much tragic as it marks a refusal of humans to accept their divine election. The issues of human cloning and embryonic stem-cell research are used to exemplify what difference these respective differences might make in a process of moral deliberation. PMID:16266968

Waters, Brent

2005-08-01

154

Management Issues  

E-print Network

This report focuses on identifying the extent and characteristics of the youthful offender populations currently incarcerated in adult facilities and on documenting their conditions of confinement. These findings suggest that the phenomenon of youthful offender incarceration in adult correctional facilities is a burgeoning issue in many correctional systems across the nation. Correctional administrators need alternative strategies to address the issues associated with managing young offenders in an adult correctional environment while responding to their unique needs with developmentally appropriate programming. The following recommendations are offered for further research and present suggested topic areas in which the Bureau of Justice Assistance and other public and private agencies should be prepared to establish standards and to provide technical assistance to correctional agencies responsible for managing this growing population. Classification Systems

unknown authors

155

Solid Propellant Environmental Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the Solid Propellant Environmental Issues (SPEI) project is to demonstrate environmentally acceptable technologies that will enhance the continued production of solid rocket motors (SRMs) by complying with current and anticipated environmental regulations. Phase I of the project identifies current and anticipated environmental regulations that may affect SRMs manufacturing in the future and identify emerging process technologies which

Minh D. Le

1998-01-01

156

Factors influencing public acceptance of STOL noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The responses of people to special noise characteristics associated with short takeoff aircraft are discussed. The findings of studies which have yielded data that may be pertinent to community acceptance of short takeoff aircraft noise are presented. A three step program to evaluate public acceptance of short takeoff aircraft noise was conducted. The three steps were: (1) definition of short takeoff aircraft noise characteristics, (2) laboratory tests to evaluate individual responses, and (3) the use of community survey data to extrapolate conventional takeoff aircraft experience.

Edge, P. M., Jr.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Powell, C. A., Jr.

1972-01-01

157

12 CFR 412.7 - Conditions for acceptance.  

...PAYMENT FROM A NON-FEDERAL SOURCE FOR TRAVEL EXPENSES § 412.7 Conditions for...Eximbank may accept payment for employee travel from a non-Federal source when a written...accept payment is issued in advance of the travel following a determination by the...

2014-01-01

158

Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

Ward, Russell A.

1980-01-01

159

The Crime Question: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens. [Student Edition.] Major Issues in American Government. Law in Social Studies Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for students in grades 7-12, this social studies infusion unit examines individual rights and responsibilities in the context of the American criminal justice system and explores the balance between individual and group rights achieved at various levels of government. An introductory chapter establishes how crime control is…

Suter, Coral; Croddy, Marshall

160

Framing and Counterframing the Issue of Corporate Social ResponsibilityThe Communication Strategies of Nikebiz.com  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on the communication strategies that sports shoe giant Nike used to successfully protect its corporate social responsibility (CSR) reputation during the late 1990s. The article opens with a brief discussion of CSR and its critical importance to transnationals such as Nike. The opening also includes four research questions guiding this study. The article then discusses why frame

Randall L. Waller; Roger N. Conaway

2011-01-01

161

The Crime Question: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens. Instructor's Manual. Major Issues in American Government. Law in Social Studies Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for teachers of students in grades 7-12, this social studies infusion unit examines individual rights and responsibilities in the context of the American criminal justice system and explores the balance between individual and group rights achieved at various levels of American government. An introductory chapter outlines the program and…

Suter, Coral; Croddy, Marshall

162

Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

2011-01-01

163

Learning Responsibility: The Importance of the Home, School and Workplace. Ideas for Action in Education and Work, Issue 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The findings of a research project undertaken by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) on student responsibility as it relates to job performance are reported. Forty high school students, 15 teachers, and 18 employers involved in Cooperative Work Experience and Experience-Based Career Education programs were interviewed. The…

Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

164

Important Issues, Some Rhetoric, and a Few Straw Men: A Response to Comments on "Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors respond to the eight commentaries on "Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science" using several themes to organize their response. These themes include ability, developmental trajectories, effort and opportunity, psychosocial factors, eminence, and equity.…

Worrell, Frank C.; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.

2012-01-01

165

Acceptance of Internet Banking Systems among Young Managers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to determine acceptance of internet banking system among potential young users, specifically future young managers. The relationships and the effects of computer self-efficacy (CSE) and extended technology acceptance model (TAM) on the behavioural intention (BI) to use internet banking system were examined. Measurement of CSE, TAM and BI were adapted from previous studies. However construct for TAM has been extended by adding a new variable which is perceived credibility (PC). A survey through questionnaire was conducted to determine the acceptance level of CSE, TAM and BI. Data were obtained from 275 Technology Management students, who are pursuing their undergraduate studies in a Malaysia's public university. The confirmatory factor analysis performed has identified four variables as determinant factors of internet banking acceptance. The first variable is computer self-efficacy (CSE), and another three variables from TAM constructs which are perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PE) and perceived credibility (PC). The finding of this study indicated that CSE has a positive effect on PU and PE of the Internet banking systems. Respondents' CSE was positively affecting their PC of the systems, indicating that the higher the ability of one in computer skills, the higher the security and privacy issues of PC will be concerned. The multiple regression analysis indicated that only two construct of TAM; PU and PC were significantly associated with BI. It was found that the future managers' CSE indirectly affects their BI to use the internet banking systems through PU and PC of TAM. TAM was found to have direct effects on respondents' BI to use the systems. Both CSE and the PU and PC of TAM were good predictors in understanding individual responses to information technology. The role of PE of the original TAM to predict the attitude of users towards the use of information technology systems was surprisingly insignificant.

Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; M, Yeow S.; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad

2013-06-01

166

Using Specification-Based Intrusion Detection for Automated Response  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most controversial issues in intrusion detection is automating responses to intrusions, which can provide a more efficient, quicker, and precise way to react to an attack in progress than a human. However, it comes with several disadvantages that can lead to a waste of resources, which has so far prevented wide acceptance of automated response-enabled systems. We

Ivan Balepin; Sergei Maltsev; Jeff Rowe; Karl N. Levitt

2003-01-01

167

High acceptance recoil polarimeter  

SciTech Connect

In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

The HARP Collaboration

1992-12-05

168

Computed radiography acceptance testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compact sized computed radiography (CR) systems based on photostimulable phosphor technology are now being more widely used in radiology departments. Measurement of imaging performance at time of installation is essential to ensure that the CR system is operating within the manufacturer's specifications and producing a clinically acceptable image quality. At any given radiation dose, CR imaging performance primarily relates to image contrast, spatial resolution, and noise. Tests for these key aspects of CR performance are described and typical results, as obtained with a commercial system, are presented.

Huda, Walter; Arreola, Manuel; Jing, Zhenxue

1995-05-01

169

SPS technical issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The technical issues which would either seriously impact or potentially negate the integrity of a solar power satellite program are enumerated. Issues are identified not only relating to the question of engineering feasibility, but also to the equally important areas of environmental and social acceptability and, especially, economic viability. Specific information required for resolution of the issues was developed and a planned overall approach for resolution was identified. Results of these analyses show that 60% of the technical issues can be resolved with analysis only; 10% require only ground testing for resolution; and the remaining 30% require space experiments or demonstrations for resolution. The results also show that 85% resolution of the issues may be accomplished prior to development of a protoype.

Guttman, C. H.

1980-07-01

170

Acceptability and Ethics of Product Placement in Sport Video Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Product placement in sport video games is an emerging area of marketing and advertising communication, but it also raises controversial ethical issues. In order to investigate these issues from a consumer perspective, this study examines the perceptions of the acceptability of product placement in sport video games (SVGs). Data were gathered from 253 sport video gamers using an online survey.

Min Soo Kim; Steven R. McClung

2010-01-01

171

Acceptance of chronic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience of chronic pain can be associated with significant distress and disability; however, this is not always the\\u000a case. Although attempts to control or reduce pain can be helpful for many pain sufferers, on some occasions this is not an\\u000a effective option and a different response is required. This different response can include a fiexible mix of control and

Lance M. McCracken; Kevin E. Vowles

2006-01-01

172

Statistical issues in radiation dose-response analysis of employees of the nuclear industry in Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Poisson regression methods are used to describe dose-response relations for cancer mortality for a subcohort of 28,347 white male radiation workers. Age specific baseline rates are described using both internal and external (US white male) rates. Regression analyses are based on an analytic data structure (ADS) that consists of a table of observed deaths, expected deaths, and person-years at risk for each combination of levels of seven risk factors. The factors are socioeconomic status, length of employment, birth cohort, age at risk, facility, internal exposure, and external exposure. Each observation in the ADS consists of the index value of each of the stratifying factors, the observed deaths, the expected deaths, the person-years, and the ten year lagged average cumulative dose. Regression diagnostics show that a linear exponential relative risk model is not appropriate for these data. Results are presented using a main effects model for factors other than external radiation, and an excess relative risk term for cumulative external radiation dose.

Frome, E.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Watkins, J.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States). Center for Epidemiologic Research

1997-11-01

173

The California breast density information group: a collaborative response to the issues of breast density, breast cancer risk, and breast density notification legislation.  

PubMed

In anticipation of breast density notification legislation in the state of California, which would require notification of women with heterogeneously and extremely dense breast tissue, a working group of breast imagers and breast cancer risk specialists was formed to provide a common response framework. The California Breast Density Information Group identified key elements and implications of the law, researching scientific evidence needed to develop a robust response. In particular, issues of risk associated with dense breast tissue, masking of cancers by dense tissue on mammograms, and the efficacy, benefits, and harms of supplementary screening tests were studied and consensus reached. National guidelines and peer-reviewed published literature were used to recommend that women with dense breast tissue at screening mammography follow supplemental screening guidelines based on breast cancer risk assessment. The goal of developing educational materials for referring clinicians and patients was reached with the construction of an easily accessible Web site that contains information about breast density, breast cancer risk assessment, and supplementary imaging. This multi-institutional, multidisciplinary approach may be useful for organizations to frame responses as similar legislation is passed across the United States. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24023072

Price, Elissa R; Hargreaves, Jonathan; Lipson, Jafi A; Sickles, Edward A; Brenner, R James; Lindfors, Karen K; Joe, Bonnie N; Leung, Jessica W T; Feig, Stephen A; Bassett, Lawrence W; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Daniel, Bruce L; Kurian, Allison W; Love, Elyse; Ryan, Lauren; Walgenbach, Donna D; Ikeda, Debra M

2013-12-01

174

Ethical issues in organ transplantation.  

PubMed

Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate and ethically acceptable ways of utilizing the recent advances of stem cell transplantation from adult versus fetal donors, tissue engineering and the use of organs from animals or xenotransplantation. Data provided in support of the concept that clinical organ and tissue transplantation can be more beneficial and life saving if everyone involved in the process, including physicians and medical institutions, respect and consider the best interests of the patients, as well as honor the ethical, moral and religious values of society and are not tempted to seek personal fame or financial rewards. PMID:12566971

Abouna, George M

2003-01-01

175

Digital Camera Identification from Images - Estimating False Acceptance Probability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photo-response non-uniformity noise present in output signals of CCD and CMOS sensors has been used as fingerprint to uniquely identify the source digital camera that took the image. The same fingerprint can establish a link between images according to their common source. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art identification method and discuss its practical issues. In the camera identification task, when formulated as a binary hypothesis test, a decision threshold is set on correlation between image noise and modulated fingerprint. The threshold determines the probability of two kinds of possible errors: false acceptance and missed detection. We will focus on estimation of the false acceptance probability that we wish to keep very low. A straightforward approach involves testing a large number of different camera fingerprints against one image or one camera fingerprint against many images from different sources. Such sampling of the correlation probability distribution is time consuming and expensive while extrapolation of the tails of the distribution is still not reliable. A novel approach is based on cross-correlation analysis and peak-to-correlation-energy ratio.

Goljan, Miroslav

176

Simulating smokers' acceptance of modifications in a cessation program.  

PubMed Central

Recent research has underscored the importance of assessing barriers to smokers' acceptance of cessation programs. This paper illustrates the use of computer simulations to gauge smokers' response to program modifications which may produce barriers to participation. It also highlights methodological issues encountered in conducting this work. Computer simulations were based on conjoint analysis, a consumer research method which enables measurement of smokers' relative preference for various modifications of cessation programs. Results from two studies are presented in this paper. The primary study used a randomly selected sample of 218 adult smokers who participated in a computer-assisted phone interview. Initially, the study assessed smokers' relative utility rating of 30 features of cessation programs. Utility data were used in computer-simulated comparisons of a low-cost, self-help oriented program under development and five other existing programs. A baseline version of the program under development and two modifications (for example, use of a support group with a higher level of cost) were simulated. Both the baseline version and modifications received a favorable response vis-à-vis comparison programs. Modifications requiring higher program costs were, however, associated with moderately reduced levels of favorable consumer response. The second study used a sample of 70 smokers who responded to an expanded set of smoking cessation program features focusing on program packaging. This secondary study incorporate in-person, computer-assisted interviews at a shopping mall, with smokers viewing an artist's mock-up of various program options on display. A similar pattern of responses to simulated program modifications emerged, with monetary cost apparently playing a key role. The significance of conjoint-based computer simulation as a tool in program development or dissemination, salient methodological issues, and implications for further research are discussed. PMID:1738813

Spoth, R

1992-01-01

177

Examining the relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, victim blame, homophobia, gender roles, and ambivalent sexism.  

PubMed

The relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, attitudes toward gay men, a series of gender role and sexism measures, victim blame and assault severity were investigated. It was predicted that men would display more negative, stereotypical attitudes than women and that male rape myth endorsement would be related to, and predicted by, the other attitude and attribution scales. Respondents comprised 323 undergraduates (146 males and 177 females) from a large University in the Northwest of England. Results broadly conformed to predictions, with men generally more negative than women, and male rape myth acceptance significantly related to female rape myth acceptance, negative attitudes about gay men, gender role attitudes, and victim blame. Furthermore, male rape myth acceptance was predicted by female rape myth acceptance, gender attitudes, and victim blame. Methodological issues and implications for future work and those working with victims are discussed. PMID:22550150

Davies, Michelle; Gilston, Jennifer; Rogers, Paul

2012-09-01

178

STOL ride quality criteria - Passenger acceptance.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to mathematically model human reaction to variables involved in transportation systems offers a very desirable tool both for the prediction of passenger acceptance of proposed systems, and for establishing acceptance criteria for the system designer. As a first step in the development of a general model for STOL systems, a mathematical formulation is presented which accepts as inputs nine variables felt to be important in flight under STOL-type conditions and presents an index of human response as the output. The variables used are three linear motions, three angular motions, pressure, temperature and noise level. The results are used to establish specifications for stability augmentation systems to improve the ride quality of existing STOL aircraft.

Jacobson, I. D.; Kuhlthau, A. R.

1972-01-01

179

Physiologic correlates to background noise acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Acceptance of background noise can be evaluated by having listeners indicate the highest background noise level (BNL) they are willing to accept while following the words of a story presented at their most comfortable listening level (MCL). The difference between the selected MCL and BNL is termed the acceptable noise level (ANL). One of the consistent findings in previous studies of ANL is large intersubject variability in acceptance of background noise. This variability is not related to age, gender, hearing sensitivity, personality, type of background noise, or speech perception in noise performance. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if individual differences in physiological activity measured from the peripheral and central auditory systems of young female adults with normal hearing can account for the variability observed in ANL. Correlations between ANL and various physiological responses, including spontaneous, click-evoked, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem and middle latency evoked potentials, and electroencephalography will be presented. Results may increase understanding of the regions of the auditory system that contribute to individual noise acceptance.

Tampas, Joanna; Harkrider, Ashley; Nabelek, Anna

2001-05-01

180

Colorectal cancer defeating? Challenge accepted!  

PubMed

Colorectal tumours are actually considered as aberrant organs, within it is possible to notice a different stage of cell growth and differentiation. Their origin is reported to arise from a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with, just like the healthy stem cells, self-renewal and aberrant multi-lineage differentiation capacity likely to be called colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs). Cancer stem cells (CSCs) fate, since their origin, reflects the influences from their microenvironment (or niche) both in the maintenance of stemness, in promoting their differentiation, and in inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, responsible of CSCs dissemination and subsequent formation of metastatic lesions. The tumour cells heterogeneity and their immuno-response resistance nowadays probably responsible of the failure of the conventional therapies, make this research field an open issue. Even more importantly, our increasing understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate CSC quiescence and cell cycle regulation, self-renewal, chemotaxis and resistance to cytotoxic agents, is expected to eventually result in tailor-made therapies with a significant impact on the morbidity and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:23927966

Di Franco, S; Todaro, M; Dieli, F; Stassi, G

2014-10-01

181

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue of "ERCMExpress" discusses "Tapping into Nontraditional Community Partners for Emergency Management." Collaboration by schools with community…

Kahn, Gina

2007-01-01

182

Assessing E-Learning Acceptance by University Students in Thailand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to assess e-learning acceptance by students, using data collected from 377 students at three public universities in Thailand. Using the "E-learning Acceptance Measure" (Teo, 2010b), participants gave their responses to 21 statements on three factors hypothesised to measure e-learning: tutor quality, perceived usefulness,…

Teo, Timothy; Wong, Su Luan; Thammetar, Thapanee; Chattiwat, Wisa

2011-01-01

183

Introduction: Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory Studies of Intimate Adult Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The studies in this special issue explore three questions drawn from newly formulated postulates in parental acceptance-rejection theory: (a) To what extent is perceived acceptance or rejection by an intimate partner in adulthood associated with the same form of psychological adjustment or maladjustment that perceived parental acceptance-rejection is known to be in childhood? (b) To what extent do remembrances of

Ronald P. Rohner

2008-01-01

184

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of the local public, we put some effort in informing interested people, media, politicians on all l

Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

2009-04-01

185

Beyond acceptable risk: On the social acceptability of technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social acceptability of large-scale technologies depends upon a wide range of things, some related to safety and economics, but also some factors of cultural, social and psychological significance. However, many risk analysts assume that public opposition to technologies is mostly due to unfounded fears of their risks and, that there can exist quantitative criteria of “acceptable risk” that could

Harry J. Otway; DETLOF VON WINTERFELDT

1982-01-01

186

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-06-01

187

Workplace violence: managing a culture of acceptance.  

PubMed

The cultural acceptance of workplace violence is changing. Management has become more educated on regulatory issues around its tolerance of workplace violence. Events around the country in a variety of settings have aided in raising awareness of this issue. Healthcare professionals are not immune to workplace violence, including those working in the imaging profession. Healthcare workers, historically, have given care despite the demeanor of patients, often putting up with aggressive behavior including sexual harassment and physical assault. Management needs to take all possible measures to ensure employees feel safe at work. It is essential to have well thought out policies and procedures to mitigate workplace violence; keeping in mind that a goal of eliminating workplace violence is unrealistic. PMID:25174140

Fredrick, Marie

2014-01-01

188

Dissolution test acceptance sampling plans.  

PubMed

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) general monograph provides a standard for dissolution compliance with the requirements as stated in the individual USP monograph for a tablet or capsule dosage form. The acceptance rules recommended by USP have important roles in the quality control process. The USP rules and their modifications are often used as an industrial lot release sampling plan, where a lot is accepted when the tablets or capsules sampled are accepted as proof of compliance with the requirement. In this paper, the operating characteristics of the USP acceptance rules are reviewed and compared to a selected modification. The operating characteristics curves show that the USP acceptance rules are sensitive to the true mean dissolution and do not reject a lot or batch that has a large percentage of tablets that dissolve with less than the dissolution specification. PMID:7581426

Tsong, Y; Hammerstrom, T; Lin, K; Ong, T E

1995-07-01

189

Texas Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: An Overview of Legislative Responsibilities, Code Compliance Issues and Accomplishments  

E-print Network

program for code officials. 5. Assist cities and counties to achieve above code performance. 6. Translate the EE/RE savings into EPA acceptable emissions reductions which can be applied to the State Implementation Plan, SIP....

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J. A.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01

190

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?  

PubMed Central

Background An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision of adequate palliative/end-of-life (P/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P/EOL care often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits social program aimed at informal P/EOL caregivers - operates as a public health response in sustaining informal caregivers providing P/EOL care, and whether or not it adequately addresses known aspects of caregiver burden that are addressed within the population health promotion (PHP) model. Methods As part of a national evaluation of Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit, 57 telephone interviews were conducted with Canadian informal P/EOL caregivers in 5 different provinces, pertaining to the strengths and weaknesses of the CCB and the general caregiving experience. Interview data was coded with Nvivo software and emerging themes were identified by the research team, with such findings published elsewhere. The purpose of the present analysis was identified after comparing the findings to the literature specific to caregiver burden and public health, after which data was analyzed using the PHP model as a guiding framework. Results Informal caregivers spoke to several of the determinants of health outlined in the PHP model that are implicated in their burden experience: gender, income and social status, working conditions, health and social services, social support network, and personal health practises and coping strategies. They recognized the need for improving the CCB to better address these determinants. Conclusions This study, from the perspective of family caregivers, demonstrates that the CCB is not living up to its full potential in sustaining informal P/EOL caregivers. Effort is required to transform the CCB so that it may fulfill the potential it holds for serving as one public health response to caregiver burden that forms part of a healthy public policy that addresses the determinants of this burden. PMID:21592383

2011-01-01

191

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14

192

Water Governance: Some Critical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an analysis of the issues discussed at a special international workshop on water governance. While it is generally accepted that good governance for the water sector is essential, it is also clear that its implementation requires qualitative and quantitative factors, which may vary from one country to another. In order to objectively assess the opportunities and constraints

Cecilia Tortajada

2010-01-01

193

Controversial Issues in Learning Disability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author discusses controversial issues in the field of learning disabilities (LD). Among topics addressed are conflicting definitions of LD and the impact of the operational definition accepted by the US Government; etiological questions concerning the separation of neurological, environmental, and emotional factors; approaches used in training…

Sapir, Selma C.

194

Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

Borja, Rhea R.

2005-01-01

195

Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

Higgins, Chris

2012-01-01

196

Issues and approaches for using equipment reliability alert levels  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work accomplished to identify issues and approaches to establish alert levels for component reliability. Reliability alert levels are established on standby component counts of success and failure, where equipment demands are monitored and counted to ascertain if assumptions about acceptable reliability are likely to be correct. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the detection responses and false alarm rates of several alert level systems. The detection responses were obtained in response to a specified reliability degradation. Two of the alert systems were demonstrated with actual failure data on the Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) for five plants. Burden and risk measures of effectiveness were developed to compare different alert level schemes having different detection responses and false alarm rates. 7 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

Lofgren, E.V.; Gregory, S.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1991-06-01

197

Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-01-01

198

Accept or divert ICU patients? A heated ethical debate.  

PubMed

Stretching scarce resources is more than a managerial issue. Should an understaffed ICU accept the patient or divert him to another facility? The intense "medical utility" controversy focuses on a situation that critical care nurses now face every day. PMID:11998065

Angelucci, P A

2000-01-01

199

Issues management made easier  

SciTech Connect

Increases in ES&H compliance issues within the past few years have necessitated a formal process by which DOE facilities address these issues. In May 1991, ANL-W implemented the ANL-W Issues Management System (IMS) to facilitate the management of compliance issues and scheduling of corrective action plans with limited resources. The central focus of this process is a computer database, Integrated Resource Management System (IRMS), which allows quick retrieval of compliance information, organization of compliance issues based on a risk-based prioritization methodology, and tracking of corrective action plans. Without the IRMS, the ANL-W Issues Management System would have been difficult to administer and manage. ANL-W has used the IRMS for both audit preparation and audit response, most noticeably the preparation and subsequent response to the 1991 Tiger Team audit. The IRMS was used to track ANL-W Self-Assessment corrective action plans, provide instant information to Tiger Team members regarding Self-Assessment findings, produce prioritized lists of Tiger Team concerns for developing corrective action plans, and track Tiger Team corrective action plans. Status reports to senior, laboratory management regarding the Tiger Team corrective action plan are produced based on information provided by the IRMS. This paper discusses the criteria used for selecting the IRMS, implementation of the Issues Management System using the IRMS, lessons learned, and the future evolution of the IRMS.

Brownson, L.

1993-10-01

200

Nome Issue 11  

E-print Network

things happening?the response to NOME 10 in general, and the LoC column (which was fantastic?keep it coming!) in particular, and, of course, the outcome of the first annual SURAK Awards, held at Shore Leave last summer. NOME won in several categories..., and the deeply disappointing response from fandom to our flier for HEARTSTRINGS. (We have abandoned this project as a separate entity; instead, a HEARTSTRINGS section will be presented in each subsequent issue of NOME?commencing in this issue with "No Greater...

Multiple Contributors

1988-01-01

201

Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids  

SciTech Connect

The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

1982-04-01

202

BLACK ISSUES  

E-print Network

transactions in recent years include Viacom's acquisition of Black Entertainment Television, NBC's purchaseBLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity :: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: http of the Telemundo television network and the Chicago-based Tribune Company's heavy investments in Spanish

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

203

Electroreception in neonatal bonnethead sharks, Sphyrna tiburo Received: 9 December 2002 / Accepted: 17 April 2003 / Published online: 19 June 2003  

E-print Network

Electroreception in neonatal bonnethead sharks, Sphyrna tiburo Received: 9 December 2002 / Accepted of electroreceptive response. This article describes and quantifies the orientation responses of neonatal bonnethead

Kajiura, Stephen

204

Acceptance and meanings of wheelchair use in senior stroke survivors.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of the lived experience of senior stroke survivors who used prescribed wheelchairs in their homes and communities. The study involved semistructured, in-depth interviews that were conducted with 10 participants, ages 70 to 80 years old, who had used a wheelchair for a mean of 5.6 years. A constant comparative inductive method of analysis was performed. Three different categories of acceptance of wheelchair use were identified; reluctant acceptance, grateful acceptance, and internal acceptance. Increased mobility, varied social response, and loss of some valued roles were common to all three wheelchair acceptance categories. Aspects of level of burden, freedom, and spontaneity varied in degree among the three acceptance categories. As the wheelchair provided opportunity for increased continuity in the lives of these stroke survivors, it appeared to be accepted more fully and viewed more positively. Prestroke lifestyle and values need to be carefully considered in order to maximize acceptance of wheelchair use among senior stroke survivors. PMID:15068158

Barker, Donna J; Reid, Denise; Cott, Cheryl

2004-01-01

205

Further Conceptualization of Treatment Acceptability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review and extension of previous conceptualizations of treatment acceptability is provided in light of progress within the area of behavior treatment development and implementation. Factors including legislation, advances in research, and service delivery models are examined as to their relationship with a comprehensive conceptualization of…

Carter, Stacy L.

2008-01-01

206

Dissolution test acceptance sampling plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) general monograph provides a standard for dissolution compliance with the requirements as stated in the individual USP monograph for a tablet or capsule dosage form. The acceptance rules recommended by USP have important roles in the quality control process. The USP rules and their modifications are often used as an industrial lot release sampling plan, where

Yi Tsong; Thomas Hammerstrom; Karl Lin; Ting Eng Ong

1995-01-01

207

Safety, risk acceptability, and morality.  

PubMed

The primary aim of this article is to develop and defend a conceptual analysis of safety. The article begins by considering two previous analyses of safety in terms of risk acceptability. It is argued that these analyses fail because the notion of risk acceptability is more subjective than safety, as risk acceptability takes into account potential benefits in a way that safety does not. A distinction is then made between two different kinds of safety--safety qua cause and safety qua recipient--and both are defined in terms of the probability of a loss of value, though the relationship between safety and the probability of loss varies in each case. It is then shown that although this analysis is less subjective than the previously considered analyses, subjectivity can still enter into judgments of safety via the notions of probability and value. In the final section of this article, it is argued that the difference between safety and risk acceptability is important because it corresponds in significant ways to the difference between consequentialist and deontological moral viewpoints. PMID:18373214

Macpherson, James A E

2008-09-01

208

BIOINFORMATICS Accepted for publication 2007  

E-print Network

a distribution computed by ACMI. This results in a set of probability-weighted all-atom protein modelsBIOINFORMATICS Preprint Accepted for publication 2007 Creating Protein Models from Electron Soni a,b, Craig A. Bingmand, George N. Phillips, Jr. c,a,d, Jude W. Shavlik a,b a Computer Sciences

Shavlik, Jude W.

209

Technology acceptability for medical assistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research we examine the age-specific acceptance motives of medical assistive technologies assessing the general openness of using these technologies as well as estimating potential barriers, which may impede a successful rollout. 122 respondents (20 - 80 years) participated in a survey, in which they were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of medical assistive

Martina Ziefle; Wiktoria Wilkowska

2010-01-01

210

Addressing Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

Schoebel, Susan

1991-01-01

211

Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

Wang, Zhihuan

212

Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma  

SciTech Connect

This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

Peterson, T.

1995-12-01

213

This Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces a theme issue that describes studies which have been conducted on teaching as persuasion and discusses key ideas and concepts that have emerged from these studies, attempting to arrange these ideas and concepts into a coherent theory of learning as a process of change and teaching as a process of persuasion. (SM)

Murphy, P. Karen, Ed.

2001-01-01

214

Workforce Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of four papers presented during a symposium on work force issues moderated by Jan DeJong at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Rethinking the Ties that Bind: An Exploratory Study of Employee Development in Utilities in Canada and the United States" (Michael Aherne, David Barron) reports…

1996

215

Emotional Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a variety of ways. Patience, consistency, understanding, and love are some of the most important things you can provide to ensure the emotional health of your child. Parents of a ...

216

Sanskrit Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

1971-01-01

217

77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...Certificate of Authority issued by the Treasury to Western Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to...

2012-01-05

218

24 CFR 905.320 - Contract administration and acceptance of work.  

...Contract administration and acceptance of work. (a) Contract administration...contractual and administrative issues arising out of their procurements. The PHA shall...Entity shall carry out inspections of work in progress and goods...

2014-04-01

219

Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

2010-01-01

220

76 FR 66361 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Western National Mutual Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Western National Mutual Insurance Company...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2011-10-26

221

77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2012-02-15

222

75 FR 22689 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: General Casualty Company of Wisconsin  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: General Casualty Company of Wisconsin...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-04-29

223

75 FR 11229 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association Insurance...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-03-10

224

75 FR 60865 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-10-01

225

75 FR 11228 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Manufacturers Alliance Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Manufacturers Alliance Insurance Company...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-03-10

226

78 FR 19366 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Ohio Security Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Ohio Security Insurance Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2013-03-29

227

75 FR 22689 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Regent Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Regent Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-04-29

228

77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Insurance Company of Michigan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Insurance Company of Michigan...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. [[Page...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2012-02-15

229

77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2012-02-15

230

76 FR 77591 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2011-12-13

231

75 FR 11228 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers Indemnity Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers Indemnity...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2010-03-10

232

77 FR 25535 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Pacific Employers Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Pacific Employers Insurance Company AGENCY...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. [[Page...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2012-04-30

233

78 FR 15123 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Atlantic Specialty Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Atlantic Specialty Insurance Company...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY...Authority as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is hereby issued under 31 U.S.C....

2013-03-08

234

Information Communication Technologies in the Classroom: Expanding TAM to Examine Instructor Acceptance and Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies show that use of computer-based information communication technologies (ICTs) can have positive impacts on student motivation and learning. The present study examines the issue of ICT adoption in the classroom by expanding the Technology Acceptance Model to identify factors that contribute to teacher acceptance and use of these…

Huntington, Heidi; Worrell, Tracy

2013-01-01

235

Racial and Ethnic Cultural Factors in the Process of Acceptance of Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptance of mental illness is essential to promoting recovery and is uniquely impacted by issues of culture, race, and ethnicity. Qualitative case narrative methodology was used to identify themes related to the cultural facilitators and barriers in the acceptance process. Five participant narratives are presented to assist practitioners in…

Mizock, Lauren; Russinova, Zlatka

2013-01-01

236

Social acceptance of renewable energy innovation: An introduction to the concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the special issue on Social Acceptance of Renewable Energy Innovation. It is a collection of best papers presented at an international research conference held in Tramelan (Switzerland) in February 2006. While there are ambitious government targets to increase the share of renewable energy in many countries, it is increasingly recognized that social acceptance may be a constraining

Rolf Wüstenhagen; Maarten Wolsink; Mary Jean Bürer

2007-01-01

237

Acceptability of solar disinfection of drinking water treatment in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the acceptability of solar disinfection of drinking water (SODIS) in a village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, using constructs from the Health Belief Model as a framework to identify local understandings of water, sanitation and health issues. There has been no published research on the acceptability of SODIS in household testing in Nepal. Understanding the context of water

Rochelle C. Rainey; Anna K. Harding

2005-01-01

238

Senior Citizens' Acceptance of Information Systems: A Study in the Context of e-Government Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The turn of the century has seen a rapidly graying population concurrently with increasingly ubiquitous information technology (IT). The elderly population being less familiar with IT implies that issues pertaining to their acceptance of information systems (IS) deserve special attention. However, the IS and gerontology literatures seldom explore IS acceptance among the aged. Attempting to address this gap, a research

Chee Wei Phang; Juliana Sutanto; Atreyi Kankanhalli; Yan Li; Bernard C. Y. Tan; Hock-Hai Teo

2006-01-01

239

Workload based order acceptance in job shop environments M.J.R. Ebben*, E.W. Hans**,1  

E-print Network

deliveries may also lead to higher (penalty) costs, and possibly lost customers. A good order acceptance, a sales department is responsible for order acceptance, while a production department is responsible for the production planning. The sales department will tend to accept all orders, regardless of the available

Vellekoop, Michel

240

To retrieve or not to retrieve: These are the issues  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors that must be evaluated when determining whether a buried mixed waste site should be retrieved and subsequently stored, treated, and/or disposed of or if some other action is more appropriate. The criteria developed for the evaluation of remedial actions at mixed waste sites under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) regulation EPA, provide an excellent methodology for deciding upon a preferred action even if the site is not under CERCLA regulation. Each topic for evaluation in the criteria is not mutually exclusive, and many tradeoffs must be reviewed. The criteria have been broken down into a number of categories: overall protection of human health and the environment; compliance with Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs); long-term effectiveness and permanence; reduction of toxicity, mobility, and volume; short-term effectiveness; implementability; cost; state acceptance; and community acceptance. Once the data is gathered, a Hazards Analysis must be performed to understand the risks of the site to workers, the public, and the environment. The Hazard Analysis is critical in helping personnel understand the associated issues so that an effective evaluation can take place. The intent of this paper is not to focus on a particular site, but to provide information that is useful for many problem holders to better understand the issues associated with buried mixed waste retrieval. Ultimately, these issues affect the final decision of whether or not retrieval is a feasible alternative.

Hyde, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M.; Nickelson, D.F.; Swanson, S.P.

1997-10-01

241

Factors of accepting pain management decision support systems by nurse anesthetists  

PubMed Central

Background Pain management is a critical but complex issue for the relief of acute pain, particularly for postoperative pain and severe pain in cancer patients. It also plays important roles in promoting quality of care. The introduction of pain management decision support systems (PM-DSS) is considered a potential solution for addressing the complex problems encountered in pain management. This study aims to investigate factors affecting acceptance of PM-DSS from a nurse anesthetist perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data from nurse anesthetists in a case hospital. A total of 113 questionnaires were distributed, and 101 complete copies were returned, indicating a valid response rate of 89.3%. Collected data were analyzed by structure equation modeling using the partial least square tool. Results The results show that perceived information quality (?=.451, p<.001), computer self-efficacy (?=.315, p<.01), and organizational structure (?=.210, p<.05), both significantly impact nurse anesthetists’ perceived usefulness of PM-DSS. Information quality (?=.267, p<.05) significantly impacts nurse anesthetists’ perceptions of PM-DSS ease of use. Furthermore, both perceived ease of use (?=.436, p<.001, R2=.487) and perceived usefulness (?=.443, p<.001, R2=.646) significantly affected nurse anesthetists’ PM-DSS acceptance (R2=.640). Thus, the critical role of information quality in the development of clinical decision support system is demonstrated. Conclusions The findings of this study enable hospital managers to understand the important considerations for nurse anesthetists in accepting PM-DSS, particularly for the issues related to the improvement of information quality, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. In addition, the results also provide useful suggestions for designers and implementers of PM-DSS in improving system development. PMID:23360305

2013-01-01

242

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2012-01-01

243

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2011-01-01

244

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2013-01-01

245

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2014-01-01

246

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2010-01-01

247

Probabilistic simulation for flaw acceptance by dye-penetrant inspection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the problems encountered in assessing the reliability of dye-penetrant nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques in preventing failures due to undetected surface flaws, as well as from flaw acceptance (Fitness-For-Purpose). A Monte Carlo simulation procedure which includes the major variables of the problem is presented as a means of quantifying reliability. Some issues associated with distribution selection are examined. A methodology for selecting the penetrant type and flaw acceptance size for the specific components analyzed using the simulation is proposed. Current methodology limitations are discussed along with possible future effort. Penetrant selection and acceptable sizes of detected flaws are based on a probabilistic assessment of the effect of component and dye-penetrant system variables on structural reliability.

Russell, D. A.; Keremes, J. J.

1990-01-01

248

Why do they go? Empirical evidence of employees' motives for seeking or accepting relocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses one of the shortcomings apparent in previous research on expatriate job-transfers, namely the lack of exploratory, empirical groundwork into the motives of expatriates to seek or accept international assignments. The relocatee population of a large German MNC was surveyed for their motives to seek or accept their transfer, using an open-response format. Responses were content analysed in

Thomas Hippler

2009-01-01

249

An Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy for Individuals With Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to clinical observations and research findings that individuals with generalized anxiety disorder are reactive to their internal experiences, avoid and suppress painful emotions, thoughts, and sensations, and limit their involvement in meaningful activities, an Acceptance Based Behavioral Therapy (ABBT) was developed to specifically target these responses. ABBT incorporates acceptance and mindfulness strategies with more traditional behavior therapy techniques.

Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton; Susan M. Orsillo; Lizabeth Roemer

250

Phosphorylation of Arabidopsis response regulator 7 (ARR7) at the putative phospho-accepting site is required for ARR7 to act as a negative regulator of cytokinin signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cytokinins are plant hormones that regulate diverse aspects of plant growth and development. Arabidopsis cytokinin signal transduction utilizes a multi-step two-component signaling (TCS) system by histidyl–aspartidyl phosphorelays.\\u000a We here show that phosphorylation of ARR7, an A-type response regulator that acts as a negative regulator of cytokinin signaling,\\u000a is required for its function in plants. Phosphorylation of ARR7 is inhibited in

Dong Ju Lee; Sunmi Kim; Young-Min Ha; Jungmook Kim

2008-01-01

251

41 CFR 102-75.1290 - What happens if the landholding agency requesting the property does not promptly accept custody...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...promptly accept custody and accountability? 102-75.1290 Section...promptly accept custody and accountability? (a) The requesting...protection and maintenance responsibilities for the property within...letter assigning custody and accountability for the property....

2010-07-01

252

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue of "ERCMExpress," titled "Coping with the Death of a Student or Staff Member," highlights the range of impact death can have on a school community;…

Schonfeld, David J.

2007-01-01

253

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" is a newsletter that provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue, entitled "Emergency Management Opportunities and Challenges for Non-Public Schools," examines integrating non-public schools into emergency…

Taymans, Mary Frances; McDonald, Dale

2007-01-01

254

Clinical determinants of PACS acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the key determinants influencing how successfully a radiology department can convert from a conventional film-based environment to an exclusively digital imaging environment may be how well referring physician members of the hospital staff who are not radiologists endorse this new system. The benefits of Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) to radiologists are becoming widely accepted and documented; however, physicians who interact with the radiology department represent an important user group whose views on PACS are less well understood. The acceptance of PACS by referring physicians (clinicians) may be critical to the overall utility ofPACS as well as a major drivingforce behind why a hospitalpurchases PACS. The degree to which referring physicians support PACS may be dependent upon many factors. This study identifies several aspects through the administration and analysis ofa survey which improve PACS acceptance by nonradiology physicians. It appears the more patients a referring physician sends to the radiology department, the more time a physician spends traveling to andfrom thefllmflle room retrievingfllms, and, the more interested a referring physician is about computers, the higher his interest is in PACS. If a referring physician believes that PACS will save him or her time, will reduce the incidence oflostfilms, or will cause performance of radiology exams or generation of reports to be more efficient, the referring physician appears more likely to support PACS and to make the initial time investment necessary to learn how PACS equipment operates. The factors which cause referring physicians to support PACS are principally: (1) the elimination oflost, misplaced, and checked outfllms, and (2) the elimination oftrips to and from thefile room. The major distractions ofthe technology are: (1) system reliability, and (2) reduced diagnostic capability. While the high cost ofPACS is also a distraction, it is not the predominant concern.

Saarinen, Allan O.; Youngs, Gayle L.; Haynor, David R.; Loop, John W.

1990-08-01

255

Issue Brief  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This assignment is meant to make students stop and think about an environmental issue that gets to them and do some research on what type of solutions would be appropriate. It also challenges them to go out and research the effectiveness of the solutions to that problem and propose other options. An important part of the assignment is to make students realize that sometimes the best way to solve a problem is to do "nothing." Some solutions, especially those arrived at from consensus, may worsen the problem.

Chirenje, Tait

256

Learner Acceptance of a Multimedia-Based Learning System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study applied the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine the determinants leading to learners' behavioral intention to use a multimedia-based learning system. Four exogenous constructs – multimedia self-efficacy, perceived richness of multimedia presentation, perceived learner control, and perceived system responsiveness – were externally added to the framework to improve its predictive power for the specific behavioral context. In

Doo Young Lee; Dong-Hee Shin

2012-01-01

257

Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is  

E-print Network

Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is required for all advertisements. All advertisements are subject to approval. The University of Chicago Press reserves the right to reject advertising for any reason. The advertiser and/or its advertising agency are entirely responsible for the lawfulness

McReynolds, Ben

258

Radioactive waste acceptance team and generator interface yields successful implementation of waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project has developed a successful Low Level Waste Shipping Program in compliance with the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325, Revision 1. This shipping program is responsible for the successful disposal of more than 4 million cubic feet of Low Level Waste over the past decade. The success of the Fernald Low Level Waste Shipping Program is due to the generator program staff working closely with the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program Team to achieve win/win situations. The teamwork is the direct result of dedicated, proactive professionals working together toward a common objective: the safe disposition of low level radioactive waste. The growth and development of this program has many lessons learned to share with the low level waste generating community. The recognition of reciprocal interests enables consistently high annual volumes of Fernald waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site without incident. The large volumes successfully disposed serve testimony to the success of the program which is equally important to all Nevada Test Site and Fernald stakeholders. The Fernald approach to success is currently being shared with other low-level waste generators through DOE-NV sponsored outreach programs. This paper introduces examples of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation contributions to the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program outreach initiatives. These practices are applicable to other low level waste disposal programs whether federal, commercial, domestic or international.

Rowe, J.G. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Griffin, W.A.; Rast, D.M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01

259

Family Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... their marriage, other children, work, finances, and personal relationships and responsibilities. Parents now have to shift much of their resources ... needs of a child with ASD complicates familial relationships, especially with siblings. However, parents can help their family by informing their other ...

260

Predicting the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems.  

PubMed

The strong prevalence of human error as a crash causation factor in motorcycle accidents calls for countermeasures that help tackling this issue. Advanced rider assistance systems pursue this goal, providing the riders with support and thus contributing to the prevention of crashes. However, the systems can only enhance riding safety if the riders use them. For this reason, acceptance is a decisive aspect to be considered in the development process of such systems. In order to be able to improve behavioural acceptance, the factors that influence the intention to use the system need to be identified. This paper examines the particularities of motorcycle riding and the characteristics of this user group that should be considered when predicting the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems. Founded on theories predicting behavioural intention, the acceptance of technologies and the acceptance of driver support systems, a model on the acceptance of advanced rider assistance systems is proposed, including the perceived safety when riding without support, the interface design and the social norm as determinants of the usage intention. Since actual usage cannot be measured in the development stage of the systems, the willingness to have the system installed on the own motorcycle and the willingness to pay for the system are analyzed, constituting relevant conditions that allow for actual usage at a later stage. Its validation with the results from user tests on four advanced rider assistance systems allows confirming the social norm and the interface design as powerful predictors of the acceptance of ARAS, while the extent of perceived safety when riding without support did not have any predictive value in the present study. PMID:23200440

Huth, Véronique; Gelau, Christhard

2013-01-01

261

Issues in workforce composition analysis  

SciTech Connect

An issue of paramount interest to US industry is the supply and quality of human resources available for this country`s scientific and technological activities. The changing composition of the workforce and the responsibility that an organization has to assure equal opportunity, give rise to various issues. This paper discusses some of the issues associated with the scientific and technical workforce. Specifically, it explores some of the questions pertaining to workforce composition and measures of workforce composition. This paper should be useful to those responsible for personnel policies.

Koeck, D.C.; Rogers, J.D.

1996-05-01

262

Geographic variation in social acceptability of wildland fuels management in the western United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Contemporary natural resource management requires consideration of the social acceptability of management practices and conditions. Agencies wishing to measure, respond to, and influence social acceptability must understand the nuances of public perception regarding controversial issues. This study explores social acceptability judgments about one such issue: reduction of wildland fuel hazards on federal lands in the western United States. Citizens were surveyed in four locations where fire has been a significant ecological disturbance agent and public land agencies propose to reduce wildland fuel levels and wildfire hazards via prescribed burning, thinning, brush removal, and/or livestock grazing. Respondents in different locations differed in their knowledge about fire and fuel issues as well in their acceptability judgments. Differences are associated with location-specific social and environmental factors as well as individual beliefs. Results argue against using a??one-size-fits-alla?? policies or information strategies about fuels management.

Brunson, M.; Schindler, Bruce A.

2004-01-01

263

Pipeline issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

Eisley, Joe T.

1990-01-01

264

The acceptability of railway induced vibration in residential environments.  

PubMed

The aim of the study presented in this paper is to investigate the use of self-reported acceptability for assessing the human response to environmental vibration in residential environments. The human response to environmental stressors such as noise and vibration is often expressed in terms of exposure-response relationships that describe annoyance as a function of the magnitude of the vibration. These relationships are often the basis of noise and vibration policy and the setting of limit values. This paper takes a different approach by expressing exposure-response relationships for vibration in terms of self-reported acceptability. It is argued that exposure-response relationships expressing acceptability as a function of vibration exposure will complement existing relationships for annoyance in future policy decisions regarding environmental vibration. The results presented in this paper are derived from data collected through a large scale (N = 1431) socio-vibration survey conducted in the United Kingdom, the aim of which was to derive exposure-response relationships for vibration in residential environments. The sources of vibration considered are railways and construction. PMID:25235566

Woodcock, James; Peris, Eulalia; Sica, Gennaro; Sharp, Calum; Moorhouse, Andy T; Waddington, David C

2014-04-01

265

Limits of Acceptable Change and Natural Resources Planning: When is LAC Useful, When is it Not?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract—Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) was originally for- mulated to deal with the issue of recreation carrying capacity in wilderness. Enthusiasm for the process has led to questions about its applicability to a broad range of natural resource issues—both within and outside of protected areas. This paper uses a generic version of the LAC process to identify

David N. Cole; Stephen F. McCool

266

Do people with dementia find lies and deception in dementia care acceptable?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Research suggests that the use of lies and deception are prevalent in dementia care settings. This issue has been explored from the view point of carers and professionals, and the acceptability and ethicality of deception in dementia care remains an area of heated debate. This article explored the issue of lies and deception in dementia care from the unique

Anna M. Day; Ian A. James; Thomas D. Meyer; David R. Lee

2011-01-01

267

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01

268

IEEE Trans. Neural Nets special issue on spiking neural computation (2004) in press 1 Abstract--Responses of vestibular primary afferent neurons to  

E-print Network

--Responses of vestibular primary afferent neurons to head rotation exhibit fractional order dynamics. As a consequence estimation, vestibular. I. INTRODUCTION arge neurons in the brains of teleost fish, called Mauthner neurons in the vertebrate vestibular system. We have studied information transmission in rotation- sensitive vestibular

Paulin, Mike

269

State Policies and Procedures and Selected Local Implementation Practices in Response to Intervention in the Six Southeast Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 063  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Response to Intervention has garnered recent interest from policymakers, researchers, and educators. Studies of its effectiveness have found it promising, and state education agencies are increasingly interested in the approach. This report supplies basic information about state planning and implementation of the approach in Alabama, Florida,…

Sawyer, Richard; Holland, Dana; Detgen, Amy

2008-01-01

270

Apollo experience report environmental acceptance testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Environmental acceptance testing was used extensively to screen selected spacecraft hardware for workmanship defects and manufacturing flaws. The minimum acceptance levels and durations and methods for their establishment are described. Component selection and test monitoring, as well as test implementation requirements, are included. Apollo spacecraft environmental acceptance test results are summarized, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

Laubach, C. H. M.

1976-01-01

271

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

2011-01-01

272

Predicting Taxpayers' Acceptance of Online Taxation Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study proposes an extended model to predict users' acceptance of online taxation system for their personal income based on technology acceptance model (TAM) and diffusion of innovation (DOI). The results show that taxpayers' attitudes toward using online taxation are strongly and positively correlated with users' acceptance. The empirical results confirm that perceived ease of use (PEOU), perceived usefulness (PU),

Ching-Wen Chen; Echo Huang

2006-01-01

273

ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" focuses on integrating students with special needs and disabilities into emergency response and crisis management planning. Meeting the needs of students with disabilities and special needs in the event of an emergency does not have to be…

US Department of Education, 2006

2006-01-01

274

ERCMExpress. Volume 1, Issue 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the inaugural issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress," and it focuses on the new technical assistance center. The center will support 243 grantees funded under the Emergency Response and Crisis Management program in managing and implementing their projects, and in sustaining…

US Department of Education, 2005

2005-01-01

275

ACS Industry Group Debates Social Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes ideas of Corporation Associates concerning public clamor over social responsibilities of chemical companies. Concludes that the industry must pay more than lip service to these issues. (CC)

Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

1973-01-01

276

The challenge of existential issues in acute care: nursing considerations for the patient with a new diagnosis of lung cancer.  

PubMed

A new diagnosis of lung cancer is a highly threatening experience that raises personally relevant existential issues and brings death-related thoughts and concerns to mind. Those issues can be very disturbing to patients, leading to distress and potentially to a lowered quality of life. The purpose of this article is to present to the practicing oncology nurse the types of existential and death-related concerns that patients with a new diagnosis of lung cancer may have. In addition, the article identifies practical strategies and resources for oncology nurses who can help patients accept and manage the normal but often distressing responses to a life-threatening diagnosis. PMID:22297019

Lehto, Rebecca H

2012-02-01

277

The revision of RP 91 on criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations.  

PubMed

In 1997 the European Commission published Radiation Protection 91: 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations'. This document specified the minimum criteria for acceptability. It has been used to this effect in legislation, codes of practice and by individual professionals. In a single document, it defined a level of performance at which remedial action was required. The document specified a series of parameters which characterised equipment performance and acceptable levels of performance. In its time it proved to be a useful document which was applied in member states to various degrees. Since the publication of Report 91 in 1997, a series of weaknesses emerged over time. Development of new radiological systems and technologies, as well as improvements in traditional technologies, has created circumstances where the acceptability criteria were in need of review. These weaknesses were recognised by the European Commission and a tender for its revision was issued. The criteria were developed by a team drawn from a broad range of backgrounds including hospitals, industry, government bodies, regulators and standardisation organisations. Representatives were mainly from Europe, but individuals from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and International Atomic Energy Agency were included in the drafting process. This study describes the process employed in developing the revised document and the consultation process involved. One of the major difficulties the revision team encountered was related to an understanding of the actual meaning of the EC Directive. The view taken by the revision team was that Article 8, paragraph 3 places responsibilities on both the holders of radiological equipment and competent authorities. The acceptability criteria have been produced consistent with the European Commission's Medical Exposures Directive, which requires that patient exposures are optimised and justified. PMID:23169813

Faulkner, K; Malone, J F; Christofides, S; Lillicrap, S; Horton, P

2013-02-01

278

Public acceptance of urban rotorcraft operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though tiltrotor operations from city center to city center could greatly shorten travel times over moderate ranges, public opposition to intense urban rotorcraft activity has kept this possibility from being realized. One significant factor in this opposition is rotorcraft noise. Over the last 25 years, NASA has explored the subjective response to rotorcraft noise and developed low noise design concepts and noise abatement flight procedures. While low noise designs can be applied for future rotorcraft, this is not an effective near-term means of reducing rotorcraft noise, because of the costs associated with replacement of helicopter rotor blades. Recent noise abatement research, which has been focusing on the development of tools and techniques to facilitate the design of quieter flight procedures for existing vehicles, has much more immediate application. While very little subjective response work has occurred recently, prior work at NASA in this area from the 1970s and 1980s is discussed. Lastly, thoughts on future research areas that might help improve the public acceptance of rotorcraft will be described.

Marcolini, Michael A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Posey, Joe W.

2001-05-01

279

Getting physicians to accept new information technology: insights from case studies  

PubMed Central

Background The success or failure of a computer information system (CIS) depends on whether physicians accept or resist its implementation. Using case studies, we analyzed the implementation of such systems in 3 hospitals to understand better the dynamics of physicians' resistance to CIS implementation. Methods We selected cases to maximize variation while allowing comparison of CIS implementations. Data were collected from observations, documentation and interviews, the last being the main source of data. Interviewees comprised 15 physicians, 14 nurses and 14 system implementers. Transcripts were produced; 45 segments of the transcripts were coded by several judges, with an appropriate level of intercoder reliability. We conducted within-case and cross-case analyses of the data. Results Initially, most staff were neutral or enthusiastic about the CIS implementations. During implementation, the level of resistance varied and in 2 instances became great enough to lead to major disruptions and system withdrawal. Implementers' responses to physicians' resistance behaviours played a critical role. In one case, the responses were supportive and addressed the issues related to the real object of resistance; the severity of resistance decreased, and the CIS implementation was ultimately successful. In the other 2 cases, the implementers' responses reinforced the resistance behaviours. Three types of responses had such an effect in these cases: implementers' lack of response to resistance behaviours, antagonistic responses, and supportive responses aimed at the wrong object of resistance. Interpretation The 3 cases we analyzed showed the importance of the roles played by implementers and users in determining the outcomes of a CIS implementation. PMID:16717265

Lapointe, Liette; Rivard, Suzanne

2006-01-01

280

130 Theoretical Foundations of a Study Examining Adolescent Literature and Rape Myth Acceptance  

E-print Network

Abstract: Adolescents are at the greatest risk for victimization and perpetration of sexual assault. This paper examines the current trends in literacy education which marginalize aesthetic reading experiences and using reader response theory, and argues that young adult literature may provide an opportunity to reduce rape myth acceptance in adolescents. What makes reading a novel different from other types of adolescent reading experiences? The most accepted aspect of a novel that delineates it from other forms of fictional narrative is length: the novel is longer than other types of narrative such as short stories or novellas which may be read in a single sitting. Furthermore, the plots found in novels generally deal with multiple events, issues and ideas, and is generally too long to be focused on only one incident (Probst, 1988). Thus, a major distinction between the experience involved with a novel and other types of narrative is that reading a novel is a longer and more involved process. Because reading a novel may reduce the time that is available for standardized test practice, the amount of experiences many students have with novels in the classroom is diminishing. Curricula in language arts and English classrooms have been directly influenced by the

Victor Malo-juvera

281

Consumer acceptance of electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this study was to determine guidelines for the enhancement of consumers' perceptions to electric vehicles (EV). The specific objectives were to: expose the population of Potsdam, New York to an electric car, and to demonstrate its functioning; determine the relative importance of the different attributes of the electric car from the viewpoint of the potential consumer; and determine changes in consumers' perceptions after exposure to the car (and accompanying media coverage), as compared with their perceptions before exposure. An electric vehicle was ordered from a Florida firm whose officers absconded taking the vehicle downpayment and not delivering the EV. Subsequently the chief investigator of this project drove a rented EV for 5 months with survey respondents as passengers. The conclusions and recommendations of the study were: exposure to the EV and advertising positively affect its public acceptance; the high price is the most negative feature; energy tax credits would promote EV sales; and the most probable current use for EV's is in utility service fleets. (LCL)

Sethna, B.N.

1982-09-02

282

Rights & Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue guides teachers and students to annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with topics related to rights and responsibilities. Sidebar features discuss animal rights, handling money responsibly, and taking responsibility for the environment. (Contains Three…

Online-Offline, 2000

2000-01-01

283

The clinical pain acceptance Q-sort: A tool for assessment and facilitation of pain acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topic of pain acceptance can be clinically difficult to raise in a respectful way. This article introduces a method of managing the topic of pain acceptance in daily clinical practice: The clinical pain acceptance Q-sort. The Q-sort procedure comprises 13 small cards with printed statements concerning pain acceptance on the one side, score numbers on the other side. The

Peter la Cour

2012-01-01

284

No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity - a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy  

PubMed Central

Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and ?-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20??M) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle – the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern. PMID:24848642

Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

2014-01-01

285

No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity--a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy.  

PubMed

Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and ?-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20??M) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle - the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern. PMID:24848642

Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

2014-01-01

286

Selection of criteria for assessment of occlusal acceptability.  

PubMed

There is no general agreement on criteria that could be applied to distinguish between orthodontically acceptable and non-acceptable occlusions after the completion of dental development. The aim of the present study was to analyse morphological and functional features that could be used as an index to define an acceptable occlusion in young adults. Three expert panels representing specialists in orthodontics and stomatognathic physiology participated in a modified Delphi method. Each panel responded to a questionnaire concerning the usefulness of various occlusal features, and a set of characteristics was selected on the basis of the responses; thereafter, applicability of the chosen characteristics and their cut-offs for an acceptable non-acceptable dichotomy was tested clinically. To obtain a consensus level of 100%, the last panel session was completed with a group discussion. Assessments made using the morphological criteria were compared with those made with the dental health component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. The selected morphological characteristics consisted of overjet, overbite, canine relationship, crossbite, scissors bite and midline deviation. The functional evaluation comprised assessments of discrepancy between the centric relation and the intercuspal position, working- and non-working-side contacts and protrusion contacts. The dental health component and our morphological criteria showed different sensitivity to contact point displacements, interdigitation in buccal segments and increased overbite. This study provides a set of morphological and functional indicators reflecting the current consensus opinion of Finnish professionals. Further studies are needed to analyse the reproducibility of assessment of the characteristics included. PMID:12166910

Svedström-Oristo, Anna-Liisa; Pietilä, Terttu; Pietilä, Ilpo; Helenius, Hans; Peutzfeldt, Pentti; Varrela, Juha

2002-06-01

287

Gender Issues in the Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gender in the workplace: Is it still an issue? Although it is increasingly easier in the early 21st century for women to work, manage, and take positions of high responsibility in American business, some issues and difficulties still remain. This case consists of a series of vignettes that touch on some difficult situations--for both women and men--involving sexual and romantic

R. Freeman; Jenny Mead; Lynn Manthy

288

Parent's Acceptance of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Behavior and Communication Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to examine what parents find as acceptable treatment options for children with behavior problems in a communication disorders population. Parents' acceptability of seven treatment options, including positive reinforcement, time-out, response cost, spanking, overcorrection, differential attention, and medication were…

Boothe, Jennifer L.; Borrego, Joaquin

2004-01-01

289

Specificity and the Cognitive Hierarchy: Value Orientations and the Acceptability of Urban Wildlife Management Actions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article tests theory suggesting cognitions at the same level of specificity have stronger associations than those at different levels. Using data from a survey of Anchorage, AK, residents (n = 971, response rate = 59%), we explored relationships between general wildlife value orientations and (1) the general acceptability of hunting urban wildlife populations, and (2) specific wildlife management actions (e.g., the acceptability of

Doug Whittaker; Jerry J. Vaske; Michael J. Manfredo

2006-01-01

290

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2011-01-01

291

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2010-01-01

292

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2013-01-01

293

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2014-01-01

294

7 CFR 1215.23 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Popcorn Board § 1215.23 Acceptance. Each individual...

2012-01-01

295

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2012-01-01

296

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2013-01-01

297

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2014-01-01

298

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2011-01-01

299

7 CFR 1209.32 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Mushroom Council § 1209.32 Acceptance. Each...

2010-01-01

300

[Acceptance and safety of vaccines].  

PubMed

As a result of decreasing willingness to be vaccinated some diseases, which seemingly had been eradicated, may reappear. One example for this is the increase of measles cases in the United Kingdom since the 1990s after a decrease of immunization rate in response to a subsequently discredited publication suggesting a link between the triple measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and autism. As the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases decreases, vaccine safety dominates personal risk-benefit analysis. To deal with such concerns this review discusses pre- and post-licensing procedures controlling vaccine safety, taking HPV vaccination as well as vaccination against rotavirus as examples. PMID:19353475

Bartz, H; von Knebel-Döberitz, M

2009-04-01

301

Development of athletic injury psychological acceptance scale.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The world of competitive sports has its own unique subculture which at times works towards covering up psychological problems faced by athletes with injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an "Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale (AIPAS)" to screen athletes for serious psychological problems resulting from injury. [Subjects] A total of 189 subjects responded to the survey, of which 168 (mean age= 19.93?years; average number of days unable to participate in sports= 71.84 days, SD = 88.01 days) valid responses were subjected to analysis. [Methods] A provisional version of the AIPAS was created from question items based on face-to-face subject interviews and content validity testing by specialists. In order to test criterion-related validity of the AIPAS, subjects were asked to complete indices that would serve as an external criterion. For this purpose, indices that measure athletic rehabilitation dedication and time perspective were designed. [Results] Item analysis of the provisional AIPAS was conducted to confirm the discrimination of each item. Exploratory factor analysis identified "Self-motivation" and "Focus on the Present" as two factors of the provisional scale. Confirmatory factor analysis supported these results. The Cronbach's alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. Since ?=0.81, the reliability of the scale was confirmed. A significant correlation was found between AIPAS and external indices, indicating criterion-related validity. [Conclusion] AIPAS is a reliable and valid scale composed of two subscales. PMID:24259799

Tatsumi, Tomonori

2013-05-01

302

Development of Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The world of competitive sports has its own unique subculture which at times works towards covering up psychological problems faced by athletes with injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an “Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale (AIPAS)” to screen athletes for serious psychological problems resulting from injury. [Subjects] A total of 189 subjects responded to the survey, of which 168 (mean age= 19.93?years; average number of days unable to participate in sports= 71.84 days, SD = 88.01 days) valid responses were subjected to analysis. [Methods] A provisional version of the AIPAS was created from question items based on face-to-face subject interviews and content validity testing by specialists. In order to test criterion-related validity of the AIPAS, subjects were asked to complete indices that would serve as an external criterion. For this purpose, indices that measure athletic rehabilitation dedication and time perspective were designed. [Results] Item analysis of the provisional AIPAS was conducted to confirm the discrimination of each item. Exploratory factor analysis identified “Self-motivation” and “Focus on the Present” as two factors of the provisional scale. Confirmatory factor analysis supported these results. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. Since ?=0.81, the reliability of the scale was confirmed. A significant correlation was found between AIPAS and external indices, indicating criterion-related validity. [Conclusion] AIPAS is a reliable and valid scale composed of two subscales. PMID:24259799

Tatsumi, Tomonori

2013-01-01

303

Acceptability of HIV self-testing: a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

Background The uptake of HIV testing and counselling services remains low in risk groups around the world. Fear of stigmatisation, discrimination and breach of confidentiality results in low service usage among risk groups. HIV self-testing (HST) is a confidential HIV testing option that enables people to find out their status in the privacy of their homes. We evaluated the acceptability of HST and the benefits and challenges linked to the introduction of HST. Methods A literature review was conducted on the acceptability of HST in projects in which HST was offered to study participants. Besides acceptability rates of HST, accuracy rates of self-testing, referral rates of HIV-positive individuals into medical care, disclosure rates and rates of first-time testers were assessed. In addition, the utilisation rate of a telephone hotline for counselling issues and clients` attitudes towards HST were extracted. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (HST had been offered effectively to study participants and had been administered by participants themselves) and demonstrated universally high acceptability of HST among study populations. Studies included populations from resource poor settings (Kenya and Malawi) and from high-income countries (USA, Spain and Singapore). The majority of study participants were able to perform HST accurately with no or little support from trained staff. Participants appreciated the confidentiality and privacy but felt that the provision of adequate counselling services was inadequate. Conclusions The review demonstrates that HST is an acceptable testing alternative for risk groups and can be performed accurately by the majority of self-testers. Clients especially value the privacy and confidentiality of HST. Linkage to counselling as well as to treatment and care services remain major challenges. PMID:23924387

2013-01-01

304

Predictingthe use of web-based information systems: self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growing reliance on computerized systems and increasing rapidity of the introduction of new technologies, user acceptance of technology continues to be an important issue. Drawingupon recent findings in information systems, human computer interaction, and social psychology, the present research extends the technology acceptance model by incorporatingthe motivation variables of self-efficacy, enjoyment, and learningg oal orientation in order to

Mun Y. Yi

305

What makes people accept a robot in a social environment - discussion from six-week study in an office  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the near future, robots are expected to play active roles in human communities. After this time arrives, robots will need to be socially accepted by the people in the communities to which they belong. However, it remains unknown what issues must be resolved to make robots socially accepted. In this paper, we point out the three criteria with which

Noriaki Mitsunaga; Zenta Miyashita; Kazuhiko Shinozawa; Takahiro Miyashita; Hiroshi Ishiguro; Norihiro Hagita

2008-01-01

306

Effect of expectations and the definition of product category on the acceptance of unfamiliar foods 1 This study was conducted while H. Tuorila worked as a visiting scientist at the US Army Natick RD&E Center with the support of the US Army European Research Office and Academy of Finland (project no. 35438). 1 2 This paper has been processed for the Special Issue by the Editor H. J. H. MacFie. 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expected and actual acceptance of three unfamiliar vs. three familiar foods were examined among US subjects to determine the extent to which positive information about their origin, nutritional properties and flavor, in the presence or absence of product category information, contributed to their acceptance. Subjects (n=160) were divided into the following four conditions: (1) `NOI' Unfamiliar foods, no verbal information;

Hely M Tuorila; Herbert L Meiselman; Armand V Cardello; Larry L Lesher

1998-01-01

307

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2Storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and

F. Schilling; F. Ossing; H. Würdemann

2009-01-01

308

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01

309

New Product Development Under Channel Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

In channel structures characterized by a powerful retailer (e.g., Wal-Mart, Home Depot), the dominant retailer's acceptance of a manufacturer's new product often determines the success of the new offering. Focusing on a manufacturer in such a market, we develop an approach to positioning and pricing a new product that directly incorporates the retailer's acceptance criteria into the development process. Our

Lan Luo; P. K. Kannan; Brian T. Ratchford

2007-01-01

310

Explaining Consumer Acceptance of Online Digital Music  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to explain consumer acceptance of online digital music. The extended technology acceptance model (TAM), incorporated with user's perception of enjoyment and risks and moral intensity, was tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and assessed and modified by structural equation model (SEM). The findings indicate that perceived ease of use is positively related to perceived usefulness and perceived

Chun-Hsiung Liaoa; Chung-Wang Tsou; Yu-Chi Kao

311

Why Do Women Accept the Rape Myth?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rape myth, defined as prejudicial, stereotyped, or false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and rapists, is accepted by individuals from varied walks of life, including women. It has been suggested that rape myth acceptance (RMA) among women serves a protective function by enabling women to dissociate themselves from a rape victim's experience.…

Tabone, Christopher; And Others

312

A Distributive Model of Treatment Acceptability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A model of treatment acceptability is proposed that distributes overall treatment acceptability into three separate categories of influence. The categories are comprised of societal influences, consultant influences, and influences associated with consumers of treatments. Each of these categories are defined and their inter-relationships within…

Carter, Stacy L.

2008-01-01

313

Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.  

PubMed

Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development. PMID:22416723

Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

2011-01-01

314

The acceptability of ending a patient's life  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To clarify how lay people and health professionals judge the acceptability of ending the life of a terminally ill patient. Design: Participants judged this acceptability in a set of 16 scenarios that combined four factors: the identity of the actor (patient or physician), the patient's statement or not of a desire to have his life ended, the nature of the action as relatively active (injecting a toxin) or passive (disconnecting life support), and the type of suffering (intractable physical pain, complete dependence, or severe psychiatric illness). Participants: 115 lay people and 72 health professionals (22 nurse's aides, 44 nurses, six physicians) in Toulouse, France. Main measurements: Mean acceptability ratings for each scenario for each group. Results: Life ending interventions are more acceptable to lay people than to the health professionals. For both, acceptability is highest for intractable physical suffering; is higher when patients end their own lives than when physicians do so; and, when physicians are the actors, is higher when patients have expressed a desire to die (voluntary euthanasia) than when they have not (involuntary euthanasia). In contrast, when patients perform the action, acceptability for the lay people and nurse's aides does not depend on whether the patient has expressed a desire to die, while for the nurses and physicians unassisted suicide is more acceptable than physician assisted suicide. Conclusions: Lay participants judge the acceptability of life ending actions in largely the same way as do healthcare professionals. PMID:15923476

Guedj, M; Gibert, M; Maudet, A; Munoz, S; Mullet, E; Sorum, P

2005-01-01

315

Safety and Public Acceptance of Transgenic Products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public acceptance of transgenic (genetically engineered, GE) prod- ucts is influenced by the perception of direct or indirect risks and benefits and the credibility of regulatory agencies that evaluate food and environmental safety. In North America acceptance of GE foods is holding steady, while knowledge about them remains low. Develop- ment of transgenic foods with improved nutritional properties or other

Patrick F. Byrne

2006-01-01

316

Heavy Metal, Religiosity, and Suicide Acceptability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on data taken from the General Social Survey that found a link between "heavy metal" rock fanship and suicide acceptability. Finds that relationship becomes nonsignificant once level of religiosity is controlled. Heavy metal fans are low in religiosity, which contributes to greater suicide acceptability. (Author/JDM)

Stack, Steven

1998-01-01

317

Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT  

E-print Network

Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT doi: 10.3906/yer-0910-44 Growth Rate. Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences [Turkish J. Earth Sci.] (2011) [in press]. This PDF file is an early version of a manucript accepted for publication in Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences

Metscher, Brian

318

Hanford Site liquid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the waste acceptance criteria for liquid waste managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). These waste acceptance criteria address the various requirements to operate a facility in compliance with applicable environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This document also addresses the sitewide miscellaneous streams program.

LUECK, K.J.

1999-09-11

319

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Fold interaction and wavelength selection  

E-print Network

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models with analytical and numerical methods. New multilayer-folding domains can be distinguished. Wavelength and growthrate scaling laws and domain-limit equations are derived. Wavelength in 2D and 3D numerical simulations

Kaus, Boris

320

What makes a contraceptive acceptable?  

PubMed

The women's health movement is developing an increasing number of negative campaigns against various contraceptive methods based on three assumptions: 1) user-controlled methods are better for women than provider-controlled methods, 2) long-acting methods are undesirable because of their susceptibility to abuse, and 3) systemic methods carry unacceptable health risks to women. While these objections have sparked helpful debate, criticizing an overreliance on such methods is one thing and calling for bans on the provision of injectables and implants and on the development of vaccine contraceptives is another. Examination of the terms "provider-controlled," "user-controlled," and "long-acting" reveals that their definitions are not as clear-cut as opponents would have us believe. Some women's health advocates find the methods that are long-acting and provider-controlled to be the most problematic. They also criticize the near 100% contraceptive effectiveness of the long-acting methods despite the fact that the goal of contraception is to prevent pregnancy. It is wrong to condemn these methods because of their link to population control policies of the 1960s, and it is important to understand that long-acting, effective methods are often beneficial to women who require contraception for 20-22 years of their lives. Arguments against systemic methods (including RU-486 for early abortion and contraceptive vaccines) rebound around issues of safety. Feminists have gone so far as to create an intolerable situation by publishing books that criticize these methods based on erroneous conclusions and faulty scientific analysis. While women's health advocates have always rightly called for bans on abuse of various methods, they have not extended this ban to the methods themselves. In settings where other methods are not available, bans can lead to harm or maternal deaths. Another perspective can be used to consider methods in terms of their relationship with the user (repeated application). While feminists have called for more barrier and natural methods, most people in the world today refuse to use condoms even though they are the best protection from infection. Instead science should pursue promising new methods as well as continue to improve existing methods and to fill important gaps. Feminists should be advocates for women and their diverse needs rather than advocates against specific contraceptive methods. PMID:12179713

Berer, M

1995-01-01

321

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21

322

Effect of Suppression, Reappraisal, and Acceptance of Emotional Pictures on Acoustic Eye-Blink Startle Magnitude  

PubMed Central

To examine the effects of different emotion regulation strategies on acoustic eye-blink startle, 65 participants viewed positive, neutral, and negative pictures and were instructed to suppress, reappraise, or accept their emotional responses to these pictures using a within-group experimental design with separate blocks of pictures for each strategy. Instructions to suppress the emotional response led to an attenuation of the eye-blink startle magnitude, in comparison with instructions to reappraise or accept. Reappraisal and acceptance instructions did not differ from one another in their effect on startle. These results are discussed within the context of the existing empirical literature on emotion regulation. PMID:24551448

Asnaani, Anu; Sawyer, Alice T.; Aderka, Idan M.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

2012-01-01

323

Payment generosity and physician acceptance of Medicare and Medicaid patients.  

PubMed

Using 2008 physician survey data, we estimate the relationship between the generosity of fees paid to primary care physicians under Medicaid and Medicare and his/her willingness to accept new patients covered by Medicaid, Medicare, or both programs (i.e., dually enrolled patients). Findings reveal physicians are highly responsive to fee generosity under both programs. Also, their willingness to accept patients under either program is affected by the generosity of fees under the other program, i.e., there are significant spillover effects between Medicare and Medicare fee generosity. We also simulate how physicians in 2008 would have likely responded to Medicaid and Medicare payment reforms similar to those embodied in the 2010 Affordable Care Act, had they been permanently in place in 2008. Our findings suggest that "Medicaid Parity" for primary care physicians would have likely dramatically improved physician willingness to accept new Medicaid patients while only slightly reducing their willingness to accept new Medicare patients. Also, many more primary care physicians would have been willing to treat dually enrolled patients. PMID:25005072

Brunt, Christopher S; Jensen, Gail A

2014-12-01

324

Flight Crew Workload, Acceptability, and Performance When Using Data Comm in a High-Density Terminal Area Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes a collaborative FAA/NASA experiment using 22 commercial airline pilots to determine the effect of using Data Comm to issue messages during busy, terminal area operations. Four conditions were defined that span current day to future flight deck equipage: Voice communication only, Data Comm only, Data Comm with Moving Map Display, and Data Comm with Moving Map displaying taxi route. Each condition was used in an arrival and a departure scenario at Boston Logan Airport. Of particular interest was the flight crew response to D-TAXI, the use of Data Comm by Air Traffic Control (ATC) to send taxi instructions. Quantitative data was collected on subject reaction time, flight technical error, operational errors, and eye tracking information. Questionnaires collected subjective feedback on workload, situation awareness, and acceptability to the flight crew for using Data Comm in a busy terminal area. Results showed that 95% of the Data Comm messages were responded to by the flight crew within one minute and 97% of the messages within two minutes. However, post experiment debrief comments revealed almost unanimous consensus that two minutes was a reasonable expectation for crew response. Flight crews reported that Expected D-TAXI messages were useful, and employment of these messages acceptable at all altitude bands evaluated during arrival scenarios. Results also indicate that the use of Data Comm for all evaluated message types in the terminal area was acceptable during surface operations, and during arrivals at any altitude above the Final Approach Fix, in terms of response time, workload, situation awareness, and flight technical performance. The flight crew reported the use of Data Comm as implemented in this experiment as unacceptable in two instances: in clearances to cross an active runway, and D-TAXI messages between the Final Approach Fix and 80 knots during landing roll. Critical cockpit tasks and the urgency of out-the window scan made the additional head down time to respond to Data Comm messages undesirable during these events. However, most crews also stated that Data Comm messages without an accompanying audio chime and no expectation of an immediate response could be acceptable even during these events.

Norman, R. Michael; Baxley, Brian T.; Adams, Cathy A.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Latorella, Kara A.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

2013-01-01

325

Issues and potential program on denatured fuel utilization. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was performed to review the issues involved in implementing an alternative fuel cycle that may contribute to reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. The objectives of this report are to discuss the political, technical, and economic issues that will affect the acceptance and use of the denatured fuel cycle and to identify a possible program plan typical

S. E. Turner; W. L. Partain

1978-01-01

326

Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance  

PubMed Central

Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence. PMID:19337456

D'Amico, Domenico; Tepper, Stewart J

2008-01-01

327

Menopause: Salient Issues for Counselors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses issues surrounding menopause, with the idea that counselors are in an ideal position to help change attitudes toward viewing menopause as a time of positive change rather than a time of psychological distress. Reviews historical, sociological, psychological, and attitudinal factors that account for negative responses associated with…

Patterson, Marilyn M.; Lynch, Ann Q.

1988-01-01

328

Assistive Technology: Issues and Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses current issues regarding assistive technology devices and services, especially in relation to the roles and responsibilities of the rehabilitation psychologist. Following an introductory section which defines an assistive technology device and an assistive technology service, the following sections discuss: (1) past…

Scherer, Marcia J.

329

ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" introduces the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF), a free public service that provides information on planning, designing, funding, building, improving and maintaining safe, healthy, high-performance schools. NCEF is…

US Department of Education, 2006

2006-01-01

330

Exercise: Issues for prescribing psychologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exercise has been associated with many psychological and physiological benefits. Increasing numbers of psychologists wish to prescribe exercise for their clients. The article warns that to do so requires special training. The author reviews the issues involved in exercise prescription: benefits and risks, nonadherence, exercise ignorance, safety, professional domain violations, ethical responsibility, and legal liability. The review concludes with recommendations

Mary Clearing-sky

1988-01-01

331

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ECRM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter "ERCMExpress" provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. Many nontraditional schools across the United States, such as storefront schools, rural schools, and alternative education facilities, face challenges in…

Taylor, Matt

2007-01-01

332

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. Memorials are deeply rooted in our culture and remind us of a person who has died or an event in which people died, and they provide a place for people to…

Paine, Cathy

2007-01-01

333

ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of ERCMExpress presents the topic "Schools Respond to Infectious Disease." Every year, schools confront a range of infectious diseases such as chicken pox, lice, ringworm and seasonal influenza. In response, faculty and staff work together to control the outbreak, quell fears and dispel rumors. For example, school administrators may…

US Department of Education, 2006

2006-01-01

334

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01

335

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17

336

Approaches to acceptable risk: a critical guide  

SciTech Connect

Acceptable-risk decisions are an essential step in the management of technological hazards. In many situations, they constitute the weak (or missing) link in the management process. The absence of an adequate decision-making methodology often produces indecision, inconsistency, and dissatisfaction. The result is neither good for hazard management nor good for society. This report offers a critical analysis of the viability of various approaches as guides to acceptable-risk decisions. This report seeks to define acceptable-risk decisions and to examine some frequently proposed, but inappropriate, solutions. 255 refs., 22 figs., 25 tabs.

Fischhoff, B.; Lichtenstein, S.; Slovic, P.; Keeney, R.; Derby, S.

1980-12-01

337

Modeling gap acceptance at freeway merges  

E-print Network

This thesis develops a merging model that captures the gap acceptance behavior of drivers that merge from a ramp into a congested freeway. Merging can be classified into three types: normal, forced and cooperative lane ...

Lee, Gunwoo

2006-01-01

338

Accepted for NIPS 2001 Motivated Reinforcement Learning  

E-print Network

Accepted for NIPS 2001 Motivated Reinforcement Learning Peter Dayan Gatsby Computational reinforcement learning view of the involvement of neuromodulatory systems in instrumental conditioning in- cludes a rather straightforward conception of motivation as prediction of sum future reward. Competition

Dayan, Peter

339

What Are Acceptable Limits of Radiation?  

NASA Video Gallery

Brad Gersey, lead research scientist at the Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration, or CRESSE, at Prairie View A&M University, describes the legal and acceptable limits ...

340

48 CFR 1311.103 - Market acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 1311.103 Market acceptance. The designee authorized as the head of the agency is set forth in CAM...

2011-10-01

341

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any person selected as a committee...

2010-01-01

342

Investigation of Variables Associated with Vaccine Acceptance  

E-print Network

Abstract The current study investigated the relationship between the Health Belief Model (HBM) framework, social variables, personality factors, and H1N1 flu vaccine acceptance. Four hundred thirty two undergraduate students completed online...

Black, Lora L.

2011-12-31

343

7 CFR 966.29 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Committee § 966.29 Acceptance. Any person selected as a...

2012-01-01

344

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11

345

WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-02-17

346

Generic criticality safety issues  

SciTech Connect

An independent group has been designated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (MMES) to internally review Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs) that describe containers for shipment of radioactive material. This group is called the Energy Systems Independent Review Group (ESIRG), reporting to the MMES Transportation Safety Manager as part of a central staff function. The ESIRG focus is Y-12 Plant packages, with additional review responsibilities for the Paducah Tiger UF{sub 6} overpack and 6M package. Review questions are posed directly to the SARP preparers. This paper addresses three generic issues that arose during the ESIRG criticality reviews: analysis tools, uncertainties in results, and resulting (finite) probability of criticality. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Hively, L.M.

1991-01-01

347

Methylmercury risk assessment issues  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

Lipfert, F.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Saroff, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-07-01

348

1 CFR 21.41 - Agency responsibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Citations of Authority § 21.41 Agency responsibility. (a) Each issuing agency is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the citations of authority in the documents it issues. (b) Each issuing agency shall formally amend...

2012-01-01

349

1 CFR 21.41 - Agency responsibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Citations of Authority § 21.41 Agency responsibility. (a) Each issuing agency is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the citations of authority in the documents it issues. (b) Each issuing agency shall formally amend...

2011-01-01

350

1 CFR 21.41 - Agency responsibility.  

...Citations of Authority § 21.41 Agency responsibility. (a) Each issuing agency is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the citations of authority in the documents it issues. (b) Each issuing agency shall formally amend...

2014-01-01

351

1 CFR 21.41 - Agency responsibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Citations of Authority § 21.41 Agency responsibility. (a) Each issuing agency is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the citations of authority in the documents it issues. (b) Each issuing agency shall formally amend...

2010-01-01

352

1 CFR 21.41 - Agency responsibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Citations of Authority § 21.41 Agency responsibility. (a) Each issuing agency is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the citations of authority in the documents it issues. (b) Each issuing agency shall formally amend...

2013-01-01

353

Acceptable Operating Force for Buttons on In-Ear Type Headphones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The touch headphones are a solution for providing playback and volume controls on in-ear type headphones. One of the issues with placing controls on earpieces is that applied pressure is transferred to the inner ear, which potentially creates discomfort. The experiment described in this short paper shows that conventional button switches are not well accepted. Users preferred to operate a

Vincent Buil; Gerard Hollemans

2005-01-01

354

Trust in governance and the acceptance of genetically modified food in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assumes that trust is a major issue in the interaction between government, citizens and societal organizations. The central question in this paper relates to the specific determinants of public trust. A survey study is reported (n = 1019) which focuses on the role of trust in the acceptance of genetically modified (GM) food. Our expectation was that three

Jan Gutteling; Lucien Hanssen; Veer van der Neil; Erwin Seydel

2006-01-01

355

Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

2013-01-01

356

An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

2008-01-01

357

Early Intervention and Treatment Acceptability: Multiple Perspectives for Improving Service Delivery in Home Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines issues related to treatment acceptability in early intervention programs, by applying concepts pertaining to collaboration, cultural difference, compliance and freedom of choice, family life cycles, and systems theory. A paradigm for designing home-based intervention plans with families of preschoolers with behavior disorders…

Paget, Kathleen D.

1991-01-01

358

Current IT Issues, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

2004-01-01

359

[Acceptance and mindfulness-based cognitive-behavioral therapies].  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the main approaches in psychotherapy. It teaches the patient to examine the link between dysfunctional thoughts and maladaptive behaviors and to re- evaluate the cognitive biases involved in the maintenance of symptoms by using strategies such as guided discovery. CBT is constantly evolving in part to improve its' effectiveness and accessibility. Thus in the last decade, increasingly popular approaches based on mindfulness and acceptance have emerged. These therapies do not attempt to modify cognitions even when they are biased and dysfunctional but rather seek a change in the relationship between the individual and the symptoms. This article aims to present the historical context that has allowed the emergence of this trend, the points of convergence and divergence with traditional CBT as well as a brief presentation of the different therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. Hayes (2004) described three successive waves in behavior therapy, each characterized by "dominant assumptions, methods and goals": traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. The latter consider that human suffering occurs when the individual lives a restricted life in order avoid pain and immediate discomfort to the detriment of his global wellbeing. These therapies combine mindfulness, experiential, acceptance strategies with traditional behavior principles in order to attain lasting results. There are significant points of convergence between traditional CBT and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. They are both empirically validated, based upon a theoretical model postulating that avoidance is key in the maintenance of psychopathology and they recommend an approach strategy in order to overcome the identified problem. They both use behavioral techniques in the context of a collaborative relationship in order to identify precise problems and to achieve specific goals. They focus on the present moment rather than on historical causes. However, they also present significant differences: control vs acceptance of thoughts, focus on cognition vs behavior, focus on the relationship between the individual and his thoughts vs cognitive content, goal of modifying dysfunctional beliefs vs metacognitive processes, use of experiential vs didactic methods, focus on symptoms vs quality of life, strategies used before vs after the unfolding of full emotional response. The main interventions based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance are: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Therapy, the expanded model of Behavioral Activation, Metacognitive Therapy, Mindfulness based Cognitive Therapy, Dialectic Behavior Therapy, Integrative Behavioral Couples Therapy and Compassionate Mind Training. These are described in this article. They offer concepts and techniques which might enhance therapeutic efficacy. They teach a new way to deploy attention and to enter into a relationship with current experience (for example, defusion) in order to diminish cognitive reactivity, a maintenance factor for psychopathology, and to enhance psychological flexibility. The focus on cognitive process, metacognition as well as cognitive content might yield additional benefits in therapy. It is possible to combine traditional CBT with third wave approaches by using psychoeducation and cognitive restructuring in the beginning phases of therapy in order to establish thought bias and to then encourage acceptance of internal experiences as well as exposure to feared stimuli rather than to continue to use cognitive restructuring techniques. Traditional CBT and third wave approaches seem to impact different processes: the former enhance the capacity to observe and describe experiences and the latter diminish experiential avoidance and increase conscious action as well as acceptance. The identification of personal values helps to motivate the individual to undertake actions required in order to enhance quality of life. In

Ngô, Thanh-Lan

2013-01-01

360

Issues in Ecology, Issue 14 Press Release  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This November 2011 press release can be used as an accessible reading assignment to accompany and introduce a discussion of the ecological concepts included in issue #14 of ESA's Issues in Ecology series, "Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore ecosystem health."

Lester, Liza

2012-03-07

361

Dose–response models: how might we think about linearity and nonlinearity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We add to the issues raised by Dr David Ropeik’s article Risk Communication and Non-Linearity (forthcoming, BELLE Newsletter, 2008) regarding the thinking about the acceptance of linear and nonlinear (hormetic) dose–response models. We summarize some of the perceptual aspects discussed by Ropeik (2008) and comment on decision-making by the single decision-maker. It seems that the heuristics discussed by Ropeik (2008)

PF Ricci

2009-01-01

362

Defining "Acceptable Risk" for Earthquakes Worldwide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The greatest and most rapidly growing earthquake risk for mortality is in developing countries. Further, earthquake risk management actions of the last 50 years have reduced the average lethality of earthquakes in earthquake-threatened industrialized countries. (This is separate from the trend of the increasing fiscal cost of earthquakes there.) Despite these clear trends, every new earthquake in developing countries is described in the media as a "wake up" call, announcing the risk these countries face. GeoHazards International (GHI) works at both the community and the policy levels to try to reduce earthquake risk. GHI reduces death and injury by helping vulnerable communities recognize their risk and the methods to manage it, by raising awareness of its risk, building local institutions to manage that risk, and strengthening schools to protect and train the community's future generations. At the policy level, GHI, in collaboration with research partners, is examining whether "acceptance" of these large risks by people in these countries and by international aid and development organizations explains the lack of activity in reducing these risks. The goal of this pilot project - The Global Earthquake Safety Initiative (GESI) - is to develop and evaluate a means of measuring the risk and the effectiveness of risk mitigation actions in the world's largest, most vulnerable cities: in short, to develop an earthquake risk index. One application of this index is to compare the risk and the risk mitigation effort of "comparable" cities. By this means, Lima, for example, can compare the risk of its citizens dying due to earthquakes with the risk of citizens in Santiago and Guayaquil. The authorities of Delhi and Islamabad can compare the relative risk from earthquakes of their school children. This index can be used to measure the effectiveness of alternate mitigation projects, to set goals for mitigation projects, and to plot progress meeting those goals. The preliminary results suggest that the comparisons of the participating cities are easily understood, and defensible. The evaluation of the sources of El Salvador's risk, made before the January 13th earthquake, pointed to the vulnerability made visible by the earthquake: earthquake-induced landslides, and difficulties with emergency response.

Tucker, B.

2001-05-01

363

Defining Acceptable Levels for Ecological Indicators: An Approach for Considering Social Values  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components.

Smyth, Robyn L.; Watzin, Mary C.; Manning, Robert E.

2007-03-01

364

Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Workplace Safety & Health Topics NIOSH Share Compartir Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work America's work ... parenting responsibilities. 1 Work-related health challenges facing women Women face different workplace health challenges than men. ...

365

Alcohol on Campus: Three Current Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers views on three issues important to campus alcohol policy: (1) teaching responsible drinking; (2) operating campus pubs; and (3) raising the legal drinking age. Asserts that carefully considered decisions are needed to help establish normative behavior. (Author/NB)

Fulton, Donald R.; Spooner, Sue E.

1987-01-01

366

Social Perception of Rape: How Rape Myth Acceptance Modulates the Influence of Situational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the role of rape myth acceptance (RMA) and situational factors in the perception of three different rape scenarios (date rape, marital rape, and stranger rape). One hundred and eighty-two psychology undergraduates were asked to emit four judgements about each rape situation: victim responsibility, perpetrator responsibility,…

Frese, Bettina; Moya, Miguel; Megias, Jesus

2004-01-01

367

Ethical and Malpractice Issues in Hospital Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical and malpractice issues arising in hospital practice are reviewed. Topics include (a) preparation and authorization to carry out clinical responsibilities, (b) personnel procedures, (c) financial and political forces influencing hospital policies, (d) billing procedures, (e) clinical procedures for responding to patients’ needs, (f) confidentiality, (g) discrimination, (h) internship and training issues, (i) sexual abuse of patients, and (j) staff

Kenneth S. Pope

1990-01-01

368

Certification Issues for Some Common Aquaculture Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is interest in certification of aquaculture production facilities in response to concerns about negative environmental and social impacts and food safety. This study identifies issues to be considered by stakeholders in developing certification standards for channel catfish, tilapias, rainbow trout, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, and seaweed. Common issues include land and water use, water pollution, benthic effects, effects

Claude E. Boyd; Aaron A. McNevin; Jason Clay; Howard M. Johnson

2005-01-01

369

Introducing ethical issues into the curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ACM SIGITE Curriculum Committee 2005 has recently published recommendations paying significant attention to the coverage of societal and ethical issues and professional responsibility. It is expected that a growing number of IT departments and schools will seek to address these curricular issues. This panel will examine a variety of approaches to integrating ethics across the IT curriculum, the development

Florence Appel; Keith Miller; Michael Quinn

2006-01-01

370

CTE's Role in Worker Retraining. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Issue Brief will explore the essential role that career and technical education programs play in addressing many of the issues faced by unemployed and underemployed workers. These programs target the adult learner through short-term and accelerated courses; utilize flexible learning approaches to account for students' other responsibilities;…

Association for Career and Technical Education (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

371

Animal Experimentation: Issues for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the extent to which issues related to animal experimentation are in conflict and proposes choices that might least comprise them. These issues include animal well-being, human well-being, self-interest of science, scientific validity and responsibility, progress in biomedical and behavioral science, and the future quality of medical care.…

Zola, Judith C.; And Others

1984-01-01

372

Illicit drugs, testing, prevention and work in France: ethical and legal issues.  

PubMed

The use of illicit drugs in the workplace raises issues pertaining to prevention and safety and the responsibility of the various members of staff. It also brings into question the interface between work and private life. If employees are in theory responsible for their own safety and risk heavy penalties in the event of the consumption of illicit drugs in the workplace, such behaviour has to be proved. In reality, the worker can only be partially and marginally held liable, given the fact that the employer is prohibited from infringing on their rights and liberties (restrictions on the searching of their personal belongings and lockers as well as on the carrying out of breath testing and saliva testing under restrictive conditions). Employers have for their part a broader range of responsibilities and, above all, an absolute obligation to achieve specific goals in terms of health and safety resulting in the need to take action. In accordance with the International Labour Organization recommendations, European and national legislation, the employer has to implement a suitable preventive policy. However, where is the balance between prevention and repression? Very few studies have raised these issues and our aim is to precisely situate the place of drug testing in the employer's repressive arsenal in France and to try to answer the legal and ethical issues raised. Thus, for example, repression can only be acceptable when it deals with moderate and non-addicted users, or it could be tantamount to discrimination. PMID:22145557

Fantoni-Quinton, Sophie; Bossu, Bernard; Morgenroth, Thomas; Frimat, Paul

2010-09-01

373

ISLA: An Isochronous Spectrometer with Large Acceptances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel type of recoil mass spectrometer and separator is proposed for the future secondary radioactive beams of the ReA12 accelerator at NSCL/FRIB, inspired from the TOFI spectrometer developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for online mass measurements. The Isochronous Spectrometer with Large Acceptances (ISLA) is able to achieve superior characteristics without the compromises that usually plague the design of large acceptance spectrometers. ISLA can provide mass-to-charge ratio (m/q) measurements to better than 1 part in 1000 by using an optically isochronous time-of-flight independent of the momentum vector of the recoiling ions, despite large acceptances of 20% in momentum and 64 msr in solid angle. The characteristics of this unique design are shown, including requirements for auxiliary detectors around the target and the various types of reactions to be used with the re-accelerated radioactive beams of the future ReA12 accelerator.

Bazin, D.; Mittig, W.

2013-12-01

374

Space Station Engineering Design Issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Station Freedom topics addressed include: general design issues; issues related to utilization and operations; issues related to systems requirements and design; and management issues relevant to design.

Mcruer, Duane T.; Boehm, Barry W.; Debra, Daniel B.; Green, C. Cordell; Henry, Richard C.; Maycock, Paul D.; Mcelroy, John H.; Pierce, Chester M.; Stafford, Thomas P.; Young, Laurence R.

1989-01-01

375

The role of rape myth acceptance in the social norms regarding sexual behavior among college students.  

PubMed

This study examined the antecedents for the acceptance of rape myths. The information motivation behavioral skills model was the basis for this study. In this cross-sectional study at a northeastern university, 237 students consented to participate in an online survey examining knowledge, social norms regarding sexual behavior, future time perspective, and rape myth acceptance (RMA). The majority of the sample was female. Forty-one percent believed that a woman who was raped while drunk was responsible. Men had higher RMA and the less sexual knowledge they had, the more they accepted the rape myths. Direction is provided regarding primary prevention of sexual assault. PMID:22857406

Aronowitz, Teri; Lambert, Cheryl Ann; Davidoff, Sara

2012-01-01

376

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01

377

Acceptance Rates in Multigrid Monte Carlo  

E-print Network

An approximation formula is derived for acceptance rates of nonlocal Metropolis updates in simulations of lattice field theories. The predictions of the formula agree quite well with Monte Carlo simulations of 2-dimensional Sine Gordon, XY and phi**4 models. The results are consistent with the following rule: For a critical model with a fundamental Hamiltonian H(phi) sufficiently high acceptance rates for a complete elimination of critical slowing down can only be expected if the expansion of in terms of the shift psi contains no relevant term (mass term).

M. Grabenstein; K. Pinn

1992-04-30

378

Resource quality or competition: why increase resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics?  

PubMed Central

Some animal species increase resource acceptance rates in the presence of conspecifics. Such responses may be adaptive if the presence of conspecifics is a reliable indicator of resource quality. Similarly, these responses could represent an adaptive reduction in choosiness under high levels of scramble competition. Although high resource quality and high levels of scramble competition should both favor increased resource acceptance, the contexts in which the increase occurs should differ. In this paper, we tested the effect of social environment on egg-laying and aggressive behavior in the walnut fly, Rhagoletis juglandis, in multiple contexts to determine whether increased resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics was better viewed as a response to increased host quality or increased competition. We found that grouped females oviposit more readily than isolated females when provided small (low-quality) artificial hosts but not when provided large (high-quality) artificial hosts, indicating that conspecific presence reduces choosiness. Increased resource acceptance was observed even when exposure to conspecifics was temporally or spatially separate from exposure to the resource. Finally, we found that individuals showed reduced aggression after being housed in groups, as expected under high levels of scramble competition. These results indicate that the pattern of resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics may be better viewed as a response to increased scramble competition rather than as a response to public information about resource quality. PMID:22479135

Nufio, Cesar R.; Papaj, Daniel R.

2011-01-01

379

How to Handle Anxiety: The Effects of Reappraisal, Acceptance, and Suppression Strategies on Anxious Arousal  

PubMed Central

It has been suggested that reappraisal strategies are more effective than suppression strategies for regulating emotions. Recently, proponents of the acceptance-based behavior therapy movement have further emphasized the importance of acceptance-based emotion regulation techniques. In order to directly compare these different emotion regulation strategies, 202 volunteers were asked to give an impromptu speech in front of a video camera. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. The Reappraisal group was instructed to regulate their anxious arousal by reappraising the situation; the Suppression group was asked to suppress their anxious behaviors; and the Acceptance group was instructed to accept their anxiety. As expected, the Suppression group showed a greater increase in heart rate from baseline than the Reappraisal and Acceptance groups. Moreover, the Suppression group reported more anxiety than the Reappraisal group. However, the Acceptance and Suppression groups did not differ in their subjective anxiety response. These results suggest that both reappraising and accepting anxiety is more effective for moderating the physiological arousal than suppressing anxiety. However, reappraising is more effective for moderating the subjective feeling of anxiety than attempts to suppress or accept it. PMID:19281966

Hofmann, Stefan G.; Heering, Sanna; Sawyer, Alice T.; Asnaani, Anu

2009-01-01

380

Disability and stigma: how Japanese educators help parents accept their children's differences.  

PubMed

In this report, part of a larger ethnographic study, the authors examined the support Japanese elementary school educators provide to parents of children with relatively mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and high-functioning autism. Conditions that affect children's learning and behaviors are widespread, but cultures vary in responses to children with such difficulties and their families. In many cultures, disability remains a sensitive issue due to lingering stigma. Japan's recent implementation of special education services for children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities provided a unique context in which to examine otherwise taken-for-granted beliefs and practices related to disability. Participant observations in a Japanese elementary school and individual interviews with educators and parents suggest that parents' sensitivity to other people's "eyes," or stigma, can be an obstacle to their acceptance of their children's need for special education, permission for their children to receive services, and collaboration with educators. Educators supported parents through a steadfast focus on emotional support, communication, relationship building, and partnerships. Japanese practices and adults' reflections on stigma provide a broader context for international, school, and other social workers to reflect on their own beliefs and practices with families of children with disabilities. PMID:24640228

Kayama, Misa; Haight, Wendy

2014-01-01

381

Intimate Partner Acceptance, Parental Acceptance in Childhood, and Psychological Adjustment Among Turkish Adults in Ongoing Attachment Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing stimulus from a central postulate in parental acceptance-rejection theory, this study explored relations among perceived partner acceptance, remembrances of parental (maternal and paternal) acceptance in childhood, and the psychological adjustment of 681 Turkish adults in ongoing attachment relationships. Five self-report questionnaires were used to assess adults' perceptions of partner acceptance, remembrances of parental acceptance in childhood, and adults' psychological

Azmi Varan; Ronald P. Rohner; Gül Eryuksel

2008-01-01

382

48 CFR 570.402-5 - Potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Potential acceptable locations. 570.402-5...Space Requirements 570.402-5 Potential acceptable locations. If the contracting officer identifies potential acceptable locations through...

2011-10-01

383

48 CFR 570.402-5 - Potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Potential acceptable locations. 570.402-5...Continued Space Requirements 570.402-5 Potential acceptable locations. If you identify potential acceptable locations through the...

2010-10-01

384

48 CFR 570.402-4 - No potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false No potential acceptable locations. 570.402-4...Requirements 570.402-4 No potential acceptable locations. If the...contracting officer does not identify any potential acceptable locations...

2011-10-01

385

48 CFR 570.402-4 - No potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No potential acceptable locations. 570.402-4...Space Requirements 570.402-4 No potential acceptable locations. If you do not identify any potential acceptable locations through the...

2010-10-01

386

2013 UCI Applicants/Acceptances to Medical School Institution Applied Accepted BCPM CUM VR PS BS  

E-print Network

Uniformed Service University of Health Sci. 50 2 University of Alabama School of Medicine 42 2 University2013 UCI Applicants/Acceptances to Medical School Institution Applied Accepted BCPM CUM VR PS BS Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 312 7 3.89 3.88 10.3 12.5 11.6 34.5 Saint Louis University School

Rose, Michael R.

387

Adding positive reinforcement in justice settings: Acceptability and feasibility  

PubMed Central

Although contingency management (CM) approaches are among the most promising methods for initiating drug abstinence (S. T. Higgins, S. M. Alessi, & R. L. Dantona, 2002; S. T. Higgins, S. H. Heil, & J. P. Lussier, 2004), adoption and implementation of CM protocols into treatment programs are both challenging and infrequent. In criminal justice agencies, where roughly 70% of clients report substance abuse issues (F. S. Taxman, K. L. Cropsey, D. W. Young, & H. Wexler, 2007), CM interventions are virtually nonexistent. The Justice Steps (JSTEPS) study uses a longitudinal, mixed-method design to examine the implementation of a CM-based protocol in five justice settings. This article presents qualitative data collected during Phase 1 of the JSTEPS project regarding the acceptability and feasibility of CM in these justice settings. The study finds a level of acceptability (find CM tolerable) and feasibility (find CM suitable) within justice agencies, but with some challenges. These challenges are reflected in the following: (a) incorporating too many desired target behaviors into CM models; (b) facing intraorganizational challenges when designing CM systems; and (c) emphasizing sanctions over rewards despite the evidence-base for positive reinforcers. These findings have implications for advancing the dissemination, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based treatments (and CM in particular) in criminal justice settings. PMID:21940135

Rudes, Danielle S.; Taxman, Faye S.; Portillo, Shannon; Murphy, Amy; Rhodes, Anne; Stitzer, Maxine; Luongo, Peter F.; Friedmann, Peter D.

2013-01-01

388

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28

389

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01

390

Acceptance Inspection for Audio Cassette Recorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of inspections for cassette recorders that can be performed to assure that the devices are acceptable is described. The inspections can be completed in 20 minutes and can be performed by instructional personnel. The series of inspection procedures includes tests of the intelligibility of audio, physical condition, tape speed, impulse…

Smith, Edgar A.

391

Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

2007-01-01

392

Review of Recent Treatment Acceptability Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With recent increases in the use of positive approaches to treatment for individuals with developmental disabilities, it seems appropriate to review the variables that have been found to influence the acceptability of various treatments. Programmatic treatments for problematic behaviors that incorporate primarily positive (reinforcement)…

Carter, Stacy L.

2007-01-01

393

Accepted Peer Practices in Adventure Programming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the purpose of raising the level of safety, encouraging educational institutions and training programs to develop leaders, providing information for programs, establishing a base for communication with land use agencies, and providing information for school and agency custodians of potential students, the manual outlines "Accepted Peer…

Johanson, Karl M., Comp.

394

Attachment, Temperament, and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations between preschool children's attachment security, temperament, and peer acceptance. Ninety-eight preschool children and their mothers were recruited through childcare centers in the southeast. Mothers and their children participated in two two-hour home observations. Attachment security was assessed using the…

Szewczyk-Sokolowski, Margaret; Bost, Kelly K.; Wainwright, Ada B.

2005-01-01

395

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance  

E-print Network

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad for the design of buffer tanks. We consider mainly the case where the objective of the buffer tank is to dampen-mail: skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no, Tel.: +47 73 59 41 54, Fax.: +47 73 59 40 80 1 #12;1 Introduction Buffer tanks

Skogestad, Sigurd

396

OPA EVMS Acceptance Review Out Briefing  

E-print Network

OPA EVMS Acceptance Review Out Briefing For Princeton UniversityPrinceton University Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory October 6, 2011 by The Office of Project Assessment (OPA), Office of Science #12;Participants and Assignments Review Leadership Ethan Merrill, SC /OPA Review Team (per ANSI

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

397

STATE OF CALIFORNIA OUTDOOR AIR ACCEPTANCE  

E-print Network

Check one of the following: Variable Air Volume (VAV) - Check as appropriate: a. Sensor used to control outdoor air flow must have calibration certificate or be fieldSTATE OF CALIFORNIA OUTDOOR AIR ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-2A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

398

CULTURAL DIFFERENCES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the main streams of research in the IS field is the explanation and prediction of Information technology (IT) adoption and usage. Even though several theories have been developed to address this phenomenon a consensus about the determinants of IT usage has emerged among researchers in the IS field. Specifically, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989) is considered

Amel Ben Zakour

399

Risk Acceptance and Expectations of Laryngeal Allotransplantation  

PubMed Central

Background Laryngeal allotransplantation (LA) is a technique involving transplantation of a deceased donor's larynx into a recipient, and it may be substituted for conventional laryngeal reconstruction. There are widely different views on LA, as the recipient is administered continuous, potentially life-threatening, immunosuppressive therapy for a functional or aesthetic result, which is not directly related to life extension. The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference in risk acceptance and expectations of LA between four population groups. Methods A survey was performed to examine patients' risk acceptance and expectations of LA. The survey included 287 subjects in total (general public, n=100; kidney transplant recipients, n=53; post-laryngectomy patients, n=34; doctors, n=100), using a Korean translated version of the louisville instrument for transplantation (LIFT) questionnaire. Results All four groups responded differently at various levels of their perception in risk acceptance and expectations. The kidney transplant recipients reported the highest risk acceptance and expectations, and the doctor group the lowest. Conclusions This study examined the disparate perception between specific population groups of the risks and benefits of using LA for the promotion of the quality of life. By addressing the information gaps about LA in the different populations that have been highlighted from this survey, we suggest that LA can become a more viable alternative to classical surgery with resultant improved quality of life for patients.

Jo, Hyun Kyo; Park, Jang Wan; Hwang, Jae Ha; Lee, Sam Yong; Shin, Jun Ho

2014-01-01

400

Polish consumers acceptance of genetically modified food  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The paper presents the preliminary results of on going research on Polish consumers attitudes towards GM food and their willingness to pay for such food products. We focus on consumers acceptance of GM food having attributes related to taste, price, nutritional and environmental benefits. The results of the research show that despite the potential benefits GM food may bring

Sylwia Zakowska-Biemans; Mariusz Maciejczak

401

Textbook Websites: User Technology Acceptance Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared with course management software (e.g. Blackboard and WebCT), the content and technology offered by a textbook website (TBW) is relatively costless to universities and professors, and is a potentially valuable tool that can be leveraged to help students learn course material. The present study uses the extended Technology Acceptance Model…

Jonas, Gregory A.; Norman, Carolyn Strand

2011-01-01

402

Siting policy for an acceptable nuclear future  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is an outgrowth of studies aimed at devising an acceptable nuclear energy system for the United States. It is argued that a nuclear siting policy leading to a few, large concentrated sites is preferable in the long run to the present policy which could lead to many dispersed sites. Such a policy could be implemented incrementally if requirements

C. C. Burwell; M. J. Ohanian; A. M. Weinberg

1979-01-01

403

Introduction Consumer acceptance of specialty, gour-  

E-print Network

Introduction Consumer acceptance of specialty, gour- met, or premium potatoes has been increasing these types of cultivars even more appealing to consumers. Specialty pota- toes comprise only a small percentage (1 versus 70 percent for russets) of the total fresh potatoes consumed and, therefore, lend

O'Laughlin, Jay

404

ACCEPTABLE HUMANITIES (HU) COURSES * African Studies  

E-print Network

ACCEPTABLE HUMANITIES (HU) COURSES * African Studies CAS AA 103 Introduction to African American Literature American & New England Studies CAS AM 200 Introduction to American Studies Archaeology CAS AR 100, 161, 162, 211, and 261 CAS CG 111. 112. 211 and 212 English Literature CAS EN 121 Readings in World

405

AIR CLEANING FOR ACCEPTABLE INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses air cleaning for acceptable indoor air quality. ir cleaning has performed an important role in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems for many years. raditionally, general ventilation air-filtration equipment has been used to protect cooling coils ...

406

Issues Specific to Women  

MedlinePLUS

... here Enter ZIP code here Issues Specific to Women Issues Specific to Women We now know a great deal about women's ... treatment that is specific women. General Information for Women Women, Trauma, and PTSD Learn about trauma and ...

407

Dental Issues & Down Syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

408

Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues Associated With Two New Generation Vehicles: P2000 and EXS2  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) has been proceeding with the development of designs for high-fuel-economy vehicles, it also has been assessing whether impediments exist to the transition to these vehicles. Toward that end, as materials options and vehicle designs have been developed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been conducting analyses related to the attendant

Sujit Das; T. Randall Curlee; Gary Davis; Rajive Dhingra; Stanton W. Hadley; Donald W. Jones; Jonathon Overly; Susan M. Schexnayder; Bruce E. Tonn; Amy K. Wolfe

2000-01-01

409

Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute

S. Das; T. R. Curlee; D. W. Jones; P. E. Leiby; J. D. Rubin; S. M. Schexnayder; D. P. Vogt; A. K. Wolfe

1999-01-01

410

Space debris, remarks on current legal issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A legal definition of space debris must take into consideration its consequences on the legal status of the object. For the purpose of mitigation of space debris at the time of the launch, any object launched in outer pace will turn sooner or later into a space debris. For liability purposes, a definition of a "space object " is more useful that the notion of "space debris". It must be sure that every space debris is considered as a space objet according to the liability convention. At the end and certainly a more difficult issue is the qualification of a space object as a space debris when it will be technically feasible to remove it. The question of the property of the debris or object should be important. States are responsible and liable for space debris. According to article VI and VII of the Outer Space Treaty, they must authorise and control any national space activity and make sure these activities will not be conducted against the law. In the case of an accident and excepting the use of nuclear power sources, the main problem lies on damage in outer space to other spacecraft. In that case, the victim must prove a fault. According with the lack of precise rules it should be difficult. It should be necessary to precise the law applicable to space debris. At the domestic level, rules must be taken to prevent space debris through an assessment of risk within the licensing process. At the international level, the principle of an obligation to mitigate debris should be clearly accepted. Some general rules should be useful to avoid breach of competition between commercial actors. The adoption of a clear and precise code of conduct should be of great help because it would determine the good launching States' behaviour and greatly helps the judge appreciating the proof of a fault in case of an accident.

Kerrest, Armel

2001-10-01

411

20 CFR 30.316 - How does the FAB issue a final decision on a claim?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false How does the FAB issue a final decision on a claim? 30...Decisions on Claims § 30.316 How does the FAB issue a final decision on a claim...or part of the recommended decision, the FAB may issue a final decision accepting...

2010-04-01

412

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14

413

Treatment Acceptability of Behavioral Interventions for Children: An Assessment by Mothers of Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study assesses the acceptability of six child-management interventions as rated by mothers (N=20) of children referred for treatment for a disruptive-behavior disorder. Positive reinforcement was rated as a more acceptable treatment than response time, time-out, differential attention, overcorrection, and spanking. Results validate findings of…

Jones, Melanie L.; Eyberg, Sheila M.; Adams, Christina D.; Boggs, Stephen R.

1998-01-01

414

Contemporary American Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This nine-week unit from a junior high American government curriculum covers the following topics: (1) What are the current issues in our physical and social environment?; (2) How do we investigate and evaluate issues?; and (3) What contemporary issues in my physical or social environment do I want to investigate? Students are required to do…

Lewis, Bill; And Others

415

News & Issues, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the three 2000 issues of "News & Issues," a newsletter from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The winter issue includes the following articles:…

Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

2000-01-01

416

Issues in sustainable transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is growing interest in sustainability, sustainable development, and sustainable transportation. This paper identifies issues related to the definition, evaluation and implementation of sustainable transportation. Significant issues include the range of definitions of sustainability, the range of issues considered under sustainability, the range of perspectives, criticism of sustainability analysis, evaluating sustainability, transportation impacts on sustainability, goals vs. objectives, sustainable transport

Todd Litman; David Burwell

2006-01-01

417

Paper Motivation Paper Issues  

E-print Network

and design education Elodie Fourquet A Projective Drawing System #12;Paper Motivation Paper Issues ProjectivePaper Motivation Paper Issues Projective Geometry Projective Geometry in Paper A Projective Drawing A Projective Drawing System #12;Paper Motivation Paper Issues Projective Geometry Projective Geometry in Paper

Waterloo, University of

418

Children's acceptance of others with disability: the influence of a disability-simulation program.  

PubMed

Elementary school is a transitional and impressionable period for any child. In inclusive classroom settings, children with disabilities may experience the challenges of acceptance and integration into peer relationships. The experience of children with disabilities in such classrooms can be positive if their classmates are accepting and open. One way to encourage these attitudes is by increasing awareness through disability-simulation. This study evaluates an existing school program, whose goal is to increase acceptance of others with disability. We surveyed students to assess the influence of the program. An adapted acceptance scale was distributed to students before and after participation in the program. Our hypothesis was that student acceptance would increase after participating in the program. Additionally, we hypothesized that physical, visual, and auditory disabilities would be easier for students to understand, making acceptance scores for these disabilities higher than those for a learning disability. We report changes in acceptance using group means. Our results reveal that post-survey responses showed higher acceptance than pre-survey responses, especially for auditory disabilities. Other significant findings include differences in attitudes between the two schools and differences based on prior experience with someone with a disability. By evaluating the effectiveness of this type of program (whose efficacy has been controversial in the literature), this study can provide teachers, administrators, genetic counselors, and parents with a better idea of how to address children's attitudes towards peers. In our study, the effectiveness of promoting understanding through disability-simulation has proven its worth to improve children's acceptance. PMID:22890717

Hurst, Christina; Corning, Ken; Ferrante, Richard

2012-12-01

419

The Despatch Issue 21  

E-print Network

nodded in acceptance. "She will be mourned," he replied simply. Discomfited by the control exhibited by his guest, McCullough quickly turned to other matters. "Ah...as you know, Ambassador, the major talks between us have been concluded. Documents... nodded in acceptance. "She will be mourned," he replied simply. Discomfited by the control exhibited by his guest, McCullough quickly turned to other matters. "Ah...as you know, Ambassador, the major talks between us have been concluded. Documents...

Multiple Contributors

1974-01-01

420

Harz/Vesper: Acceptance Research with Logical Relations and Pragma-Dialectics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use two different theories for our research on the acceptance of carbon capture and storage (CCS), geothermal energy and shale gas: logical relations and pragma-dialectics. With the theory of logical relations we can describe the structure of the terminus "acceptance" as a three-place or more relationship. We use the Newtonian binominal coefficients order to reflect on the complexity of the concept of acceptance. We are exploring relations between citizens, politicians, scientists, businesses and technologies. The technological-philosophical reflection on the topic "Determinants for acceptance of new technologies" concerns the issues of "Trust", "Security" as well as "Interest and Use" as the essential constituents of acceptance. Trust: Politicians, scientists and entrepreneurs need to understand themselves as advocates of acceptance. Acceptance is not automatic but requires a great effort and continuous personal commitment, as you want to secure acceptance not only for the short-term but for the long-term. The confidence curve follows a hysteresis loop as known from the magnetization of materials: It requires a significant effort. If the existing trust is lost due to erroneous communication or incorrect political action, the restoration effort is significantly greater. Citizens need to understand themselves as being asked for acceptance and as actively influencing the shapes of their life. They may not feel as victims or sufferers from technological developments but should have a realistic feeling of being able to influence - in fact - anything. "Openness creates openness." (H.-J. Bullinger) Security: The advocate promoting acceptance must take into account the security needs of the citizens with regard to the technologies which are supposed to be accepted. Even irrational fears are actual fears that can prevent acceptance. Interests and Goals of Usage: The advocate promoting acceptance must - sincerely and publicly - express his interest in the use and goals of the new technology. Politics must focus on the majority's needs. Businesses must openly commit themselves to their interest in maximizing profit by using the new technologies. Science must contribute to the effective and independent function of the technologies and claim true statements about them. Using the pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation we define "acceptance" in terms of the "acceptance of a standpoint" as an outcome of the protagonist's attempt to justify the "acceptability of a standpoint". The pragma-dialectical ideal model of critical discussion provides a number of norms for a dialectical discussion process leading to the "acceptance of a standpoint". These norms make a systematic analysis of accomplishments and flaws within a critical exchange possible. One of these norms is the sound use of argument schemes which connect a standpoint with an argument. An arguer using the argument scheme of pragmatic argumentation presents the desirable or undesirable consequences of a certain action to back up the (un)acceptability of the standpoint. Critical questions are used to reveal the (in)correct use of pragmatic argumentation. We argue that accomplishments and flaws in the pragmatic argumentation of the four parties observed are closely related to the acceptance of the technology CCS.

Harz, M.

2012-04-01

421

Different Perspectives on Technology Acceptance: The Role of Technology Type and Age  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although eHealth technologies offer an enormous potential to improve healthcare, the knowledge about key determinants of acceptance for eHealth technology is restricted. While the underlying technology of eHealth technologies and Information and Communication technology (ICT) is quite similar, utilization contexts and using motives are quite different. In order to explore the role of technology type on acceptance, we contrasted central application characteristics of both technology types using the scenario technique. A questionnaire was administered (n = 104) measuring individual variables (age, gender) and attitudes regarding an eHealth application (blood sugar meter) in contrast to an ICT device (Personal Digital Assistant, PDA). Older users basically approved the utilization of health-related technologies and perceived lower usability barriers. In addition, we identified main utilization motives of eHealth technology and technology-specific acceptance patterns, especially regarding issues of data safety in the eHealth context. Effects of age and gender in acceptance ratings suggest a differential perspective on eHealth acceptance. Finally, practical interventions were derived in order to support eHealth device design and to promote acceptance of eHealth technology.

Arning, Katrin; Ziefle, Martina

422

Focus Issue: Coping with Cellular Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Organisms constantly face potential damage from internal and external sources, thus necessitating signaling cascades that couple specific cellular stresses to the appropriate responses. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the signaling pathways that are activated by and that mediate responses to diverse types of stresses.

Wei Wong (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2009-11-10

423

Predicting the use of web-based information systems: self-efficacy, enjoyment, learning goal orientation, and the technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growing reliance on computerized systems and increasing rapidity of the introduction of new technologies, user acceptance of technology continues to be an important issue. Drawing upon recent findings in information systems, human computer interaction, and social psychology, the present research extends the technology acceptance model by incorporating the motivation variables of self-efficacy, enjoyment, and learning goal orientation in

Mun Y Yi; Yujong Hwang

2003-01-01

424

Early Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE.Our goal was to evaluate the effects of breastfeeding and dietary experi- ences on acceptance of a fruit and a green vegetable by 4- to 8-month-old infants. METHODS.Forty-five infants, 44% of whom were breastfed, were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 treatment groups. One group was fed green beans, and the other was fed green beans and then peaches at

Catherine A. Forestell; Julie A. Mennella

2007-01-01

425

Acceptance as a Coping Reaction: Adaptive or not?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance as a coping reaction to unchangeable negative events has been discussed controversially. While some studies suggest it is adaptive, others report negative effects on mental health. We propose a distinction between two forms of acceptance reactions: active acceptance, which is associated with positive psychological outcomes, and resigning acceptance, which is associated with negative psychological outcomes. In this study, 534

Yuka Maya Nakamura; Ulrich Orth

2005-01-01

426

A case study in the acceptance of a new discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

What factors contribute to the acceptance of a new discipline? The disciplinary map is not static but not all candidate disciplines find acceptance in the academy. This article presents a case study of the acceptance of a discipline in one university. It argues that a close association with an existing high?status discipline was fundamental to the acceptance of the new

Martyn Clark

2006-01-01

427

Consumer Acceptance of Personal Information and Communication Technology Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

In today's information and communication technol- ogy (ICT)-enabled service economy, there is great interest in digital service management. While the extant technology acceptance re- search has mainly studied user acceptance of various ICTs, there is a dearth of research on consumer acceptance of personal ICT services. In this paper, we extend the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

James Y. L. Thong; Viswanath Venkatesh; Xin Xu; Se-Joon Hong; Kar Yan Tam

2011-01-01

428

Acceptability of Potential Rectal Microbicide Delivery Systems for HIV Prevention: A Randomized Crossover Trial  

PubMed Central

We assessed the acceptability of three of over-the-counter products representative of potential rectal microbicide (RM) delivery systems. From 2009 to 2010, 117 HIV-uninfected males (79 %) and females (21 %) who engage in receptive anal intercourse participated in a 6-week randomized crossover acceptability trial. Participants received each of three products (enema, lubricant-filled applicator, suppository) every 2 weeks in a randomized sequence. CASI and T-ACASI scales assessed product acceptability via Likert responses. Factor analysis was used to identify underlying factors measured by each scale. Random effects models were fit to examine age and gender effects on product acceptability. Three underlying factors were identified: Satisfaction with Product Use, Sexual Pleasure, and Ease of Product Use. For acceptability, the applicator ranked highest; however, differences between product acceptability scores were greatest among females and younger participants. These findings indicate that RM delivery systems impact their acceptability and should be considered early in RM development to enhance potential use. PMID:23114512

Gorbach, Pamina M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Hess, Kristen; Murphy, Ryan; Saunders, Terry; Brown, Joelle; Anton, Peter A.; Cranston, Ross D.

2012-01-01

429

Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

Dzenitis, J M

2006-12-12

430

The relationship of state medicaid coverage to medicaid acceptance among substance abuse providers in the United States.  

PubMed

The Affordable Care Act will dramatically increase the number of Americans with Medicaid coverage for substance abuse treatment (SAT). Currently, few SAT providers accept Medicaid, and consequently, there is concern that newly-eligible Medicaid enrollees will have difficulty finding SAT providers willing to serve them. However, little is known about why few SAT providers accept Medicaid. In response, this study examines how features of state Medicaid coverage for SAT, including benefits, eligibility, and oversight, are associated with Medicaid acceptance among SAT providers. Medicaid acceptance was positively associated with the number of SAT services covered, and the number of optional categorical expansions implemented by the state. Requirements for physician involvement were associated with lower odds of acceptance. The results suggest that more generous Medicaid coverage may encourage SAT providers to accept Medicaid, but regulatory policies may inhibit their ability to do so. PMID:24407938

Andrews, Christina M

2014-10-01

431

Why do women accept to undergo a nipple sparing mastectomy or to reconstruct the nipple areola complex when nipple sparing mastectomy is not possible?  

PubMed

In a retrospective study, we investigated the reasons why women accepted to undergo a nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) and why women who could not keep their nipple areola complex (NAC) decided to reconstruct it. We intended to investigate whether keeping the NAC plays a psychological role, to state possible advantages of NSM. Between 2004 and 2006, 310 women with NAC sparing and 143 patients with successive NAC reconstruction were mailed a single open-ended question at follow-up 12 months after final breast reconstruction surgery or final NAC reconstruction with tattoo. The purpose was to explore personal motivations that drove women to accept NSM or to perform a NAC tattoo reconstruction. Responses were classified into 11 categories by five reviewers. We performed an analysis of the relative frequency of emerging issues. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Among the patients who responded to the open-ended question, 190 patients preserved their NAC, and 100 patients received postponed NAC reconstruction. Women in the NSM group were significantly younger (P = 0.02), more highly educated (P < 0.0001), and more frequently lived in Northern Italy (P = 0.03). The reasons for accepting NSM were more frequently related to body image satisfaction and integrity of the body (P = 0.002), reduction of psychological distress (P = 0.003), and surgeon's influence (P < 0.0001). Esthetic reasons were highly associated to the control group. These results help us to better understand the psychological impact of NAC sparing versus NAC reconstruction. NSM was accepted because it was perceived as a technique that preserved the integrity of the body, reduced the feeling of mutilation, improved the breast cosmetic results, and reduced psychological distress regarding the loss of the breast. PMID:22350788

Didier, F; Arnaboldi, P; Gandini, S; Maldifassi, A; Goldhirsch, A; Radice, D; Minotti, I; Ballardini, B; Luini, A; Santillo, B; Rietjens, M; Petit, J Y

2012-04-01

432

Validation of the Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) for the assessment of acceptance in fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ). Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live a worthwhile life despite it. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) is the questionnaire most often used to measure pain acceptance in chronic pain populations.

Baltasar Rodero; Javier García-Campayo; Benigno Casanueva; Yolanda Lopez del Hoyo; Antoni Serrano-Blanco; Juan V Luciano

2010-01-01

433

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

Gravois, Melanie

2007-06-27

434

Words matter: a qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionals  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals have an important role to play in the management of obesity, but may be unsure how to raise weight issues with patients. The societal stigma associated with excess weight means that weight status terms may be misunderstood, cause offence and risk upsetting patient-professional relationships. This study investigated the views of people who were overweight or obese on the acceptability of weight status terms and their potential to motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. Methods A qualitative study comprising 34 semi-structured interviews with men and women in their mid-to-late 30s and 50s who were overweight or obese and had recently been informed of their weight status. Thematic framework analysis was conducted to allow the systematic comparison of views by age, gender and apparent motivation to lose weight. Results Although many people favoured 'Overweight' to describe their weight status, there were doubts about its effectiveness to motivate weight loss. Terms including 'BMI' ('Body Mass Index') or referring to the unhealthy nature of their weight were generally considered acceptable and motivational, although a number of men questioned the validity of BMI as an indicator of excess weight. Participants, particularly women, felt that health professionals should avoid using 'Fat'. Whilst response to 'Obese' was largely negative, people recognised that it could be appropriate in a health consultation. Some younger people, particularly those who appeared motivated to lose weight, felt 'Obese' could encourage weight loss, but it was also clear the term could provoke negative emotions if used insensitively. Conclusions Although most people who are overweight or obese accept that it is appropriate for health professionals to discuss weight issues with patients, there is great variation in response to the terms commonly used to describe excess weight. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to discussing weight status: some men and younger people may appreciate a direct approach, whilst others need to be treated more sensitively. It is therefore important that health professionals use their knowledge and understanding to select the terms that are most likely to be acceptable, but at the same time have most potential to motivate each individual patient. PMID:21714892

2011-01-01

435

OSP WEEKLY FUNDING BULLETIN Volume 6, Issue 37 September 10, 2012  

E-print Network

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Volume 6, Issue 37 September 10, 2012 Open Funding Opportunities BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION Grand Challenges Explorations The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is now accepting grant proposals for Round 10

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

436

42 CFR 411.380 - When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...accepted the request for an advisory opinion, or, for requests that CMS determines, in its discretion, involve complex legal issues or highly complicated fact patterns, within a reasonable time period. (2) If the 90th day falls on a...

2010-10-01

437

42 CFR 411.380 - When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...accepted the request for an advisory opinion, or, for requests that CMS determines, in its discretion, involve complex legal issues or highly complicated fact patterns, within a reasonable time period. (2) If the 90th day falls on a...

2011-10-01

438

42 CFR 411.380 - When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...accepted the request for an advisory opinion, or, for requests that CMS determines, in its discretion, involve complex legal issues or highly complicated fact patterns, within a reasonable time period. (2) If the 90th day falls on a...

2013-10-01

439

42 CFR 411.380 - When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...accepted the request for an advisory opinion, or, for requests that CMS determines, in its discretion, involve complex legal issues or highly complicated fact patterns, within a reasonable time period. (2) If the 90th day falls on a...

2012-10-01

440

The acceptability and preference for the psychological treatment of PTSD.  

PubMed

The acceptability and preference of psychological treatments is important in understanding patient treatment seeking, choice, engagement and attrition and possibly treatment response in health care. The acceptability of, and preference for, 14 different types of psychological treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were investigated in a student population through invitation to participate in a web-based survey. Respondents were asked to rate each treatment on 10 scales and to rank the treatments in order of preference. Respondents were also asked whether they would seek treatment themselves, recommend treatment to friends and family, feel stigmatised by suffering from PTSD, had any prior knowledge of the treatments and if this had been positive or negative and whether they had a history of psychological problems or treatment. A total of 330 respondents completed the survey. A past or current history of psychological problems and treatment was surprisingly high. Almost all respondents indicated that they would seek or recommend treatment in spite of high levels of stigmatisation. Factor analysis of the 10 scales indicated two factors: Endorsement and Discomfort. Rank ordering on preference and Endorsement scores was highly consistent. The highly preferred and endorsed treatments involved cognitive therapy, exposure or psycho-education in spite of high levels of discomfort anticipated with exposure. Treatments involving new technologies, EMDR and psychodynamic psychotherapy received the lowest Endorsement and preference. There was a modest influence of prior knowledge of a treatment. PMID:16460671

Tarrier, Nicholas; Liversidge, Tom; Gregg, Lynsey

2006-11-01

441

New approaches in the derivation of acceptable daily intake (ADI)  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for estimating human health risks from exposure to threshold-acting toxicants in water or food, such as those established by the U.S. EPA, the FDA, the NAS, the WHO and the FAO, consider only chronic or lifetime exposure to individual chemicals. These methods generally estimate a single, constant daily intake rate which is low enough to be considered safe or acceptable. The intake rate is termed the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Two problems with the approach have been recognized. The first problem is that the method does not readily account for the number of animals used to determine the appropriate 'no-observed-effect-level' (NOEL). The second problem with the current approach is that the slope of the dose-response curve of the critical toxic effect is generally ignored in estimating the ADI. The report illustrates both a revised approach to estimate ADIs with all toxicity data which includes methods for partial lifetime assessment, and novel methods for ADI estimation with quantal or continuous toxicity data. The latter method addresses to a degree the common problems with the current approach.

Dourson, M.L.

1986-01-01

442

The indicator performance estimate approach to determining acceptable wilderness conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using data from a study conducted in the Cranberry Wilderness Area of West Virginia, United States, this paper describes how a modified importance—performance approach can be used to prioritize wilderness indicators and determine how much change from the pristine is acceptable. The approach uses two key types of information: (1) indicator importance, or visitor opinion as to which wilderness indicators have the greatest influence on their experience, and (2) management performance, or the extent to which actual indicator conditions exceed or are within visitor expectations. Performance was represented by calculating indicator performance estimates (IPEs), as defined by standardized differences between actual conditions and visitor preferences for each indicator. The results for each indicator are then presented graphically on a four-quadrant matrix for objective interpretation. Each quadrant represents a management response: keep up the good work, concentrate here, low priority, or possible overkill. The technique allows managers to more systematically and effectively utilize information routinely collected during the limits of acceptable change wilderness planning process.

Hollenhorst, Steven; Gardner, Lisa

1994-11-01

443

Usability and User Acceptance for Personal Health Records: A Perspective from Healthcare Citizens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal Health Records (PHR) allow patients to carry their own health records in some format for their own review purposes\\u000a as well as across doctors and other care providers. This study aimed at determining the usability and user acceptance issues\\u000a involving a Web-based personal health record system. The study indicated that such a Web-based system was found useful by\\u000a the

A. Ant Ozok; Ayse P. Gurses; Huijuan Wu; Melissa Nelson; David Moen; June Wei

2009-01-01

444

Emerging Issues in International Humanitarian Law: The Right to Counsel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the United States initiated its military response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, law and respect for legal rights has remained a focal point of legitimacy. No single issue, however, has dominated the legal debate. Instead, like Republican candidates for the presidential nomination, different issues have risen to discourse dominance, only to recede as other issues displaced

Geoffrey S. Corn; Peter Chickris

2012-01-01

445

Development of quantitative risk acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Some of the major considerations for effective management of risk are discussed, with particular emphasis on risks due to nuclear power plant operations. Although there are impacts associated with the rest of the fuel cycle, they are not addressed here. Several previously published proposals for quantitative risk criteria are reviewed. They range from a simple acceptance criterion on individual risk of death to a quantitative risk management framework. The final section discussed some of the problems in the establishment of a framework for the quantitative management of risk.

Griesmeyer, J. M.; Okrent, D.

1981-01-01

446

Issues in Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By assuming personal responsibility for their own professional growth and development, educators can help young people become independent and socially responsible on shaping their future social environment. (MB)

Frymier, Jack R.

1976-01-01

447

NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE  

E-print Network

NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE "ARTIFICIAL BRAINS" Call for Papers Guest Editors Prof. Dr for review to a special issue of the Neurocomputing journal, on the theme of "Artificial Brains". Background, and more powerful FPGA based accelerator boards, etc. thus allowing builders of "artificial brains" more

Wojcik, Vladimir

448

Multicultural Issues in Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The professional literature provides ample evidence that individuals with autism exhibit a myriad of unusual social, communication, and behavioral patterns of interactions that present challenges to their families and service providers. However, there is a dearth of quality works on multicultural issues regarding autistic spectrum disorders. In this article, we explore issues surrounding autism and multiculturalism, with the intent not

TinaTaylor Dyches; Lynn K. Wilder; Richard R. Sudweeks; Festus E. Obiakor; Bob Algozzine

2004-01-01

449

Issues in Curriculum Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Views the spectrum of opinions on curriculum issues as ranging from advocacy of measurable, programed, teacher-prepared objectives to advocacy of a flexible, limited, pupil-oriented framework. Also discussed are structuring the learning environment, existentialism vs behaviorism, process vs product, and other issues. (BP)

Ediger, Marlow

1978-01-01

450

Yellowstone Resources and Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park online book is a compendium of concise information about the park's history, natural and cultural resources, issues, and major areas. Chapters, which are downloadable as PDF files, focus on the history of the park, the yellowstone ecosystem, geology, life in extreme heat (as in the hot springs), vegetation, fire in yellowstone, wildlife, and park issues.

Park, Yellowstone N.

451

Examinee Issues in CAT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perspective of the examinee during the administration of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) is discussed, focusing on issues of test development. Item review is the first issue discussed. Virtually no CATs provide the opportunity for the examinee to go back and review, and possibly change, answers. There are arguments on either side of the…

Wise, Steven L.

452

TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS  

EPA Science Inventory

These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

453

California's Water Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Foothill College and the Using a Web-Based GIS to Teach Problem-Based Science in High School and College project, this powerpoint discusses California's water issues. These include population growth, the mismatch between where precipitation falls and where people are located, drought, pollution, and climate change. Each issue is discussed in detail along with potential solutions.

2012-08-03

454

Issues in Teaching Mathematics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book aims to provide the reader with background knowledge and understanding of major contemporary issues facing mathematics teachers in Great Britain. Much of the book is devoted to discussing issues related to curriculum construction and change. The chapters are: (1) "The Aims of Teaching Mathematics" (A. Orton); (2) "Mathematics Education…

Orton, Anthony, Ed.; Wain, Geoffrey, Ed.

455

Issues in Gifted Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four papers address issues of identification, secondary program alternatives, guidance to develop creativity, and needed research in gifted education. In the first paper, "Some Creative Dimensions to the Issue of Identification," E. Torrance analyzes the problem of idntifying and cultivating creative giftedness in an unfavorable national climate.…

Gallagher, James J.; And Others

456

Issues in Pupil Transportation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this book is to present the critical issues in pupil transportation that will confront pupil transportation supervisors in local school districts. The following issues are discussed: (1) demands for extended service from community pressure groups; (2) reductions in budget requests by governing bodies; (3) unrest among driver…

Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

457

Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals  

E-print Network

's publication is "Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals." Oklahoma, like the rest of the nation, is facing, the solution to the problem is simple: Oklahoma needs more physicians, especially in rural areas Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals State of the State's Rural Health 2008 Edition #12;On

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

458

Oral History and Problematic Questions Promote Issues-Centered Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Oral History Project at the American School Foundation in Mexico City, Mexico that focuses on examining the Mexican countryside through oral history projects, infusing art and photography within the issues-centered framework, and promoting the acceptance of other cultures. Views the teacher as a facilitator whereas the students…

Penyak, Lee M.; Duray, Pamela B.

1999-01-01

459

Theme Issue on Visual Attention: Guest Editor's Introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

WHEN GARVIN CHASTAIN ASKED ME to be guest editor for a theme issue of The Journal of General Psychology, I thought it might be worthwhile if I could improve on the very lengthy time lag between submission and acceptance that most of us have seen from other journals. Unfortunately, most journals still request multiple printed copies (4 or 5). In

Marylou Cheal

1999-01-01

460

ISSUES OF SUICIDE PREVENTION: 'YOU CANNOT COUNSEL THE DEAD  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUICIDE PREVENTION ENDEAVOURS MAY BE DIVERSE . T HIS PAPER DISCUSSES issues of primary and secondary prevention. Australia compared with other nations has an alarmingly high rate of young male suicide and, with this in mind, secondary preventative strategies that rely on impinging on the availability of culturally accepted relatively lethal methods of suicide are examined. Political pitfalls are highlighted

Chris Cantor

461

Unauthorized Employment in the United States: Issues, Options, and Legislation  

Microsoft Academic Search

[Excerpt] As immigration reform and the illegal alien population have gained congressional and public attention in the past several years, the issue of unauthorized employment has come to the fore. It is widely accepted that most unauthorized aliens enter and remain in the United States in order to work. Thus, eliminating employment opportunities for these aliens has been seen as

2009-01-01

462

Workplace Issues in Human Resources. Symposium 40. [AHRD Conference, 2001].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This symposium on workplace issues in human resources consists of two presentations. "The Effect of Organizational Structure on Single-Source and Multiple-Source Performance Appraisal Processes: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD)" (Karen K. Yarrish, Judith A. Kolb) investigates ratee acceptance of single- and multi-source…

2001

463

Problems and issues for short-haul air transportation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problems of developing an efficient short-haul air system are not primarily technical, but economic and political. The key issues are whether the community will accept new and expanded air facilities, what standards of service the passengers will demand and how the system will evolve. The solutions recommended are national in scope and require the federal government to take a leading role.

Vittek, J. F., Jr.

1972-01-01

464

Post merger and acquisition integration issues: An Australian study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of six Australian organisations explores four post M&A agreement integration issues previously highlighted as important in the literature: strategic planning, corporate culture, employee retention and the role of leadership. It was found that successful integration requires five key factors: (i) acceptance of the new corporate vision and mission, (ii) a complementary structure, (iii) a clear integration timetable, (iv)

Paul de Lange; Jarrod McDonald; Max Coulthard

465

Ethical Issues in Withholding Care from Severely Handicapped Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical issues are examined that involve withholding medical treatment from severely handicapped infants. Although current laws do not sanction euthanasia, severely handicapped infants are often assisted in dying. Discussion includes society's apparent acceptance of this practice and several solutions to the problems. (Author)

Cohen, Libby

1981-01-01

466

Issues in Monitoring Medication Effects in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The task of medication monitoring in the schools has increased for school psychologists, yet there is little research specific to pediatric psychoactive medication. The current article reviews issues pertinent to school-based medication monitoring. Feasibility, acceptability, and perception of effectiveness are reviewed as fundamental…

Anderson, Laura; Walcott, Christy M.; Reck, Sarah G.; Landau, Steven

2009-01-01

467

Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

2000-07-01

468

Acceptance and control of aircraft interior noise and vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ride quality criteria for noise, vibration, and their combination in the helicopter cabin environment are discussed. Results are presented of laboratory and field studies of passenger responses to interior noise and vibration during the performance of a listening task and during reverie, as well as to the interaction of noise with multi-frequency and multi-axis vibration. A study of means for reducing helicopter interior noise based on analytical, experimental and flight studies of the near-field noise source characteristics of the aircraft, the transmission of noise through aircraft structures and the attenuation of noise by various noise control treatments is then presented which has resulted in a reduction of 3 dB in helicopter cabin noise. Finally, a model under development to evaluate passenger acceptance of a helicopter noise and vibration environment is indicated which incorporates the observed noise and vibration effects on comfort and is expected to provide insights for more effective noise and vibration control.

Stephens, D. G.; Leatherwood, J. D.

1980-01-01

469

Now accepting applications for Sam Nunn Fellows  

E-print Network

are in national and international security policy. However, security relevant policy has always been Change o Energy Security o Infrastructure Protection o Disaster Management o Mass Casualty Weapons o, and continues to be, broadly defined by the program to include such issues as: o Resource Scarcity o Climate

Li, Mo

470

Multicultural Issues in Deafness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book considers, from both educational and cultural perspectives, the needs of children with deafness from African American, American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Island families. The text calls for a child-centered curriculum based on a fundamental acceptance of differences in communication and interpretation. Section I presents the…

Christensen, Kathee M., Ed.; Delgado, Gilbert L., Ed.

471

Psychological issues in pediatric obesity  

PubMed Central

Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity. PMID:23766572

Kalra, Gurvinder; De Sousa, Avinash; Sonavane, Sushma; Shah, Nilesh

2012-01-01

472

Plants and gravity. Special issue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This issue of the Journal of Plant Growth Regulation explores the effects of gravity on plant growth and development from several perspectives. Most of the review papers consider plants and gravity from the viewpoint of ground-based laboratory research, and several papers consider gravitropism, the directed growth in response to gravity, in some detail. However, another approach to study the effects of gravity on plant is to effectively remove the force due to gravity. A very dramatic way to accomplish this goal is through the free-fall conditions achieved by spacecraft in low Earth orbit, so some of the authors have reviewed recent advances in spaceflight research with plant systems.

Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

2002-01-01

473

Special issue: space radiation biology.  

PubMed

This special issue about the biological effects of space radiation on human health is concerned with cell death, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, developmental abnormalities, carcinogenesis, and senescence. Articles examine the effects of space radiation consisting of heavy charged particles with a low dose and low dose-rate and their possible dependence on microbeams, clustered DNA damage, bystander effects, and radioadaptive responses, which are important factors in radiation sensitivity. Topics also include the effects of microgravity on the relative biological effectiveness of space radiation and the effects of solar ultraviolet particles. PMID:15887353

2004-12-01

474

Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table ... turn Javascript on. What is a High-Risk Pregnancy? All pregnancies involve a certain degree of risk ...

475

Summary Of Identification Of Rrgulatory Acceptability Of Enhanced Attenuation Categories  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents once introduced to the subsurface are a persistent contaminant. Though many types of active treatments have been developed and deployed to treat contaminated sites, most sites will ultimately incorporate the use of passive treatments into the remediation process. A process favored by many is the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation that relies on the natural attenuation processes occurring within the system to remediate the contaminants. However, it is likely there will be instances where the natural attenuation processes will be insufficient to reduce the level of contamination to acceptable levels in an acceptable span of time. Rather than redeploying source treatments, the Department of Energy along with the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) are developing the concept of Enhanced Attenuation (EA). An enhancement is any type of intervention that might be implemented in a source-plume system that increases the magnitude of attenuation by natural processes beyond that which occurs without intervention. Enhanced Attenuation is the result of applying an enhancement or intervention technique that will sustainably manipulate a natural attenuation process leading to an increased reduction in mass flux of contaminants. Efforts are moving forward along several fronts in developing this concept. This effort is a follow-on to initial discussions with site owners, regulators and stakeholder organizations in the development of the concepts of Enhanced Attenuation, the use of mass balance to evaluate the stability of a waste site/groundwater plume, and identification of tools that will support characterization and monitoring efforts for MNA and EA treatments. Those discussions are documented in the report titled ''Summary Document of Workshops for Hanford, Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site as part of the Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation for Chlorinated Solvents-DOE Alternative Project for Technology Acceleration'' (WSRC, 2003). The objective of this report is to document the May 12th, 2005 deliberations of the ITRC Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics team. The purpose of these deliberations was to identify issues related to regulatory acceptability of the different categories of processes/technologies that may be considered enhancements.

Vangelas, K

2006-01-04

476

THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

Christina B. Behr-Andres

2001-10-01

477

Sexual Education In Malaysia: Accepted Or Rejected?  

PubMed Central

Background: Introduction to sexual education in schools was suggested by the Malaysian government as one of the effort taken in the aim to reduce the sexual-related social problems among Malaysian teenagers nowadays. This study was proposed in the aim to determine the rate of acceptance among adolescents on the implementation of sexual education in schools. Methods: This study was conducted using questionnaires distributed to 152 pre-degree students in Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Kampus Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Results: Almost half (49.3%) of the respondents agreed that sexual education might help to overcome the social illness among school teenagers. Besides, a large number (77.6%) of respondents also agreed that this module should be incorporated with other core subjects compare to the feedback received on the implementation of this module on its own (28.9%). Conclusion: These results have provided some insight towards the perception of sexual education among the teenagers. Since most of the respondents agreed with this idea, so it might be a sign that the implementation of sexual education is almost accepted by the adolescents. PMID:23113207

Mohd Mutalip, Siti Syairah; Mohamed, Ruzianisra

2012-01-01

478

Grazing function g and collimation angular acceptance  

SciTech Connect

The grazing function g is introduced - a synchrobetatron optical quantity that is analogous (and closely connected) to the Twiss and dispersion functions {beta}, {alpha}, {eta}, and {eta}'. It parametrizes the rate of change of total angle with respect to synchrotron amplitude for grazing particles, which just touch the surface of an aperture when their synchrotron and betatron oscillations are simultaneously (in time) at their extreme displacements. The grazing function can be important at collimators with limited acceptance angles. For example, it is important in both modes of crystal collimation operation - in channeling and in volume reflection. The grazing function is independent of the collimator type - crystal or amorphous - but can depend strongly on its azimuthal location. The rigorous synchrobetatron condition g = 0 is solved, by invoking the close connection between the grazing function and the slope of the normalized dispersion. Propagation of the grazing function is described, through drifts, dipoles, and quadrupoles. Analytic expressions are developed for g in perfectly matched periodic FODO cells, and in the presence of {beta} or {eta} error waves. These analytic approximations are shown to be, in general, in good agreement with realistic numerical examples. The grazing function is shown to scale linearly with FODO cell bend angle, but to be independent of FODO cell length. The ideal value is g = 0 at the collimator, but finite nonzero values are acceptable. Practically achievable grazing functions are described and evaluated, for both amorphous and crystal primary collimators, at RHIC, the SPS (UA9), the Tevatron (T-980), and the LHC.

Peggs, S.G.; Previtali, V.

2009-11-02

479

Site acceptance test, W-030 MICON system  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and control of the W-030 ventilation upgrade is provided by a distributed control system (DCS) furnished by MICON Corporation. After shipment to the Hanford Site, the site acceptance test (SAT) for this system was conducted in a laboratory environment over a six month period, involving four distinct phases and numerous hardware and software modifications required to correct test exceptions. The final results is a system which is not fully compliant with procurement specifications but is determined to meet minimum Project W-030 safety and functional requirements. A negotiated settlement was reached with the supplier to establish a `path forward` for system implementation. This report documents the `as-run` status of the SAT. The SAT was completed in August of 1995. It was later followed by comprehensive acceptance testing of the W-030 control-logic configuration software; results are documented in WHC-SD-W030-ATR-011. Further testing is reported as part of process system startup operational testing, performed after the MICON installation.

Hill, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-10

480

INTRODUCTION TO PARENTAL ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION THEORY, METHODS, EVIDENCE, AND IMPLICATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research program reported in this article was initiated almost five decades ago in response to claims by Western social scientists that parental love is essential to the healthy social and emotional development of children. After more than two thousand studies, many inspired directly by parental acceptance-rejection theory (PARTheory) described here at least one conclusion is clear: Children everywhere need

Ronald P. Rohner; Abdul Khaleque

481

Social and Emotional Competencies: Contributions to Young African-American Children's Peer Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored the relation between measures of emotional competence, behavioral regulation, and general social competence and African American preschoolers' peer acceptance and popularity. Found that gender, emotional knowledge, emotion regulation, and themes of violence in response to hypothetical situations of interpersonal conflict were strongly…

Smith, Maureen

2001-01-01

482

The Acceptability of Credentials Earned Online for Obtaining Employment in the Health Care Professions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A national survey of health care administrators was used to assess the acceptability of a job applicant's qualifications that included a degree earned online, partly online, or in a traditional program. A questionnaire was sent in response to job advertisements that were posted in newspapers from 38 metropolitan areas throughout the United States.…

Adams, Jonathan; DeFleur, Margaret H.; Heald, Gary R.

2007-01-01

483

The Acceptability of Online Degrees Earned as a Credential for Obtaining Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A national survey of hiring executives was conducted to assess the acceptability of a job applicant's qualifications for employment that included a degree earned solely online or one that included a significant amount of online coursework. The questionnaire was sent in response to job advertisements posted in newspapers in eight major metropolitan…

Adams, Jonathan; DeFleur, Margaret H.

2006-01-01

484

submitted to Medical Physics accepted for publication on Sep 2, 2009  

E-print Network

submitted to Medical Physics accepted for publication on Sep 2, 2009 Liquid crystal display response times estimation for medical applications Tobias Elze Max-Planck Institute for Mathematics is crucial in medical applications such as radiology and clinical neurosciences. While classical CRT medical

Jost, Jürgen

485

Prior encounters modulate subsequent choices in host acceptance behavior by the bark beetle Ips pini  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory bioassays indicate that the bark beetle Ips pini employs flexible, rather than absolute, responses to phytochemicals in its host acceptance behavior. Each beetle's decision to enter substrate was influenced by the types and concentrations of monoterpenes present. However, previous rejection of a simulated host containing a moderate concentration of monoterpenes increased the likelihood that the same concentration would be

Kimberly F. Wallin; Kenneth F. Raffa

2002-01-01

486

Extended TAM Model: Impacts of Convenience on Acceptance and Use of Moodle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increasing online access to courses, programs, and information has shifted the control and responsibility of learning process from instructors to learners. Learners' perceptions of and attitudes toward e-learning constitute a critical factor to the success of such system. The purpose of this study is to take TAM (technology acceptance model)…

Hsu, Hsiao-hui; Chang, Yu-ying

2013-01-01

487

Improving Communicative Competence with "Clickers": Acceptance/Attitudes among Nigerian Primary School Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the predictive power of teachers' perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU), behavioural intention (BI) to use personal response system (PRS) and computer experience (CE) on teachers' acceptance and attitude towards using PRS in improving communicative competence in the classroom where English is taught…

Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

2014-01-01

488

The Effect of Young Adult Literature on Adolescents' Rape Myth Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This quasi-experimental study (N = 139) measured the effect of a reader response based instructional unit of the novel Speak on adolescents’ rape myth acceptance. Participants were eighth grade language arts students at a Title I middle school in a major metropolitan school district. Seven classes were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 4) or control (n = 3) condition.

Victor Malo-Juvera

2012-01-01

489

The effect of young adult literature on adolescents' rape myth acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This quasi-experimental study (N = 139) measured the effect of a reader response based instructional unit of the novel Speak on adolescents' rape myth acceptance. Participants were eighth grade language arts students at a Title I middle school in a major metropolitan school district. Seven classes were randomly assigned to treatment ( n = 4) or control (n = 3)

Victor Malo-Juvera

2012-01-01

490

Issues Management: End of First Decade Progress Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that issues management is a robust contribution to the public relations discipline. Offers additional rationale for empowering public relations practitioners by involving them in strategic planning, making them responsible for issue scanning and monitoring, integrating their advice into standards of corporate social responsibility, and…

Heath, Robert L.; Cousino, Kenneth R.

1990-01-01

491

Vocational Education in the 1990s: Major Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is designed to present issues facing vocational education today and in the immediate future and to serve as a potential agenda for confronting these issues and assisting in responsible and responsive policy development, financing, research, and operation of vocational education programs in the 1990s. The 14 chapters are as follows:…

Pautler, Albert J., Jr., Ed.

492

Defining acceptable levels for ecological indicators: an approach for considering social values.  

PubMed

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components. PMID:17203340

Smyth, Robyn L; Watzin, Mary C; Manning, Robert E

2007-03-01

493

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this te