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1

Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary  

SciTech Connect

On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

NONE

1995-03-01

2

Issues affecting the acceptance of hydrogen fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the topic of hydrogen as an alternative vehicle fuel is gaining increasing attention internationally, one significant aspect of its introduction has been given less attention than others: the public acceptance of such a new technology and fuel. After reviewing the existing literature on acceptance, risk perception and customer satisfaction, this paper describes the development of a model that illustrates

Inga Schulte; David Hart; Rita van der Vorst

2004-01-01

3

Who accepts responsibility for their transgressions?  

PubMed

After committing an offense, transgressors can optimize their chances of reconciling with the victim by accepting responsibility. However, transgressors may be motivated to avoid admitting fault because it can feel threatening to accept blame for harmful behavior. Who, then, is likely to accept responsibility for a transgression? We examined how implicit theories of personality--whether people see personality as malleable (incremental theory) or fixed (entity theory)--influence transgressors' likelihood of accepting responsibility. We argue that incremental theorists may feel less threatened by accepting responsibility because they are more likely to view the situation as an opportunity for them to grow as a person and develop their relationship with the victim. We found support for our predictions across four studies using a combination of real-world and hypothetical offenses, and correlational and experimental methods. These studies therefore identify an important individual difference factor that can lead to more effective responses from transgressors. PMID:25252938

Schumann, Karina; Dweck, Carol S

2014-12-01

4

Issues in Differential Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Differential response (DR), also referred to as alternative response (AR), family assessment response (FAR), or multiple track response, was developed to incorporate family-centered, strengths-based practices into child protective services (CPS), primarily by diverting lower risk families into an assessment track rather than requiring the…

Hughes, Ronald C.; Rycus, Judith S.; Saunders-Adams, Stacey M.; Hughes, Laura K.; Hughes, Kelli N.

2013-01-01

5

Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Issues in Counseling Psychology Training: Acceptance in the Millennium?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reacts to earlier articles concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB) issues in graduate psychology programs. States that these articles demonstrate that psychology may be transitioning from the tolerance stage and is now moving toward the acceptance stage involving shared responsibility in promoting life adjustment and advancement of LGB people in…

Mobley, Michael

1998-01-01

6

What happens after calling the ambulance: Information, communication, and acceptance issues in a telemedical workflow  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we describe the information, communication, and acceptance issues in a telemedical workflow, taking a pre-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) as an example. EMS workflows are extremely time-critical, impose a high responsibility, and crucially depend on a close, welltrained cooperation between EMS personnel. Though increasingly information and communication technologies (ICT) are used to support this sensitive and life-critical

Shirley Beul; Sarah Mennicken; Martina Ziefle; Eva-Maria Jakobs

2010-01-01

7

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Dementia: ethical issues  

E-print Network

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Dementia: ethical issues July 2008 Page 1 of 5 Nuffield Council on Bioethics: Dementia: ethical issues Response by the Wellcome Trust July 2008 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to respond to the Nuffield Council on Bioethics consultation on dementia. Over

Rambaut, Andrew

8

Issues and problems in inferring a level of acceptable risk  

SciTech Connect

The present study addresses the formulation of risk acceptance criteria and the management of risk by goals. Risk-reduction goals are defined as the minimization of accident probabilities, minimization of maximum accident consequences, reduction of risk to levels as low as reasonably achievable, minimization of socially perceived risks, and the equitable sharing of benefits and risks. The explicit or implicit choice of risk-reduction goals themselves becomes a key to risk regulation. As a consequence, agencies that regulate risk, either directly or indirectly, should explicitly recognize and consider the impacts of the goals they adopt.

Salem, S.L.; Solomon, K.A.; Yesley, M.S.

1980-08-01

9

College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

Fowler, Samantha R.

2009-01-01

10

College students' use of science content during socioscientific issues negotiation: Impact of evolution understanding and acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do college students evoke during SSI negotiation, (1b) what is the depth of the

Samantha R. Fowler

2009-01-01

11

Invited Commentary on "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ronald Hughes and his colleagues have written a groundbreaking article on child welfare's use of differential response. Their research addresses the matter from a "lessons learned" and "ways to improve" approach. Our comments focused on three key issues: (1) the importance of evidence-based practice; (2) the recognition…

Vaughan-Eden, Viola; Vandervort, Frank E.

2013-01-01

12

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

2010-10-01

13

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

2011-10-01

14

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

2014-10-01

15

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

2012-10-01

16

49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2...ACCOUNTS, RECORDS AND REPORTS GENERAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE...

2013-10-01

17

College students' use of science content during socioscientific issues negotiation: Impact of evolution understanding and acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do college students evoke during SSI negotiation, (1b) what is the depth of the evolutionary science content reflected in college students. SSI negotiation, and (2) what is the nature of the interaction between evolution understanding and evolution acceptance as they relate to depth of use of evolution content during SSI negotiation? The Socioscientific Issues Questionnaire (SSI-Q) was developed using inductive data analysis to examine science content use and to develop a rubric for measuring depth of evolutionary science content use during SSI negotiation. Sixty upper level undergraduate biology and non-biology majors completed the SSI-Q and also the Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS: Anderson, Fisher, & Norman, 2002) to measure evolution understanding and the Measure of Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution (MATE: Rutledge & Warden, 1999) to measure evolution acceptance. A multiple regression analysis tested for interaction effects between the predictor variables, evolution understanding and evolution acceptance. Results indicate that college students primarily use science concepts related to evolution to negotiate biology-based SSI: variation in a population, inheritance of traits, differential success, and change through time. The hypothesis that the extent of one's acceptance of evolution is a mitigating factor in how evolution content is evoked during SSI negotiation was supported by the data. This was seen in that evolution was the predominant science content used by participants for each of the three SSI scenarios used in this study and used consistently throughout the three SSI scenarios. In addition to its potential to assess aspects of argumentation, a modification of the SSI-Q could be used for further study about students' misconceptions about evolution or scientific literacy, if it is defined as one's tendency to utilize science content during a decision-making process within an SSI context.

Fowler, Samantha R.

18

Training immigrant doctors: issues and responses.  

PubMed

An unprecedented wave of immigration of doctors to Israel, mainly from the former Soviet Union, posed for Israeli health leaders the problem of bringing them to a common and accepted Western level of performance. Stemming from the deep commitment which Israel has towards the immigrants, the state offers them a training opportunity to enhance their chances of being licensed and finding jobs in their profession. A 6-month programme was launched by Ben-Gurion University, later adopted by other medical schools and supported by the Government of Israel. The programme was designed to provide effective responses to the specific problems of the immigrant population, which are: lack of knowledge of local language, both everyday and professional; overspecialization in too narrow specialties; possession of clinical specialties which do not exist in the new country; insufficient updating in medical sciences and technology; unawareness of economic implications of health care; difficulty in originating new solutions to clinical problems, and lack of skill in answering objective test items. The programme is characterized by a protective environment, problem-oriented learning, small-group activities and emphasis on learning languages. The clinical problems are designed to emphasize the general practitioner's point of view of both common and emergency situations. The programme has achieved its goals, as judged by the success rate of its graduates in the National Licensing Examination as compared with the success of immigrant doctors who chose not to participate in the training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8433665

Romem, Y; Benor, D E

1993-01-01

19

Radiation response issues for infrared detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

Kalma, Arne H.

1990-01-01

20

Issues management and inoculation: Tylenol’s responsible dosing advertising  

Microsoft Academic Search

Issues management developed as a long-term process interested in the continued health and success of organizations. This essay presents a contemporary issues management case that uses inoculation and a priori solutions as issues management tactics. The case study involving Johnson & Johnson’s responsible dosing campaign demonstrates that organizations perceived to have a high standard of corporate social responsibility are not

Shari R. Veil; Michael L. Kent

2008-01-01

21

Geologic Sequestration: An Integrated Framework for Assessing Technical, Economic, Public Acceptance, and Policy Issues  

SciTech Connect

Successful deployment of carbon capture and disposal technologies will require a thorough understanding of not only the technical risks and benefits, but also the social acceptability and policy implications of such technologies. There are a variety of approaches for evaluating the technical and economic performance of carbon capture and disposal technologies, such as geologic sequestration, but relatively few that also effectively incorporate the social and policy factors that will affect the deployment of these technologies. We present a framework that integrates knowledge about the technical performance of geological sequestration with economic considerations and public acceptability and policy formulation issues. The utility of an integrated framework is in developing a holistic understanding of the potential impacts and challenges associated with such projects, as well as in identifying opportunities for further investments. In addition, the framework supplies an intellectual construct that employs this knowledge so that stakeholders can understand the totality of this technology and make informed tradeoffs about the deployment of deep geologic carbon disposal in their community or region.

Mahasenan, N Maha; Cook, Elizabeth M.; Saripalli, Prasad

2003-09-01

22

Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute materials and the components of the substitute materials, as well as the automotive parts constructed from the new materials. This report documents a set of analyses that attempt to identify potential barriers--economic, infrastructure, and public acceptance barriers--to the materials substitution in New Generation Vehicles. The analyses rely on hypothetical vehicle market penetration scenarios and material composition. The approach is comprehensive, examining issues ranging from materials availability to their eventual disposition and its effect on the automobile recycling industry, and from supporting industries' capacity to the public acceptability of these vehicles. The analyses focus on two likely substitute materials, aluminum and glass-reinforced polymer composites.

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.E.; Rubin, J.D.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.

1999-03-01

23

IN PURSUIT OF MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE RATES FOR MAIL SURVEYS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT While mail surveys have a reputation for low response rates there is a worldwide concern with the decline in response rates for all types of research. Almost all surveys have some nonresponse,prompting researchers like Brown (1994) and Hosie (1995) to comment that at some level of response, interim estimates for particular questions’ results do not vary significantly from final

Ron Garland; David Tweed

24

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance  

PubMed Central

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n = 18), we used a ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids play a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG, and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula, and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well-being in the social environment. PMID:23958960

Hsu, David T; Sanford, Benjamin J; Meyers, Kortni K; Love, Tiffany M; Hazlett, Kathleen E; Wang, Heng; Ni, Lisong; Walker, Sara J; Mickey, Brian J; Korycinski, Steven T; Koeppe, Robert A; Crocker, Jennifer K; Langenecker, Scott A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

2013-01-01

25

Response of the ?-opioid system to social rejection and acceptance.  

PubMed

The endogenous opioid system, which alleviates physical pain, is also known to regulate social distress and reward in animal models. To test this hypothesis in humans (n=18), we used an ?-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer to measure changes in MOR availability in vivo with positron emission tomography during social rejection (not being liked by others) and acceptance (being liked by others). Social rejection significantly activated the MOR system (i.e., reduced receptor availability relative to baseline) in the ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). This pattern of activation is consistent with the hypothesis that the endogenous opioids have a role in reducing the experience of social pain. Greater trait resiliency was positively correlated with MOR activation during rejection in the amygdala, PAG and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), suggesting that MOR activation in these areas is protective or adaptive. In addition, MOR activation in the pregenual ACC was correlated with reduced negative affect during rejection. In contrast, social acceptance resulted in MOR activation in the amygdala and anterior insula, and MOR deactivation in the midline thalamus and sgACC. In the left ventral striatum, MOR activation during acceptance predicted a greater desire for social interaction, suggesting a role for the MOR system in social reward. The ventral striatum, amygdala, midline thalamus, PAG, anterior insula and ACC are rich in MORs and comprise a pathway by which social cues may influence mood and motivation. MOR regulation of this pathway may preserve and promote emotional well being in the social environment. PMID:23958960

Hsu, D T; Sanford, B J; Meyers, K K; Love, T M; Hazlett, K E; Wang, H; Ni, L; Walker, S J; Mickey, B J; Korycinski, S T; Koeppe, R A; Crocker, J K; Langenecker, S A; Zubieta, J-K

2013-11-01

26

A Quantitative Assessment of the Factors that Influence Technology Acceptance in Emergency Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional models for studying user acceptance and adoption of technology focused on the factors that identify and tested the relationships forged between the user and the technology in question. In emergency response, implementing technology without user acceptance may affect the safety of the responders and citizenry. Integrating the factors…

Seiter, Thomas C.

2012-01-01

27

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications Educational Aspects,  

E-print Network

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications ­ Educational Aspects, August 2005 Revised May 2006 Selected eHealth Applications, Cyprus (2) Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Cyprus (3) Ministry of Health, Cyprus

Pitsillides, Andreas

28

Focus Issue: External and Internal Regulators of Immune Responses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Innate Immunity (http://www.sciencemag.org/special/immunity), highlights the effects of viral and bacterial components on host cells, signaling pathways involved in regulating innate immune responses, and factors that modulate the functions of dendritic cells, which are required for effective adaptive immunity.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science Signaling REV)

2010-01-19

29

Responding to "Issues in Differential Response"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hughes, Rycus, Saunders-Adams, Hughes, and Hughes's article represents an important effort to critically examine the foundation of thought and empirical evidence associated with the rise in prominence of differential response (DR) within child welfare systems throughout the United States. The insights and criticisms offered are an important…

Perry, Robin Ernest

2013-01-01

30

Accepted Manuscript Woody plant population dynamics in response to climate changes from 1984 to  

E-print Network

Accepted Manuscript Woody plant population dynamics in response to climate changes from 1984, E., Soumaguel, N., Baup, F., Woody plant population dynamics in response to climate changes from the resilience Sahel vegetation.14 Keywords: Sahel, Mali, climate change, drought, woody plant population,

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

On the choice of acceptance radius in free-response observer performance studies  

PubMed Central

Objectives Choosing an acceptance radius or proximity criterion is necessary to analyse free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) observer performance data. This is currently subjective, with little guidance in the literature about what is an appropriate acceptance radius. We evaluated varying acceptance radii in a nodule detection task in chest radiography and suggest guidelines for determining an acceptance radius. Methods 80 chest radiographs were chosen, half of which contained nodules. We determined each nodule's centre. 21 radiologists read the images. We created acceptance radii bins of <5 pixels, <10 pixels, <20 pixels and onwards up to <200 and 200+ pixels. We counted lesion localisations in each bin and visually compared marks with the borders of nodules. Results Most reader marks were tightly clustered around nodule centres, with tighter clustering for smaller than for larger nodules. At least 70% of readers' marks were placed within <10 pixels for small nodules, <20 pixels for medium nodules and <30 pixels for large nodules. Of 72 inspected marks that were less than 50 pixels from the centre of a nodule, only 1 fell outside the border of a nodule. Conclusion The acceptance radius should be based on the larger nodule sizes. For our data, an acceptance radius of 50 pixels would have captured all but 2 reader marks within the borders of a nodule, while excluding only 1 true-positive mark. The choice of an acceptance radius for FROC analysis of observer performance studies should be based on the size of larger abnormalities. PMID:22573302

Haygood, T M; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C; Li, S; Marom, E M; McEntee, M F; Itani, M; Evanoff, M; Chakraborty, D

2013-01-01

32

Focus Issue--Tailoring the Immune Response  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recent advances have led to increasing sophistication in our ability to manipulate the immune response to prevent or treat disease. Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a viable therapeutic approach against both cancer and autoimmune disease. Rituximab, the first monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for cancer therapy, appears to achieve its therapeutic effects through a combination of mechanisms that may include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-mediated cell lysis, and the direct stimulation of apoptotic signaling pathways in target cells. Moreover, an increased understanding of the factors that govern immune tolerance has poised us on the brink of further breakthroughs in the immunotherapy of cancer and autoimmune disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that lead to T cell anergy may allow us to promote or overcome tolerance as appropriate in the therapy of autimmune disease and cancer. Activation of toll-like receptor pathways in dendritic cells is one approach that may help break tumor tolerance and thereby enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer dendritic cell vaccines.

Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science's STKE REV)

2004-07-13

33

Sucrose acceptance, discrimination and proboscis responses of honey bees ( Apis mellifera L.) in the field and the laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory studies in honey bees have shown positive correlations between sucrose responsiveness, division of labour and learning.\\u000a We tested the relationships between sucrose acceptance and discrimination in the field and responsiveness in the laboratory.\\u000a Based on acceptance in the field three groups of bees were differentiated: (1) bees that accept sucrose concentrations >10%,\\u000a (2) bees that accept some but not

Samir Mujagic; Joachim Erber

2009-01-01

34

DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS RESPONSE AND HIGH-  

E-print Network

DYNAMIC PROCEDURE AIDS: INCREASING ACCESS, ASSIMILATION, ACCEPTANCE, AND ATTENTION IN CRISIS is known about how to design checklists well, especially new forms of computer-aided checklists; experts produce most existing designs in an ad-hoc manner. In response, we introduce the Dynamic Procedure aids

Klemmer, Scott

35

AGING AND TOXIC RESPONSE: ISSUES RELEVANT TO RISK ASSESSMENT (FINAL)  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has released a final report entitled, Aging and Toxic Response: Issues Relevant to Risk Assessment . This document contributes to the Agency's efforts to better understand the physiology of aging in order to protect the health of older persons, and identifies several d...

36

[People with stomas - issues and responses in critical periods].  

PubMed

People with stomas who have either been cured of cancer or are living with cancer have achieved good interrelationships among the three issues of"establishing self-care","dealing with stoma complications", and"accepting stomas", and they are maintaining stable physical and mental states.However, self-care may become difficult due to stoma complications and adverse events caused by chemotherapy and radiation therapy in the cancer treatment period, and in advanced phases of cancer serious stoma complications may occur due to deterioration of general condition and advancing cancer. Therefore, there is a risk that those stable physical and mental states will collapse.In order to deal with this critical state, in the cancer treatment period, stoma skin care is used for handling skin problems around the stoma, and for adverse events such as hand-and-foot syndrome, braces that are easy to operate are chosen from among various types of stoma braces in order to cover impediments.During advanced phases of cancer, care is conducted with the main priority placed on physical stability in order to ensure that the three major complications of stoma varicose veins, stoma prolapse, and parastomal hernia do not worsen and significantly affect general condition and daily life.Stoma outpatient treatment that provides lifelong support for such issues, and the existence of skin- and excretion-care certified nurses who provided highly specialized selfcare support, are extremely important for cancer survivors with stomas. PMID:24423946

Aoki, Kazue; Ishiguro, Miho

2014-01-01

37

Mothers' and Fathers' Responsive Problem Solving with Early Adolescents: Do Gender, Shyness, and Social Acceptance Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the extent to which youths' (n = 231) shyness and social acceptance in preadolescence were associated with parents' responsive problem solving 1 year later after controlling for initial levels of parents' problem solving. Teachers (n = 176) completed assessments of youths' shyness and social acceptance, and parents (n = 231 married…

Miller, Scott R.; Brody, Gene H.; Murry, Velma M.

2010-01-01

38

Focus Issue: Keeping the Immune Response in Check  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When exploring control of a biological system such as the inflammatory response, we often think first of mechanisms that promote activation of the system. But just as important are the signals that that modulate and terminate these processes. Unchecked recruitment and infiltration of leukocytes into tissues and the unrestrained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can lead to tissue damage and even cancer. This issue of Science’s STKE highlights studies that enhance our understanding of how pro-inflammatory signals are switched on, and--equally important--how they are switched off.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science's STKE REV)

2007-05-01

39

Beyond the Transboundary River: Issues of Riparian Responsibilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The issues of riparian countries sharing transboundary waters spans decades, and has been greatly strengthened by its collaboration with partner agencies. International cooperation on shared water resources is critical, especially in water scarce regions experiencing the impacts of over-consumption and pollution. Where, river basins are transboundary, this requires regular and structured consultation, coordination and cooperation among all states sharing the catchment. Rapid and unsustainable development of river basins and their wetlands has led to the disruption of natural hydrological cycles. In many cases this has resulted in greater frequency and severity of flooding, drought and pollution. Appropriate transnational planning, protection and allocation of water to wetlands are essential to avoid disaster and enable these ecosystems to continue to provide important goods and services to local communities. Integrated river basin management takes into account policies and measures for the multifunctional use of rivers on a catchment scale and associated institutional changes. The implementation of these involves a number of steps such as definition of aim, construction of conceptual model, selection of variables, comparison with selection criteria, database assessment, and indicator selection division of tasks and responsibilities for river basin management with regard to the development of indicators, data collection, and their application in decision-making. This work presents issues pertaining to the pressure to the river, the state of the river ecosystem, the impact to goods and services provided by the river, and the societal response.

Parhi, P. K.; Sankhua, R. N.

2013-11-01

40

Methadone Maintenance for HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients in Kyiv: Acceptability and Treatment Response  

PubMed Central

Background With up to 40% of opioid injectors infected with HIV, Ukraine has one of the most concentrated HIV epidemics in the world, mainly due to unsterile injection practices and a historical absence of effective prevention services. Harm reduction programs, including syringe exchange and a small buprenorphine treatment program, were introduced in 2004 and methadone maintenance was allowed in 2007. Despite an initial expansion, by 2009, only 3221 injectors were receiving methadone treatment. A growing body of research on methadone maintenance has found high retention rates with reduction in opioid use and HIV risk behaviors. We report on the acceptability and initial outcome of methadone treatment as a function of HIV status, an issue that has not yet been reported for injectors in Ukraine. Methods Longitudinal observational study of a 12-week course of methadone treatment in 25 HIV+ and 25 HIV? opioid addicted individuals recruited from a harm reduction program and the city AIDS Center. Drug use and HIV risk were assessed at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12 and 20; all patients were offered continued methadone maintenance in the Kyiv city program at the end of 12 weeks. Results Fifty-four individuals were asked if they were interested in the study and 50, demographically similar to other samples of opioid addicted Ukrainians, agreed to participate. Two died of non-study related causes; the other 48 completed assessments at weeks 4, 8 and 12, and 47 completed followups at week 20. Significant reductions were seen in use of heroin (p<. 0001), other opiates/analgesics (p< 0.0001), and HIV risk behaviors (drug, sex, total; all p <0.0001). All 48 patients chose to continue methadone after the 12-weeks of study medication ended. Unlike most opioid treatment studies, sexual risk was somewhat higher than injecting risk at study intake. Conclusions Methadone maintenance was well accepted by HIV+ and HIV? opioid dependent individuals and has the potential for significant public health impact if made more widely available with sustained access and support. PMID:24548802

Dvoriak, Sergii; Karachevsky, Andrey; Chhatre, Sumedha; Booth, Robert; Metzger, David; Schumacher, Joseph; Chychula, Nina; Pecoraro, Anna; Woody, George

2014-01-01

41

Host acceptance and sex allocation of Nasonia wasps in response to conspecifics and heterospecifics.  

PubMed

Species recognition is an important aspect of an organism's biology. Here, we consider how parasitoid wasps vary their reproductive decisions when their offspring face intra- and interspecific competition for resources and mates. We use host acceptance and sex ratio behaviour to test whether female Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia longicornis discriminate between conspecifics and heterospecifics when ovipositing. We tested pairs of conspecific or heterospecific females ovipositing either simultaneously or sequentially on a single host, using strains varying in their recent history of sympatry. Both N. vitripennis and N. longicornis rejected parasitized hosts more often than unparasitized hosts, although females were more likely to superparasitize their own species in the sequential treatment. However, sex ratio behaviour did not vary, suggesting similar responses towards conspecifics and heterospecifics. This contrasts with theory predicting that heterospecifics should not influence sex ratios as their offspring do not influence local mate competition, where conspecifics would. These non-adaptive sex ratios reinforce the lack of adaptive kin discrimination in N. vitripennis and suggest a behavioural constraint. Discrimination between closely related species is therefore context dependent in Nasonia. We suggest that isolating mechanisms associated with the speciation process have influenced behaviour to a greater extent than selection on sex ratios. PMID:19640886

Ivens, A B F; Shuker, D M; Beukeboom, L W; Pen, I

2009-10-22

42

Individualism, acceptance and differentiation as attitude traits in the public’s response to vaccination  

PubMed Central

The attitude of the general public to vaccination was evaluated through a survey conducted on a representative sample of the Israeli population (n = 2,018), in which interviewees were requested to express their standpoints regarding five different vaccination programs. These included: pandemic influenza vaccination, seasonal influenza vaccination, travel vaccines, Human Papilloma Virus vaccine and childhood vaccinations. Analysis of the responses reveal three major attitude traits: a) acceptance, characterized by the opinion that targets should be vaccinated; b) individualism, characterized by the opinion that vaccination should be left to personal choice; and c) differentiation, characterized by the tendency to express different attitudes when addressing different vaccination programs. Interestingly, direct opposition to vaccination was found to be a minor attitude trait in this survey. Groups within the population could be defined according to their tendency to assume these different attitudes as Acceptors, Judicious-acceptors, Differentiators, Soft-individualists, and Hard-individualists. These groups expressed different standpoints on all five vaccination programs as well as on other health recommendations, such as screening for early detection of cancer. Attitude traits could be also correlated, to a certain extent, with actual compliance with vaccination programs. Interestingly, attitudes to vaccination were not correlated with social profiles related to income or education, although younger individuals exhibited higher degrees of individualism and differentiation. Taken together, all this is in accordance with the current social settings, underlining the individual's tendency for critical evaluation and self-stirring. This should be taken into consideration by health authorities involved in vaccination programs. PMID:22894959

Velan, Baruch; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Ziv, Arnona; Yagar, Yaakov; Kaplan, Giora

2012-01-01

43

LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2  

SciTech Connect

This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

Schwartz, W W

2009-11-19

44

Acceptability of the female condom in Zimbabwe: Positive but male-centred responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acceptability study of the female condom was carried out in Zimbabwe among sex workers (89), urban women attending a family planning clinic in Harare (84), and rural women (23). Their main reason for trying this new method was as protection from sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Over 50 per cent of the women in all three groups said that

Sunanda Ray; Mary Bassett; Caroline Maposhere; Portia Manangazira; Roderick Machekano; Josephine Moyo

1995-01-01

45

Coming to School in Connecticut: Accepting Children as They Are. Issue Papers Developed by the Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of seven policy issue papers developed by the Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council, an action-oriented coalition of statewide organizations concerned with early childhood education. Members include teachers, school administrators, children's librarians, child care providers, Head Start directors, State Department of…

Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council.

46

State subsidies induce gray jays to accept greater danger: an ecologically rational response?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of strictly rational choice assume that decision-makers evaluate options on relevant dimensions, assign fixed values\\u000a to options, and then make consistent choices based on these values. If so, recent experience would have no impact on preference.\\u000a But, recent events change an animal’s state, and preference may change accordingly. We explore how state affects willingness\\u000a to accept greater danger to

Thomas A. Waite; Andrew L. Nevai; Kevin M. Passino

2007-01-01

47

Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

2009-01-01

48

Approaching Civic Responsibility Using Guided Controversies about Environmental Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We implemented a series of three guided controversies to provide experience in environmental problem solving to students in a science course designed for nonmajors. Students wrote essays in response to their experiences in each controversy; we analyzed these essays for five problem-solving criteria. A questionnaire administered at the end of the…

Dresner, Marion; Blatner, Jen Seamans

2006-01-01

49

Public acceptance of wildland fire and fuel management: panel responses in seven locations.  

PubMed

Wildland fire affects both public and private resources throughout the United States. A century of fire suppression has contributed to changing ecological conditions and accumulated fuel loads. Managers have used a variety of approaches to address these conditions and reduce the likelihood of wildland fires that may result in adverse ecological impacts and threaten communities. Public acceptance is a critical component of developing and implementing successful management programs. This study examines the factors that influence citizen support for agency fuel reduction treatments over time-particularly prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study examining resident beliefs and attitudes regarding fire management and fuels treatments in seven states: Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Utah, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The study was implemented in two phases over a 6-year period using mail surveys to residents of communities adjacent to federal lands in each location. Questions replicated measures from the original project as well as some new items to allow a more in-depth analysis of key concepts. The study design enables comparisons over time as well as between locations. We also assess the factors that influence acceptance of both prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. Findings demonstrate a relative stability of attitudes toward fuels management approaches over time and suggest that this acceptance is strongly influenced by confidence in resource managers and beliefs that the treatments would result in positive outcomes. PMID:25034754

Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; McCaffrey, Sarah; Bennett, James

2014-09-01

50

Public Acceptance of Wildland Fire and Fuel Management: Panel Responses in Seven Locations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wildland fire affects both public and private resources throughout the United States. A century of fire suppression has contributed to changing ecological conditions and accumulated fuel loads. Managers have used a variety of approaches to address these conditions and reduce the likelihood of wildland fires that may result in adverse ecological impacts and threaten communities. Public acceptance is a critical component of developing and implementing successful management programs. This study examines the factors that influence citizen support for agency fuel reduction treatments over time—particularly prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study examining resident beliefs and attitudes regarding fire management and fuels treatments in seven states: Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Utah, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The study was implemented in two phases over a 6-year period using mail surveys to residents of communities adjacent to federal lands in each location. Questions replicated measures from the original project as well as some new items to allow a more in-depth analysis of key concepts. The study design enables comparisons over time as well as between locations. We also assess the factors that influence acceptance of both prescribed fire and mechanical vegetation removal. Findings demonstrate a relative stability of attitudes toward fuels management approaches over time and suggest that this acceptance is strongly influenced by confidence in resource managers and beliefs that the treatments would result in positive outcomes.

Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; McCaffrey, Sarah; Bennett, James

2014-09-01

51

Public Acceptance of Wildland Fire and Fuel Management: Panel Responses in Seven Locations  

E-print Network

/ Published online: 18 July 2014 Ã? Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Wildland fire study examining social issues was completed by Stankey among wilderness users in a 1971 study in Montana the negative impacts of fire while underestimating fire's beneficial effects. Not surprisingly, a majority

52

Response efficacy: the key to minimizing rejection and maximizing acceptance of emotion-based anti-speeding messages.  

PubMed

This study sought to improve understanding of the persuasive process of emotion-based appeals not only in relation to negative, fear-based appeals but also for appeals based upon positive emotions. In particular, the study investigated whether response efficacy, as a cognitive construct, mediated outcome measures of message effectiveness in terms of both acceptance and rejection of negative and positive emotion-based messages. Licensed drivers (N=406) participated via the completion of an on-line survey. Within the survey, participants received either a negative (fear-based) appeal or one of the two possible positive appeals (pride or humor-based). Overall, the study's findings confirmed the importance of emotional and cognitive components of persuasive health messages and identified response efficacy as a key cognitive construct influencing the effectiveness of not only fear-based messages but also positive emotion-based messages. Interestingly, however, the results suggested that response efficacy's influence on message effectiveness may differ for positive and negative emotion-based appeals such that significant indirect (and mediational) effects were found with both acceptance and rejection of the positive appeals yet only with rejection of the fear-based appeal. As such, the study's findings provide an important extension to extant literature and may inform future advertising message design. PMID:20159067

Lewis, I M; Watson, B; White, K M

2010-03-01

53

XX = Primary Responsibility; Driver to address or resolve issue X = Involved or participates in resolution  

E-print Network

XX = Primary Responsibility; Driver to address or resolve issue X = Involved or participates research policy formulation X X X X X XX X X X X 2 Oversee the research administration process and education/training in the responsible conduct of research X X XX X 3 Review, interpret and disseminate

54

December 2002 Issue #13 2002 SULFUR RESPONSES AND THE WISCONSIN ALFALFA SULFUR  

E-print Network

December 2002 Issue #13 ­ 2002 SULFUR RESPONSES AND THE WISCONSIN ALFALFA SULFUR SURVEY 1/ K to applied sulfur fertilizer in northern and western Wisconsin on lighter textured, low organic matter soils and Kelling, 1987). More recently, crop consultants and others have reported seeing sulfur responses on soils

Balser, Teri C.

55

Rapid-response impulsivity: Definitions, measurement issues, and clinical implications.  

PubMed

Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Experts from the International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) met to discuss and evaluate RRI measures in terms of reliability, sensitivity, and validity, with the goal of helping researchers and clinicians make informed decisions about the use and interpretation of findings from RRI measures. Their recommendations are described in this article. Commonly used clinical and preclinical RRI tasks are described, and considerations are provided to guide task selection. Tasks measuring two conceptually and neurobiologically distinct types of RRI, "refraining from action initiation" (RAI) and "stopping an ongoing action" (SOA) are described. RAI and SOA tasks capture distinct aspects of RRI that may relate to distinct clinical outcomes. The InSRI group recommends that (a) selection of RRI measures should be informed by careful consideration of the strengths, limitations, and practical considerations of the available measures; (b) researchers use both RAI and SOA tasks in RRI studies to allow for direct comparison of RRI types and examination of their associations with clinically relevant measures; and (c) similar considerations be made for human and nonhuman studies in an effort to harmonize and integrate preclinical and clinical research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25867840

Hamilton, Kristen R; Littlefield, Andrew K; Anastasio, Noelle C; Cunningham, Kathryn A; Fink, Latham H L; Wing, Victoria C; Mathias, Charles W; Lane, Scott D; Schütz, Christian G; Swann, Alan C; Lejuez, C W; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F Gerard; Potenza, Marc N

2015-04-01

56

Teaching and Learning Responsible Research Conduct: Influences of Prior Experiences on Acceptance of New Ideas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite requirements for Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training, little is known about how much this training actually influences the thinking and behaviors of participants. Interview-based qualitative research methods were used to study the reactions of Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows to what was taught in an RCR course. For trainees with limited prior RCR experience, or who agreed with

RICHARD MCGEE; JULKA ALMQUIST; JILL L. KELLER; STEVEN J. JACOBSEN

2008-01-01

57

What Responsibilities Should Teachers Accept? Stirling Educational Seminar Papers No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five value-laden levels of increasing responsibility are outlined as criteria applied to teacher's own activities; students' overt classroom behavior; comprehension and attitudes; abilities acquired by students; and future characteristics of students. Knowledge available to a teacher and working conditions influence level choice more than teacher…

McIntyre, Donald

1979-01-01

58

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10

59

Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues  

SciTech Connect

Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

Herzenberg, C.L.

1998-09-01

60

Critical Issues in State-Local Fiscal Policy: Sorting Out State and Local Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States is undergoing a transition as state governments reclaim responsibilities that the federal government had assumed earlier in the century. Sorting out which governmental body should take charge of various services is the subject of this report. It focuses on two critical issues in the relationship between state and local…

National Conference of State Legislatures, Denver, CO.

61

Teaching and learning responsible research conduct: influences of prior experiences on acceptance of new ideas.  

PubMed

Despite requirements for Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training, little is known about how much this training actually influences the thinking and behaviors of participants. Interview-based qualitative research methods were used to study the reactions of Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows to what was taught in an RCR course. For trainees with limited prior RCR experience, or who agreed with what was taught, it was relatively easy to influence their attitudes and how they thought they would use the new information in the future. However, if their prior experiences or existing knowledge conflicted with what was taught they resisted and often rejected new ideas that were presented. Interviews also revealed the tremendously complex process trainees must undergo trying to resolve or integrate all of the different perspectives they receive on RCR from other sources. These results revealed the importance of viewing RCR training from the perspective of learning theory and how prior knowledge influences what people learn. The results also support the need for periodic rather than one-time RCR training to counter the often conflicting views and practices young scientists experience in real-life research settings. PMID:18298028

McGee, Richard; Almquist, Julka; Keller, Jill L; Jacobsen, Steven J

2008-01-01

62

First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012  

PubMed Central

Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be integrated as an additional tool into the response. PMID:24147164

Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

2013-01-01

63

Young Children’s Affective Responses to Acceptance and Rejection From Peers: A Computer-based Task Sensitive to Variation in Temperamental Shyness and Gender  

PubMed Central

This study presents a novel task examining young children’s affective responses to evaluative feedback—specifically, social acceptance and rejection—from peers. We aimed to determine (1) whether young children report their affective responses to hypothetical peer evaluation predictably and consistently, and (2) whether young children’s responses to peer evaluation vary as a function of temperamental shyness and gender. Four- to seven-year-old children (N = 48) sorted pictures of unknown, similar-aged children into those with whom they wished or did not wish to play. Computerized peer evaluation later noted whether the pictured children were interested in a future playdate with participants. Participants then rated their affective responses to each acceptance or rejection event. Children were happy when accepted by children with whom they wanted to play, and disappointed when these children rejected them. Highly shy boys showed a wider range of responses to acceptance and rejection based on initial social interest, and may be particularly sensitive to both positive and negative evaluation. Overall, the playdate task captures individual differences in affective responses to evaluative peer feedback and is potentially amenable to future applications in research with young children, including pairings with psychophysiological measures. PMID:23997429

Howarth, Grace Z.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly

2013-01-01

64

Different communities, different perspectives: issues affecting residents' response to a volcanic eruption in southern Iceland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano and emergency response procedures in all rural and urban communities located in the eastern and southern Katla hazard zones. Using a questionnaire survey conducted in 2008, we demonstrate that there is an apparent difference between rural and urban communities' knowledge and perceptions, and identify some of the issues influencing residents' perspectives and behaviour. All rural and most urban residents have an accurate knowledge of Katla, the proposed warning system and emergency response plan. Urban residents perceived the emergency response plan to be appropriate. In comparison, rural residents did not perceive the emergency response plan as appropriate. Rural residents stated that they would personally assess the situation before deciding on a course of action independent of the proposed plan. Livelihood connections and inherited knowledge affect rural residents' ability and willingness to comply with the recommended procedures. Factors such as hazard knowledge, sense of community and attachment to place indicate that rural residents are more resilient to volcanic hazards. Based on our findings we recommend that emergency management agencies consider issues such as personal responsibility, neighbourliness and community involvement and cooperation, to develop and implement more appropriate volcanic risk mitigation strategies. In light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, we provide a brief discussion on the 2010 emergency response. Although our findings are Iceland-specific, our recommendations may be applied internationally to other volcanic and disaster-prone regions.

Bird, Deanne K.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Dominey-Howes, Dale

2011-11-01

65

Accepted for publication in a special issue of Energy and Buildings. This research effort was funded by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) through the California Institute  

E-print Network

LBNL-49018 DA-438 Accepted for publication in a special issue of Energy and Buildings. This research effort was funded by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) through the California Institute the endorsement or agreement of any CIEE sponsor. Pacific Gas & Electric Company's funding is provided

66

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1  

E-print Network

, and three assumptions as to how the terrorists craft their attacks. Index Terms--Decision support systemThis article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final for Electric Power Systems Under Terrorist Threat Natalia Romero, Ningxiong Xu, Linda K. Nozick, Ian Dobson

Dobson, Ian

67

Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.  

PubMed

E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices. PMID:18162284

Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

2009-01-01

68

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating various aspects of DR programs. This paper also describes the various technical aspects of the DRAS including its interfaces and major modes of operation. This includes how the DRAS supports automating such Utility/Customer interactions as automated DR bidding, automated DR event handling, and finally real-time pricing.

Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-10-01

69

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for  

E-print Network

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In early 2009 the FWS removed the published 1988 and 1996 wetland plant lists from their National Wetland

US Army Corps of Engineers

70

1988 National List of Plant Species that Occur in Wetlands The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for  

E-print Network

1988 National List of Plant Species that Occur in Wetlands The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In early 2009 the FWS removed the published 1988 and 1966 wetland

US Army Corps of Engineers

71

Optimization of Chemical properties, Sensory Descriptive and Consumer Acceptance of Jiaogulan tea Using Response Surface Methodology (RSM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jiaogulan (Gynostemma pentaphyllum, GP) is a Chinese medicinal herb which can grow in Thailand. The objective of this study was to optimize the chemi- cal component, the sensory quality and consumer acceptance of Jiaogulan tea. The sensory descriptive analysis was conducted to describe the sensory properties of Jiaogulan tea. The hedonic scaling method was used to measure the consumer acceptability

Niramon Utama-ang; Penkwan Chompreeda; Vichai Haruthaithanasan; Nusiri Lerdvuthisopon; Thongchai Suwonsichon; Bruce A. Watkins

2007-01-01

72

Positive Emotional Responses to Hybridised Writing about a Socio-Scientific Issue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to understand better the role of affect in learning about socio-scientific issues (SSI), this study investigated Year 12 students' emotional arousal as they participated in an online writing-to-learn science project about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. Students wrote a series of hybridised scientific narratives, or BioStories, that integrate scientific information about biosecurity with narrative storylines, and uploaded these to a dedicated website. Throughout their participation in the project, students recorded their emotional responses to the various activities ( N = 50). Four case students were also video recorded during selected science lessons as they researched, composed and uploaded their BioStories for peer review. Analysis of these data, as well as interview data obtained from the case students, revealed that pride, strength, determination, interest and alertness were among the positive emotions most strongly elicited by the project. These emotions reflected students' interest in learning about a new socio-scientific issue, and their enhanced feelings of self-efficacy in successfully writing hybridised scientific narratives in science. The results of this study suggest that the elicitation of positive emotional responses as students engage in hybridised writing about SSI with strong links to environmental education, such as biosecurity, can be valuable in engaging students in education for sustainability.

Tomas, Louisa; Ritchie, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

73

The glial response to intracerebrally delivered therapies for neurodegenerative disorders: is this a critical issue?  

PubMed Central

The role of glial cells in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) is now well established (as is discussed in other reviews in this special issue of Frontiers in Neuropharmacology). What is less clear is whether there are changes in these same cells in terms of their behavior and function in response to invasive experimental therapeutic interventions for these diseases. This has, and will continue to become more of an issue as we enter a new era of novel treatments which require the agent to be directly placed/infused into the CNS such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), cell transplants, gene therapies and growth factor infusions. To date, all of these treatments have produced variable outcomes and the reasons for this have been widely debated but the host astrocytic and/or microglial response induced by such invasively delivered agents has not been discussed in any detail. In this review, we have attempted to summarize the limited published data on this, in particular we discuss the small number of human post-mortem studies reported in this field. By so doing, we hope to provide a better description and understanding of the extent and nature of both the astrocytic and microglial response, which in turn could lead to modifications in the way these therapeutic interventions are delivered. PMID:25071571

Cicchetti, Francesca; Barker, Roger A.

2014-01-01

74

Should age-period-cohort analysts accept innovation without scrutiny? A response to Reither, Masters, Yang, Powers, Zheng and Land.  

PubMed

This commentary clarifies our original commentary (Bell and Jones, 2014c) and illustrates some concerns we have regarding the response article in this issue (Reither et al., 2015). In particular, we argue that (a) linear effects do not have to be produced by exact linear mathematical functions to behave as if they were linear, (b) linear effects by this wider definition are extremely common in real life social processes, and (c) in the presence of these effects, the Hierarchical Age Period Cohort (HAPC) model will often not work. Although Reither et al. do not define what a 'non-linear monotonic trend' is (instead, only stating that it isn't a linear effect) we show that the model often doesn't work in the presence of such effects, by using data generated as a 'non-linear monotonic trend' by Reither et al. themselves. We then question their discussion of fixed and random effects before finishing with a discussion of how we argue that theory should be used, in the context of the obesity epidemic. PMID:25641207

Bell, Andrew; Jones, Kelvyn

2015-03-01

75

Victoria's Child FIRST and IFS differential response system: progress and issues.  

PubMed

Differential response has long been utilized by statutory child protection systems in Australia. This article describes the advent and history of Victoria's differential response system, with a particular focus on the Child FIRST and IFS programme. This program entails a partnership arrangement between the Department of Human Services child protection services and community-based, not-for-profit agencies to provide a diverse range of early intervention and prevention services. The findings of a recent external service system evaluation, a judicial inquiry, and the large-scale Child and Family Services Outcomes Survey of parents/carers perspectives of their service experiences are used to critically examine the effectiveness of this differential response approach. Service-user perspectives of the health and wellbeing of children and families are identified, as well as the recognized implementation issues posing significant challenges for the goal of an integrated partnership system. The need for ongoing reform agendas is highlighted along with the policy, program and structural tensions that exist in differential response systems, which are reliant upon partnerships and shared responsibilities for protecting children and assisting vulnerable families. Suggestions are made for utilizing robust research and evaluation that gives voice to service users and promotes their rights and interests. PMID:25192958

Lonne, Bob; Brown, Gerry; Wagner, Ingrid; Gillespie, Kerri

2015-01-01

76

36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods... (a) The Director of National Intelligence is responsible for issuing...

2011-07-01

77

36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods...declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods... (a) The Director of National Intelligence is responsible for issuing...

2010-07-01

78

43 CFR 3200.8 - What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications pending on August 8, 2005?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Geothermal Resource Leasing § 3200.8 What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications...

2013-10-01

79

43 CFR 3200.8 - What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications pending on August 8, 2005?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Geothermal Resource Leasing § 3200.8 What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications...

2014-10-01

80

43 CFR 3200.8 - What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications pending on August 8, 2005?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Geothermal Resource Leasing § 3200.8 What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications...

2012-10-01

81

43 CFR 3200.8 - What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications pending on August 8, 2005?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Geothermal Resource Leasing § 3200.8 What regulations apply to leases issued in response to applications...

2011-10-01

82

Unresolved Issues in Scientific Sexology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of unresolved issues in sexologyresearch and practice are reviewed. Penile volumeassessment of sexual arousal has consistently provedmore sensitive than penile circumference assessment andrequires much shorter exposure to the erotic stimulieliciting the arousal, reducing the subjects' ability tomodify their responses. Failure to acknowledge this hasallowed acceptance of evidence based on penile circumference assessment that behavioraltreatments such as directed masturbation

Nathaniel McConaghy

1999-01-01

83

The impact of developer responsiveness on perceptions of usefulness and ease of use: an extension of the technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) suggests that the perceived usefulness (PU) and the perceived ease of use (PEOU) of an information system (IS) are major determinants of its use. Previous research has demonstrated the validity of this model across a wide variety of IS types. However, prior research has not identified antecedents of PU and there has been only limited

David Gefen; Mark Keil

1998-01-01

84

Developmental models for estimating ecological responses to environmental variability: structural, parametric, and experimental issues  

PubMed Central

Developmental models that account for the metabolic effect of temperature variability on poikilotherms, such as degree-day models, have been widely used to study organism emergence, range and development, particularly in agricultural and vector-borne disease contexts. Though simple and easy to use, structural and parametric issues can influence the outputs of such models, often substantially. Because the underlying assumptions and limitations of these models have rarely been considered, this paper reviews the structural, parametric, and experimental issues that arise when using degree-day models, including the implications of particular structural or parametric choices, as well as assumptions that underlie commonly used models. Linear and nonlinear developmental functions are compared, as are common methods used to incorporate temperature thresholds and calculate daily degree-days. Substantial differences in predicted emergence time arose when using linear vs. non-linear developmental functions to model the emergence time in a model organism. The optimal method for calculating degree-days depends upon where key temperature threshold parameters fall relative to the daily minimum and maximum temperatures, as well as the shape of the daily temperature curve. No method is shown to be universally superior, though one commonly used method, the daily average method, consistently provides accurate results. The sensitivity of model projections to these methodological issues highlights the need to make structural and parametric selections based on a careful consideration of the specific biological response of the organism under study, and the specific temperature conditions of the geographic regions of interest. When degree-day model limitations are considered and model assumptions met, the models can be a powerful tool for studying temperature-dependent development. PMID:24443079

Moore, Julia L

2014-01-01

85

Received 9 Dec 2013 | Accepted 25 Sep 2014 | Published 17 Nov 2014 Coccolithophore calcification response to past  

E-print Network

calcification response to past ocean acidification and climate change Sarah A. O'Dea1, Samantha J. Gibbs1, Paul carbon dioxide emissions are forcing rapid ocean chemistry changes and causing ocean acidification (OA barrier (the coccosphere). Our current understanding of coccolithophore responses to ocean acidification

86

View of Socioscientific Issues among Educators: The Willingness of Teachers to Accept SSI into the Classroom and the Reasoning Underyling Those Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socioscientific issues (SSI) are potentially controversial topics, which can be examined using a social and a scientific perspective. The inclusion of these topics in elementary and secondary classrooms has caused a number of conflicts over the past century. In the present study, I explore the willingness of teachers to include three SSI:…

Parr, John Carlos

2013-01-01

87

Coming to School in Connecticut: Accepting Children As They Are. Issue Papers Developed by the Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of seven policy issue papers developed by the Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council, an action-oriented coalition of statewide organizations concerned with early childhood education. Members include teachers, school administrators, children's librarians, child care providers, Head Start directors, State Department of…

Connecticut Early Childhood Education Council.

88

Cone penetrometer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

Boechler, G.N.

1996-09-19

89

EPA'S REANALYSIS OF KEY ISSUES RELATED TO DIOXIN TOXICITY AND RESPONSE TO NAS COMMENTS (VOLUME 1) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA is releasing the draft report, EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (Volume 1) , that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the ...

90

Submitted to Energy and Buildings February 23, 2005 and accepted for publication March 1, 2006. Subject responses to electrochromic windows  

E-print Network

. LBNL-57125 Subject responses to electrochromic windows R.D. Clear* , V. Inkarojrit, E.S. Lee Building in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually- operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3

91

Towards ecologically meaningful and socially acceptable buffers: Response distances of shorebirds in Victoria, Australia, to human disturbance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buffers are often used to separate threatening stimuli, such as humans, from wildlife but with few exceptions buffer widths are based on little empirical information. We measured the distance at which a response (i.e., flight initiation distance [FID]) occurred among 28 of Australia's 36 regularly occurring shorebird species when presented with an approaching human (n=760 approaches in Victoria, south eastern

Hayley K. Glover; Michael A. Weston; Grainne S. Maguire; Kelly K. Miller; Belinda A. Christie

2011-01-01

92

Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo  

PubMed Central

Background Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. Method An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. Results A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. Conclusions This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change. PMID:24929563

2014-01-01

93

A Disability Studies Response to JTE's Themed Issue on Diversity and Disability in Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a recent themed issue of "Journal of Teacher Education" ("JTE" 63.4) about issues of disability, diversity, and teacher education, guest editors Marleen Pugach, Linda Blanton, and Lani Florian (2012) invite readers to participate in "honest, difficult, and much needed dialogue across the many diversity constituencies in teacher education" (p.…

Collins, Kathleen M.

2013-01-01

94

Nuclear Power as an Ethical Issue: Utilitarian Ethics and Egalitarian Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the philosophical debate over the issue of nuclear power. Discussed are the utilitarian nature of the justification of nuclear power and the utilitarian approaches to the issue of nuclear power, the strengths and weaknesses of this approach, and utilitarian versus egalitarian ethics. (KR)

Hadjilambrinos, Constantine

1990-01-01

95

Positive Emotional Responses to Hybridised Writing about a Socio-Scientific Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to understand better the role of affect in learning about socio-scientific issues (SSI), this study investigated Year 12 students' emotional arousal as they participated in an online writing-to-learn science project about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. Students wrote a series of hybridised scientific narratives, or BioStories,…

Tomas, Louisa; Ritchie, Stephen M.

2012-01-01

96

Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

2003-10-06

97

RESPONSE TO ISSUES AND DATA SUBMISSIONS ON THE CARCINOGENICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)  

EPA Science Inventory

The scientific debate over the potential carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. his document reviews the issues considered by the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addendum to the Health Assessmen...

98

Basic Issues in the Interpretive Paradigm: A Response to Messrs. Heap, Munby, and Olson.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exploring ontological, epistemological, and conceptual questions of his work, the author discusses three essential issues: interpreting meaning, the interpretive paradigm and the generalizability of findings, and instruction versus assessment. (MD)

Heyman, Richard D.

1983-01-01

99

A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues  

E-print Network

There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

Shapira, Yoav

2006-01-01

100

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

101

Paradigmatic Compulsions: A Response to Hills's "Issues in Research on Instructional Supervision."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jean Hill's article in the same "Journal of Curriculum and Supervision" issue critiques the interpretivists' alleged ambiguities, contradictions, and uncritically held assumptions, based on the a priori assumptions of his own positivist paradigm. Critical theorists would deplore the exclusion of Marxism, feminism, and race-specific orientations…

Scheurich, James Joseph; Lather, Patti

1991-01-01

102

Acceptability of human risk.  

PubMed Central

This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

Kasperson, R E

1983-01-01

103

Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?  

PubMed

The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa. PMID:21981823

Adenle, Ademola A

2011-01-01

104

Reexamining traditional issues in survey research: Just how evil is the anathema of low response rate?  

SciTech Connect

Survey researchers have long been exhorted to strive for high response rates in order to maximize the likelihood that the respondents are representative of the population being surveyed. It is not surprising then, that much survey research has been directed towards examining the effects of various manipulatable factors on response rate. It is clear that attempts to reach the goal of minimizing the likelihood of nonresponse bias through testing various methods of increasing survey response rates have consumed much research and debate. The results obtained in this research have been inconsistent. Some studies have found significant differences, others have found none. The present study was designed to determine the extent to which the results of an employment survey of former graduates of a teacher preparation program would have been affected by changes in response rate.

Clark, S.B. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States). Science/Engineering Education Division; Boser, J.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-08-01

105

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed...20 U.S.C. 1145g) [55 FR 33581, Aug. 16, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 66225, Dec. 17,...

2012-07-01

106

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed...20 U.S.C. 1145g) [55 FR 33581, Aug. 16, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 66225, Dec. 17,...

2011-07-01

107

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed...20 U.S.C. 1145g) [55 FR 33581, Aug. 16, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 66225, Dec. 17,...

2013-07-01

108

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed...20 U.S.C. 1145g) [55 FR 33581, Aug. 16, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 66225, Dec. 17,...

2014-07-01

109

34 CFR 86.303 - What are the procedures used by the Secretary for issuing a response other than the formulation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...assistance? 86.303 Section 86.303 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by an IHE § 86.303...

2010-07-01

110

Biological weapons, genetics and social analysis: emerging responses, emerging issues--I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent terrorist attacks in the USA have generated significant attention in many countries to the threats posed by biological weapons. In response to these events and the spectre of future attacks, bioscientists and professional organizations have begun or intensified asking questions about the possible malign applications of their research. As Part I of a two-part article, this paper surveys how

BRIAN RAPPERT

2003-01-01

111

Technology Teacher Education: Alternative Pathways Established in Response to Issues of Supply and Demand in NSW  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher shortages have encouraged initiatives to tailor training programs to meet the demand in both past, current and future contexts. Such programs have been streamlined to ensure a rapid response to shortages, in addition to also drawing participants from non-traditional groups as a source of potential educators. Within teacher education,…

Cornius-Randall, Rachael

2004-01-01

112

Response-to-Intervention in High-Risk Preschools: Critical Issues for Implementation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes the current knowledge of response-to-intervention (RTI) models in preschool settings, with an emphasis on evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of our current research base. Particular attention is given to the unique challenges of high-risk preschool settings. Presently, sufficient empirical support exists to begin…

Ball, Carrie R.; Trammell, Beth A.

2011-01-01

113

Learning through Life: A Response to the Special Issue 29(4)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this response to the commentaries, the author makes some general observations on the nature of the Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning (IFLL) and "Learning Through Life" ("LTL"): their design and purpose. He then turns to the comments from the "International Journal of Lifelong Education" ("IJLE") contributors which seem to him to…

Schuller, Tom

2010-01-01

114

Teacher Perceptions of Issues Related to Implementation of Response to Intervention in the Regular Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several school districts in a southern US state use a three-tiered Response to Intervention (RtI) model to supplemental core reading instruction and positively impact student achievement, the model appears to have had nominal impact. The theoretical foundation for this study is anchored in a constructivist approach to education. Three…

Bissell, Erica K.

2012-01-01

115

Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

2002-01-01

116

Do Ethical Judgments Depend on the Type of Response Scale? Comparing Acceptability versus Unacceptability Judgments in the Case of Life-Ending Procedures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using Functional Measurement (Anderson, 2008), Frileux, Lelievre, Munoz Sastre, Mullet, and Sorum (2003) examined the joint impact of several key factors on lay people's judgments of the acceptability of physicians' interventions to end patients' lives. The level of acceptability was high, and the information integration rule that best described…

Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Gonzalez, Charlene; Lhermitte, Astrid; Sorum, Paul C.; Mullet, Etienne

2010-01-01

117

SPECIAL ISSUE ON 'CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING MITIGATION ANDADAPTATION AS RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE'  

SciTech Connect

This special issue of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategiesfor Global Change (MITI) reflects a growing recognition that the globalresponse to possible impacts of climate change will include bothmitigation and adaptation (M&A). On the one hand, impacts are alreadyemerging and mitigation efforts are not progressing as rapidly as hadonce been hoped. Further, even if greenhouse gas emissions were to stopabruptly, climate change will continue because of historically committedemissions. As a result, adaptation cannot be avoided. It will beessential, and in some cases it is essential now. On the other hand, ifclimate change is significant, impacts may exceed the capacity of manydeveloping countries, natural ecosystems, and high-impact sites to adapt,which means that mitigation is equally essential.

WILBANKS, THOMAS J.; SATHAYE JAYANT; KLEIN, RICHARD J.T.

2007-05-01

118

Measurement Issues in Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR): Toward a Transparent, Reliable, and Construct Valid Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the major roadblocks in conducting Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR) research is operationalization\\u000a of the construct. Existing ECSR measurement tools either require primary data gathering or special subscriptions to proprietary\\u000a databases that have limited replicability. We address this deficiency by developing a transparent ECSR measure, with an explicit\\u000a coding scheme, that strictly relies on publicly available data. Our

Noushi Rahman; Corinne Post

2012-01-01

119

Generating a taxonomy of regulatory responses to emerging issues in biomedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the biomedical field, calls for the generation of new regulations or for the amendment of existing regulations often follow\\u000a the emergence of apparently new research practices (such as embryonic stem cell research), clinical practices (such as facial\\u000a transplantation) and entities (such as Avian Influenza\\/’Bird Flu’). Calls for regulatory responses also arise as a result\\u000a of controversies which bring to

Wendy Lipworth

2005-01-01

120

This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Nucleic Acids Research following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version 2006 Jul 1;34(Web Server issue):W119-23 is available online at  

E-print Network

,version1-23Jul2007 Author manuscript, published in "Nucleic Acids Res 2006;34(Web Server issue):W119This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Nucleic Acids Research following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version 2006 Jul 1;34(Web

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

121

Equilibrium responses of soil carbon to climate change: Issues of parameterization  

SciTech Connect

We use the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to investigate how assumptions about the active soil carbon at calibration sites influence estimates of global soil carbon response to climate change. When TEM is parameterized for [open quotes]1 m[close quotes] soil carbon at each of the calibration sites, it estimates global equilibrium soil carbon stocks to be 1301.5 Pg (10[sup 15] g) for contemporary climate at an atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration of 312.4 ppmv. For a 1 C[degrees] warming applied across the terrestrial biosphere, TEM estimates a soil carbon release of 42.7 Pg. In contrast, when TEM is parameterized for [open quotes]20 cm[close quotes] soil carbon, it estimates global stocks of 837.2 Pg for contemporary climate and a release of 18.8 Pg for a 1 C[degrees] warming. When we adjust the active soil layer at calibration sites so that transitions in soil carbon are smooth at ecosystem boundaries, the relative contribution of tropical ecosystems to the global response declines. We conclude that using a constant depth to define the active soil layer should be avoided.

McGuire, A.D.; Melillo, J.M.; Joyce, L.A.; Kicklighter, D.W. (Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

1994-06-01

122

OSP Award Acceptance and Notification Process Notification  

E-print Network

OSP Award Acceptance and Notification Process Award Notification received Date/time stamp Award issues. Once resolved Process Review with PI. If accepted, Process. Review Award Doc and T&C Review, applicable Staff & CGA Finish AOR forward Award to appropriate CA to process. Notify PI, obtain copy of docs

Fork, Richard

123

In acceptance we trust? Conceptualising acceptance as a viable approach to NGO security management.  

PubMed

This paper documents current understanding of acceptance as a security management approach and explores issues and challenges non-governmental organisations (NGOs) confront when implementing an acceptance approach to security management. It argues that the failure of organisations to systematise and clearly articulate acceptance as a distinct security management approach and a lack of organisational policies and procedures concerning acceptance hinder its efficacy as a security management approach. The paper identifies key and cross-cutting components of acceptance that are critical to its effective implementation in order to advance a comprehensive and systematic concept of acceptance. The key components of acceptance illustrate how organisational and staff functions affect positively or negatively an organisation's acceptance, and include: an organisation's principles and mission, communications, negotiation, programming, relationships and networks, stakeholder and context analysis, staffing, and image. The paper contends that acceptance is linked not only to good programming, but also to overall organisational management and structures. PMID:23278470

Fast, Larissa A; Freeman, C Faith; O'Neill, Michael; Rowley, Elizabeth

2013-04-01

124

Stream Macroinvertebrate Response Models for Bioassessment Metrics: Addressing the Issue of Spatial Scale  

PubMed Central

We developed independent predictive disturbance models for a full regional data set and four individual ecoregions (Full Region vs. Individual Ecoregion models) to evaluate effects of spatial scale on the assessment of human landscape modification, on predicted response of stream biota, and the effect of other possible confounding factors, such as watershed size and elevation, on model performance. We selected macroinvertebrate sampling sites for model development (n?=?591) and validation (n?=?467) that met strict screening criteria from four proximal ecoregions in the northeastern U.S.: North Central Appalachians, Ridge and Valley, Northeastern Highlands, and Northern Piedmont. Models were developed using boosted regression tree (BRT) techniques for four macroinvertebrate metrics; results were compared among ecoregions and metrics. Comparing within a region but across the four macroinvertebrate metrics, the average richness of tolerant taxa (RichTOL) had the highest R2 for BRT models. Across the four metrics, final BRT models had between four and seven explanatory variables and always included a variable related to urbanization (e.g., population density, percent urban, or percent manmade channels), and either a measure of hydrologic runoff (e.g., minimum April, average December, or maximum monthly runoff) and(or) a natural landscape factor (e.g., riparian slope, precipitation, and elevation), or a measure of riparian disturbance. Contrary to our expectations, Full Region models explained nearly as much variance in the macroinvertebrate data as Individual Ecoregion models, and taking into account watershed size or elevation did not appear to improve model performance. As a result, it may be advantageous for bioassessment programs to develop large regional models as a preliminary assessment of overall disturbance conditions as long as the range in natural landscape variability is not excessive. PMID:24675770

Waite, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

2014-01-01

125

Research Lasers and Air Traffic Safety: Issues, Concerns and Responsibilities of the Research Community  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of outdoor use of lasers relative to air traffic has become a diverse and dynamic topic. During the past several decades, the use of lasers in outdoor research activities have increased significantly. Increases in the outdoor use of lasers and increases in air traffic densities have changed the levels of risk involved. To date there have been no documented incidents of air traffic interference from research lasers; however, incidents involving display lasers have shown a marked increase. As a result of the national response to these incidents, new concerns over lasers have arisen. Through the efforts of the SAE G-10T Laser Safety Hazards Subcommittee and the ANSI Z136.6 development committee, potential detrimental effects to air traffic beyond the traditional eye damage concerns have been identified. An increased emphasis from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Center for Devices and Radiological Hazards (CDRH), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) along with increased concern by the public have resulted in focused scrutiny of potential hazards presented by lasers. The research community needs to rethink the traditional methods of risk evaluation and application of protective measures. The best current approach to assure adequate protection of air traffic is the application of viable hazard and risk analysis and the use of validated protective measures. Standards making efforts and regulatory development must be supported by the research community to assure that reasonable measures are developed. Without input, standards and regulations can be developed that are not compatible with the needs of the research community. Finally, support is needed for the continued development and validation of protective measures.

Nessler, Phillip J., Jr.

1998-01-01

126

Market Efficiency or Not? The Behaviour of China’s Stock Prices in Response to the Announcement of Bonus Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Event study analysis is applied to investigate stock price reaction to the announcement of bonus issues for the emerging stock markets of China. Results show that the issues with a high bonus ratio (number of bonus shares in the issue\\/number of existing shares) usually attract positive returns and the issues with a low bonus ratio are rewarded with negative returns.

Michelle L. Barnes; Shiguang Ma

2001-01-01

127

Linking Morphodynamic Response with Sediment Mass Balance: Issues of Scale, Geomorphic Setting, and Sampling Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sediment mass balance, or budget, is one of the most powerful and frequently used conceptual frameworks in fluvial geomorphology. Sediment budgets are used to evaluate the effects of streamflow regulation, inform the design of stream restoration projects, and anticipate the outcomes of dam removal, among other applications. In almost every case, the primary interest is the interaction between changes in the sediment budget and the morphodynamics of specific channel features that make up the components of the sediment budget. However, linkages between changes in specific morphologic features and changes in the sediment budget are not necessarily straightforward and are often poorly understood. In order for the sediment budget to be used as an effective tool, these linkages must be better quantified. A complete understanding of these linkages is usually hampered by sparse data. Measurements of morphologic change typically consist of some type of sampling scheme that requires extrapolation to the reach scale and adequate measurements of both sediment influx and efflux are rarely available. Our attempts to develop a monitoring program for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon that tracks changes in specific morphologic features, transfers in sediment storage among channel features, and changes in the sediment budget have yielded several insights: (1) changes in sediment storage can be highly localized with as much as 80% of changes in storage occurring within as little as 1% of a reach; (2) areas where large storage changes are likely may be predictable in the sense that the largest changes tend to occur in specific geomorphic settings; (3) magnitudes of changes are unpredictable because nearby features of the same general geomorphic type often respond differently due to differences in local hydraulics; (4) the morphology of a set of features at the time of measurement may be strongly affected by the antecedent flow regime, thereby confounding attempts to make comparisons among data collected under different flow regimes; and (5) even with a relatively robust topographic measurement program and rational method of extrapolation, a sediment budget based on morphologic change may be inconsistent with a flux-based mass balance. These findings illustrate the many pitfalls that exist and may result in severe bias when one attempts to reconcile the sediment budget with measured morphologic changes. Our findings are based on a data set that includes airborne lidar, aerial photogrammetry, and total station surveys for terrestrial measurements; multibeam and singlebeam sonar for bathymetric measurements; and multi-frequency acoustics for a continuous record of sediment influx and efflux. While the examples that are provided are specific to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, the observed processes apply to many bedrock canyon rivers, and the basic problem of linking morphodynamic response with the sediment budget is general to all rivers.

Grams, P. E.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Kaplinski, M. A.; Hazel, J. E.

2011-12-01

128

76 FR 28973 - Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC; Order on Rehearing and Accepting Tariff Filing, Subject to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...ER11-2127-001, ER11-2127-002, EL11-37-000] Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC; Order on Rehearing and Accepting...transmission tariff (OATT) submitted by Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC (Terra-Gen), in response to a Commission order issued in...

2011-05-19

129

Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

130

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1  

E-print Network

as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING 1 terminology Manuscript received March 30, 2012; revised September 4, 2012; accepted September 23, 2012

131

Affective Issues in Learning Technologies: Emotional Responses to Technology and Technology's Role in Supporting Socio-Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on some of the author's research studies over the past thirty years and places these in a wider context to reflect on research into affective issues in learning technologies over this period, and to consider whether and how the issues uncovered by research have changed as technologies have developed over time. Three issues are…

Jones, Ann

2010-01-01

132

75 FR 28610 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EPA-HQ-ORD-2010-0395] Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and...entitled, ``EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and...document, ``EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity...

2010-05-21

133

Are the corporate social responsibility matters based on good intentions or false pretences? An empirical study of the motivations behind the issuing of CSR reports by UK companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper documents the motivations of modern corporations in issuing corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports to their stakeholders. It further demonstrates why these entities have suddenly become more moral or ethical. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An empirical methodology was used to gather and analyse the required information from companies drawn from two sectors of the capital market. Findings – The

Samuel O. Idowu; Ioanna Papasolomou

2007-01-01

134

Effects of Color, Format, and Severity of Issue on Response Rate of Mail Questionnaires When Respondent Population Has Some Familiarity with Sender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of (1) format and color, and (2) severity of issue (freeze damage to citrus industry) on response rate of mail questionnaires is presented. Questionnaires were formatted in two different ways: a one page, legal size printed on both sides, and one sheet 11- by 17-inch size center-folded with items on three pages. Two colors were used:…

Taylor, C. L.; Summerhill, W. R.

135

Too young for rainforests? The impact of a rainforest curriculum on elementary students' affective responses to nature  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theory relating to children's affective responses to education about large-scale, distant environmental issues has become fairly widely accepted among environmental educators. The theory is encapsulated in the term \\

Kathryn Alice Matteson

2008-01-01

136

This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been fully edited. Content may change prior to final publication. Abstract--This paper deals with easy to implement control  

E-print Network

to implement control strategies when a seven-phase Axial Flux Permanent Magnet machine (AFPM) supplied system of electromotive forces (EMF). Manuscript received February 28, 2007. Accepted for publication magnetomotive force distribution. Corresponding currents are obtained using hysteresis controllers in the stator

Boyer, Edmond

137

Effectiveness and Patient Acceptance of Halcinonide 0.1% Cream in 216g Jars for Large-area Steroid-responsive Dermatoses  

PubMed Central

When treating patients with extensive dermatitis, total body surface area affected must be considered when prescribing topical medication. Halcinonide 0.1% cream, a class 2 topical corticosteroid, is now available in a 216g jar. This large size is convenient and cost effective for patients with large-area dermatoses. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy and patient acceptance of halcinonide in 216g jars for the treatment of large-area dermatoses. Design: This study was an open-label, noncomparator trial evaluating the clinical outcomes and acceptability of halcinonide in 216g jars. Halcinonide was prescribed twice daily for up to 28 days. Measurement: Severity of dermatoses was based on investigator observations at the baseline visit and again after 28 days. Patient satisfaction was evaluated based on a questionnaire completed at the conclusion of the study. Results: Total enrollment was 40 patients. Dermatoses affected an average of 12 percent body surface area. At baseline, all patients exhibited dermatoses rated as severe or moderate. Nearly half of patients were completely cleared or almost cleared by 28 days, with all patients noting at least some improvement. Most patients agreed that they liked the way the product spread on the skin (94.7%), and more than 80 percent found that it was neither sticky nor greasy. In more than 90 percent of cases, the investigator reported that halcinonide provided a shorter duration of therapy versus triamcinolone one-pound jars. Conclusion: Halcinonide 0.1% cream in 216g jars is effective and convenient for patients with large-area dermatoses. PMID:21532875

2011-01-01

138

Accepting the T3D  

SciTech Connect

In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

1994-10-01

139

75 FR 33615 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (EPA...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...revises the draft assessment in response to the independent external peer...steps (hazard identification and dose-response evaluation) of the risk assessment...IRIS provides oral reference doses (RfDs) and inhalation...

2010-06-14

140

Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: Is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision\\u000a of adequate palliative\\/end-of-life (P\\/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P\\/EOL care\\u000a often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically\\u000a examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB) - a contributory benefits

Allison M Williams; Jeanette A Eby; Valorie A Crooks; Kelli Stajduhar; Melissa Giesbrecht; Mirjana Vuksan; S Robin Cohen; Kevin Brazil; Diane Allan

2011-01-01

141

The need for dental ethicists and the promise of universal patient acceptance: response to Richard Masella's "Renewing professionalism in dental education".  

PubMed

Richard Masella's "Renewing Professionalism in Dental Education: Overcoming the Market Environment" reveals why professionalism is nearly dead in America; it also shows the good of commerce and the excesses of commercialism in the market. More importantly, it collects and summarizes most of the relevant forms of education currently available to teach professionalism and professional ethics in dentistry; it then briefly examines whether those forms of education are used and if they are effective. Masella also asks some key challenging questions. His select and limited references lead to deeper studies about the nature and definition of professionalism and how it might be learned and presented. His suggestions for renewing professionalism are minimal; this sets the stage for proposing and selecting other ideas that need attention and development. Some of those ideas and suggestions, such as competition and collaboration, four types of dentistry, understanding two conflicting meanings of desire and need, and universal patient acceptance were recently explored in a workshop, "Professional Promises: Hopes and Gaps in Access to Oral Health Care" (procedings published in the November 2006 Journal of Dental Education), and were not yet available to Masella when his article was authored. His article, though, stimulates good discussion and action. Its data and substance show why, for example, dentistry needs to develop a core cadre of full-time practicing professional dental ethicists. Currently, there is only a small but very dedicated group of volunteers trying to meet our society's need to bring new life to professionalism in dentistry and our market. PMID:17314383

Patthoff, Donald E

2007-02-01

142

High response rate and acceptable toxicity of a combination of rituximab, vinorelbine, ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and prednisone for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in first relapse: results of the R-NIMP GOELAMS study.  

PubMed

The optimal management of relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is not standardized. The Groupe Ouest Est des Leucémies et aAutres Maladies du Sang developed a combination of vinorelbine, ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and prednisone (NIMP) for the treatment of relapsed DLBCL, and assessed its efficacy and safety in association with rituximab (R). This multicentric phase II study included 50 patients with DLBCL in first relapse, aged 18-75 years. Patients received rituximab 375 mg/m² day 1, ifosfamide 1000 mg/m² days 1-5, vinorelbine 25 mg/m² days 1 and 15, mitoxantrone 10 mg/m² day 1, and prednisone 1 mg/kg days 1-5, every 28 days for three cycles. Responding patients underwent autologous transplantation or received three additional R-NIMP cycles. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 49 for response. Centralized pathology review confirmed DLBCL in all cases. Toxicities were mainly haematological with infectious events needing hospitalization in nine cases. Two toxic deaths were observed. After three cycles, 22 patients (44%) achieved complete response/unconfirmed complete response, 11 achieved partial response (24%), 2 had stable disease and 13 progressed. The non-germinal centre B immunophenotype was associated with shorter progression-free survival. in conclusion, the R-NIMP regimen displayed significant activity in relapsed DLBCL, with acceptable toxicity and should be considered a candidate for combination with new agents. PMID:23692641

Gyan, Emmanuel; Damotte, Diane; Courby, Stéphane; Sénécal, Delphine; Quittet, Philippe; Schmidt-Tanguy, Aline; Banos, Anne; Le Gouill, Steven; Lamy, Thierry; Fontan, Jean; Maisonneuve, Hervé; Alexis, Magda; Dreyfus, Francois; Tournilhac, Olivier; Laribi, Kamel; Solal-Céligny, Philippe; Arakelyan, Nina; Cartron, Guillaume; Gressin, Remy

2013-07-01

143

Selected College Students' Knowledge and Perceptions of Biotechnology Issues Reported in the Mass Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Agricultural communications students (n=330) were surveyed to determine their knowledge of and attitudes toward biotechnology issues reported in the mass media. Although students achieved only 30% correct responses, 84% perceived their knowledge level to be average to high. Most were somewhat accepting of genetic modification for plants but less…

Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.; Dunsford, Deborah W.

2002-01-01

144

Studies of Technology Tool Usage Are Not Enough: A Response to the Articles in This Special Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research in this special issue of the "Journal of Research in Leadership Education" (JRLE) is critically important for moving forward the practice of school leader preparation. The articles are well done and each includes at least one multimedia example of technology-suffused educational leadership pedagogy in practice. Every one of these…

McLeod, Scott; Bathon, Justin M.; Richardson, Jayson W.

2011-01-01

145

Towards a Dynamic Systems Approach to Moral Development and Moral Education: A Response to the "JME" Special Issue, September 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Is "development" a concept that properly belongs to mind and morality and, if it does, what account can we give of moral development now that Piagetian and Kohlbergian models are increasingly being abandoned in developmental psychology? In addressing this central issue, it is hoped that the paper will contribute to the quest for a new integrated…

Kim, Minkang; Sankey, Derek

2009-01-01

146

26 CFR 301.6110-6 - Written determinations issued in response to requests submitted before November 1, 1976.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...3)(ii) of this section, shall be published at the earliest practicable time after...inspection upon written request shall be published within a reasonable time after the...issued before July 5, 1967, shall be published in the following order. The...

2010-04-01

147

State Policies and Procedures on Response to Intervention in the Midwest Region. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 116  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on a review of state documents and interviews with state and local officials in six Midwest Region states, this qualitative study describes state education agency policy development and planning for response to intervention approaches to instruction. It also looks at the support provided to districts and schools implementing response to …

Detgen, Amy; Yamashita, Mika; Davis, Brittany; and Wraight, Sara

2011-01-01

148

State Policies and Procedures on Response to Intervention in the Midwest Region. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 116  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on a review of state documents and interviews with state and local officials in six Midwest Region states, this qualitative study describes state education agency policy development and planning for response to intervention approaches to instruction. It also looks at the support provided to districts and schools implementing response to…

Detgen, Amy; Yamashita, Mika; Davis, Brittany; and Wraight, Sara

2011-01-01

149

Evolving an acceptable nuclear power fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The following issues are examined: long-term safe nuclear power plant operation; acceptable nuclear waste management and, mainly, high-level waste management; and provision for long-term fissile fuel supply in a long-term nuclear fission economy. (LM)

Steinberg, M.

1986-10-01

150

49 CFR 1103.30 - Acceptance of employment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding... Acceptance of employment. (a) The practitioner must decline to conduct a case or...

2010-10-01

151

49 CFR 1103.30 - Acceptance of employment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding... Acceptance of employment. (a) The practitioner must decline to conduct a case or...

2012-10-01

152

49 CFR 1103.30 - Acceptance of employment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding... Acceptance of employment. (a) The practitioner must decline to conduct a case or...

2011-10-01

153

Geographic Variation in Social Acceptability of Wildland Fuels Management in the Western United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary natural resource management requires consideration of the social acceptability of management practices and conditions. Agencies wishing to measure, respond to, and influence social acceptability must understand the nuances of public perception regarding controversial issues. This study explores social acceptability judgments about one such issue: reduction of wildland fuel hazards on federal lands in the western United States. Citizens were

MARK W. BRUNSON; BRUCE A. SHINDLER

2004-01-01

154

Text recycling: acceptable or misconduct?  

PubMed

Text recycling, also referred to as self-plagiarism, is the reproduction of an author's own text from a previous publication in a new publication. Opinions on the acceptability of this practice vary, with some viewing it as acceptable and efficient, and others as misleading and unacceptable. In light of the lack of consensus, journal editors often have difficulty deciding how to act upon the discovery of text recycling. In response to these difficulties, we have created a set of guidelines for journal editors on how to deal with text recycling. In this editorial, we discuss some of the challenges of developing these guidelines, and how authors can avoid undisclosed text recycling. PMID:25127654

Harriman, Stephanie; Patel, Jigisha

2014-01-01

155

Linguistic Models of FO Use, Physiological Models of FO Control, and the Issue of "Mean Response Time."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluates "mean response time" (MRT), a method used in previous studies to relate physiological evidence (recordings of electromyographic activity in the cricothyroid and sternohyoid) to acoustic evidence (fundamental frequency). (Author/VWL)

Herman, Rebecca; Beckman, Mary; Honda, Kiyoshi

1999-01-01

156

Environmental Response: Strawberry Hill Campus, Bar Harbor, Maine. The 21st Awards Program: A Year of Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Progressive Architecture Awards Jury gave citations to three projects grouped as "the response by architects to environmental problems." One citation was awarded to a college campus design utilizing solar energy, recycled materials, and wind power. (MF)

Progressive Architecture, 1974

1974-01-01

157

Workshop report: identifying key issues underpinning the selection of linear or non-linear dose-response extrapolation for human health risk assessment of systemic toxicants.  

PubMed

The report of an Expert Panel convened by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), entitled Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment (National Research Council, 2009a), includes a recommendation to use, as a default approach, low-dose linear extrapolation for systemic toxicity. This recommendation represents a significant departure from long-standing risk assessment practices for non-cancer toxicity, where the most appropriate No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) or Benchmark Dose (BMD) of the critical effect in the key study is selected, and then a "safe exposure" level is derived by applying uncertainty factors to account for dataset completeness, potential greater sensitivity of humans when compared with experimental animals, and for potential variability of sensitivity in humans. A workshop was held to "frame" issues raised by the NAS report that needed further study. Workshop objectives included the following: (1) identify the issues raised by the 2009 NRC report and discuss the extent to which existing science may (or may not) align with the NAS analyses and recommendations, and (2) identify/develop possible actions to assist in advancing deeper and broader considerations of some of the critical issues presented by the 2009 NAS Panel. Experts invited to this "Framing" Workshop encompassed a full spectrum of toxicology and risk assessment disciplines; in particular, expertise in molecular interactions and dose-response of biological systems were well represented. The recommendations developed at this Framing Workshop provide specific ideas on possible further steps to facilitate deeper and broader consideration of the issues underpinning dose-response extrapolation in the risk assessment of systemic toxicants. PMID:21256913

Pottenger, Lynn H; Becker, Richard A; Moran, Elizabeth J; Swenberg, James A

2011-04-01

158

OnlineTED.com ? a novel web-based audience response system for higher education. A pilot study to evaluate user acceptance  

PubMed Central

Background and aim: Audience response (AR) systems are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education. However, high costs and complexity of conventional AR systems often limit their use. Here we present a novel AR system that is platform independent and does not require hardware clickers or additional software to be installed. Methods and results: “OnlineTED” was developed at Technische Universität München (TUM) based on Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) with a My Structured Query Language (MySQL)-database as server- and Javascript as client-side programming languages. “OnlineTED” enables lecturers to create and manage question sets online and start polls in-class via a web-browser. Students can participate in the polls with any internet-enabled device (smartphones, tablet-PCs or laptops). A paper-based survey was conducted with undergraduate medical students and lecturers at TUM to compare "OnlineTED" with conventional AR systems using clickers. "OnlineTED" received above-average evaluation results by both students and lecturers at TUM and was seen on par or superior to conventional AR systems. The survey results indicated that up to 80% of students at TUM own an internet-enabled device (smartphone or tablet-PC) for participation in web-based AR technologies. Summary and Conclusion: “OnlineTED” is a novel web-based and platform-independent AR system for higher education that was well received by students and lecturers. As a non-commercial alternative to conventional AR systems it may foster interactive teaching in undergraduate education, in particular with large audiences. PMID:24575156

Kühbeck, Felizian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

2014-01-01

159

Air Call-Accept  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We've all had our hands in the dishwater when an important call comes in. The Air Call-Accept application gives users the ability to just wave their hand across the proximity sensor, and voila: the call is accepted. It's quite useful for people who are driving around quite a bit, though others will certainly find it efficacious. This version is compatible with devices running Android 1.6 and newer.

2013-08-15

160

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 47, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2012 1  

E-print Network

(without antenna) achieves a measured average responsivity and noise equivalent power of 285 MV/W and 8.1 (30­300 GHz), there are propagation windows located near 35, 94, 140, 220 GHz [1], where operating near the 94 GHz frequency window provide reasonable balance among capability of currently

Heydari, Payam

161

The Crime Question: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens. [Student Edition.] Major Issues in American Government. Law in Social Studies Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for students in grades 7-12, this social studies infusion unit examines individual rights and responsibilities in the context of the American criminal justice system and explores the balance between individual and group rights achieved at various levels of government. An introductory chapter establishes how crime control is…

Suter, Coral; Croddy, Marshall

162

Faculty Responsibilities for Student Health and Safety The following information addresses health and safety related issues and emergency  

E-print Network

Faculty Responsibilities for Student Health and Safety The following information addresses health learning environment for their students. According to the President's policy on Health and Safety Training students. Classroom Safety This brochure assists faculty in understanding their role in providing a safe

de Lijser, Peter

163

Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

2011-01-01

164

31 CFR 309.11 - Tenders; payment of accepted tenders.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tenders; payment of accepted tenders. 309.11 Section 309.11 Money and Finance...ISSUE AND SALE OF TREASURY BILLS § 309.11 Tenders; payment of accepted tenders. Settlement...

2010-07-01

165

Acceptance of Internet Banking Systems among Young Managers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to determine acceptance of internet banking system among potential young users, specifically future young managers. The relationships and the effects of computer self-efficacy (CSE) and extended technology acceptance model (TAM) on the behavioural intention (BI) to use internet banking system were examined. Measurement of CSE, TAM and BI were adapted from previous studies. However construct for TAM has been extended by adding a new variable which is perceived credibility (PC). A survey through questionnaire was conducted to determine the acceptance level of CSE, TAM and BI. Data were obtained from 275 Technology Management students, who are pursuing their undergraduate studies in a Malaysia's public university. The confirmatory factor analysis performed has identified four variables as determinant factors of internet banking acceptance. The first variable is computer self-efficacy (CSE), and another three variables from TAM constructs which are perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PE) and perceived credibility (PC). The finding of this study indicated that CSE has a positive effect on PU and PE of the Internet banking systems. Respondents' CSE was positively affecting their PC of the systems, indicating that the higher the ability of one in computer skills, the higher the security and privacy issues of PC will be concerned. The multiple regression analysis indicated that only two construct of TAM; PU and PC were significantly associated with BI. It was found that the future managers' CSE indirectly affects their BI to use the internet banking systems through PU and PC of TAM. TAM was found to have direct effects on respondents' BI to use the systems. Both CSE and the PU and PC of TAM were good predictors in understanding individual responses to information technology. The role of PE of the original TAM to predict the attitude of users towards the use of information technology systems was surprisingly insignificant.

Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; M, Yeow S.; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad

2013-06-01

166

Press Releases Issued by Supplements Industry Organisations and Non-Industry Organisations in Response to Publication of Clinical Research Findings: A Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background Dietary supplement use is increasing despite lack of evidence of benefits, or evidence of harm. Press releases issued by the supplements industry might contribute to this situation by using ‘spin’ (strategies to hype or denigrate findings) to distort the results of clinical studies. We assessed press releases issued in response to publication of clinical studies on dietary supplements. Methods and Findings We analyzed 47 supplements industry press releases and 91 non-industry press releases and news stories, generated in response to 46 clinical studies of dietary supplements published between 1/1/2005 and 5/31/2013. The primary outcome was ‘spin’ content and direction. We also assessed disposition towards use of dietary supplements, reporting of study information, and dissemination of industry press releases. More supplements industry press releases (100%) contained ‘spin’ than non-industry media documents (55%, P<0.001). Hyping ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting benefit of supplements (median ‘spin’ score 3.3, 95% CI 1.0–5.5 vs 0.5, 0–1.0; P<0.001). Denigratory ‘spin’ scores were higher in industry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting no effect (6.0, 5.0–7.0 vs 0, 0–0; P<0.001) or harm (6.0, 5.5–7.5 vs 0, 0–0.5; P<0.001) from a supplement. Industry press releases advocated supplement use in response to >90% of studies that reported no benefit, or harm, of the supplement. Industry press releases less frequently reported study outcomes, sample size, and estimates of effect size than non-industry media documents (all P<0.001), particularly for studies that reported no benefit of supplements. Industry press releases were referenced by 148 news stories on the websites of 6 organizations that inform manufacturers, retailers and consumers of supplements. Conclusions Dietary supplements industry press releases issued in response to clinical research findings are characterized by ‘spin’ that hypes results that are favourable to supplement use and denigrates results that are not. PMID:24992571

Wang, Michael T. M.; Gamble, Greg; Bolland, Mark J.; Grey, Andrew

2014-01-01

167

The promise of acceptance as an NGO security management approach.  

PubMed

This paper explores three questions related to acceptance as a security management approach. Acceptance draws upon relationships with community members, authorities, belligerents and other stakeholders to provide consent for the presence and activities of a non-governmental organisation (NGO), thereby reducing threats from these actors. Little is documented about how NGOs gain and maintain acceptance, how they assess and monitor the presence and degree of acceptance, or how they determine whether acceptance is effective in a particular context. Based on field research conducted in April 2011 in Kenya, South Sudan and Uganda, we address each of these three issues and argue that acceptance must be actively sought as both a programme and a security management strategy. In the paper we delineate elements common to all three contexts as well as missed opportunities, which identify areas that NGOs can and should address as part of an acceptance approach. PMID:25440000

Fast, Larissa; Freeman, Faith; O'Neill, Michael; Rowley, Elizabeth

2015-04-01

168

Nuclear power and public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

Public acceptance is a decisive factor of growing importance, although economics has been and will remain the most decisive factor in ordering new nuclear capacity. Nuclear energy can make an important contribution toward preventing and reducing the greenhouse effect. Many politicians tend to base their decisions not on facts but rather on so called public opinion and consequently to overreact in particular on environmental issues. The entire debate hinges on public confidence rather than on a lack of information. There is no 100% guarantee that technical facilities will operate completely accident-free. Therefore, standards should be harmonized, plants should be operated safely and consequences of possible accidents should be limited. There needs to be some kind of early information system between countries concerning upcoming issues as a prerequisite for acting instead of reacting, because this is an essential tool in convincing the public that they can have more confidence. Technical information alone does not answer the real questions of the public. Political, technical, and economic matters as well as public opinion are interwoven and cannot be separated from each. Therefore, the exchange of experience gained in all these sectors on an international basis must be improved.

Hirschmann, H.

1989-01-01

169

Accepted Manuscript Correspondence  

E-print Network

Accepted Manuscript Correspondence Recently discovered properties of aspirin may be doubly helpful of aspirin may be doubly helpful in bipolar disorders, Medical Hypotheses (2014), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10 Letter Recently discovered properties of aspirin may be doubly helpful in bipolar disorders Running title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Perfectionism and Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper argues that there is both a positive and a negative form of perfectionism, and that they can be differentiated in terms of acceptance. The basic argument is that there is nothing unhealthy or dysfunctional about the striving for perfection as such—perfectionism, however, becomes dysfunctional when this striving for perfection turns into a demand for perfection, defined as

Lars-Gunnar Lundh

2004-01-01

171

Why was Relativity Accepted?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2)

S. G. Brush

1999-01-01

172

Special Issue – Review The Domestication Syndrome Genes Responsible for the Major Changes in Plant Form in the Triticeae Crops  

E-print Network

the transition of early humans from hunter/gatherers to pastoralists/farmers. Recent research has revealed the identity of some of the main genes responsible for domestication. Two of the major domestication events in barley were (i) the failure of the spike to disarticulate and (ii) the six-rowed spike. The former mutation increased grain yield by preventing grain loss after maturity, while the latter resulted in an up to 3-fold increase in yield potential. Here we provide an overview of the disarticulation systems and inflorescence characteristics, along with the genes underlying these traits, occurring in the Triticeae tribe. Keywords: Barley Domestication Non-brittle rachis Six-rowed spike Triticeae vrs1.

Shun Sakuma; Björn Salomon; Takao Komatsuda

2010-01-01

173

Acceptability and Ethics of Product Placement in Sport Video Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Product placement in sport video games is an emerging area of marketing and advertising communication, but it also raises controversial ethical issues. In order to investigate these issues from a consumer perspective, this study examines the perceptions of the acceptability of product placement in sport video games (SVGs). Data were gathered from 253 sport video gamers using an online survey.

Min Soo Kim; Steven R. McClung

2010-01-01

174

Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

Ward, Russell A.

1980-01-01

175

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue of "ERCMExpress" discusses "Tapping into Nontraditional Community Partners for Emergency Management." Collaboration by schools with community…

Kahn, Gina

2007-01-01

176

Temperament: concepts, issues and problems.  

PubMed

There are marked individual differences in children's temperamental styles-- differences thought to be constitutionally determined in part. The importance of temperamental features is evident in their links with various forms of psychopathology and in their effects on the manner in which other people respond to the child. For these and other reasons it has rightly come to be accepted that greater attention needs to be paid to temperamental issues in consideration of the processes of development, children's responses to stress situations, and the genesis of emotional, behavioural and learning disorders. However, major conceptual, methodological and theoretical problems remain. Problems of measurement are considered in terms of the relativity of measures, whether or not to take social context into account, the functional equivalence of measures at different ages, the circumstances to use in assessing temperament, the choice of measuring instrument and the categorization of temperamental features. The issues involved in the meaning of temperamental differences are discussed with respect to consistency, developmental change, genetic influences, brain damage and mental retardation, sex differences and the mechanisms by which temperamental variables exert their effects. PMID:6922750

Rutter, M

1982-01-01

177

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-01-01

178

Linking morphodynamic response with sediment mass balance on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon: Issues of scale, geomorphic setting, and sampling design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of morphologic change are often used to infer sediment mass balance. Such measurements may, however, result in gross errors when morphologic changes over short reaches are extrapolated to predict changes in sediment mass balance for long river segments. This issue is investigated by examination of morphologic change and sediment influx and efflux for a 100 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. For each of four monitoring intervals within a 7 year study period, the direction of sand-storage response within short morphologic monitoring reaches was consistent with the flux-based sand mass balance. Both budgeting methods indicate that sand storage was stable or increased during the 7 year period. Extrapolation of the morphologic measurements outside the monitoring reaches does not, however, provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of sand-storage change for the 100 km study area. Extrapolation results in large errors, because there is large local variation in site behavior driven by interactions between the flow and local bed topography. During the same flow regime and reach-average sediment supply, some locations accumulate sand while others evacuate sand. The interaction of local hydraulics with local channel geometry exerts more control on local morphodynamic response than sand supply over an encompassing river segment. Changes in the upstream supply of sand modify bed responses but typically do not completely offset the effect of local hydraulics. Thus, accurate sediment budgets for long river segments inferred from reach-scale morphologic measurements must incorporate the effect of local hydraulics in a sampling design or avoid extrapolation altogether.

Grams, Paul E.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt

2013-06-01

179

Special Issue: In Google's Broad Wake: Taking Responsibility for Shaping the Global Digital Library. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Number 250  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"ARL" is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). "ARL" reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff and users; higher…

Johnson, Richard K.

2007-01-01

180

Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

Higgins, Chris

2012-01-01

181

[On the acceptability of xenografts].  

PubMed

Transplantation represents a major advance in modern medicine with a major impact on the interactions between individuals and society. The numbers of patients undergoing organ transplantation increased steadily over the years and around 250,000 individuals are living nowadays in Europe with a transplanted organ. On the other hand, the numbers of cadaveric (brain-dead) donors used for organ transplantation remains stable, at around 5,000 each year, and the numbers of transplantation from living donors only slowly increase in Europe. Therefore, a gap is growing between the numbers of patients in need of a transplant and the numbers of organs available for transplantation. About 45,000 patients are currently on renal transplant waiting lists in Europe and, depending on the countries considered, 15 to 30 % of candidates for liver or heart transplantation die before a life-saving transplant becomes available to them. There is therefore an urgent need to implement innovative research and to take full advantage of recent biotechnological advances to explore new avenues in xenotransplantation, and to simultaneously address the ethical, societal and public health issues related to organ replacement. Much progresses have been accomplished in the understanding of xenograft rejection processes that include hyperacute, acute vascular and cellular rejection mechanisms. Strategies to promote xenograft survival that are currently under evaluation include genetic engineering of donor pigs, adapted immunosuppressive treatments and tolerance induction. Also, the psychological acceptance has been evaluated. PMID:15745706

Séveno, Céline; Fellous, Michèle; Ashton-Chess, Joanna; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Vanhove, Bernard

2005-03-01

182

Usability and Acceptability Studies of Conversational Virtual Human Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance, accessibility, and usability data from a series of studies of a series of applica- tions suggest that most users readily accept re- sponsive virtual characters as valid conversational partners. By responsive virtual characters we mean full-body animated, con- versant, realistic characters with whom the user interacts via natural language and who exhibit emotional, social, gestural, and cogni- tive intelligence.

Curry Guinn; Robert Hubal; Geoffrey Frank; Henry Schwetzke; James Zimmer; Sarah Backus; Robin Deterding; Michael Link; Polly Armsby; Rachel Caspar; Laura Flicker; Wendy Visscher; Amanda Meehan; Harvey Zelon

183

Individual and Sex Differences in the Zone of Acceptable Alternatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined zone of acceptable alternatives construct from Gottfredson's theory of career aspiration. College students' (N=246) responses to Occupations List were coded with measurements of sex type and prestige, and indicators of zone of acceptable alternatives for subjects' were computed. Found changes over time and differences related to gender…

Leung, S. Alvin; Harmon, Lenore W.

1990-01-01

184

Assessing E-Learning Acceptance by University Students in Thailand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to assess e-learning acceptance by students, using data collected from 377 students at three public universities in Thailand. Using the "E-learning Acceptance Measure" (Teo, 2010b), participants gave their responses to 21 statements on three factors hypothesised to measure e-learning: tutor quality, perceived usefulness,…

Teo, Timothy; Wong, Su Luan; Thammetar, Thapanee; Chattiwat, Wisa

2011-01-01

185

"It's Still Science but Not Like Normal Science": Girls' Responses to the Teaching of Socio-Scientific Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socio-scientific issues, which are often controversial, involve the use of science and are of interest to society, raising ethical and moral dilemmas. Examples of these issues could include genetic technology or air pollution. Following a curriculum reform in England in 2006, socioscientific issues now have a heightened presence in the 14-16…

Morris, Helen

2014-01-01

186

Engaging Actively with Issues in the Responsible Conduct of Science: Lessons from International Efforts Are Relevant for Undergraduate Education in the United States  

PubMed Central

Numerous studies are demonstrating that engaging undergraduate students in original research can improve their achievement in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and increase the likelihood that some of them will decide to pursue careers in these disciplines. Associated with this increased prominence of research in the undergraduate curriculum are greater expectations from funders, colleges, and universities that faculty mentors will help those students, along with their graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, develop an understanding and sense of personal and collective obligation for responsible conduct of science (RCS). This Feature describes an ongoing National Research Council (NRC) project and a recent report about educating faculty members in culturally diverse settings (Middle East/North Africa and Asia) to employ active-learning strategies to engage their students and colleagues deeply in issues related to RCS. The NRC report describes the first phase of this project, which took place in Aqaba and Amman, Jordan, in September 2012 and April 2013, respectively. Here we highlight the findings from that report and our subsequent experience with a similar interactive institute in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Our work provides insights and perspectives for faculty members in the United States as they engage undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, to help them better understand the intricacies of and connections among various components of RCS. Further, our experiences can provide insights for those who may wish to establish “train-the-trainer” programs at their home institutions. PMID:24297287

Clements, John D.; Connell, Nancy D.; Dirks, Clarissa; El-Faham, Mohamed; Hay, Alastair; Heitman, Elizabeth; Stith, James H.; Bond, Enriqueta C.; Colwell, Rita R.; Anestidou, Lida; Husbands, Jo L.; Labov, Jay B.

2013-01-01

187

Texas Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: An Overview of Legislative Responsibilities, Code Compliance Issues and Accomplishments  

E-print Network

program for code officials. 5. Assist cities and counties to achieve above code performance. 6. Translate the EE/RE savings into EPA acceptable emissions reductions which can be applied to the State Implementation Plan, SIP....

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J. A.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01

188

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open for public, press, NGOs,…). - being open for visitors (first of all for the local!) often we informed the public together with the mining authorities - being open for podium discussions and presentation etc. - organized by NGOs, Student groups, press, politics, scientific meetings… Since people usually trust scientists more than politicians and companies, scientists have an enhanced responsibility while informing the public. Once again - always tell the truth and take care of your credibility! In this case, it was most helpful that the project was embedded in the broad scientific activity of research centre which seems to have given the project a positive neutral background. As many people have an undefined fear of all operations in the underground, we tried to address all issues related to storage. Ranging from the transport, injection facility, technical installation, safety of the storage site, the wells, hydraulic system, chemical reactions etc.. When addressing all major concerns before people ask, confidence to the scientists is kept high. We never said that there is absolutely no risk (by the way, nobody would believe that!) we weighted the risk with respect to health, safety and environmental HSE issues. We explained in detail the different trapping mechanisms of the storage operation. This has to be done according to the social groups involved. For the broad public common analogues were helpful: - Trapping in the pore space - a sponge - Trapping through a tight cap rock - a bottle of mineral water with a crown cap as seal - Chemical Trapping - opening of a bottle of mineral water - Well bore integrity - problem of retightening of a bottle with a crown cap - Sucking in of fluid -instead of releasing a sandstone sample standing partly in water - Injecting of CO2 - using a soda machine - Often the concern of burning gas is addressed - showing a CO2 fire extinguisher -CO is poisonous, CO2 not: - drinking soda or even better? champaigne Beyond information of the local public, we put some effort in informing interested people, media, politicians on all l

Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

2009-04-01

189

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin’s theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that derive from the intuitiveness of alternative theories. The main emotional obstacles to accepting evolution are its apparent conflict with valued beliefs about God, souls, and morality. We draw on the philosophy of science and on a psychological theory of cognitive and emotional belief revision to make suggestions about what can be done to improve acceptance of Darwinian ideas.

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-06-01

190

Energy Management Issued: June 2010  

E-print Network

equipment. #12;Energy Management Policy Issued: June 2010 Revised: Responsible Administrative Unit: FinanceEnergy Management Policy Issued: June 2010 Revised: Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration Policy Contact: Director of Facilities Management gary.bowersock@is.mines.edu Page 1 of 5 1

191

Accepted for publication in  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Willapa Bay, a partially mixed coastal plain estuary, is located on the shoreward side of a narrow, deep continental shelf whose water properties fluctuate on several day scales in response to alternating periods of upwelling and downwelling. Hydrographic surveys as well as water property and velocity time series at a number,of sites both within the estuary and on the

B. m. Hickey; X. Zhang; N. Banas

192

Workplace violence: managing a culture of acceptance.  

PubMed

The cultural acceptance of workplace violence is changing. Management has become more educated on regulatory issues around its tolerance of workplace violence. Events around the country in a variety of settings have aided in raising awareness of this issue. Healthcare professionals are not immune to workplace violence, including those working in the imaging profession. Healthcare workers, historically, have given care despite the demeanor of patients, often putting up with aggressive behavior including sexual harassment and physical assault. Management needs to take all possible measures to ensure employees feel safe at work. It is essential to have well thought out policies and procedures to mitigate workplace violence; keeping in mind that a goal of eliminating workplace violence is unrealistic. PMID:25174140

Fredrick, Marie

2014-01-01

193

Issues management made easier  

SciTech Connect

Increases in ES&H compliance issues within the past few years have necessitated a formal process by which DOE facilities address these issues. In May 1991, ANL-W implemented the ANL-W Issues Management System (IMS) to facilitate the management of compliance issues and scheduling of corrective action plans with limited resources. The central focus of this process is a computer database, Integrated Resource Management System (IRMS), which allows quick retrieval of compliance information, organization of compliance issues based on a risk-based prioritization methodology, and tracking of corrective action plans. Without the IRMS, the ANL-W Issues Management System would have been difficult to administer and manage. ANL-W has used the IRMS for both audit preparation and audit response, most noticeably the preparation and subsequent response to the 1991 Tiger Team audit. The IRMS was used to track ANL-W Self-Assessment corrective action plans, provide instant information to Tiger Team members regarding Self-Assessment findings, produce prioritized lists of Tiger Team concerns for developing corrective action plans, and track Tiger Team corrective action plans. Status reports to senior, laboratory management regarding the Tiger Team corrective action plan are produced based on information provided by the IRMS. This paper discusses the criteria used for selecting the IRMS, implementation of the Issues Management System using the IRMS, lessons learned, and the future evolution of the IRMS.

Brownson, L.

1993-10-01

194

Lib_Accept.rtf LIBRARIAN EMPLOYMENT ACCEPTANCE FORM  

E-print Network

Lib_Accept.rtf LIBRARIAN EMPLOYMENT ACCEPTANCE FORM I. LIBRARIAN INFORMATION Name: Position Number to the question above was YES, please sign below this line and proceed to the bottom of this page.) Librarian Date assessment program. Librarian Date III. CERTIFICATION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY I hereby certify

Garbey, Marc

195

Pharmacogenomics: The Genomics of Drug Response  

PubMed Central

Pharmacogenomics is defined as the study of the association between genetics and drug response. This is a rapidly expanding field with the hope that, within a few years, prospective genotyping will lead to patients being prescribed drugs which are both safer and more effective (‘the right drug for the right patient’, or personalized medicine). There are many existing examples in the literature of strong associations between genetic variation and drug response, and some of these even form the basis of accepted clinical tests. The molecular basis for some of these associations is described, and includes examples of variation in genes responsible for absorption and metabolism of the drug, and in target and disease genes. However, there are many issues surrounding the legal, regulatory and ethical framework to these studies that remain unanswered, and a huge amount of education both for the public and haelthcare professionals will be needed bafore the results of this new madicine can be widely accepted. PMID:10797598

2000-01-01

196

This Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces a theme issue on learner-centered psychological principles (LCP), which undergird learner-centered teaching. Learner-centered teaching embodies the notion of learning partnerships between teachers and students. The articles address such issues as applying LCP in middle school, high school, and teacher education; postsecondary strategies…

McCombs, Barbara L.

2003-01-01

197

Issue Rivalries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article expands upon the traditional interstate rivalry concept by focusing on two conceptual dimensions of interstate rivalry: issues and militarization. The first dimension captures the number of distinct issues that characterize a dyadic interstate relationship, such as repeated clashes between states over border disputes, maritime zones, or cross-border rivers. The second dimension is very similar to the dispute density

Sara McLaughlin Mitchell; Cameron G. Thies

2011-01-01

198

Gender Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Coordinators' Notebook" focuses on gender issues in early childhood. The first article, "Both Halves of the Sky: Gender Socialization in the Early Years," focuses on the arguments that have led to an international call for increased participation of girls in education, an introduction to studies which map young children's…

Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

1997-01-01

199

Acceptance of Online Degrees by Undergraduate Mexican Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality and acceptance of online degree programs are still controversial issues. In Mexico, where access to technology is limited, there are few studies on the matter. Undergraduate students (n = 104) answered a survey that aimed to evaluate their knowledge of virtual education, their likelihood of enrollment in an online degree program, and…

Padilla Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia; Adams, Jonathan

2014-01-01

200

Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

2013-01-01

201

Email consultations in health care: 2--acceptability and safe application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Email may have an important role in augmenting and facilitating communication between patients and healthcare professionals. 1 In this article we summarise the evidence describing public and professional attitudes to using email in routine clinical care and explore issues relating to ensuring such use is safe. Specifically, we aim to answer three questions: x How acceptable is email consulting to

Josip Car; Aziz Sheikh

2004-01-01

202

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): An Overview for Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) offers school counsellors a practical and meaningful approach to helping students deal with a range of issues. This is achieved through encouraging psychological flexibility through the application of six key principles. This article describes our introduction to ACT, ACT's application to children and…

Bowden, Tim; Bowden, Sandra

2012-01-01

203

Getting to Darwin: Obstacles to Accepting Evolution by Natural Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is central to modern biology, but is resisted by many people. This paper discusses the major psychological obstacles to accepting Darwin's theory. Cognitive obstacles to adopting evolution by natural selection include conceptual difficulties, methodological issues, and coherence problems that…

Thagard, Paul; Findlay, Scott

2010-01-01

204

Gender Differences in the Perception and Acceptance of Online Games  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the proliferation of online games, understanding users' intention to play online games has become a new issue for academics and practitioners. Prior studies have investigated the factors affecting behavioural intention to play online games. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the gender differences in the acceptance of…

Wang, Hsiu-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Shun

2008-01-01

205

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2010-01-01

206

15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 - Foreign Authorized Agencies Responsible for Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Issuing End-Use Certificates Pursuant to § 745.2 No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 745 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS Pt. 745, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 745—Foreign Authorized Agencies...

2011-01-01

207

Addressing Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

Schoebel, Susan

1991-01-01

208

Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids  

SciTech Connect

The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

1982-04-01

209

Regulatory perspectives on acceptability testing of dosage forms in children.  

PubMed

Current knowledge about the age-appropriateness of different dosage forms is still fragmented or limited. Applicants are asked to demonstrate that the target age group(s) can manage the dosage form or propose an alternative strategy. However, questions remain about how far the applicant must go and what percentage of patients must find the strategy 'acceptable'. The aim of this overview is to provide an update on current thinking and understanding of the problem, and discuss issues relating to the acceptability testing. This overview should be considered as means to start a wider discussion which hopefully will result in a harmonised, globally acceptable approach for confirmation of the acceptability in the future. PMID:24704104

Kozarewicz, Piotr

2014-08-01

210

To retrieve or not to retrieve: These are the issues  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors that must be evaluated when determining whether a buried mixed waste site should be retrieved and subsequently stored, treated, and/or disposed of or if some other action is more appropriate. The criteria developed for the evaluation of remedial actions at mixed waste sites under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) regulation EPA, provide an excellent methodology for deciding upon a preferred action even if the site is not under CERCLA regulation. Each topic for evaluation in the criteria is not mutually exclusive, and many tradeoffs must be reviewed. The criteria have been broken down into a number of categories: overall protection of human health and the environment; compliance with Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs); long-term effectiveness and permanence; reduction of toxicity, mobility, and volume; short-term effectiveness; implementability; cost; state acceptance; and community acceptance. Once the data is gathered, a Hazards Analysis must be performed to understand the risks of the site to workers, the public, and the environment. The Hazard Analysis is critical in helping personnel understand the associated issues so that an effective evaluation can take place. The intent of this paper is not to focus on a particular site, but to provide information that is useful for many problem holders to better understand the issues associated with buried mixed waste retrieval. Ultimately, these issues affect the final decision of whether or not retrieval is a feasible alternative.

Hyde, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M.; Nickelson, D.F.; Swanson, S.P.

1997-10-01

211

Extending the Technology Acceptance Model: Policy Acceptance Model (PAM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been extensive research on how new ideas and technologies are accepted in society. This has resulted in the creation of many models that are used to discover and assess the contributing factors. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is one that is a widely accepted model. This model examines people's acceptance of new technologies based on variables that directly correlate to how the end user views the product. This paper introduces the Policy Acceptance Model (PAM), an expansion of TAM, which is designed for the analysis and evaluation of acceptance of new policy implementation. PAM includes the traditional constructs of TAM and adds the variables of age, ethnicity, and family. The model is demonstrated using a survey of people's attitude toward the upcoming healthcare reform in the United States (US) from 72 survey respondents. The aim is that the theory behind this model can be used as a framework that will be applicable to studies looking at the introduction of any new or modified policies.

Pierce, Tamra

212

Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

Wang, Zhihuan

213

Relationship between academic tracking and the degree of interethnic acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The unidimensional Interpersonal Relationship Assessment Technique (IRAT) was developed to examine the relationship between academic tracking and degree of cross-ethnic acceptance in integrated homeroom classes. When responses to the IRAT by 2,323 Israeli junior high school students were analyzed without the tracking factor, typical asymmetrical cross-ethnic acceptance was found. Both Middle Eastern and Western Ss exhibited a higher degree of

Joseph Schwarzwald; Sarah Cohen

1982-01-01

214

Accepted scientific research works (abstracts).  

PubMed

These are the 39 accepted abstracts for IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) September 24-24, 2014 at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and published in the Final Program Guide and Abstracts. PMID:25645134

2014-09-01

215

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14

216

An essential need: creating opportunities for veterinary students and graduates to gain an appreciation of responsibilities and opportunities in global veterinary issues.  

PubMed

Globalisation trends and bioterrorism issues have led to new concerns relating to public health, animal health, international trade and food security. There is an imperative to internationalise and strengthen global public health capacity by renewed emphasis on veterinary public health in veterinary education and increasing opportunities for elective experiential learning in public practice programmes for veterinary students. Recent experience with a US-Brazil Higher Education Consortia Program is used as an example of potential ways in which veterinary students can gain an appreciation for global veterinary issues. PMID:20128479

Malone, J B; Bavia, M E; Stromberg, B E; Valadao, C; Wiles, W T; Diaz, J H; Bergquist, R

2009-08-01

217

77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...Certificate of Authority issued by the Treasury to Western Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to...

2012-01-05

218

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...commercial letters of credit issued by a United...conducting the sale. (c) Credit or debit cards. Disposition of...

2014-01-01

219

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...commercial letters of credit issued by a United...conducting the sale. (c) Credit or debit cards. Disposition of...

2010-07-01

220

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...commercial letters of credit issued by a United...conducting the sale. (c) Credit or debit cards. Disposition of...

2012-01-01

221

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...commercial letters of credit issued by a United...conducting the sale. (c) Credit or debit cards. Disposition of...

2011-01-01

222

41 CFR 102-38.290 - What types of payment may we accept?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the Government against fraud. Acceptable payments...currency or any form of credit instrument made payable...commercial letters of credit issued by a United...conducting the sale. (c) Credit or debit cards. Disposition of...

2013-07-01

223

Special Issue of Teaching Ideas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special issue contains teaching strategies and suggestions for health-related activities at all educational levels. A few of the topics addressed by the 21 articles are heart disease, testicular cancer, hospital stress, family life, and sexual responsibility. (MT)

Health Education (Washington D.C.), 1986

1986-01-01

224

Group-level effects of facilitating conditions on individual acceptance of information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the research effort in the area of technology acceptance has been directed to investigating the effects of various\\u000a variables operating at the individual-level without considering the conjoint effects of group-level variables on individual\\u000a acceptance. The present research addresses this issue by proposing a group-level variable, organizational facilitating conditions,\\u000a and examining its effects on the unified theory of acceptance

Sung-Hee “Sunny” Park; Lorraine Lee; Mun Y. Yi

225

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" is a newsletter that provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue, entitled "Emergency Management Opportunities and Challenges for Non-Public Schools," examines integrating non-public schools into emergency…

Taymans, Mary Frances; McDonald, Dale

2007-01-01

226

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. This issue of "ERCMExpress," titled "Coping with the Death of a Student or Staff Member," highlights the range of impact death can have on a school community;…

Schonfeld, David J.

2007-01-01

227

Traffic Calming: A Social Issue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Substantial urban growth fueled by a strong economy often results in heavy traffic thus making streets less hospitable. Traffic calming is one response to the pervasiveness of the automobile. The issues concern built environments and involve multiple actors reflecting different interests. The issues are rarely technical and involve combinations of…

Crouse, David W.

2004-01-01

228

"The Responsibility to Inform, The Power to Act": A Conference for New England College Newspaper Editors on the Role of the Campus Press in Addressing Substance Use Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes pilot conference held to help New England college newspaper editors perceive importance of their role in educating their peers about substance use and other health-related issues and to offer concrete suggestions regarding how they can incorporate these topics into an activist campus press. (Author/NB)

Wechsler, Henry; And Others

1992-01-01

229

Factors of accepting pain management decision support systems by nurse anesthetists  

PubMed Central

Background Pain management is a critical but complex issue for the relief of acute pain, particularly for postoperative pain and severe pain in cancer patients. It also plays important roles in promoting quality of care. The introduction of pain management decision support systems (PM-DSS) is considered a potential solution for addressing the complex problems encountered in pain management. This study aims to investigate factors affecting acceptance of PM-DSS from a nurse anesthetist perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data from nurse anesthetists in a case hospital. A total of 113 questionnaires were distributed, and 101 complete copies were returned, indicating a valid response rate of 89.3%. Collected data were analyzed by structure equation modeling using the partial least square tool. Results The results show that perceived information quality (?=.451, p<.001), computer self-efficacy (?=.315, p<.01), and organizational structure (?=.210, p<.05), both significantly impact nurse anesthetists’ perceived usefulness of PM-DSS. Information quality (?=.267, p<.05) significantly impacts nurse anesthetists’ perceptions of PM-DSS ease of use. Furthermore, both perceived ease of use (?=.436, p<.001, R2=.487) and perceived usefulness (?=.443, p<.001, R2=.646) significantly affected nurse anesthetists’ PM-DSS acceptance (R2=.640). Thus, the critical role of information quality in the development of clinical decision support system is demonstrated. Conclusions The findings of this study enable hospital managers to understand the important considerations for nurse anesthetists in accepting PM-DSS, particularly for the issues related to the improvement of information quality, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. In addition, the results also provide useful suggestions for designers and implementers of PM-DSS in improving system development. PMID:23360305

2013-01-01

230

Understanding Learner Acceptance of Learning Objects: The Roles of Learning Object Characteristics and Individual Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many organisations and institutions have integrated learning objects into their e-learning systems to make the instructional resources more efficient. Like any other information systems, this trend has made user acceptance of learning objects an increasingly critical issue as a high level of learner satisfaction and acceptance reflects that the…

Lau, Siong-Hoe; Woods, Peter C.

2009-01-01

231

Social acceptance of renewable energy innovation: An introduction to the concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the special issue on Social Acceptance of Renewable Energy Innovation. It is a collection of best papers presented at an international research conference held in Tramelan (Switzerland) in February 2006. While there are ambitious government targets to increase the share of renewable energy in many countries, it is increasingly recognized that social acceptance may be a constraining

Rolf Wüstenhagen; Maarten Wolsink; Mary Jean Bürer

2007-01-01

232

Commentary Pro\\/con ethics debate: is nonheart-beating organ donation ethically acceptable?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pro\\/con debate explores the ethical issues surrounding nonheart-beating organ donation (NHBD), a source of considerable controversy. It is estimated that NHBD can increase the number of organs available for transplant by 25% at a time of great need. However, should NHBD be ethically acceptable? In support of NHBD, it may be acceptable practice if there is a separation of

Leslie Whetstine; Kerry Bowman; Laura Hawryluck

233

Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

2010-01-01

234

Racial and Ethnic Cultural Factors in the Process of Acceptance of Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptance of mental illness is essential to promoting recovery and is uniquely impacted by issues of culture, race, and ethnicity. Qualitative case narrative methodology was used to identify themes related to the cultural facilitators and barriers in the acceptance process. Five participant narratives are presented to assist practitioners in…

Mizock, Lauren; Russinova, Zlatka

2013-01-01

235

Information Communication Technologies in the Classroom: Expanding TAM to Examine Instructor Acceptance and Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies show that use of computer-based information communication technologies (ICTs) can have positive impacts on student motivation and learning. The present study examines the issue of ICT adoption in the classroom by expanding the Technology Acceptance Model to identify factors that contribute to teacher acceptance and use of these…

Huntington, Heidi; Worrell, Tracy

2013-01-01

236

Rights & Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue guides teachers and students to annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with topics related to rights and responsibilities. Sidebar features discuss animal rights, handling money responsibly, and taking responsibility for the environment. (Contains Three…

Online-Offline, 2000

2000-01-01

237

Sanskrit Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

1971-01-01

238

Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

Peterson, T. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

1995-12-01

239

Issues in workforce composition analysis  

SciTech Connect

An issue of paramount interest to US industry is the supply and quality of human resources available for this country`s scientific and technological activities. The changing composition of the workforce and the responsibility that an organization has to assure equal opportunity, give rise to various issues. This paper discusses some of the issues associated with the scientific and technical workforce. Specifically, it explores some of the questions pertaining to workforce composition and measures of workforce composition. This paper should be useful to those responsible for personnel policies.

Koeck, D.C.; Rogers, J.D.

1996-05-01

240

Attitudes on Staff Participation and the Acceptance of Women and Minorities at Delta College: Results of a Staff Opinion Survey Made in Response to an Accreditation Report Recommendation. Research Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to an accreditation team's concern over the status of affirmative action, the campus atmosphere toward women and ethnic minorities, and involvement of staff in decision-making at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC), in California, the college conducted a survey of staff attitudes. A questionnaire was distributed to all 942 full- and…

Debow-Makino, Ginger; And Others

241

Investigation and study on debris flow risk perception and acceptable risk criteria in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Debris flow disaster mitigation is one of important issues to be addressed in Taiwan. Past studies in this field have been focused mainly on topics related to potential assessment and susceptibility characterizations. Some valuable research results have been completed. Application of risk management in debris flow disaster mitigation has gradually become an emerging topic, as an effective and comprehensive strategy on disaster management is still been sought for. One of the key elements in risk management is the establishment of rational risk acceptance criteria. Various factors have to be taken into account and whether the set of criteria can be operable is of great concern. The purpose of this study is to provide useful information for the establishment of acceptance criteria. First, the 39 debris flow events that claims death tolls for the past 20 years are compiled. The information is used to develop a questionnaire containing six questions for the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster which would cause death and the death tolls in single debris flow event. The questionnaire is sent to general public, local government officer, and rescue members for a survey. In total, 681 effective samples is obtained. The response of each question is identified as 5 scales which is later transferred into scores using a triangular function. Through the application of fuzzy performance theory, the tolerability and acceptability of the recurrence frequency of a debris flow disaster and its corresponding number of fatalities (N) is calculated. The risk perception results are plotted in the form of log-log F-N curves where F is the frequency of N or more fatalities. The results indicate that the tolerability criterion is 10-2 while the F-N curve shows a minus-one trend. Compared with the F-N curve for slope stability in Hong Kong, the curve trend is similar but the tolerability criterion is one order higher. It indicates the tolerability of fatal debris flow event in Taiwan in higher that the fatal slope stability event in Hong Kong. The acceptability criteria are about 3x10-4 while the F-N curves also shows a minus-one trend. There is about 1 to 2 orders discrepancy between tolerability and acceptability F-N curves. The resulting F-N curves are useful reference for debris flow management by taking hardware and software approaches to reduce risk level.

Liu, Chia-Nan; Chen, Jie-Ru

2014-05-01

242

Peer Acceptance of Handicapped Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Child Awareness Program was conducted by nine elementary schools to enhance acceptance of handicapped children by their nonhandicapped peers through child awareness activities. A manual of activities was developed containing lesson plans, lists of guest speakers, audiovisual materials, and suggested simulations of handicapping conditions. (SB)

DeWar, Randy L.

1982-01-01

243

LANL measurements verification acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of SNM diversion/theft is a major concern to organizations charged with control of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Verification measurements are used to aid in the detection of SNM losses. The acceptance/rejection criteria for verification measurements are dependent on the facility-specific processes, the knowledge of the measured item, and the measurement technique applied. This paper will discuss some of the LANL measurement control steps and criteria applied for the acceptance of a verification measurement. The process involves interaction among the facility operations personnel, the subject matter experts of a specific instrument/technique, the process knowledge on the matrix of the measured item, and the measurement-specific precision and accuracy values. By providing an introduction to a site-specific application of measurement verification acceptance criteria, safeguards, material custodians, and SNM measurement professionals are assisted in understanding the acceptance/rejection process for measurements and their contribution of the process to the detection of SNM diversion.

Chavez, D. M. (David M.)

2001-01-01

244

Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work  

E-print Network

Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work R.E. Nygren, R. Raffray, D. Whyte, M.A. Urickson, M.A. Urickson, M. Baldwin, L.L. Snead, Making Tungsten Work, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi: 10.1016/j the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain. #12;Making Tungsten Work - ICFRM-14

Raffray, A. René

245

Imaginary Companions and Peer Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early research on imaginary companions suggests that children who create them do so to compensate for poor social relationships. Consequently, the peer acceptance of children with imaginary companions was compared to that of their peers. Sociometrics were conducted on 88 preschool-aged children; 11 had invisible companions, 16 had personified…

Gleason, Tracy R.

2004-01-01

246

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the introductory article to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Instead of each article herein reviewing the basics of ACT, this article contains that review. This article provides a description of where ACT fits within the larger category of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT):…

Twohig, Michael P.

2012-01-01

247

Helping Our Children Accept Themselves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents of a child with muscular dystrophy recount their reactions to learning of the diagnosis, their gradual acceptance, and their son's resistance, which was gradually lessened when he was provided with more information and treated more normally as a member of the family. (CL)

Gamble, Mae

1984-01-01

248

Probabilistic simulation for flaw acceptance by dye-penetrant inspection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the problems encountered in assessing the reliability of dye-penetrant nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques in preventing failures due to undetected surface flaws, as well as from flaw acceptance (Fitness-For-Purpose). A Monte Carlo simulation procedure which includes the major variables of the problem is presented as a means of quantifying reliability. Some issues associated with distribution selection are examined. A methodology for selecting the penetrant type and flaw acceptance size for the specific components analyzed using the simulation is proposed. Current methodology limitations are discussed along with possible future effort. Penetrant selection and acceptable sizes of detected flaws are based on a probabilistic assessment of the effect of component and dye-penetrant system variables on structural reliability.

Russell, D. A.; Keremes, J. J.

1990-01-01

249

Solid propellant environmental issues  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Solid Propellant Environmental Issues (SPEI) project is to demonstrate environmentally acceptable technologies that will enhance the continued production of solid rocket motors (SRMs) by complying with current and anticipated environmental regulations. Phase 1 of the project identifies current and anticipated environmental regulations that may affect SRMs manufacturing in the future and identify emerging process technologies which comply with these regulations. Phase 2 of the project established a baseline database by fabricating a 363 kg motor using the current manufacturing process. In Phase 3, environmentally acceptable process technologies were evaluated, ranked, and selected for demonstration using criteria developed by the team. The results for Phase 1--3 have previously been presented. This paper will present data obtained to date on Phase 4. In Phase 4, the alternate process technologies were evaluated for compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and waste minimization/pollution prevention. The best performing candidate for each application area was selected for demonstration. The selected process technologies will be inserted into the baseline manufacturing process from Phase 2. The new manufacturing process will be demonstrated and evaluated through the scale-up and fabrication of two 363 kg solid rocket motors.

Le, M.D. [Air Force Phillips Lab. Propulsion Directorate, Edwards AFB, CA (United States)] [Air Force Phillips Lab. Propulsion Directorate, Edwards AFB, CA (United States)

1998-07-01

250

An acceptable role for computers in the aircraft design process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the reasons why the computerization trend is not wholly accepted are explored for two typical cases: computer use in the technical specialties and computer use in aircraft synthesis. The factors that limit acceptance are traced in part, to the large resources needed to understand the details of computer programs, the inability to include measured data as input to many of the theoretical programs, and the presentation of final results without supporting intermediate answers. Other factors are due solely to technical issues such as limited detail in aircraft synthesis and major simplifying assumptions in the technical specialties. These factors and others can be influenced by the technical specialist and aircraft designer. Some of these factors may become less significant as the computerization process evolves, but some issues, such as understanding large integrated systems, may remain issues in the future. Suggestions for improved acceptance include publishing computer programs so that they may be reviewed, edited, and read. Other mechanisms include extensive modularization of programs and ways to include measured information as part of the input to theoretical approaches.

Gregory, T. J.; Roberts, L.

1980-01-01

251

The acceptability of continuous cell lines: A personal & historical perspective.  

PubMed

In the 1950s, only primary cell cultures were acceptable for the production of human biological products. This position was challenged in the late 1960s by human diploid cells (HDCs), and again in the 1980s by continuous cell lines (CCLs). The history of the HDC controversy is reviewed and lessons from that era that are relevant to the use of CCLs are pointed out. It became apparent in the early days of recombinant DNA technology in the 1980s that CCLs were needed for the development of some products. CCL acceptability therefore became more urgent, and several attempts were made to reach a consensus on regulatory issues. In 1986, the World Health Organization convened a Study Group to review the safety issues related to products derived from CCLs. The Study Group made a clear recommendation to pursue CCLs in product development because of the demonstrated capability of modern manufacturing processes to cope with contaminants. Issues such as acceptable levels of cellular DNA in products and the relationship of purity to safety are discussed in the context of the need for regulatory authorities, industry, and the general biomedical community to cooperate in addressing problems in a rational scientific manner. PMID:22358631

Petricciani, J C

1995-01-01

252

Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is  

E-print Network

Acceptance of Advertising A written insertion order is required for all advertisements. All advertisements are subject to approval. The University of Chicago Press reserves the right to reject advertising for any reason. The advertiser and/or its advertising agency are entirely responsible for the lawfulness

McReynolds, Ben

253

A study of users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biometric authentication methods are being increasingly used for many types of applications. Since such methods necessitate humans to interact with a device, effective implementation requires consideration of the perceptions and responses of end users. Towards this goal, we present in this paper a modality-independent evaluation methodology to study users' acceptance and satisfaction of biometric systems. It is based on the

Mohamad El-Abed; Romain Giot; Baptiste Hemery; Christophe Rosenberger

2010-01-01

254

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-print Network

(p>0.05) in all conditions. If not mentioned specifically, all responses reported below are steady state responses. Deleted: ICEBO2006, Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ (4) Formatted: Bullets and Numbering Formatted: ??? Deleted... between body parts is ? 0.83, the change of nonuniformity of thermal sensation is greater than the change of overall thermal sensation, resulting in a small improvement of thermal acceptability. The result for back cooling is similar with the one...

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01

255

The ethical dimension of terahertz and millimeter-wave imaging technologies: security, privacy, and acceptability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terahertz and millimeter-wave imaging technologies, wherever they are applied to human beings, generate problems with the "naked" body. Security issues thus inevitably lead to ethical questions of privacy and intimacy. Less apparent but no less important are other issues such as discrimination and the question of reducing this problem through post processing of data; scalability; questions of controlling the controllers; questions of proliferation. Ethical research alone can not provide acceptability. However, ultimately innovative technologies will not achieve widespread and sustainable acceptance without a fundamental clarification of the ethically relevant issues.

Ammicht Quinn, R.; Rampp, B.

2009-05-01

256

Retirement communities gain higher acceptance.  

PubMed

Retirement community gains in acceptance could indicate a bright future for the industry, according to the latest Generations research. The first ever on-line international survey of seniors and the first dial group studies of seniors show Boomers, Silent Generation seniors, and GI Generation seniors alike have become more positive in their evaluation of retirement communities as an option for the future. PMID:11372491

Brooks, S A; Adams, R T

2001-01-01

257

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-04-01

258

Stochastic Multicriteria Acceptability Analysis (SMAA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA) is a family of methods for aiding multicriteria group decision making\\u000a in problems with uncertain, imprecise or partially missing information. These methods are based on exploring the weight space\\u000a in order to describe the preferences that make each alternative the most preferred one, or that would give a certain rank\\u000a for a specific alternative. The

Risto Lahdelma; Pekka Salminen

259

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-01-01

260

Is DSM widely accepted by Japanese clinicians?  

PubMed

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III), a new standardized diagnostic system with multiaxial diagnosis, operational criteria and renewed definitions of mental disorders, was introduced in 1980 and prompted movements to reform conventions in Japanese psychiatry. This review overviews the initial response of Japanese clinicians to accept DSM-III, and its effects on the development of systematic research of psychiatric diagnosis. These new research activities include those on reliability of psychiatric diagnosis, application of various evaluation tools, discussion on the concept of mental disorders, relation of personality disorders with depressive disorders, and Taijin-kyofusho, or culturally distinctive phobia in Japan. A reference database search to survey the latest trend on psychiatric research indicated that the number of papers published by Japanese workers increased sharply after 1987, and DSM apparently greatly influenced their internationalization. Twenty years after the publication of DSM-III, a questionnaire on the use of DSM-IV was set out in 2000 to survey how widely DSM is utilized in clinical practice in Japan. Two hundred and twelve psychiatrists answered the questionnaire, and the results show that DSM has been accepted positively by the younger generation, while the older generation (over 40s) has still less interest in DSM, and DSM is used mainly for research purposes rather than in daily practice. PMID:11555338

Someya, T; Takahashi, M; Takahashi, M

2001-10-01

261

Exposures to conducted electrical weapons (including TASER® devices): how many and for how long are acceptable?  

PubMed

TASER(®) conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are an important law-enforcement tool. The purposes of this study are a) to review recent literature regarding potential pathophysiological responses to applications of CEWs, and other related issues and b) to evaluate whether enough data exist to determine the acceptability of longer-duration (or repeated) exposures. This is a narrative review, using a multidisciplinary approach of analyzing reports from physiological, legal-medical, and police-strategy literature sources. In general, short-duration exposures to CEWs result in limited effects. Longer-duration or repeated exposures may be utilized with caution, although there are currently not enough data to determine the acceptability of all types of exposures. Data examined in the literature have inherent limitations. Appropriateness of specific types of CEW usage may be determined by individual police agencies, applying risk/benefit analyses unique to each organization. While more research is recommended, initial concepts of potential future long-duration or repeated CEW applications are presented. PMID:25443856

Jauchem, James R

2015-01-01

262

When to say "yes" and when to say "no": boundary issues for hospice palliative care volunteers.  

PubMed

A total of 79 hospice palliative care volunteers from 2 community-based hospice programs responded to a 27-item Boundary Issues Questionnaire that was specifically developed for this study. Volunteers were asked to indicate whether or not they considered each item (eg, "Lend personal belongings to a patient or family," "Agree to be a patient's power of attorney," "Attend/go into a patient's medical appointment") to be something they should not do and to indicate whether or not they have ever done it. On the basis of the volunteers' responses, the authors distinguished between "definite boundary issues" (things volunteers should never do, for example, "Accept money from a patient or family"), "potential boundary issues" (things volunteers should stop and think twice about doing, for example, "Accept a gift from a patient or family"), and "questionable boundary issues" (things volunteers should be aware of doing, for example, "Give your home phone number to a patient or family"). The implications of these findings for training volunteers are discussed and the need for clear and unambiguous organizational policies and procedures to preserve boundaries is stressed. Without clear policies, etc, community-based hospice programs may be putting themselves at legal risk. PMID:21317131

Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Gibbon, Laura; Schmidt-Chamberlain, Kirsten

2011-09-01

263

Pipeline issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

Eisley, Joe T.

1990-01-01

264

More Issues in Observed-Score Equating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a response to the commentaries on the position paper on observed-score equating by van der Linden (this issue). The response focuses on the more general issues in these commentaries, such as the nature of the observed scores that are equated, the importance of test-theory assumptions in equating, the necessity to use multiple…

van der Linden, Wim J.

2013-01-01

265

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01

266

Environmental Issues: Cornell Students' Willingness to Take Action, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the relative importance to university students of various environmental issues and the acceptability of potential solutions or tradeoffs necessary for attaining environmental benefits was explored. The study found that students' willingness to accept various solutions or tradeoffs can be expected to vary greatly. (LZ)

Gigliotti, Larry M.

1994-01-01

267

Perspectives: Societal Issues in Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When students investigate local issues in science class, they gain research and critical-thinking skills while improving their attitudes toward science. However, since many societal issues are controversial, it is important to create a safe and risk-free classroom climate where students can discuss their ideas, personal needs, experiences, and responsibilities. This article discribes some strategies that will help students to use science to make personal and societal decisions.

Patrick L. Brown

2009-04-01

268

Clinical determinants of PACS acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the key determinants influencing how successfully a radiology department can convert from a conventional film-based environment to an exclusively digital imaging environment may be how well referring physician members of the hospital staff who are not radiologists endorse this new system. The benefits of Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) to radiologists are becoming widely accepted and documented; however, physicians who interact with the radiology department represent an important user group whose views on PACS are less well understood. The acceptance of PACS by referring physicians (clinicians) may be critical to the overall utility ofPACS as well as a major drivingforce behind why a hospitalpurchases PACS. The degree to which referring physicians support PACS may be dependent upon many factors. This study identifies several aspects through the administration and analysis ofa survey which improve PACS acceptance by nonradiology physicians. It appears the more patients a referring physician sends to the radiology department, the more time a physician spends traveling to andfrom thefllmflle room retrievingfllms, and, the more interested a referring physician is about computers, the higher his interest is in PACS. If a referring physician believes that PACS will save him or her time, will reduce the incidence oflostfilms, or will cause performance of radiology exams or generation of reports to be more efficient, the referring physician appears more likely to support PACS and to make the initial time investment necessary to learn how PACS equipment operates. The factors which cause referring physicians to support PACS are principally: (1) the elimination oflost, misplaced, and checked outfllms, and (2) the elimination oftrips to and from thefile room. The major distractions ofthe technology are: (1) system reliability, and (2) reduced diagnostic capability. While the high cost ofPACS is also a distraction, it is not the predominant concern.

Saarinen, Allan O.; Youngs, Gayle L.; Haynor, David R.; Loop, John W.

1990-08-01

269

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received  

E-print Network

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

Cui, Yan

270

Digital forensics and the issues of identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of what we consider to be the identity of a person has become increasingly complex as we have made ever greater use of the facilities and services that have been made available by developing technologies and the Internet. In the past people normally had one identity, while in the current environment it is acceptable to maintain separate ‘identities’

Andrew Jones; Thomas Martin

2010-01-01

271

Axelrod model: accepting or discussing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agents building social systems are characterized by complex states, and interactions among individuals can align their opinions. The Axelrod model describes how local interactions can result in emergence of cultural domains. We propose two variants of the Axelrod model where local consensus is reached either by listening and accepting one of neighbors' opinion or two agents discuss their opinion and achieve an agreement with mixed opinions. We show that the local agreement rule affects the character of the transition between the single culture and the multiculture regimes.

Dybiec, Bartlomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

2012-10-01

272

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Acceptance. 906.25 Section 906.25 Agriculture Regulations of...ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any person...

2010-01-01

273

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Acceptance. 906.25 Section 906.25 Agriculture Regulations of...ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any person...

2011-01-01

274

49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Construction acceptance. 193.2303 Section 193.2303...Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person may place in service any...passes all applicable inspections and tests prescribed by this subpart and...

2010-10-01

275

An "acceptable" low carbon scenario for  

E-print Network

An "acceptable" low carbon scenario for France Participatory scenariodesign andeconomic assessment.Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 17 II.Representation of the transport sector in Imaclim-R France ......................................................................................... 17 III.Acceptable policy measures in the transport sector

Boyer, Edmond

276

The Fix Issue 9  

E-print Network

to hold aU the other items fo r FIX 10, which will be ou t in February. We do have LaCs this time! Thanks to all who responded to my plea. I know the writers will be glad to sec your responses to thei r work. Make a New Year's Resolution to keep... commenting. or to start if you haven't LoC-ed in a whi le. Plea~ Our stories for this holiday issue couldn't have been more well?mixed than if I'd commissioned them individually! There's a li tt le of everything: humor, crime-fighting. sex and sentimentali...

Multiple Contributors

1990-01-01

277

Acceptability of Treatments for TrichotillomaniaEffects of Age and Severity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the literature, trichotillomania (TTM, chronic hair pulling) in children and adults appears to be responsive to behavioral interventions such as habit reversal. However, some have questioned the generality and acceptability of such procedures. This study compared the acceptability ratings of four interventions targeting TTM (habit reversal, hypnosis, medication, and punishment). In the study, 233 college students read case

Amy J. Elliott; R. Wayne Fuqua

2002-01-01

278

Parent's Acceptance of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Behavior and Communication Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to examine what parents find as acceptable treatment options for children with behavior problems in a communication disorders population. Parents' acceptability of seven treatment options, including positive reinforcement, time-out, response cost, spanking, overcorrection, differential attention, and medication were…

Boothe, Jennifer L.; Borrego, Joaquin

2004-01-01

279

Effects of acceptance-oriented versus evaluative emotional processing on heart rate recovery and habituation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of emotional processing on stress response trajectories may depend on the nature of processing, as evaluative rumination about emotions can prolong distress. In contrast, observing negative emotions in an accepting manner may promote efficient recovery from stressful situations. The present study examined the effect of acceptance-oriented versus evaluative emotional processing on cardiovascular habituation and recovery. Across two experimental

Carissa A. Low; Annette L. Stanton; Julienne E. Bower

2008-01-01

280

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. For more information, see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been fully edited.  

E-print Network

, where a multi-probe anechoic chamber based method is a promising candidate. Setting up a multi results. There are three main types of OTA test methods for MIMO devices: multi-probe anechoic chamber method; and the cost of the setup is the main issue with the multi-probe anechoic chamber-based method [1

Berning, Torsten

281

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

2011-01-01

282

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults’ information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults’ information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were found using factor analysis. According to older adults’ self-reported scores, the factors of needs satisfaction and support availability

Lin Wang; Pei-Luen Patrick Rau; Gavriel Salvendy

2011-01-01

283

Apollo experience report environmental acceptance testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Environmental acceptance testing was used extensively to screen selected spacecraft hardware for workmanship defects and manufacturing flaws. The minimum acceptance levels and durations and methods for their establishment are described. Component selection and test monitoring, as well as test implementation requirements, are included. Apollo spacecraft environmental acceptance test results are summarized, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

Laubach, C. H. M.

1976-01-01

284

On the Acceptance Power of Regular Languages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hertrampf et al. (1993) looked at complexity classes which are characterized (say accepted) by a regular language for the words of output bits produced by nondeterministic polynomial-time computations. A number of well-known complexity classes between P and PSPACE are accepted by regular languages. For example, NP is accepted by the regular language which consists of the words which contain at

Bernd Borchert

1995-01-01

285

On the Acceptance Power of Regular Languages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hertrampf et al. (1993) looked at complexity classes which are characterized (say accepted) by a regular language for the words of output bits produced by nondeterministic polynomial-time computations. A number of well-known complexity classes between P and PSPACE are accepted by regular languages. For example, NP is accepted by the regular language which consists of the words which contain at

Bernd Borchert

1994-01-01

286

Public acceptance of urban rotorcraft operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though tiltrotor operations from city center to city center could greatly shorten travel times over moderate ranges, public opposition to intense urban rotorcraft activity has kept this possibility from being realized. One significant factor in this opposition is rotorcraft noise. Over the last 25 years, NASA has explored the subjective response to rotorcraft noise and developed low noise design concepts and noise abatement flight procedures. While low noise designs can be applied for future rotorcraft, this is not an effective near-term means of reducing rotorcraft noise, because of the costs associated with replacement of helicopter rotor blades. Recent noise abatement research, which has been focusing on the development of tools and techniques to facilitate the design of quieter flight procedures for existing vehicles, has much more immediate application. While very little subjective response work has occurred recently, prior work at NASA in this area from the 1970s and 1980s is discussed. Lastly, thoughts on future research areas that might help improve the public acceptance of rotorcraft will be described.

Marcolini, Michael A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Posey, Joe W.

2001-05-01

287

Host, vehicular and environmental factors responsible for road traffic crashes in a nigerian city: identifiable issues for road traffic injury control  

PubMed Central

Introduction Road traffic injury (RTI) has assumed major public health importance world-wide and the burden is heavier on the health-care infrastructure of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Nigeria, RTI is the leading cause of trauma related morbidity and mortality. While there are some published epidemiological reports on RTI in the region, studies on the mechanism of causation of road traffic crashes (RTC) are not available. Methods Over a 9-month period, we prospectively captured the 571 victims of RTC presenting to a single tertiary health care center in Nigeria. Data collected include demographic data, Mechanism of causation of RTC, Injuries sustained and outcomes. Results Over three-quarters of the victims are young people and half were either traders (27.5%) or students (20%). Pedestrians, motorcycle riders and open truck occupants (people sitting at the rear loading compartment of trucks) often had fatal injuries. Analysis of collision patterns showed that lone crashes were the most frequent though car-to-motorcycle crashes caused a quarter of the deaths. Host factors (over-speeding driver, driver misjudgment, sleeping driver etc.) were responsible for four-fifths of the crashes while vehicular and environmental factors accounted for the remaining. On binary regression analysis, head injured victims had higher odds of dying than the non-head injured (Odds ratio = 6.5). Conclusion This paper elucidates the mechanisms of causation of and types of injuries sustained following RTC in Nigeria and thus provide opportunities for prevention and control of this unacceptable situation.

Adeoye, Peter Oladapo; Kadri, Dotun Musiliu; Bello, Jibril Oyekunle; Ofoegbu, Chima Kingsley Pascal; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman Olajide; Adekanye, Adedeji Olugbenga; Solagberu, Babatunde Akeeb

2014-01-01

288

Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Process  

SciTech Connect

On February 25, 2000, the US. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLWMLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLWMLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified disposal process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

SHRADER, T.; MACBETH, P.

2002-01-01

289

Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Processes  

SciTech Connect

On February 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLW/MLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLW/MLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified dispos al process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

Shrader, T. A.; Macbeth, P. J.

2002-02-26

290

Computer acceptance of older adults.  

PubMed

Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

2012-01-01

291

Acceptable Use Policies: A Handbook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the Virginia Department of Education Technology Division, this site offers guidelines for the appropriate use of computer networks. These guidelines are generally known as Acceptable Internet Use Policy, or AUP, and are comprised of "a written agreement . . . signed by students, their parents and their teachers, outlining the terms and conditions of Internet use-rules of online behavior and access privileges." Rather than set out a single AUP, this online handbook features a collection of selected resources to help administrators, teachers, library media specialists, and parents develop their own local AUP. The handbook includes links to examples of various components of an AUP, sample policies from Virginia and other states, and a selection of templates.

292

DISPOSABLE CANISTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to provide the bases for defining the preclosure limits on radioactive material releases from radioactive waste forms to be received in disposable canisters at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, this calculation will provide the basis for criteria to be included in a forthcoming revision of the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) that limits releases in terms of non-isotope-specific canister release dose-equivalent source terms. These criteria will be developed for the Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) standard canister, the Multicanister Overpack (MCO), the naval spent fuel canister, the High-Level Waste (HLW) canister, the plutonium can-in-canister, and the large Multipurpose Canister (MPC). The shippers of such canisters will be required to demonstrate that they meet these criteria before the canisters are accepted at the MGR. The Quality Assurance program is applicable to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of DSNF and is performed using procedure AP-3.124, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to procedure QAP-2-0, Control of Activities, which has been superseded by AP-2.21Q, Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to the requirements of DOE/RW/0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 2000). This work is also prepared in accordance with the development plan titled Design Basis Event Analyses on DOE SNF and Plutonium Can-In-Canister Waste Forms (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This calculation contains no electronic data applicable to any electronic data management system.

R.J. Garrett

2001-07-30

293

Factors influencing the acceptability of energy policies: A test of VBN theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines factors influencing the acceptability of energy policies aimed to reduce the emission of CO2 by households. More specifically, it is studied to what extent the value–belief–norm theory of environmentalism (VBN theory; Stern, [(2000). Toward a coherent theory of environmentally significant behavior. Journal of Social Issues, 56(3), 407–424.]) is successful in explaining acceptability judgements. In contrast to previous

Linda Steg; Lieke Dreijerink; Wokje Abrahamse

2005-01-01

294

Pro\\/con ethics debate: is nonheart-beating organ donation ethically acceptable?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pro\\/con debate explores the ethical issues surrounding nonheart-beating organ donation (NHBD), a source of considerable\\u000a controversy. It is estimated that NHBD can increase the number of organs available for transplant by 25% at a time of great\\u000a need. However, should NHBD be ethically acceptable? In support of NHBD, it may be acceptable practice if there is a separation\\u000a of

Leslie Whetstine; Kerry Bowman; Laura Hawryluck

2002-01-01

295

33 CFR 155.1065 - Procedures for plan submission, approval, requests for acceptance of alternative planning...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...acceptance of alternative planning criteria, and appeal. 155.1065 Section 155.1065 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD...FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1065 Procedures for plan submission,...

2010-07-01

296

An issue-charged first year for AHA's Davidson.  

PubMed

Reclassification and reform were major issues in Richard Davidson's first year as president of the American Hospital Assn. Those issues, as well as a litany of other budget and legislative battles, promise to rank among his biggest challenges during his second year in office. He's cleared the first hurdle in the reform battle--finding a plan most AHA members can accept. PMID:10160862

Wagner, L; Burda, D

1992-07-27

297

Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue  

E-print Network

Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue Joseph P. Culver,1, * Wolfgang; accepted 25 March 2009; posted 25 March 2009 (Doc. ID 109253); published 30 March 2009 This Applied Optics feature issue on Topics in Biomedical Optics highlights papers presented at the 2008 Biomedical Topical

Larson-Prior, Linda

298

41 CFR 304-5.1 - When may we accept payment from a non-Federal source for travel to a meeting or authorize an...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...authorize an employee to accept payment on our behalf? 304-5.1 Section 304-5.1 Public Contracts and Property Management...AGENCY REQUIREMENTS 5-AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES § 304-5.1 When may we accept payment from a...

2014-07-01

299

41 CFR 304-5.1 - When may we accept payment from a non-Federal source for travel to a meeting or authorize an...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...authorize an employee to accept payment on our behalf? 304-5.1 Section 304-5.1 Public Contracts and Property Management...AGENCY REQUIREMENTS 5-AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES § 304-5.1 When may we accept payment from a...

2013-07-01

300

41 CFR 304-5.1 - When may we accept payment from a non-Federal source for travel to a meeting or authorize an...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...authorize an employee to accept payment on our behalf? 304-5.1 Section 304-5.1 Public Contracts and Property Management...AGENCY REQUIREMENTS 5-AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES § 304-5.1 When may we accept payment from a...

2011-07-01

301

41 CFR 304-5.1 - When may we accept payment from a non-Federal source for travel to a meeting or authorize an...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...authorize an employee to accept payment on our behalf? 304-5.1 Section 304-5.1 Public Contracts and Property Management...AGENCY REQUIREMENTS 5-AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES § 304-5.1 When may we accept payment from a...

2012-07-01

302

Study on Influencing Factor Analysis and Application of Consumer Mobile Commerce Acceptance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mobile commerce (MC) refers to e-commerce activities carried out using a mobile device such as a phone or PDA. With new technology, MC will be rapidly growing in the near future. At the present time, what factors making consumer accept MC and what MC applications are acceptable by consumers are two of hot issues both for MC providers and f or MC researchers. This study presents a proposed MC acceptance model that integrates perceived playfulness, perceived risk and cost into the TAM to study which factors affect consumer MC acceptance. The proposed model includes five variables, namely perceived risk, cost, perceived usefulness, perceived playfulness, perceived ease of use, perceived playfulness. Then, using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to calculate weight of criteria involved in proposed model. Finally, the study utilizes fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to evaluate MC applications accepted possibility, and then a MC application is empirically tested using data collected from a survey of MC consumers.

Li, Gaoguang; Lv, Tingjie

303

Nutrient Management Issues inNutrient Management Issues in TennesseeTennessee  

E-print Network

issued by Dept. of EnvironmentPermits issued by Dept. of Environment and Conservation (TDEC)and Conservation (TDEC) Responsible for permit issuance andResponsible for permit issuance;Key DefinitionsKey Definitions Animal Feeding OperationAnimal Feeding Operation Confines animals

304

Ethical Issues Involving the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet is a network of networks, sharing the same protocol and linking universities, research communities, businesses, and individuals world wide. In this new global information infrastructure, all citizens need to understand the power and pitfalls of the technology in order to function as responsible members. This paper discusses issues

Connolly, Mary V.

305

ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of ERCMExpress presents the topic "Schools Respond to Infectious Disease." Every year, schools confront a range of infectious diseases such as chicken pox, lice, ringworm and seasonal influenza. In response, faculty and staff work together to control the outbreak, quell fears and dispel rumors. For example, school administrators may…

US Department of Education, 2006

2006-01-01

306

ERCMExpress. Volume 3, Issue 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's newsletter, "ERCMExpress," provides comprehensive information on key issues in school emergency management. Memorials are deeply rooted in our culture and remind us of a person who has died or an event in which people died, and they provide a place for people to…

Paine, Cathy

2007-01-01

307

Flight Crew Workload, Acceptability, and Performance When Using Data Comm in a High-Density Terminal Area Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes a collaborative FAA/NASA experiment using 22 commercial airline pilots to determine the effect of using Data Comm to issue messages during busy, terminal area operations. Four conditions were defined that span current day to future flight deck equipage: Voice communication only, Data Comm only, Data Comm with Moving Map Display, and Data Comm with Moving Map displaying taxi route. Each condition was used in an arrival and a departure scenario at Boston Logan Airport. Of particular interest was the flight crew response to D-TAXI, the use of Data Comm by Air Traffic Control (ATC) to send taxi instructions. Quantitative data was collected on subject reaction time, flight technical error, operational errors, and eye tracking information. Questionnaires collected subjective feedback on workload, situation awareness, and acceptability to the flight crew for using Data Comm in a busy terminal area. Results showed that 95% of the Data Comm messages were responded to by the flight crew within one minute and 97% of the messages within two minutes. However, post experiment debrief comments revealed almost unanimous consensus that two minutes was a reasonable expectation for crew response. Flight crews reported that Expected D-TAXI messages were useful, and employment of these messages acceptable at all altitude bands evaluated during arrival scenarios. Results also indicate that the use of Data Comm for all evaluated message types in the terminal area was acceptable during surface operations, and during arrivals at any altitude above the Final Approach Fix, in terms of response time, workload, situation awareness, and flight technical performance. The flight crew reported the use of Data Comm as implemented in this experiment as unacceptable in two instances: in clearances to cross an active runway, and D-TAXI messages between the Final Approach Fix and 80 knots during landing roll. Critical cockpit tasks and the urgency of out-the window scan made the additional head down time to respond to Data Comm messages undesirable during these events. However, most crews also stated that Data Comm messages without an accompanying audio chime and no expectation of an immediate response could be acceptable even during these events.

Norman, R. Michael; Baxley, Brian T.; Adams, Cathy A.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Latorella, Kara A.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

2013-01-01

308

From Ethical Responsibility to Corporate Social Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corporate social responsibility is a concept on the rise, but also a heavily criticized one. Basically, it suffers from a crucial weakness: it has no generally accepted, common framework. Consequently, it remains an amalgam of descriptive, instrumental and normative proposals, based on mutually incompatible ethical, sociological and economic theories. This article starts from the concept of responsibility as a moral

Antonio Argandoña

309

Current ethical issues in IVF.  

PubMed

This article has briefly reviewed the range of public policy issues and ethical questions raised with respect to IVF. It then discussed selected issues that are now under policy debate and decision. Given the wide acceptance of IVF as a medical procedure for married couples, what variants might also be ethically defensible? IVF for unmarried couples appears defensible under specific conditions that are equally applicable to married couples. Involvement of third parties (gamete donation and gestational surrogacy) is more complex and needs case by case examination. Sperm donation appears to generate little that is ethically new when coupled with IVF but requires the same care and concern as AID. Egg or embryo donation, however, does raise new ethical questions that need close attention and continuing analysis. Freezing of human embryos also breaks new ethical ground, particularly in the options it generates beyond a narrowly defined medical domain. Certain of these options are better not undertaken without further public policy decision. Improvement of current procedures and techniques through effective clinical trials can be ethically carried out in terms of scientific and medical perspectives. However, efforts in this direction will be more effective if undertaken within a public policy framework that clearly defines acceptability during a transitional period of confidence-building. PMID:3833444

Grobstein, C; Flower, M

1985-12-01

310

A Jewish response to the Vatican's new bioethical guidelines.  

PubMed

The Vatican recently published directives (Dignitas Personae) regarding "beginning of life" issues that explain the Catholic Church's position regarding new technologies in this area. We think that it is important to develop a response that presents the traditional Orthodox Jewish position on these same issues in order to present an alternative, parallel system. There are many points of commonality between the Vatican document and traditional Jewish thought as well as several important issues where there is a divergence of opinion. The latter include the status of the zygote as produced during in vitro fertilization (IVF), the acceptable of procreation in a method other than through the conjugal act, and the permissibility of deriving benefit from the products of an illicit act. These points of agreement and disagreement are discussed in detail in this article. PMID:19882451

Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Jotkowitz, Alan

2009-11-01

311

TODS Special Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The March 2004 issue of TODS should be in your mailbox (as well as available in cyberspace, at the ACM Digital Library) around the time you receive this issue of SIGMOD Record. This issue is a first, a special issue dedicated to extended versions of SIGMOD and PODS papers from the 2002 conference. This special issue opens the topic of

Richard T. Snodgrass

2004-01-01

312

Challenges in international medicine: ethical dilemmas, unanticipated consequences, and accepting limitations.  

PubMed

While personal and organizational challenges occur in every area of health care, practitioners of international medicine face unique problems and dilemmas that are rarely discussed in training programs. Health professions schools, residency and fellowship programs, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and government programs have a responsibility to make those new to international medicine aware of the special circumstances that they may face and to provide methods for understanding and dealing with these circumstances. Standard "domestic" approaches to such challenges may not work in international medicine, even though these challenges may appear to be similar to those faced in other clinical settings. How should organizations ensure that well-meaning health intervention efforts do not cause adverse unintended sequelae? How should an individual balance respect for cultural uniqueness and local mores that may profoundly differ from his or her own beliefs, with the need to remain a moral agent true to one's self? When is acceptance the appropriate response to situations in which limitations of resources seem to preclude any good solution? Using a case-based approach, the authors discuss issues related to the four major international medicine domains: clinical practice (postdisaster response, resource limitations, standards of care), medical systems and systems development (prehospital care, wartime casualties, sustainable change, cultural awareness), teaching (instruction and local resources, professional preparation), and research (questionable funded studies, clinical trials, observational studies). It is hoped that this overview may help prepare those involved with international medicine for the challenges and dilemmas they may face and help frame their responses to these situations. PMID:22548491

Iserson, Kenneth V; Biros, Michelle H; James Holliman, C

2012-06-01

313

Copyright (c) 2011 IEEE. Personal use is permitted. For any other purposes, Permission must be obtained from the IEEE by emailing pubs-permissions@ieee.org. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been  

E-print Network

and the propagation speed of torsional waves. To this end, dispersion relations of torsional waves are obtained from-effects in the dynamic torsional response of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by developing a modified nonlocal continuum shell model. The purpose is to facilitate the design of devices based on CNT torsion by providing

Phani, A. Srikantha

314

Copyright (c) 2013 IEEE. Personal use is permitted. For any other purposes, permission must be obtained from the IEEE by emailing pubs-permissions@ieee.org. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been  

E-print Network

components ("metasurfaces") based on arrays of these antennas. To demonstrate the versatility of metasurfaces) metasurfaces with a constant interfacial phase gradient that deflect light into arbitrary directions; (b) metasurfaces with anisotropic optical responses that create light beams of arbitrary polarization over a wide

Capasso, Federico

315

Transparency and social responsibility issues for Wikipedia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wikipedia is known as a free online encyclopedia. Wikipedia uses largely transparent writing and editing processes, which\\u000a aim at providing the user with quality information through a democratic collaborative system. However, one aspect of these\\u000a processes is not transparent—the identity of contributors, editors, and administrators. We argue that this particular lack\\u000a of transparency jeopardizes the validity of the information being

Adele Santana; Donna J. Wood

2009-01-01

316

Electric utility responses to grid security issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the different initiatives that utility decision makers have set in place to address the vulnerability of the US power grid to physical and cyber attacks. One of the efforts to enhance grid security is EPRI's Infrastructure Security Initiative (ISI), which was designed to develop both prevention countermeasures and enhanced recovery capabilities. To protect against cyber attacks, several

R. Schainker; J. Douglas; T. Kropp

2006-01-01

317

Consumers' Perceptions of the Ethics and Acceptability of Product Placements in Movies: Product Category and Individual Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Product placement in movies is an important emerging area of marketing and advertising communications, but it also raises controversial ethical issues. In order to investigate these issues from a consumer point of view, this paper reports on an empirical study of 1012 college students and their perceptions of the acceptability of such placements. The results indicate that while there are

Pola B. Gupta; Stephen J. Gould

1997-01-01

318

Payment generosity and physician acceptance of Medicare and Medicaid patients.  

PubMed

Using 2008 physician survey data, we estimate the relationship between the generosity of fees paid to primary care physicians under Medicaid and Medicare and his/her willingness to accept new patients covered by Medicaid, Medicare, or both programs (i.e., dually enrolled patients). Findings reveal physicians are highly responsive to fee generosity under both programs. Also, their willingness to accept patients under either program is affected by the generosity of fees under the other program, i.e., there are significant spillover effects between Medicare and Medicare fee generosity. We also simulate how physicians in 2008 would have likely responded to Medicaid and Medicare payment reforms similar to those embodied in the 2010 Affordable Care Act, had they been permanently in place in 2008. Our findings suggest that "Medicaid Parity" for primary care physicians would have likely dramatically improved physician willingness to accept new Medicaid patients while only slightly reducing their willingness to accept new Medicare patients. Also, many more primary care physicians would have been willing to treat dually enrolled patients. PMID:25005072

Brunt, Christopher S; Jensen, Gail A

2014-12-01

319

CTE's Role in Worker Retraining. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Issue Brief will explore the essential role that career and technical education programs play in addressing many of the issues faced by unemployed and underemployed workers. These programs target the adult learner through short-term and accelerated courses; utilize flexible learning approaches to account for students' other responsibilities;…

Association for Career and Technical Education (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

320

Animal Experimentation: Issues for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the extent to which issues related to animal experimentation are in conflict and proposes choices that might least comprise them. These issues include animal well-being, human well-being, self-interest of science, scientific validity and responsibility, progress in biomedical and behavioral science, and the future quality of medical care.…

Zola, Judith C.; And Others

1984-01-01

321

Readers’ response  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article found its inception as a response to three articles in an issue of the 1984 Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, Volume 5, No. 5. The authors are attempting to draw information, analogies and lessons from the situation of multilingual\\/ multi?ethnic school populations in Britain and the strategies for training teachers for this type of school population. It

Edith W. King; Carlos Vallejo

1986-01-01

322

Methylmercury risk assessment issues  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

Lipfert, F.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Saroff, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-07-01

323

Factors Affecting Non Bank-Issued POS E-micropayment Choice: A Study of Taiwan Market  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Taiwan, organizations with existing captive markets, that is, transport-related companies and convenience stores, have issued their own non bank-issued POS e- micropayment programs and achieved good success. Due to legal restriction imposed on non bank-issued programs, Taiwan's market has evolved further resulting in two major categories: non bank-issued programs and bank-issued programs. Through an extended Post-acceptance Model of IS

Wee Kheng Tan

324

Heavy Metal, Religiosity, and Suicide Acceptability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on data taken from the General Social Survey that found a link between "heavy metal" rock fanship and suicide acceptability. Finds that relationship becomes nonsignificant once level of religiosity is controlled. Heavy metal fans are low in religiosity, which contributes to greater suicide acceptability. (Author/JDM)

Stack, Steven

1998-01-01

325

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01

326

40 CFR 161.70 - Acceptable protocols.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Acceptable protocols. 161.70 Section 161.70 Protection...Provisions § 161.70 Acceptable protocols. The Agency has published Pesticide...161.20(d), which contain suggested protocols for conducting tests to develop the...

2011-07-01

327

40 CFR 161.70 - Acceptable protocols.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Acceptable protocols. 161.70 Section 161.70 Protection...Provisions § 161.70 Acceptable protocols. The Agency has published Pesticide...161.20(d), which contain suggested protocols for conducting tests to develop the...

2010-07-01

328

Safety and Public Acceptance of Transgenic Products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public acceptance of transgenic (genetically engineered, GE) prod- ucts is influenced by the perception of direct or indirect risks and benefits and the credibility of regulatory agencies that evaluate food and environmental safety. In North America acceptance of GE foods is holding steady, while knowledge about them remains low. Develop- ment of transgenic foods with improved nutritional properties or other

Patrick F. Byrne

2006-01-01

329

Public Acceptance for Geological CO2Storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and

F. Schilling; F. Ossing; H. Würdemann

2009-01-01

330

PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A 5-YEAR RESEARCH PROGRAM WHICH ANALYZED MANY OF THE CORRELATES OF PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION IN A SERIES OF STUDIES INVOLVING 37,913 SCHOOL CHILDREN, AGES 9 TO 12 YEARS. PEER ACCEPTANCE-REJECTION WAS INVESTIGATED THROUGH THE USE OF A PEER RATING SCALE AND A TEACHER RATING SCALE. A NUMBER OF METHODOLOGICAL…

SELLS, S.B.; AND OTHERS

331

When did prisons become acceptable mental  

E-print Network

When did prisons become acceptable mental healthcare facilities? Co-Published by: California State Strikes Project Director, Michael Romano Three Strikes Project #12;When did prisons become acceptable prisoners. Despite her success in changing the country's perception and treatment of the mentally ill

Straight, Aaron

332

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21

333

Understanding diversity: the importance of social acceptance.  

PubMed

Two studies investigated how people define and perceive diversity in the historically majority-group dominated contexts of business and academia. We hypothesized that individuals construe diversity as both the numeric representation of racial minorities and the social acceptance of racial minorities within a group. In Study 1, undergraduates' (especially minorities') perceptions of campus diversity were predicted by perceived social acceptance on a college campus, above and beyond perceived minority representation. Study 2 showed that increases in a company's representation and social acceptance independently led to increases in perceived diversity of the company among Whites. Among non-Whites, representation and social acceptance only increased perceived diversity of the company when both qualities were high. Together these findings demonstrate the importance of both representation and social acceptance to the achievement of diversity in groups and that perceiver race influences the relative importance of these two components of diversity. PMID:25713169

Chen, Jacqueline M; Hamilton, David L

2015-04-01

334

Am I Fat? Helping Young Children Accept Differences in Body Size.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers information and ideas to support teachers, parents and other caregivers in their efforts to help children accept and like their bodies. It includes specific tips on dealing with body image issues and suggestions for role modeling healthy attitudes about body size. It also offers suggestions for healthy eating, increasing physical…

Ikeda, Joanne; Naworski, Priscilla

335

Real versus Hypothetical Willingness to Accept: The Bishop and Heberlein Model Revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

To study the validity of survey-based contingent value estimates, Bishop and Heberlein (Amer. J. Agr. Econom. 61, 926-930, 1979) compared people's stated and real willingness to accept (WTA) for hunting permits. This paper reconsid- ers the econometric issue of estimating their referendum models by allowing for decison uncertainty in individual choices. The results indicate that the hypothet- ical WTA is

Chuan-Zhong Li; Karl-Gustaf Löfgren; W. Michael Hanemann

1995-01-01

336

An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

2008-01-01

337

Trust in governance and the acceptance of genetically modified food in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assumes that trust is a major issue in the interaction between government, citizens and societal organizations. The central question in this paper relates to the specific determinants of public trust. A survey study is reported (n = 1019) which focuses on the role of trust in the acceptance of genetically modified (GM) food. Our expectation was that three

Jan Gutteling; Lucien Hanssen; Veer van der Neil; Erwin Seydel

2006-01-01

338

Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

2013-01-01

339

Width of the latitude of acceptance as a determinant of attitude change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examined the implications of social judgment theory for predicting individual differences in attitude change. Ss (N = 124 undergraduates) received a message advocating a position on birth control either mildly, moderately, or strongly discrepant from their own. For all 3 levels of discrepancy, the Ss with wide latitudes of acceptance on the issue showed greater attitude change than Ss with

Alice H. Eagly; Kathleen Telaak

1972-01-01

340

Applying the Technology Acceptance Model to Assess Outcomes in a Globally Linked Strategic Communication Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public relations students at two U.S. universities separated by several time zones were assigned to use online message boards to communicate with each other as well as cultural consultants in Korea to write an issue statement and promotional plan for an international strategic communications project. The technology acceptance model was found to fit well with student attitudes and behaviors related

Tom Kelleher; Michelle OMalley

2005-01-01

341

State Issues Digest, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report looks at higher education policy issues that are taking shape at the state level and provides data on key trends and indicators. The first section presents findings from the 2001 State Issues Survey. Topics discussed include: fiscal issues; governance/management; economic development; academic issues; distance education; and…

American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

342

Current IT Issues, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. Administered by the EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee, whose members review and recommend the set of issues to be presented each year, the survey identifies the issues that leaders in higher education information technology see as their most critical IT challenges. The Top-Ten current IT…

Spicer, Donald Z.; Deblois, Peter B.

2004-01-01

343

Parental Acceptance of HPV Vaccine in Peru: A Decision Framework  

PubMed Central

Objective and Method Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer affecting women worldwide and it is an important cause of death, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) and can be prevented by HPV vaccine. The challenge is to expand vaccine availability to countries where it is most needed. In 2008 Peru’s Ministry of Health implemented a demonstration project involving 5th grade girls in primary schools in the Piura region. We designed and conducted a qualitative study of the decision-making process among parents of girls, and developed a conceptual model describing the process of HPV vaccine acceptance. Results We found a nonlinear HPV decision-making process that evolved over time. Initially, the vaccine’s newness, the requirement of written consent, and provision of information were important. If information was sufficient and provided by credible sources, many parents accepted the vaccine. Later, after obtaining additional information from teachers, health personnel, and other trusted sources, more parents accepted vaccination. An understanding of the issues surrounding the vaccine developed, parents overcome fears and rumors, and engaged in family negotiations–including hearing the girl’s voice in the decision-making process. The concept of prevention (cancer as danger, future health, and trust in vaccines) combined with pragmatic factors (no cost, available at school) and the credibility of the offer (information in the media, recommendation of respected authority figure) were central to motivations that led parents to decide to vaccinate their daughters. A lack of confidence in the health system was the primary inhibitor of vaccine acceptance. Conclusions Health personnel and teachers are credible sources of information and can provide important support to HPV vaccination campaigns. PMID:23144719

Bartolini, Rosario M.; Winkler, Jennifer L.; Penny, Mary E.; LaMontagne, D. Scott

2012-01-01

344

Social Perception of Rape: How Rape Myth Acceptance Modulates the Influence of Situational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the role of rape myth acceptance (RMA) and situational factors in the perception of three different rape scenarios (date rape, marital rape, and stranger rape). One hundred and eighty-two psychology undergraduates were asked to emit four judgements about each rape situation: victim responsibility, perpetrator responsibility,…

Frese, Bettina; Moya, Miguel; Megias, Jesus

2004-01-01

345

Space Station Engineering Design Issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Station Freedom topics addressed include: general design issues; issues related to utilization and operations; issues related to systems requirements and design; and management issues relevant to design.

Mcruer, Duane T.; Boehm, Barry W.; Debra, Daniel B.; Green, C. Cordell; Henry, Richard C.; Maycock, Paul D.; Mcelroy, John H.; Pierce, Chester M.; Stafford, Thomas P.; Young, Laurence R.

1989-01-01

346

Cue Set Stimulation as a Factor in Human Response Generation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The hypotheses that there will be a significant difference (1) in the number of responses generated according to economic issues, (2) in the number of responses generated according to social issues, (3) in the number of responses generated between the category of economic issues and the category of social issues, (4) in cue ranking by response

Petelle, John L.

347

Global quality imaging: emerging issues.  

PubMed

Quality imaging may be described as "a timely access to and delivery of integrated and appropriate procedures, in a safe and responsive practice, and a prompt delivery of an accurately interpreted report by capable personnel in an efficient, effective, and sustainable manner." For this article, radiation safety is considered as one of the key quality elements. The stakeholders are the drivers of quality imaging. These include those that directly provide or use imaging procedures and others indirectly supporting the system. Imaging is indispensable in health care, and its use has greatly expanded worldwide. Globalization, consumer sophistication, communication and technological advances, corporatization, rationalization, service outsourcing, teleradiology, workflow modularization, and commoditization are reshaping practice. This article defines the emerging issues; an earlier article in the May 2011 issue described possible improvement actions. The issues that could threaten the quality use of imaging for all countries include workforce shortage; increased utilization, population radiation exposure, and cost; practice changes; and efficiency drive and budget constraints. In response to these issues, a range of quality improvement measures, strategies, and actions are used to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks. The 3 measures are procedure justification, optimization of image quality and radiation protection, and error prevention. The development and successful implementation of such improvement actions require leadership, collaboration, and the active participation of all stakeholders to achieve the best outcomes that we all advocate. PMID:21723489

Lau, Lawrence S; Pérez, Maria R; Applegate, Kimberly E; Rehani, Madan M; Ringertz, Hans G; George, Robert

2011-07-01

348

65 Contingency Planning Issues CONTINGENCY PLANNING ISSUES  

E-print Network

65 Contingency Planning Issues Chapter 6 CONTINGENCY PLANNING ISSUES INTRODUCTION The California Energy Shortage Contingency Plan is activated in the event of a shortage of electrical energy or fuel.). For planning purposes, the Energy Commission considers a shortage to mean an actual or potential loss of supply

349

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17

350

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01

351

Approaches to acceptable risk: a critical guide  

SciTech Connect

Acceptable-risk decisions are an essential step in the management of technological hazards. In many situations, they constitute the weak (or missing) link in the management process. The absence of an adequate decision-making methodology often produces indecision, inconsistency, and dissatisfaction. The result is neither good for hazard management nor good for society. This report offers a critical analysis of the viability of various approaches as guides to acceptable-risk decisions. This report seeks to define acceptable-risk decisions and to examine some frequently proposed, but inappropriate, solutions. 255 refs., 22 figs., 25 tabs.

Fischhoff, B.; Lichtenstein, S.; Slovic, P.; Keeney, R.; Derby, S.

1980-12-01

352

Defining Acceptable Levels for Ecological Indicators: An Approach for Considering Social Values  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components.

Smyth, Robyn L.; Watzin, Mary C.; Manning, Robert E.

2007-03-01

353

Resource quality or competition: why increase resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics?  

PubMed Central

Some animal species increase resource acceptance rates in the presence of conspecifics. Such responses may be adaptive if the presence of conspecifics is a reliable indicator of resource quality. Similarly, these responses could represent an adaptive reduction in choosiness under high levels of scramble competition. Although high resource quality and high levels of scramble competition should both favor increased resource acceptance, the contexts in which the increase occurs should differ. In this paper, we tested the effect of social environment on egg-laying and aggressive behavior in the walnut fly, Rhagoletis juglandis, in multiple contexts to determine whether increased resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics was better viewed as a response to increased host quality or increased competition. We found that grouped females oviposit more readily than isolated females when provided small (low-quality) artificial hosts but not when provided large (high-quality) artificial hosts, indicating that conspecific presence reduces choosiness. Increased resource acceptance was observed even when exposure to conspecifics was temporally or spatially separate from exposure to the resource. Finally, we found that individuals showed reduced aggression after being housed in groups, as expected under high levels of scramble competition. These results indicate that the pattern of resource acceptance in the presence of conspecifics may be better viewed as a response to increased scramble competition rather than as a response to public information about resource quality. PMID:22479135

Nufio, César R.; Papaj, Daniel R.

2011-01-01

354

Focus Issue: Coping with Cellular Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Organisms constantly face potential damage from internal and external sources, thus necessitating signaling cascades that couple specific cellular stresses to the appropriate responses. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the signaling pathways that are activated by and that mediate responses to diverse types of stresses.

Wei Wong (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science Signaling REV)

2009-11-10

355

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any...

2014-01-01

356

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any...

2012-01-01

357

7 CFR 906.25 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.25 Acceptance. Any...

2013-01-01

358

7 CFR 945.27 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Committee § 945.27 Acceptance. Any...

2010-01-01

359

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

1999-05-01

360

Investigation of Variables Associated with Vaccine Acceptance  

E-print Network

Abstract The current study investigated the relationship between the Health Belief Model (HBM) framework, social variables, personality factors, and H1N1 flu vaccine acceptance. Four hundred thirty two undergraduate students completed online...

Black, Lora L.

2011-12-31

361

75 FR 44046 - Noise Exposure Map Acceptance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Acceptance ACTION: Notice...its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Philadelphia Division...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is June 1, 2010. FOR FURTHER...

2010-07-27

362

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability....

2014-04-01

363

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability....

2013-04-01

364

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability....

2010-04-01

365

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability....

2012-04-01

366

24 CFR 7.34 - Acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Development EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.34 Acceptability....

2011-04-01

367

7 CFR 930.26 - Acceptance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...OF AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF MICHIGAN, NEW YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, OREGON, UTAH, WASHINGTON, AND WISCONSIN Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 930.26 Acceptance. Each person to be appointed by the...

2011-01-01

368

STATE OF CALIFORNIA OUTDOOR LIGHTING ACCEPTANCE TESTS  

E-print Network

Compliance Forms August 2009 Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: Note: Submit one Certificate of Acceptance is not triggered by motion outside of adjacent area Desired motion sensor coverage is not blocked by obstruction

369

Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software  

SciTech Connect

This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled.

CREA, B.A.

2000-10-25

370

Acceptance of E-Invoicing in SMEs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic invoicing (e-invoicing) refers to the sending and receiving of invoices by electronic means. Small and media sized\\u000a enterprises (SMEs) have not accepted e-invoicing to the same extent as large companies and the public sector in Sweden. The\\u000a purpose of present study was to gain a better understanding of the acceptance of e-invoicing in SMEs, particularly small business,\\u000a by describing

Karl W. Sandberg; Olof Wahlberg; Yan Pan

2009-01-01

371

Cell line issues: historical and future perspectives.  

PubMed

The initial decision to use only primary cell cultures for the production of human biological products was challenged in the late 1960s by the introduction of human diploid cells (HDCs), and again in the 1980s by continuous cell lines (CCLs). The history of the HDC controversy is reviewed and lessons from that era that are relevant to the use of CCLs are pointed out. With the introduction of recombinant DNA technology in the 1980s, and the potential usefulness of CCLs in product development, the issue of cell acceptability became more urgent, and several attempts were made to reach a consensus on regulatory issues. In 1986, the World Health Organization convened a Study Group to review the safety issues related to products derived from CCLs. The Study Group made a clear recommendation to pursue CCLs in product development because of the demonstrated capability of modern manufacturing processes to cope with contaminants. Issues such as acceptable levels of cellular DNA in products, the relationship of purity to safety, and the relevance of the genetic stability of recombinant cells to product consistency are current examples of areas in need of discussion and agreement. A system in which regulatory authorities, industry, and the general biomedical community cooperate in finding solutions is ultimately in everyone's best interest. PMID:1478355

Petricciani, J C

1992-01-01

372

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14

373

41 CFR 304-3.4 - What payments may my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source? 304-3.4 Section 304-3.4 Public Contracts and Property Management...EXPENSES 3-EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY General § 304-3.4 What payments may my agency or I accept...

2012-07-01

374

41 CFR 304-3.4 - What payments may my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source? 304-3.4 Section 304-3.4 Public Contracts and Property Management...EXPENSES 3-EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY General § 304-3.4 What payments may my agency or I accept...

2014-07-01

375

41 CFR 304-3.4 - What payments may my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...my agency or I accept from a non-Federal source? 304-3.4 Section 304-3.4 Public Contracts and Property Management...EXPENSES 3-EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY General § 304-3.4 What payments may my agency or I accept...

2010-07-01

376

Treatment Acceptability of Behavioral Interventions for Children: An Assessment by Mothers of Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study assesses the acceptability of six child-management interventions as rated by mothers (N=20) of children referred for treatment for a disruptive-behavior disorder. Positive reinforcement was rated as a more acceptable treatment than response time, time-out, differential attention, overcorrection, and spanking. Results validate findings of…

Jones, Melanie L.; Eyberg, Sheila M.; Adams, Christina D.; Boggs, Stephen R.

1998-01-01

377

Issues in Peer Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on concerns raised at a workshop at the Southern California College of Optometry, addresses critical issues in the process of peer review of faculty teaching and possible alternatives to these issues as applied to an optometric institution. (EV)

Sawamura, Mark H.

2001-01-01

378

Post-Adolescent Issues  

MedlinePLUS

COPING & HEALING CARING FOR A CHILD: POST-ADOLESCENT ISSUES As your child reaches adulthood, there will be different issues and considerations to contend with. These may include restrictions on choice of ...

379

Accepting an Early Retirement Bonus: An Empirical Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study applies a pension acceptance model to acceptance of an early retirement pension bonus. Probabilities of acceptance range from .18 to .33. It also simulates acceptance behavior without the bonus, with probabilities of acceptance ranging from .11 to .30. (Author/CH)

Hogarth, Jeanne M.

1988-01-01

380

Paper Motivation Paper Issues  

E-print Network

Paper Motivation Paper Issues Projective Geometry Projective Geometry in Paper A Projective Drawing A Projective Drawing System #12;Paper Motivation Paper Issues Projective Geometry Projective Geometry in Paper. in Computer Program 2 Paper Issues Aims Need Computer Vision Techniques 3 Projective Geometry Different

Waterloo, University of

381

Benchmarks on Professional Issues Academic Year 2009-2010  

E-print Network

, being honest, disclosing fully, and being transparent. 2. Healthcare team issues, includingBenchmarks on Professional Issues Academic Year 2009-2010 Upon enrollment as a medical student, you role and responsibilities as a medical professional; 2. Recognize and understand key issues

Maxwell, Bruce D.

382

Preferences and acceptance of colorectal cancer screening in Thailand.  

PubMed

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now common in Thailand with an increase in incidence over time. Health authorities are planning to implement a nationwide CRC screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as a primary screening tool. This study aimed to estimate preferences and acceptance of FIT and colonoscopy, explore factors influencing the acceptance, and investigate reasons behind choosing and rejecting to screen before the program was implemented. Patients aged 50-69, visiting the primary care unit during the study period, were invited to join this study. Patients with a history of cancer or past CRC screening were excluded. Face-to-face interviews were conducted. Subjects were informed about CRC and the screening tests: FIT and colonoscopy. Then, they were asked for their opinions regarding the screening. The total number of subjects was 437 (86.7% response rate). Fifty-eight percent were females. The median age was 58 years. FIT was accepted by 74.1% of subjects compared to 55.6% for colonoscopy. The acceptance of colonoscopy was associated with perceived susceptibility to CRC and family history of cancer. No symptoms, unwilling to screen, healthy, too busy and anxious about diagnosis were reasons for refusing to screen. FIT was preferred for its simplicity and non-invasiveness compared with colonoscopy. Those rejecting FIT expressed a strong preference for colonoscopy. Subjects chose colonoscopy because of its accuracy; it was refused for the process and complications. If the screening program is implemented for the entire target population in Thailand, we estimate that 106,546 will have a positive FIT, between 8,618 and 12,749 identified with advanced adenoma and between 2,645 and 3,912 identified with CRC in the first round of the program. PMID:25824749

Saengow, Udomsak; Chongsuwiwatvong, Virasakdi; Geater, Alan; Birch, Stephen

2015-01-01

383

Introduction to Focus Issue: Design and Control of Self-Organization in Distributed Active Systems  

E-print Network

Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6045, USA Received 1 June 2008; accepted 1 June 2008.1063/1.2948896 In this issue, attention is focused on a broad class of sys- tems that are encountered in different fields

Showalter, Kenneth

384

Environmental Responsibility  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A unit designed to bring environmental considerations into a consumer math curriculum, structured around five activities: doing mini-studies on environmental issues; evaluating consumer products from an environmental point of view; graphing and fitting a line to fifty years of temperature data for two cities to see if the data supports global warming theory; doing a water conservation problem using different showerheads; and each student writing a statement about his or her environmental responsibility.

Stern, Beverly

385

The Rhetoric of Issue Advertising: A Rationale, a Case Study, a Critical Perspective--And More.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Supports the use of issue advertising. Argues that speech communication scholars can facilitate the responsible and effective use of issue ads. Reviews critics and proponents of issue advertising. Develops a rationale to guide the practice of issue advertising. Examines issue advertising in the current pro-nuclear campaign. (MS)

Heath, Robert L.

1988-01-01

386

Graduate Scholarships Guidelines and Responsibilities  

E-print Network

Graduate Scholarships Guidelines and Responsibilities For Students Holding A Graduate Scholarship. Acceptance of an offer of financial aid (such as a graduate scholarship, fellowship, traineeship that a copy of this Resolution should accompany every scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, and assistantship

McConnell, Terry

387

Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium  

E-print Network

Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium Presentations Atav and Deficits #12;Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium Presentations-up to a Quantitative Study on Cessation in a Rural Population #12;Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors

Suzuki, Masatsugu

388

AGENCY ACCEPTANCE FORM ES 250-01 Spring 2014  

E-print Network

AGENCY ACCEPTANCE FORM ES 250-01 Spring 2014 Truman State University Department of Health and Exercise Sciences No Agency Acceptance forms will be accepted after Friday, February 7, 2014 at 5 pm Student's Name: ________________________________________________________________ Agency

Gering, Jon C.

389

48 CFR 570.402-5 - Potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Potential acceptable locations. 570.402-5...Continued Space Requirements 570.402-5 Potential acceptable locations. If you identify potential acceptable locations through the...

2010-10-01

390

48 CFR 570.402-4 - No potential acceptable locations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No potential acceptable locations. 570.402-4...Space Requirements 570.402-4 No potential acceptable locations. If you do not identify any potential acceptable locations through the...

2010-10-01

391

16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

2014-01-01

392

16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

2013-01-01

393

16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

2012-01-01

394

16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

2011-01-01

395

14 CFR 21.502 - Acceptance of articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Acceptance of articles. 21.502 Section 21.502 Aeronautics...Acceptance of Aircraft Engines, Propellers, and Articles for Import § 21.502 Acceptance of articles. An article (including an...

2011-01-01

396

Issues Management: End of First Decade Progress Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that issues management is a robust contribution to the public relations discipline. Offers additional rationale for empowering public relations practitioners by involving them in strategic planning, making them responsible for issue scanning and monitoring, integrating their advice into standards of corporate social responsibility, and…

Heath, Robert L.; Cousino, Kenneth R.

1990-01-01

397

The New Deal: Government and the Economy. Public Issues Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is part of a series designed to help students take and defend a position on public issues. This unit on the New Deal era raises the following issues: (1) How responsible should the government be for the economic well being of citizens? To what extent should this responsibility outweigh traditional ideas of property rights? (2) What…

Singleton, Laurel R., Ed.

398

Different Perspectives on Technology Acceptance: The Role of Technology Type and Age  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although eHealth technologies offer an enormous potential to improve healthcare, the knowledge about key determinants of acceptance for eHealth technology is restricted. While the underlying technology of eHealth technologies and Information and Communication technology (ICT) is quite similar, utilization contexts and using motives are quite different. In order to explore the role of technology type on acceptance, we contrasted central application characteristics of both technology types using the scenario technique. A questionnaire was administered (n = 104) measuring individual variables (age, gender) and attitudes regarding an eHealth application (blood sugar meter) in contrast to an ICT device (Personal Digital Assistant, PDA). Older users basically approved the utilization of health-related technologies and perceived lower usability barriers. In addition, we identified main utilization motives of eHealth technology and technology-specific acceptance patterns, especially regarding issues of data safety in the eHealth context. Effects of age and gender in acceptance ratings suggest a differential perspective on eHealth acceptance. Finally, practical interventions were derived in order to support eHealth device design and to promote acceptance of eHealth technology.

Arning, Katrin; Ziefle, Martina

399

Words matter: a qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionals  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals have an important role to play in the management of obesity, but may be unsure how to raise weight issues with patients. The societal stigma associated with excess weight means that weight status terms may be misunderstood, cause offence and risk upsetting patient-professional relationships. This study investigated the views of people who were overweight or obese on the acceptability of weight status terms and their potential to motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. Methods A qualitative study comprising 34 semi-structured interviews with men and women in their mid-to-late 30s and 50s who were overweight or obese and had recently been informed of their weight status. Thematic framework analysis was conducted to allow the systematic comparison of views by age, gender and apparent motivation to lose weight. Results Although many people favoured 'Overweight' to describe their weight status, there were doubts about its effectiveness to motivate weight loss. Terms including 'BMI' ('Body Mass Index') or referring to the unhealthy nature of their weight were generally considered acceptable and motivational, although a number of men questioned the validity of BMI as an indicator of excess weight. Participants, particularly women, felt that health professionals should avoid using 'Fat'. Whilst response to 'Obese' was largely negative, people recognised that it could be appropriate in a health consultation. Some younger people, particularly those who appeared motivated to lose weight, felt 'Obese' could encourage weight loss, but it was also clear the term could provoke negative emotions if used insensitively. Conclusions Although most people who are overweight or obese accept that it is appropriate for health professionals to discuss weight issues with patients, there is great variation in response to the terms commonly used to describe excess weight. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to discussing weight status: some men and younger people may appreciate a direct approach, whilst others need to be treated more sensitively. It is therefore important that health professionals use their knowledge and understanding to select the terms that are most likely to be acceptable, but at the same time have most potential to motivate each individual patient. PMID:21714892

2011-01-01

400

Spirometry: quantitative test criteria and test acceptability.  

PubMed

Quantitative test criteria have been developed to assess the acceptability of spirometric tracings. Most automated spirometers have been programmed with the criteria in order to assist in data collection. These instruments compare computed parameters from the collected tracings with the criteria and, after 3 acceptable FVC maneuvers have been collected, print out a statement indicating that "tests meet acceptability criteria." Technicians, nurses, and even their medical supervisors are beginning to rely on these statements as assuring overall test quality. However, a review of actual curves indicates that unacceptable results can be obtained from tests that comply with these standards. Although quantitative test criteria are a positive step toward quality assurance, they should be treated as they were developed, as "minimum" criteria. All curves should be inspected for visible defects, especially if the results are used to follow subjects longitudinally. PMID:3619205

Glindmeyer, H W; Jones, R N; Barkman, H W; Weill, H

1987-08-01

401

Harz/Vesper: Acceptance Research with Logical Relations and Pragma-Dialectics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use two different theories for our research on the acceptance of carbon capture and storage (CCS), geothermal energy and shale gas: logical relations and pragma-dialectics. With the theory of logical relations we can describe the structure of the terminus "acceptance" as a three-place or more relationship. We use the Newtonian binominal coefficients order to reflect on the complexity of the concept of acceptance. We are exploring relations between citizens, politicians, scientists, businesses and technologies. The technological-philosophical reflection on the topic "Determinants for acceptance of new technologies" concerns the issues of "Trust", "Security" as well as "Interest and Use" as the essential constituents of acceptance. Trust: Politicians, scientists and entrepreneurs need to understand themselves as advocates of acceptance. Acceptance is not automatic but requires a great effort and continuous personal commitment, as you want to secure acceptance not only for the short-term but for the long-term. The confidence curve follows a hysteresis loop as known from the magnetization of materials: It requires a significant effort. If the existing trust is lost due to erroneous communication or incorrect political action, the restoration effort is significantly greater. Citizens need to understand themselves as being asked for acceptance and as actively influencing the shapes of their life. They may not feel as victims or sufferers from technological developments but should have a realistic feeling of being able to influence - in fact - anything. "Openness creates openness." (H.-J. Bullinger) Security: The advocate promoting acceptance must take into account the security needs of the citizens with regard to the technologies which are supposed to be accepted. Even irrational fears are actual fears that can prevent acceptance. Interests and Goals of Usage: The advocate promoting acceptance must - sincerely and publicly - express his interest in the use and goals of the new technology. Politics must focus on the majority's needs. Businesses must openly commit themselves to their interest in maximizing profit by using the new technologies. Science must contribute to the effective and independent function of the technologies and claim true statements about them. Using the pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation we define "acceptance" in terms of the "acceptance of a standpoint" as an outcome of the protagonist's attempt to justify the "acceptability of a standpoint". The pragma-dialectical ideal model of critical discussion provides a number of norms for a dialectical discussion process leading to the "acceptance of a standpoint". These norms make a systematic analysis of accomplishments and flaws within a critical exchange possible. One of these norms is the sound use of argument schemes which connect a standpoint with an argument. An arguer using the argument scheme of pragmatic argumentation presents the desirable or undesirable consequences of a certain action to back up the (un)acceptability of the standpoint. Critical questions are used to reveal the (in)correct use of pragmatic argumentation. We argue that accomplishments and flaws in the pragmatic argumentation of the four parties observed are closely related to the acceptance of the technology CCS.

Harz, M.

2012-04-01

402

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01

403

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01

404

European consumers' acceptance of functional foods.  

PubMed

Consumer acceptance of functional foods is analyzed from the perspective of consumer quality perception of food products. Four major dimensions of food quality are identified: taste and other sensory characteristics, healthiness, convenience, and naturalness. Functional foods provide, from the consumer perspective, synergies between healthiness and convenience, but may, in the consumer mind, lead to trade-offs between healthiness on the one side and taste and naturalness on the other side. This may explain the reluctance of European consumers to accept functional food products. PMID:20388148

Grunert, Klaus G

2010-03-01

405

An economic approach to acceptance sampling  

E-print Network

AN ECONOMIC APPROACH TO ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING A Thesis by ROBERT JUSTIN RUTH Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub... JUSTIN RUTH I Approved as to style and content by& , J ~ W P. H. Newell Head Departmen J McNicho e Mem er 8w~ D. R. Shreve Member May 1973 ABSTRACT An Economic Approach to Acceptance Sampling (&m 1973) Robert Justin Ruth, S. S ~ , Virgin1a...

Ruth, Robert Justin

1973-01-01

406

Handbook on Ethical Issues in Anthropology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Anthropological Association has recently added number 23 to its series of special online publications. Edited by Joan Cassell and Sue-Ellen Jacobs, this collection of six essays is presented to "stimulate discussion and reflection on ethical issues" among anthropologists. Offerings include a background essay and annotated bibliography, two essays containing fictional ethical dilemmas and proposed solutions, an essay on introducing issues of ethical responsibility into the classroom, and guidelines on holding a workshop on ethical problems in fieldwork.

407

The Politics and Science Behind GMO Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of nutritional quality has arisen in the International Community over the last few years along with other important issues such as population aging, multipopulation societies, and political conflicts. The nutritional issue is questioned both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is well known that the planet faces enormous problems with food that is available. Nowadays 20% of the population consumes

Theodoros H. Varzakas; Ioannis S. Arvanitoyannis; Haralambos Baltas

2007-01-01

408

Eileen House staff use only Accepted into eligible program Yes No Accepted/declined  

E-print Network

Eileen House staff use only Accepted into eligible program Yes No Accepted/declined: Felony convictions Yes No Date: Room/house number: Signature: Comments: Eileen Panigeo MacLean House Housing Application Before submitting the housing application, please read the Eileen Panigeo MacLean House dorm

Hartman, Chris

409

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET  

E-print Network

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET Prepared by: David Bau - Regional Extension Educator, Agricultural Business Management (August 2012) CROP INCOME EXAMPLE YOUR FARM EXAMPLE YOUR FARM (A) Crop Acres 400 400 176 46 (C) Price

Netoff, Theoden

410

Measuring Technology Acceptance Level of Turkish Pre-Service English Teachers by Using Technology Acceptance Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to investigate technology acceptance of prospective English teachers by using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in Turkish context. The study is based on Structural Equation Model (SEM). The participants of the study from English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe, Gazi and Baskent Universities. The participants…

Kirmizi, Özkan

2014-01-01

411

Consumer acceptance of online banking: an extension of the technology acceptance model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in electronic banking technology have created novel ways of handling daily banking affairs, especially via the online banking channel. The acceptance of online banking services has been rapid in many parts of the world, and in the leading e- banking countries the number of e-banking contracts has exceeded 50 percent. Investigates online banking acceptance in the light of the

Tero Pikkarainen; Kari Pikkarainen; Heikki Karjaluoto; Seppo Pahnila

2004-01-01

412

Management issues in automated audit analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

1994-03-01

413

Workplace Issues in Human Resources. Symposium 40. [AHRD Conference, 2001].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This symposium on workplace issues in human resources consists of two presentations. "The Effect of Organizational Structure on Single-Source and Multiple-Source Performance Appraisal Processes: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD)" (Karen K. Yarrish, Judith A. Kolb) investigates ratee acceptance of single- and multi-source…

2001

414

Ethical Issues in Withholding Care from Severely Handicapped Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical issues are examined that involve withholding medical treatment from severely handicapped infants. Although current laws do not sanction euthanasia, severely handicapped infants are often assisted in dying. Discussion includes society's apparent acceptance of this practice and several solutions to the problems. (Author)

Cohen, Libby

1981-01-01

415

Ethical and Professional Issues in Computer-Assisted Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ethical and professional issues in psychology regarding computer-assisted therapy (CAT). Topics addressed include an explanation of CAT; whether CAT is psychotherapy; software, including independent use, validation of effectiveness, and restricted access; clinician resistance; client acceptance; the impact on ethical standards; and a…

Ford, B. Douglas

1993-01-01

416

School Readiness for Gifted Children: Considering the Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses issues relevant to gifted children's readiness for school. It raises a number of questions that challenge thinking about what is meant by school readiness. Gifted children can often be ready for school entrance before the age traditionally considered appropriate. Their complex developmental profiles challenge accepted notions…

Porath, Marion

2011-01-01

417

SPECIAL ISSUE Ke Chung Kim Loren B. Byrne  

E-print Network

- scapes, which hinders ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation; (4) biodiversity studiesSPECIAL ISSUE Ke Chung Kim Ã? Loren B. Byrne Biodiversity loss and the taxonomic bottleneck: emerging biodiversity science Received: 11 April 2006 / Accepted: 10 August 2006 / Published online: 24

Byrne, Loren

418

A course treating ethical issues in physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A course focusing on ethical issues in physics has been taught to undergraduate students at Eastern Michigan University since 1988. The course covers both responsible conduct of research and ethical issues associated with how physicists interact with the rest of society. Since most undergraduate physics majors will not have a career in academia, it is important that a course such as this address issues that will be relevant to physicists in a wide range of job situations. There is a wealth of published work that can be drawn on for reading assignments.

Thomsen, Marshall

2007-03-01

419

Issues in multivariate assessment of a large-scale behavioral program  

PubMed Central

Several social and research issues directly affected the development and implementation of multivariate assessment in a large community-based applied research program. Examples are drawn from experiences of the Preparation through Responsive Educational Programs Project for disruptive and skill deficient adolescents in suburban, rural, and urban junior high school settings, focusing on the assessment of academic and social skill development and long-term skill maintenance. The social context altered both project treatment and follow-up plans, requiring assessment of potentially unintended effects and decreasing consistency across sites. Future community acceptance of such programs may depend on the investigators' adaptation to diverse community pressures for program conduct and assessment and the measurement of phenomena that are not always directly observable. PMID:16795618

Filipczak, James; Archer, Margaret B.; Neale, Michael S.; Winett, Richard A.

1979-01-01

420

Perceived Parental Acceptance and Female Juvenile Delinquency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied adolescent females at a state training school and at a high school, measuring perceived parental acceptance. Demonstrated that incarcerated females viewed their mothers and fathers more negatively than did nonincarcerated females. Indicated more ambivalent results in the mother-daughter than the father-daughter relationship. Discusses…

Kroupa, Steven E.

1988-01-01

421

Sensory acceptability of chocolate with inulina  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to study the influence of inulin on the sensory characteristics of chocolate. Three types of chocolate (milk, hazelnut and rice) where sucrose was replaced by inulin and fructose were studied in comparison to corresponding ordinary chocolates. A questionnaire between eighty diabetics and fifty-two random consumers showed that the chocolate with inulin was well accepted.

Terezija GOLOB; Jasna BERTONCELJ; Mojca JAMNIK

422

Protein contacts Accepted for publication in Biochimie  

E-print Network

Protein contacts 1 Accepted for publication in Biochimie Protein contacts, inter 7, case 7113, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris, France Short title: protein contacts * Corresponding 2008;90(4):626-39 #12;Protein contacts 2 Abstract Three-dimensional structures of proteins

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

Accepted Peer Practices in Adventure Programming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the purpose of raising the level of safety, encouraging educational institutions and training programs to develop leaders, providing information for programs, establishing a base for communication with land use agencies, and providing information for school and agency custodians of potential students, the manual outlines "Accepted Peer…

Johanson, Karl M., Comp.

424

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

E-print Network

are published online shortly after acceptance, which is prior to technical editing, formatting and proof reading12|Number43|2010PCCPPages14369­14636 1463-9076(2010)12:43;1-V COVER ARTICLE Hore etal. Water delivery Introduction Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a multi-functional nano materials20 have attracted much

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

425

Attachment, Temperament, and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations between preschool children's attachment security, temperament, and peer acceptance. Ninety-eight preschool children and their mothers were recruited through childcare centers in the southeast. Mothers and their children participated in two two-hour home observations. Attachment security was assessed using the…

Szewczyk-Sokolowski, Margaret; Bost, Kelly K.; Wainwright, Ada B.

2005-01-01

426

Acceptance of !Languages by Communicating Deterministic  

E-print Network

Acceptance of !­Languages by Communicating Deterministic Turing Machines Rudolf Freund \\Lambda) !­languages. \\Lambda email: rudi@logic.at y email: staiger@informatik.uni­halle.de #12; 2 R. Freund and L infinitely often. #12; 4 R. Freund and L. Staiger The investigations carried out in [StMM] for type 1

427

40 CFR 600.007 - Vehicle acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...will judge the acceptability of a fuel economy data vehicle on the basis of the information...criteria to be met are: (1) A fuel economy data vehicle may have...

2012-07-01

428

40 CFR 600.007 - Vehicle acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...will judge the acceptability of a fuel economy data vehicle on the basis of the information...criteria to be met are: (1) A fuel economy data vehicle may have...

2013-07-01

429

40 CFR 600.007 - Vehicle acceptability.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...will judge the acceptability of a fuel economy data vehicle on the basis of the information...criteria to be met are: (1) A fuel economy data vehicle may have...

2014-07-01

430

Psychological Acceptance: Experimental Analyses and Theoretical Interpretations  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a recent explosion of interest in experiential avoidance as a source of human psychopathology and acceptance-based interventions as a means of combating the deleterious effects of such avoidance. Most of this work has focused on clinical outcome measures, but a small body of research has also employed experimental analogs. The first part of the current article reviews

Dermot Barnes-Holmes; Andy Cochrane; Yvonne Barnes-Holmes; Louise McHugh

2004-01-01

431

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28

432

Natural hazard losses and acceptable risk criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The criteria for the definition of acceptable risk to the lives of members of a society (commonly called societal risk) resulting from exposure to natural hazards are based in most countries on the frequency and characteristics of industrial accidents, e.g., nuclear power plants. However, historical records indicate that the frequency of natural hazard events is much higher than those involved

M. Khaleghy Rad; S. G. Evans; F. Nadim; S. Lacasse

2009-01-01

433

Acceptance of sugar reduction in flavored yogurt.  

PubMed

To investigate what level of sugar reduction is accepted in flavored yogurt, we conducted a hedonic test focusing on the degree of liking of the products and on optimal sweetness and aroma levels. For both flavorings (strawberry and coffee), consumers preferred yogurt containing 10% added sugar. However, yogurt containing 7% added sugar was also acceptable. On the just-about-right scale, yogurt containing 10% sugar was more often described as too sweet compared with yogurt containing 7% sugar. On the other hand, the sweetness and aroma intensity for yogurt containing 5% sugar was judged as too low. A second test was conducted to determine the effect of flavoring concentration on the acceptance of yogurt containing 7% sugar. Yogurts containing the highest concentrations of flavoring (11% strawberry, 0.75% coffee) were less appreciated. Additionally, the largest percentage of consumers perceived these yogurts as "not sweet enough." These results indicate that consumers would accept flavored yogurts with 7% added sugar instead of 10%, but 5% sugar would be too low. Additionally, an increase in flavor concentration is undesirable for yogurt containing 7% added sugar. PMID:23871368

Chollet, M; Gille, D; Schmid, A; Walther, B; Piccinali, P

2013-09-01

434

School Choice Acceptance: An Exploratory Explication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School choice is presented by some as a panacea to the challenges facing education in the United States. Acceptance of choice as a solution, however, is far from universal. This article examines two possible contributors to choice adoption: ideology and political culture. Political culture was found to better explain the complex phenomenon of…

Koven, Steven G.; Khan, Mobin

2014-01-01

435

Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-09-15

436

Acception Based Approach for Multilingual Lexical Databases  

E-print Network

multilingual lexical database management system: NADIA. With this approach, the interlingual lexicon the management of a multilingual lexical database. Moreover, it handles the management of the interlingual Databases Management System, Lexical Databases, Interlingua, Acceptions. hal-00966437,version1-26Mar2014

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

437

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01

438

Acceptance of Foreign Clinical Data in Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a worldwide operating company, Hoechst makes all efforts to achieve approvals for its new drugs in all countries where marketing is planned as quickly as possible. The clinical development program must therefore be designed and executed in consideration of the internationally accepted medical standard. The requirements also of the most demanding drug regulatory agencies should then be fulfilled with

Bernd Knabe

1988-01-01

439

Finding Acceptable Solutions Faster Using Inadmissible Information  

E-print Network

search [2]. However, in many practical settings we must accept suboptimal solutions in order to reduce introduce skeptical search, a simplification of EES that has reduced overhead and better perfor- mance in some domains. We then illustrate how to construct the unbiased estimates that EES and skeptical search

Ruml, Wheeler

440

Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

2007-01-01

441

Aviation Safety Issues Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

2009-01-01

442

PREPRINT, ACCEPTED TO SPECIAL ISSUE IEEE TAC, TCAS-I 1 Bistable biological systems: a characterization  

E-print Network

of glucose but transcribed in the absence of glucose and presence of lactose [1], [2]. Another striking. However, under "adverse" conditions, for example after irradiation with ultra-violet light [3], the phage of cells to enter the process of programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis, as opposed to continuing

Chaves, Madalena

443

Accepted with minor revisions by TNNLS Special Issue on Learning in Nonstationary and Evolving Environments  

E-print Network

). As hurricanes and severe storms appear to occur frequently and at a large- scale [6], empirical approaches disturbances such as hurricanes and severe storms. Power distribution networks lie at the edge of the grid. Learning is applied to two real-life examples of large-scale disruptions. One is from Hurricane Ike, where

Ji, Chuanyi

444

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

Gravois, Melanie

2007-06-27

445

Focus Issue: Understanding Mechanisms of Inflammation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Inflammation, includes research that reveals regulators of a receptor implicated in an inflammatory bowel disease, as well as the contribution of a matrix metalloproteinase to skin inflammation. Perspectives discuss the role of proinflammatory cytokines in brain inflammatory disorders and the regulation of multiple types of cell death in tissues in response to proinflammatory factors. Together with content from the Science Signaling Archives, these articles underline the importance of understanding the basis of inflammatory responses that can both protect and harm the host.

John F. Foley (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science Signaling REV)

2013-01-15

446

Plants and gravity. Special issue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This issue of the Journal of Plant Growth Regulation explores the effects of gravity on plant growth and development from several perspectives. Most of the review papers consider plants and gravity from the viewpoint of ground-based laboratory research, and several papers consider gravitropism, the directed growth in response to gravity, in some detail. However, another approach to study the effects of gravity on plant is to effectively remove the force due to gravity. A very dramatic way to accomplish this goal is through the free-fall conditions achieved by spacecraft in low Earth orbit, so some of the authors have reviewed recent advances in spaceflight research with plant systems.

Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

2002-01-01

447

Physicians' obligations in radiation issues  

SciTech Connect

Radiation issues continue to be a matter of great public concern. In this context the author suggests that physicians have responsibilities in radiation matters to protect, insofar as possible, the physical and emotional health of their patients by preventing and/or minimizing the illnesses and injury that might be caused by radiation. To accomplish this goal, certain basic concepts need to be understood. These concepts serve as the basis of this presentation. They have been considered in detail in various publications and are highlighted here.

Not Available

1987-08-07

448

Is tobacco a gay issue? Interviews with leaders of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community  

PubMed Central

This study examined the extent of tobacco industry funding of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) organisations and whether leaders of these organisations thought tobacco was a priority health issue for their community. We interviewed leaders of 74 LGBT organisations and publications in the USA, reflecting a wide variety of groups. Twenty-two percent said they had accepted tobacco industry funding and few (24%) identified tobacco as a priority issue. Most leaders did not perceive tobacco as an issue relevant to LGBT identity. They saw smoking as a personal choice and individual right rather than as a health crisis fuelled by industry activities. As such, they were reluctant to judge a legal industry, fearing it might lead to having to evaluate other potential funders. They saw tobacco control as divisive, potentially alienating their peers who smoke. The minority who embraced tobacco control saw the industry as culpable and viewed their own roles as protecting the community from all harms, not just those specific to the gay community. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender tobacco-control advocates should reframe smoking as an unhealthy response to the stresses of homophobia to persuade leaders that tobacco control is central to LGBT health. PMID:18247208

OFFEN, NAPHTALI; SMITH, ELIZABETH A.; MALONE, RUTH E.

2009-01-01

449

14 CFR 11.27 - Are there other ways FAA collects specific rulemaking recommendations before we issue an NPRM?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...rulemaking recommendations before we issue an NPRM? 11.27 Section...rulemaking recommendations before we issue an NPRM? Yes, the...dealing with specific areas and problems. If we accept an ARAC recommendation...needed to focus on specific issues for a limited period of...

2010-01-01

450

Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Pregnancy and Birth Issues Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table ... turn Javascript on. What is a High-Risk Pregnancy? All pregnancies involve a certain degree of risk ...

451

Increasing social engagement among lonely individuals: the role of acceptance cues and promotion motivations.  

PubMed

Lonely individuals typically fear negative evaluation and engage in overly cautious social behaviors that perpetuate their social isolation. Recent research has found analogous security-oriented (i.e., prevention-focused) responses following experiences highlighting concerns with social loss but differing growth-oriented (i.e., promotion-focused ) responses, such as attempts at social engagement, following experiences highlighting concerns with social gain. The present studies thus investigated whether fostering a promotion focus among lonely individuals through subtle primes of acceptance could reduce their self-protective social avoidance. This hypothesis was supported across four studies in which the links between primed acceptance and promotion-focused motivations were first established, and the impact of such primes on lonely individuals' social thoughts, intentions, and behaviors were then tested. Implications of observed differences between effects of acceptance primes on lonely versus nonlonely individuals are discussed in terms of deficits versus satiation with feelings of belonging. PMID:20817823

Lucas, Gale M; Knowles, Megan L; Gardner, Wendi L; Molden, Daniel C; Jefferis, Valerie E

2010-10-01

452

Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display  

SciTech Connect

This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established.

McGevna, V.; Peterson, L.R.

1981-10-02

453

Predictions and acceptance criteria for K Reactor startup and power ascension  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to consolidate all the work performed on the predictions and acceptance criteria for the K Reactor Startup and Power Ascension Test Program. All results reported in this document are referenced to technical documents. This report consolidates the results of several technical reports previously issued. The technical background of the results can be found in the references given in this document.

Bond, R.A., Jr.

1991-06-01

454

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4)``Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment``--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J. [eds.

1990-03-01

455

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1) SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain''--research on duct injection; (2) Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option''--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3) Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''--PETC's efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4) Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment''--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.

Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D.; Mills, J. (eds.)

1990-03-01

456

Quantitative Serum Free Light Chain Assay – Analytical Issues  

PubMed Central

Serum free light chain (FLC) assay is an important advance in the diagnosis and monitoring of monoclonal light chain diseases and a complementary test to serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation. Immunoturbidimetric and immunonephelometric assays for serum FLC are available on routine chemistry analysers and can detect FLC down to ~1 mg/L. These assays use polyclonal anti-human FLC antisera and require acceptable imprecision, specificity, accuracy, and reproducibility between reagent batches to prevent under- or over-estimation of FLC concentration. Assay imprecision determined between reagent lots has a variation of 8–45% for FLC concentrations and 17–32% for the calculated ?/? FLC ratio. Dilution studies indicate some over-recovery of FLC, which may depend upon the dilution matrix. However, greater discrepancies are underestimation from nonlinear reactions and overestimation possibly from interferences or multi-reactivity to polymeric FLC. Nonlinear monoclonal FLC give concentrations which are 2- to 6-fold increased at higher sample dilution and FLC measured on different platforms may not give the same results. Laboratory staff and clinicians should be aware of the analytical limitations of the FLC assay. Assay imprecision, especially with different lots of FLC reagent, may have a significant effect on changes in the FLC concentration and ?/? FLC ratio. Sample dilution anomalies have the potential to confound result interpretation for patients with monoclonal light chain disease. These issues, if not adequately appreciated, have the potential to mislead clinical diagnosis and assessment of response to therapy. PMID:19841696

Tate, Jill; Bazeley, Sheree; Sykes, Stephen; Mollee, Peter

2009-01-01

457

NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE  

E-print Network

NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE "ARTIFICIAL BRAINS" Call for Papers Guest Editors Prof. Dr for review to a special issue of the Neurocomputing journal, on the theme of "Artificial Brains". Background, and more powerful FPGA based accelerator boards, etc. thus allowing builders of "artificial brains" more

Wojcik, Vladimir

458

California's Water Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Foothill College and the Using a Web-Based GIS to Teach Problem-Based Science in High School and College project, this powerpoint discusses California's water issues. These include population growth, the mismatch between where precipitation falls and where people are located, drought, pollution, and climate change. Each issue is discussed in detail along with potential solutions.

459

Yellowstone Resources and Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park online book is a compendium of concise information about the park's history, natural and cultural resources, issues, and major areas. Chapters, which are downloadable as PDF files, focus on the history of the park, the yellowstone ecosystem, geology, life in extreme heat (as in the hot springs), vegetation, fire in yellowstone, wildlife, and park issues.

Yellowstone National Park

460

Preface: ISBB Special Issue  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This special issue is published for the International Society of Biocatalysis and Biotechnology (ISBB). The ISBB special issue is devoted to all areas of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology in which biological systems are developed and/or used for the provision of commercial goods or serv...

461

TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS  

EPA Science Inventory

These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

462

Issue Brief on Diversity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past year, the Diversity Committee of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Board worked with the Board and the Issues Committee Chair to develop an issue brief addressing diversity, its impact on the membership and the wider community that is served by the work of DDD, resulting in recommendations that will influence policy…

Division on Developmental Disabilities, Council for Exceptional Children (NJ1), 2013

2013-01-01

463

Teaching about Population Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide on population issues contains 19 activities for students in grades 7-12. The objective is to analyze population issues that have resulted from human population dynamics. In this guide, four categories of activities are included: some are discussion starters, some provide factual data, some focus on thinking skills, and some are…

Otero, George G., Jr., Comp.

464

HRD Issues in Asia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains four papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) issues in Asia. "The Japanese Human Resource Development System" (Kiyoe Harada) provides a comprehensive model of the Japanese HRD system based on the current state of the art, including management practices and issues and trends in Japanese HRD. "Structured…

1998

465

Sexual Issues (Concerns, Harassment,  

E-print Network

Sexual Issues (Concerns, Harassment, Assault, etc.) Student Survey Items (Survey names listed in blue) #12;Student Survey Feedback by Topical Area: Sexual Issues (Concerns, Harassment, Assault, etc of the following: Services for victims of crime and harassment Freedom from harassment on campus Rules governing

Baltisberger, Jay H.

466

Leader Behavior, Timing, Type, and Faculty Acceptance of Change Initiated by New Deans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 44 deans (32%) and 212 faculty (60%) in nursing schools showed that most changes were initiated with greater frequency in the first year of a new dean's position. Sensitive interpersonal changes related directly to faculty were accepted less favorably than all other types of changes. (SK)

Colyar, Margaret R.

1996-01-01

467

Religious and Nonreligious Spirituality in Relation to Death Acceptance or Rejection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Meanings of religious and nonreligious spirituality are explored, with implications for death acceptance, death rejection, and life extension. In the first of two exploratory studies, 16 elders low on intrinsic religiosity were compared with 116 elders high in religiosity; they differed both in qualitative responses and on death attitudes. In the…

Cicirelli, Victor G.

2011-01-01

468

Prior encounters modulate subsequent choices in host acceptance behavior by the bark beetle Ips pini  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory bioassays indicate that the bark beetle Ips pini employs flexible, rather than absolute, responses to phytochemicals in its host acceptance behavior. Each beetle's decision to enter substrate was influenced by the types and concentrations of monoterpenes present. However, previous rejection of a simulated host containing a moderate concentration of monoterpenes increased the likelihood that the same concentration would be

Kimberly F. Wallin; Kenneth F. Raffa

2002-01-01

469

Family caregiving of the elderly in Botswana: Boundaries of culturally acceptable options and resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Care of the elderly in Botswana is solely afamily responsibility. In the absence of formalprograms for the elderly it is important tounderstand the cultural beliefs that guidedecision making regarding acceptance of elderlycare. The purpose of this study was to explorethe experiences of family caregivers to olderpersons in Botswana. Using grounded theorymethodology, 24 caregivers who were caring foran older person were

Sheila Shaibu; Margaret I. Wallhagen

2002-01-01

470

Acceptable limits for air pollution dosages and vegetation effects: nitrogen dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptable limits of NOâ are defined as levels which fail to cause, (1) acute responses which are manifested within 24 hours after 1 to 2 hours exposure and result in intercostal bifacial necrotic collapse of leaf tissue similar to the effects of SOâ. An overall waxy appearance is shown by some plants; (2) chronic effects which are sometimes an enhancement

C. R. Thompson; D. T. Tingey; R. A. Reinert

1974-01-01

471

Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

2011-01-01

472

Gerontechnology acceptance by elderly Hong Kong Chinese: a senior technology acceptance model (STAM).  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to develop and test a senior technology acceptance model (STAM) aimed at understanding the acceptance of gerontechnology by older Hong Kong Chinese people. The proposed STAM extended previous technology acceptance models and theories by adding age-related health and ability characteristics of older people. The proposed STAM was empirically tested using a cross-sectional questionnaire survey with a sample of 1012 seniors aged 55 and over in Hong Kong. The result showed that STAM was strongly supported and could explain 68% of the variance in the use of gerontechnology. For older Hong Kong Chinese, individual attributes, which include age, gender, education, gerontechnology self-efficacy and anxiety, and health and ability characteristics, as well as facilitating conditions explicitly and directly affected technology acceptance. These were better predictors of gerontechnology usage behaviour (UB) than the conventionally used attitudinal factors (usefulness and ease of use). PMID:24655221

Chen, Ke; Chan, Alan Hoi Shou

2014-01-01

473

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01

474

Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

NONE

1996-09-01

475

Induction graphitizing furnace acceptance test report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The induction furnace was designed to provide the controlled temperature and environment required for the post-cure, carbonization and graphitization processes for the fabrication of a fibrous graphite NERVA nozzle extension. The acceptance testing required six tests and a total operating time of 298 hrs. Low temperature mode operations, 120 to 850 C, were completed in one test run. High temperature mode operations, 120 to 2750 C, were completed during five tests.

1972-01-01

476

Accepted Common Interest Community (CIC) Proposals.  

PubMed

These are the 18 accepted proposals for the three Common Interest Community (CIC) sessions at IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Therapy and Research (SYTAR), June 5-8, 2014, in Austin, Texas and published in the Final Program Guide and CIC Works for SYTAR 2014. The sessions were CIC#1 Rehab Professionals: Bridging the Past with the Future and CIC#2a & CIC#2b Mental, Emotional and Spiritual Health. PMID:25645135

2014-09-01

477

EMPLOYER MOBILITY PLANS: ACCEPTABILITY, EFFICIENCY AND COSTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

EMPLOYER MOBILITY PLANS: ACCEPTABILITY, EFFICIENCY AND COSTS The concentrated and repeated nature of commuting traffic offers action potentials to control or reduce the number of single-occupant vehicles commuting during the peak hours. As source of the home-to-work journeys, the companies have a ringside seat to promote sustainable mobility and the last years paid an always growing attention to that mobility

Laurent Van Malderen; Bart Jourquin; Isabelle Thomas; Thomas Vanoutrive; Ann Verhetsel; Frank Witlox

2011-01-01

478

In situ viscometer instrument acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed by the software ATP) of the viscometer instrument. This document and the ATP satisfy the requirements in EP-4.1, ``Design Verification Requirements.`` The selected mode of design verification is qualification testing. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and electrical features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-08-24

479

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

DOE Order 435.1 requires that each treatment, storage, and\\/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic (TRU) waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets

A. K. MCDOWELL; G. C. TRINER

2002-01-01

480

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and\\/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the

Ellefson

1998-01-01

481

Hunter perceptions and acceptance of alternative deer management regulations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wildlife managers are often confronted with a policy paradox where a majority of the public supports an outcome, but there is no agreement on specific management strategies to achieve this outcome. Previous research has also reported a link between regulatory acceptance, hunter satisfaction, and hunter participation rates. Thus, human dimensions research aimed at understanding hunter motivations and behavior is needed for effective management. In 2005, we surveyed Minnesota (USA) deer hunters (n = 6,000; 59% response) to evaluate attitudes regarding alternative deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvest regulations. We also conducted a series of forced choice experiments in which respondents were asked to select an option from a list of representative regulations that might be adopted to achieve a particular deer management goal. Specifically, we modeled 5 deer population scenarios ranging from low populations with high buck-harvest rates to populations 50% over goal density. Our results indicate that hunters preferred different regulations depending on the population scenario, but generally preferred antler-point restrictions and disliked limiting buck licenses through a lottery. We also found consistency among scenarios, in that a small percentage of respondents indicated they would not hunt if regulations were changed. The results from this study should help wildlife managers design deer harvest regulations that are both acceptable to hunters and achieve management objectives. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Cornicelli, L.; Fulton, D.C.; Grund, M.D.; Fieberg, J.

2011-01-01

482

Acceptability of male condom: an Indian scenario.  

PubMed

The National Family Planning Programme of India had introduced condom as one of the family planning methods in the late 1960s. Condom was promoted as a family planning method through social marketing since its inception. With the increasing prevalence and incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS, condom was also promoted as a dual method for protection against both unintended pregnancies as well as sexually transmitted infections. Despite efforts at various levels, the overall use of condom among couples in India is low. Here we present literature review of studies to understand the condom acceptability among couples in India. Specifically, the paper assesses research and programmes that have been carried out to increase the use of condom among couples; determinants of condom use; reason for not using condom; and perception versus experience of condom failure. The reported problems related to condom use included non acceptance by partner, perceived ineffectiveness, less comfort, lack of sexual satisfaction, husband's alcohol use, depression, and anxiety, and not available at that instant. The role of media in the promotion of condom use was indicated as an important way to increase awareness and use. Multiple strategies would help in acceptance of male condom. PMID:25673537

Donta, Balaiah; Begum, Shahina; Naik, D D

2014-11-01

483

Defining acceptable levels for ecological indicators: an approach for considering social values.  

PubMed

Ecological indicators can facilitate an adaptive management approach, but only if acceptable levels for those indicators have been defined so that the data collected can be interpreted. Because acceptable levels are an expression of the desired state of the ecosystem, the process of establishing acceptable levels should incorporate not just ecological understanding but also societal values. The goal of this research was to explore an approach for defining acceptable levels of ecological indicators that explicitly considers social perspectives and values. We used a set of eight indicators that were related to issues of concern in the Lake Champlain Basin. Our approach was based on normative theory. Using a stakeholder survey, we measured respondent normative evaluations of varying levels of our indicators. Aggregated social norm curves were used to determine the level at which indicator values shifted from acceptable to unacceptable conditions. For seven of the eight indicators, clear preferences were interpretable from these norm curves. For example, closures of public beaches because of bacterial contamination and days of intense algae bloom went from acceptable to unacceptable at 7-10 days in a summer season. Survey respondents also indicated that the number of fish caught from Lake Champlain that could be safely consumed each month was unacceptably low and the number of streams draining into the lake that were impaired by storm water was unacceptably high. If indicators that translate ecological conditions into social consequences are carefully selected, we believe the normative approach has considerable merit for defining acceptable levels of valued ecological system components. PMID:17203340

Smyth, Robyn L; Watzin, Mary C; Manning, Robert E

2007-03-01

484

Received 14 Aug 2013 | Accepted 8 Sep 2014 | Published 13 Oct 2014 Improving battery safety by early detection of  

E-print Network

,2,4­7. For both lithium-ion and lithium metal rechargeable batteries, safety issues are often associated to lithium-ion-based batteries during the 1980s (refs 1,2,4). Current commercial lithium-ion batteries usingARTICLE Received 14 Aug 2013 | Accepted 8 Sep 2014 | Published 13 Oct 2014 Improving battery safety

Cui, Yi

485

Acceptability of Hypothetical Microbicides among Women in Sex Establishments in Rural Areas in Southern China  

PubMed Central

Objectives and Goal The objectives of this study were to measure the potential acceptability of a hypothetical microbicide among women in sex establishments in rural areas of Southern China, and demographic, behavioral and social context factors likely to affect microbicide acceptability. Study Design This was a cross-sectional survey, using a quota sampling, among 300 women from sex establishments in three rural towns. An interviewer-administered standardized questionnaire was used to measure the acceptability score of hypothetical microbicides’ characteristics, as well as sexual relationships and behaviors, and other contextual factors. Results Findings showed a generally positive response to microbicides, indicated by an acceptability index score of 2.89 (SD, 0.56, scale of 1–4) in the overall sample. Multivariate analysis shows the acceptability score varied significantly by study sites, type of sex-work establishments, marital status, sex partner type, vaginal product experience, locus of control by partners and locus of control by chance. Conclusions Microbicides may be acceptable among sex workers in rural settings in China; however, contextual factors should be carefully considered in education and promotion of microbicides in the future. PMID:17767093

Wang, Yu; Liao, Su-Su; Weeks, Margaret R.; Jiang, Jing-Mei; Abbott, Maryann; Zhou, Yue-Jiao; He, Bin; Liu, Wei; Mosack, Katie E.

2010-01-01

486

Maintenance as a safety issue.  

PubMed

Because safety is related to electrical power systems maintenance, it seems reasonable to assume there could be legal issues if maintenance is not performed. OSHA has not yet taken the stand that not performing maintenance as required by the manufacturer, NFPA 70B, or ANSI/NETA MTS-07 constitutes a willful violation. OSHA defines a willful citation as one where: "the employer knowingly commits with plain indifference to the law. The employer either knows that what he or she is doing constitutes a violation, or is aware that a hazardous condition existed and made no reasonable effort to eliminate it". However, NFPA 70E 2009 requires this maintenance, and OSHA has stated on its Web site that NFPA 70E is "a guide for meeting the requirements of the OSHA electrical regulations". In addition, federal courts have found that NFPA 70E is "standard industry practice." Once a company receives and accepts a willful citation, especially if received as the result of an accident investigation, its worker's compensation protection no longer shields it. One definition given by a trial attorney for a willful citation was that it is equal to negligent behavior. Be smart: Maintain that equipment and save yourself major problems, including unscheduled shutdowns and possible litigation. PMID:19025196

White, Jim

2008-11-01

487

Acceptance criteria for urban dispersion model evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors suggested acceptance criteria for rural dispersion models' performance measures in this journal in 2004. The current paper suggests modified values of acceptance criteria for urban applications and tests them with tracer data from four urban field experiments. For the arc-maximum concentrations, the fractional bias should have a magnitude <0.67 (i.e., the relative mean bias is less than a factor of 2); the normalized mean-square error should be <6 (i.e., the random scatter is less than about 2.4 times the mean); and the fraction of predictions that are within a factor of two of the observations (FAC2) should be >0.3. For all data paired in space, for which a threshold concentration must always be defined, the normalized absolute difference should be <0.50, when the threshold is three times the instrument's limit of quantification (LOQ). An overall criterion is then applied that the total set of acceptance criteria should be satisfied in at least half of the field experiments. These acceptance criteria are applied to evaluations of the US Department of Defense's Joint Effects Model (JEM) with tracer data from US urban field experiments in Salt Lake City (U2000), Oklahoma City (JU2003), and Manhattan (MSG05 and MID05). JEM includes the SCIPUFF dispersion model with the urban canopy option and the urban dispersion model (UDM) option. In each set of evaluations, three or four likely options are tested for meteorological inputs (e.g., a local building top wind speed, the closest National Weather Service airport observations, or outputs from numerical weather prediction models). It is found that, due to large natural variability in the urban data, there is not a large difference between the performance measures for the two model options and the three or four meteorological input options. The more detailed UDM and the state-of-the-art numerical weather models do provide a slight improvement over the other options. The proposed urban dispersion model acceptance criteria are satisfied at over half of the field experiments.

Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

2012-05-01

488

Plus Magazine: Issue 20  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Plus is an internet magazine which aims to introduce readers to the beauty and the practical applications of mathematics." It is published in conjunction with the Cambridge-based Millennium Mathematics Project. The current issue addresses a wide range of topics that include fluid mechanics; probability; and the true, original purpose of the Game of Life. Besides several feature articles, each issue also has fun puzzles, mathematical curiosities, and a news section. The news items take a mathematical perspective of current events or recent scientific investigations. Plus is released about once every other month, on average, and all the back issues are kept in an online archive.

489

Motivations and barriers to riders' acceptance of bus transit  

SciTech Connect

To determine why consumers use or do not use bus transit systems, a representative sample of middle-class Boulder, Colo., women shoppers who had access to the city's bus system was surveyed. Some 213 usable responses were obtained out of 397 questionnaires mailed. Survey results showed that consumers did not ride the bus to go shopping because it was too complicated to use. Bus routes, bus identification, and bus stops were perceived to be difficult to understand. Those consumers who frequently used the bus system did so because it was more compatible with ecological concerns than using a car was. The extent to which these findings can be generalized with previous studies on the motivations and barriers to riders' acceptance of bus transit is discussed. (5 references, 6 tables)

Schwartz, M.B.

1980-01-01

490

Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

1981-01-01

491

Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

492

Indoor Air Pollution: Issues for Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure to indoor air pollution, resulting from the burning of biomass in homes (e.g. wood, agricultural residues, leaves and dung) has been linked to a number of acute respiratory infections (ARIs). ARIs are the biggest killer of children under five and responsible for 9% of the global burden of disease. This paper provides an overview of issues relating to indoor

J R Rouse

493

Thorny Issues Hamper Teacher-Training Rules  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The tenor of discussions held in Washington last week by negotiators rewriting federal rules on teacher preparation underscored deep-seated philosophical divisions within the field, including the thorny issue of how much responsibility schools of education should bear for producing effective teachers. Though the panelists did reach compromises on…

Sawchuk, Stephen

2012-01-01

494

Aging and Developmental Disabilities. Feature Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This feature issue of a bulletin on community integration points out the challenge of making service systems more familiar with and responsive to the needs of older adults with developmental disabilities and their families. It includes articles with the following titles and authors: "Living on the Edge" (Arthur Campbell, Jr.); "Aging and…

Anderson, Deborah, Ed.; And Others

1993-01-01

495

Diversity Issues in the Engineering Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching engineering studies students about diversity issues as part of the curriculum in engineering programs is an essential part of preparing the students for their professional life. By teaching them what this is and what it means for their (professional) lives sensitises them towards more responsibility. The idea is to connect diversity…

Ihsen, Susanne; Gebauer, Sabrina

2009-01-01

496

ECOLOGICAL ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Ecological Issues in a Changing World: Status, Response and Strategy (2004), edited by Hong et al., is a compilation of papers on some of the major topics presented at the 8th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL), held in Seoul, South Korea in 2002. As such, it spans a wide range of subject m...

497

Ocean boundary making: Regional issues and developments  

SciTech Connect

Most nations are currently engaged in various forms of ocean boundary making and indeed the present decades will be looked back on as the 'golden age' of ocean boundary making. This is creating new regional pressures and the need for collective regional responses to these issues. This book examines the issues at stake and the boundary making processes. It discusses these in a general way, showing how the recently concluded Third UN conference on the Law of the Sea has helped resolve the problems whilst leaving some issues unresolved. It goes on to examine the issues and boundary making processes in seven important areas of the work where boundary making is currently in progress.

Johnston, D.M.; Saunders, P.M.

1987-01-01

498

Children with health issues.  

PubMed

All children, even the healthiest, have preventive and acute health care needs. Moreover, a growing number of children are chronically ill, with preventive, acute, and ongoing care needs that may be much more demanding than those for healthy children. Because children are unable to care for themselves, their parents are expected to provide a range of health care services without which the current health care system for children would not function. Under this "shadow health care system," parents or parent surrogates often need to be with the child, a requirement that can create difficulties for working parents, particularly for those whose children are chronically ill. How federal, state, and employer policies and practices mesh with the child health care needs of families is therefore a central issue in any discussion about work and family balance. In this article Mark Schuster, Paul Chung, and Katherine Vestal describe the health care needs of children; the essential health care responsibilities of parents; the perspective of employers; and the existing network of federal, state, and local family leave benefits that employed parents can access. They also identify current gaps in policies that leave unmet the needs of both parents and their employers. The authors suggest the outlines of a national family leave policy that would protect the interests of parents and employers. In essence, such a policy would build on the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, which gives some workers time off with no advance notice required and no loss of job or health insurance. But it would also include elements of California's Paid Family Leave Insurance, which expands coverage to more workers and provides partial pay during leave. Employers could be given some financial protections as well as protections against employee fraud and abuse. Such a policy, the authors conclude, would help to provide security to parents, minimize effects on employers, raise societal expectations for family-friendly work environments, and help maintain the parental shadow system of care on which health care professionals depend. PMID:22013630

Schuster, Mark A; Chung, Paul J; Vestal, Katherine D

2011-01-01

499

Immunocontraception of mammalian wildlife: ecological and immunogenetic issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunocontraception involves stimulating immune responses against gametes or reproductive hormones thus preventing conception. The method is being developed for the humane control of pest and overabundant populations of mammalian wildlife. This paper examines three fundamental issues associated with its use: (1) the difficulties of obtaining responses to self-antigens, (2) the likely evolution of genetically based non-response to immunocontraceptive agents, and

Desmond W Cooper; Elisabeth Larsen

2006-01-01

500

PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http:\\/\\/cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http:\\/\\/cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole

Mirjana Bozic; Margarita Man'ko

2009-01-01