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Sample records for access multiphoton microscopy

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RANDOM ACCESS MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPY FOR FAST FUNCTIONAL IMAGING OF NEURONAL ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gaddum Duemani; Kelleher, Keith; Fink, Rudy; Saggau, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic ability of neuronal dendrites to shape and integrate synaptic responses is the hallmark of information processing in the brain. Effectively studying this phenomenon requires concurrent measurements at multiple sites on live neurons. Significant progress has been made by optical imaging systems which combine confocal and multiphoton microscopy with inertia-free laser scanning. However, all systems developed to date restrict fast imaging to two dimensions. This severely limits the extent to which neurons can be studied, since they represent complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. Here we present a novel imaging system that utilizes a unique arrangement of acousto-optic deflectors to steer a focused ultra-fast laser beam to arbitrary locations in 3D space without moving the objective lens. As we demonstrate, this highly versatile random-access multiphoton microscope supports functional imaging of complex 3D cellular structures such as neuronal dendrites or neural populations at acquisition rates on the order of tens of kilohertz. PMID:18432198

  2. Advances in multiphoton microscopy technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Erich E.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled unprecedented dynamic exploration in living organisms. A significant challenge in biological research is the dynamic imaging of features deep within living organisms, which permits the real-time analysis of cellular structure and function. To make progress in our understanding of biological machinery, optical microscopes must be capable of rapid, targeted access deep within samples at high resolution. In this Review, we discuss the basic architecture of a multiphoton microscope capable of such analysis and summarize the state-of-the-art technologies for the quantitative imaging of biological phenomena. PMID:24307915

  3. Multiphoton microscopy in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Winfried

    2002-06-01

    The study of the nervous system requires to an exceptional extent observation of and experimentation on intact tissue. There, in particular, high-resolution optical microscopy benefits from the inherent advantages of multi-photon fluorescence excitation. Several cases will be presented from a number of different tissues and organisms, where multi-photon excited laser scanning fluorescence microscopy has been an essential experimental tool. Those examples include the discovery of biochemical coincidence detection in synaptic spines and the clarification of the underlying mechanism; the observation of sensory evoked dendritic signaling in intact animals and the observation of light induced calcium signals in the intact retina. Recently a fiber coupled two-photon microscopy has been developed that allows the imaging in moving animal.

  4. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  5. Stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jureller, Justin E; Kim, Hee Y; Scherer, Norbert F

    2006-04-17

    Multiparticle tracking with scanning confocal and multiphoton fluorescence imaging is increasingly important for elucidating biological function, as in the transport of intracellular cargo-carrying vesicles. We demonstrate a simple rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multifocal multiphoton microscopy (SS-MMM) fluorescence imaging technique that enables multiparticle tracking without specialized hardware at rates 1,000 times greater than conventional single point raster scanning. Stochastic scanning of a diffractive optic generated 10x10 hexagonal array of foci with a white noise driven galvanometer yields a scan pattern that is random yet space-filling. SS-MMM creates a more uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. SS-MMM is verified by simulation and experimentally demonstrated by tracking microsphere diffusion in solution. PMID:19516485

  6. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  7. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  8. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  9. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  10. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  11. Clinical multiphoton and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on clinical CARS imaging of human skin in vivo with the certified hybrid multiphoton tomograph CARSDermaInspect. The CARS-DermaInspect provides simultaneous imaging of non-fluorescent intradermal lipid and water as well as imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence from intrinsic molecules. Two different excitation schemes for CARS imaging have been realized: In the first setup, a combination of fs oscillator and optical parametric oscillator provided fs-CARS pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. In the second setup a fs oscillator was combined with a photonic crystal fiber which provided a broadband spectrum. A spectral range out of the broadband-spectrum was selected and used for CARS excitation in combination with the residual fs-oscillator output. In both setups, in addition to CARS, single-beam excitation was used for imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. Both CARS-excitation systems were successfully used for imaging of lipids inside the skin in vivo.

  12. Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Joo, Chulmin; Zhan, Chun; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    While multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been performed with a wide range of excitation wavelengths, fluorescence emission has been limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes via nonlinear excitation at 1550 nm. This all-NIR system expands the range of available MPM fluorophores, virtually eliminates background autofluorescence, and allows for use of fiber-based, turnkey ultrafast lasers developed for telecommunications.

  13. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  14. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  15. Nonlinear magic: multiphoton microscopy in the biosciences.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Warren R; Williams, Rebecca M; Webb, Watt W

    2003-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has found a niche in the world of biological imaging as the best noninvasive means of fluorescence microscopy in tissue explants and living animals. Coupled with transgenic mouse models of disease and 'smart' genetically encoded fluorescent indicators, its use is now increasing exponentially. Properly applied, it is capable of measuring calcium transients 500 microm deep in a mouse brain, or quantifying blood flow by imaging shadows of blood cells as they race through capillaries. With the multitude of possibilities afforded by variations of nonlinear optics and localized photochemistry, it is possible to image collagen fibrils directly within tissue through nonlinear scattering, or release caged compounds in sub-femtoliter volumes. PMID:14595365

  16. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  17. Multimodal optoacoustic and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Gali; Razansky, Daniel; Shoham, Shy

    2013-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful imaging modality that enables structural and functional imaging with cellular and sub-cellular resolution, deep within biological tissues. Yet, its main contrast mechanism relies on extrinsically administered fluorescent indicators. Here we developed a system for simultaneous multimodal optoacoustic and multiphoton fluorescence 3D imaging, which attains both absorption and fluorescence-based contrast by integrating an ultrasonic transducer into a two-photon laser scanning microscope. The system is readily shown to enable acquisition of multimodal microscopic images of fluorescently labeled targets and cell cultures as well as intrinsic absorption-based images of pigmented biological tissue. During initial experiments, it was further observed that that detected optoacoustically-induced response contains low frequency signal variations, presumably due to cavitation-mediated signal generation by the high repetition rate (80MHz) near IR femtosecond laser. The multimodal system may provide complementary structural and functional information to the fluorescently labeled tissue, by superimposing optoacoustic images of intrinsic tissue chromophores, such as melanin deposits, pigmentation, and hemoglobin or other extrinsic particle or dye-based markers highly absorptive in the NIR spectrum.

  18. Application of Multiphoton Microscopy in Dermatological Studies: a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah; Rowlands, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance. PMID:25075226

  19. Widefield multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy for animal study in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Su, Y.-D.; Huang, T.-Y.; Chen, S.-J.

    2010-08-01

    Unlike conventional multiphoton excited microscopy according to pixel-by-pixel point scanning, a widefield multiphoton excited microscopy based on spatiotemporal focusing has been developed to construct three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton fluorescence images only with the need of an axial scanning. By implementing a 4.0 W 10 kHz femtosecond laser amplifier with an instant strong peak power and a fast TE-cooled EMCCD camera with an ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection, the multiphoton excited fluorescence images with the excitation area over 100 μm x 100 μm can be achieved at a frame rate up to 80 Hz. A mechanical shutter is utilized to control the exposure time of 1 ms, i.e. average ten laser pulses reach the fluorescent specimen, and hence an uniform enough multiphoton excited fluorescence image can be attained with less photobleaching. The Brownian motion of microbeads and 3D neuron cells of a rat cerebellum have been observed with a lateral spatial resolution of 0.24 μm and an axial resolution of 2.5 μm. Therefore, the developed widefield multiphoton microscopy can provide fast and high-resolution multiphoton excited fluorescence images for animal study in vivo.

  20. Multiphoton Microscopy for Visualizing Lipids in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Martin; Serrels, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing the appearance of fat droplets and adipocytes in tissue can be realized using a label-free imaging method known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). CARS is a nonlinear optical technique that allows label-free imaging of a material with contrast based on the same vibrational signatures of molecules found in Raman spectroscopy. CARS can be combined with other single and multiphoton imaging modes such as second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence to image a broad variety of biological structures.Here we describe the construction of a multiphoton microscope that will enable the study of both fluorescently labeled and unlabeled tissue. This has been used to monitor the contribution of Wt1 expressing cells towards the visceral fat depots during gestation. PMID:27417963

  1. Hybrid label-free multiphoton and optoacoustic microscopy (MPOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Dominik; Tserevelakis, George J.; Omar, Murad; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-07-01

    Many biological applications require a simultaneous observation of different anatomical features. However, unless potentially harmful staining of the specimens is employed, individual microscopy techniques do generally not provide multi-contrast capabilities. We present a hybrid microscope integrating optoacoustic microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, including second-harmonic generation, into a single device. This combined multiphoton and optoacoustic microscope (MPOM) offers visualization of a broad range of structures by employing different contrast mechanisms and at the same time enables pure label-free imaging of biological systems. We investigate the relative performance of the two microscopy modalities and demonstrate their multi-contrast abilities through the label-free imaging of a zebrafish larva ex vivo, simultaneously visualizing muscles and pigments. This hybrid microscopy application bears great potential for developmental biology studies, enabling more comprehensive information to be obtained from biological specimens without the necessity of staining.

  2. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics of colonic adenocarcinoma using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong; Li, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a noninvasive optical method with high resolution and high sensitivity, can obtain detailed microstructures of biotissues at submolecular level. In this study, MPM is used to image microstructure varieties of human colonic mucosa and submucosa with adenocarcinoma. Some parameters, such as gland configuration, SHG/TPEF intensity ratio, and collagen orientation and so on, should serve the indicators of early colorectal cancer. The exploratory results show that it's potential for the development of multiphoton mini-endoscopy in real-time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  3. Photonic near-field imaging in multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, R. C.; Saliba, S. D.; Könenkamp, R.

    2013-05-01

    We report the observation of optical near fields in a photonic waveguide of conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) using multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Nonlinear two-photon photoelectron emission is enhanced at field maxima created by interference between incident 410-nm and coherently excited guided photonic waves, providing strong phase contrast. Guided modes are observed under both transverse magnetic field (TM) and transverse electric field (TE) polarized illuminations and are consistent with classical electromagnetic theory. Implications on the role of multiphoton PEEM in optical near-field imaging are discussed.

  4. Post conductive keratoplasty visualization of rabbit cornea by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Wang, Tsung-Jen; Hu, Fung-Rong; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    Conductive keratoplasty (CK) is a new refractive surgery for presbyopia and hyperopia patients. By applying radio frequency current at the peripheral regions of cornea, collagen, the most abundant composition of corneal stroma, shrinks due to the heat generated. The shrinkage at the periphery alters the corneal architecture and achieves clearer focus for near vision. In this work we use multiphoton microscopy to observe the post surgery structure variation at both submicron resolution and over a large region within the tissue. Since collagen can be induced to generate strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signal, multiphoton excitation provide direct visualization of collagen orientation within corneal stroma. In addition, since the SHG intensity of collagen tissue deteriorates with increasing thermal damage [1-3], our methodology can be used to characterize the extent of corneal stroma damage from the CK procedure. Finally, the influence of CK on the morphology and distribution of keratocytes can also be investigated by detecting multiphoton excited autofluorescence from the cells.

  5. Waveguide characterization with multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Saliba, Sebastian; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    Multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) images surface interactions of visible light with matter, showing electromagnetic (EM) waves that propagate at or near the surface. Images are interferometric, showing where incident and surface waves are in-phase (bright) and out-of-phase (dark), with strong contrast between regions of high and low rates of photoelectron emission. Interferogram analysis can determine the amplitude, wavelength, phase evolution, and propagation decay length of the surface waves. Most multi-photon PEEM studies focus on surface plasmon polaritons. We show that this technique can also be applied to conducting thin-film waveguides, measuring the properties of confined EM waves in a two-mode slab waveguide made of indium tin oxide on glass, which are consistent with waveguide theory. This research was funded by the US Department of Energy Basic Science Office under contract DE-FG02-10ER46406.

  6. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  7. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones. PMID:26872004

  8. Dynamic Multiphoton Microscopy: Focusing Light on Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major global health problem; much research has been conducted on AKI, and numerous agents have shown benefit in animal studies, but none have translated into treatments. There is, therefore, a pressing unmet need to increase knowledge of the pathophysiology of AKI. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides a tool to non-invasively visualize dynamic events in real time and at high resolution in rodent kidneys, and in this article we review its application to study novel mechanisms and treatments in different forms of AKI. PMID:25180263

  9. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  10. Spectral-resolved multifocal multiphoton microscopy with multianode photomultiplier tubes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Tzeranis, Dimitrios; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy is the preferred method for in vivo deep tissue imaging. Many biological applications demand both high imaging speed and the ability to resolve multiple fluorophores. One of the successful methods to improve imaging speed in a highly turbid specimen is multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) based on use of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). This approach improves imaging speed by using multiple foci for parallelized excitation without sacrificing signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emission photons. In this work, we demonstrate that the MAPMT based MMM can be extended with spectral resolved imaging capability. Instead of generating multiple excitation foci in a 2D grid pattern, a linear array of foci is generated. This leaves one axis of the 2D MAPMT available for spectral dispersion and detection. The spectral-resolved MMM can detect several emission signals simultaneously with high imaging speed optimized for high-throughput, high-contents applications. The new procedure is illustrated using imaging data from the kidney, peripheral nerve regeneration and dendritic morphological data from the brain. PMID:25321515

  11. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  12. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  13. Reassignment of scattered emission photons in multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T C

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  14. Reassignment of Scattered Emission Photons in Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  15. Reassignment of Scattered Emission Photons in Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-06-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image.

  16. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration. PMID:24977374

  17. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey J; Wernsing, Keith A; Domingue, Scott R; Allende Motz, Alyssa M; DeLuca, Keith F; Levi, Dean H; DeLuca, Jennifer G; Young, Michael D; Squier, Jeff A; Bartels, Randy A

    2016-06-14

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  18. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated. PMID:14668300

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  20. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  1. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of the live kidney in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Roy, Sandrine; Hickey, Michael J; Gobe, Glenda C

    2014-02-01

    The structural and functional heterogeneity of the kidney ensures a diversity of response in health and disease. Multiphoton microscopy has improved our understanding of kidney physiology and pathophysiology by enabling the visualization of the living kidney in comparison with the static view of previous technologies. The use of multiphoton microscopy with rodent models in conjunction with endogenous fluorescence and exogenous infused dyes permits the measurement of renal processes, such as glomerular permeability, juxtaglomerular apparatus function, tubulointerstitial function, tubulovascular interactions, vascular flow rate, and the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Subcellular processes, including mitochondrial dynamics, reactive oxygen species production, cytosolic ion concentrations, and death processes apoptosis and necrosis, can also be measured by multiphoton microscopy. This has allowed valuable insight into the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy, renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, hypertensive nephropathy, as well as inflammatory responses of the kidney. The current review presents an overview of multiphoton microscopy with a focus on techniques for imaging the kidney and gives examples of instances where multiphoton microscopy has been utilized to study renal pathophysiology in the living kidney. With continued advancements in the field of biological optics and increased adoption in experimental nephrology, multiphoton microscopy will undoubtedly continue to create new paradigms in kidney disease. PMID:24525825

  2. Multiphoton microscopy of antigen presenting cells in experimental cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Simon C.; Papworth, Glenn D.; Spencer, Lori A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Hackstein, Holger

    2002-06-01

    The absence of effective conventional therapy for most cancer patients justifies the application of novel, experimental approaches. One alternative to conventional cytotoxic agents is a more defined molecular approach for cancer immune treatment; promotion of the immune system specifically to target and eliminate tumor cells on the basis of expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA could be presented to T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that generate a more efficient and effective anti-tumor immune response. In fact, it has been well documented that dendritic cells, the most immunologically potent APC, are capable of recognizing, processing and presenting TAA, in turn initiating a specific antitumor immune response. Results from several laboratories and clinical trials suggested significant but still limited efficacy of TAA-pulsed dendritic cells administered to tumor-bearing hosts. Following such delivery, it is fundamentally necessary to dynamically assess cell abundance within the microenvironment of the tumor in the presence of the appropriate therapeutic agent. Multiphoton microscopy was used to assess the trafficking of pulsed dendritic cells and other APC in skin, lymph nodes and brain of several animal tumor models, following different routes of administration.

  3. The analysis of aging skin based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Shufei

    2010-11-01

    Aging is a very important issue not only in dermatology, but also in cosmetic science. Cutaneous aging involves both chronological and photoaging aging process. The chronological aging is induced with the passage of time. And the photoaging skin is the extrinsic aging caused by sun exposure. The aim of this study is to use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) in vivo to assess intrinsic-age-related and photo-age-related difference. The changes of dermal collagen are measured in quantitively. The algorithm that we used automatically produced the transversal dermal map from MPM. Others, the texture of dermis are analyzed by Fourier transform and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix. And the object extraction in textured images is proposed based on the method in object edge extraction, and the aim of it is to detect the object hidden in the skin texture in difference aging skin. The result demonstrates that the approach is effective in detecting the object in epidermis and dermis textured image in different aging skin. It could help to further understand the aging mechanism.

  4. Characterization of multiphoton microscopy in the bone marrow following intravital laser osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Mortensen, Luke J; Lin, Charles P

    2014-10-01

    The bone marrow is an important site where all blood cells are formed from hematopoietic stem cells and where hematologic malignancies such as leukemia emerge. It is also a frequent site for metastasis of solid tumors such as breast cancer and prostate cancer. Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for studying the bone marrow with single cell and sub-cellular resolution. To improve optical access to this rich biological environment, plasma-mediated laser ablation with sub-microjoule femtosecond pulses was used to thin cortical bone. By locally removing a superficial layer of bone (local laser osteotomy), significant improvements in multiphoton imaging were observed in individual bone marrow compartments in vivo. This work demonstrates the utility of scanning laser ablation of hard tissue with sub-microjoule pulses as a preparatory step to imaging. PMID:25360374

  5. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  6. Ex vivo applications of multiphoton microscopy in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manu; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2016-03-01

    Background: Routine urological surgery frequently requires rapid on-site histopathological tissue evaluation either during biopsy or intra-operative procedure. However, resected tissue needs to undergo processing, which is not only time consuming but may also create artifacts hindering real-time tissue assessment. Likewise, pathologist often relies on several ancillary methods, in addition to H&E to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. Although, helpful these techniques are tedious and time consuming and often show overlapping results. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging tool that can rapidly assess tissue in real-time at cellular level. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is one such technique that can generate histology-quality images from fresh and fixed tissue solely based on their intrinsic autofluorescence emission, without the need for tissue processing or staining. Design: Fresh tissue sections (neoplastic and non-neoplastic) from biopsy and surgical specimens of bladder and kidney were obtained. Unstained deparaffinized slides from biopsy of medical kidney disease and oncocytic renal neoplasms were also obtained. MPM images were acquired using with an Olympus FluoView FV1000MPE system. After imaging, fresh tissues were submitted for routine histopathology. Results: Based on the architectural and cellular details of the tissue, MPM could characterize normal components of bladder and kidney. Neoplastic tissue could be differentiated from non-neoplastic tissue and could be further classified as per histopathological convention. Some of the tumors had unique MPM signatures not otherwise seen on H&E sections. Various subtypes of glomerular lesions were identified as well as renal oncocytic neoplasms were differentiated on unstained deparaffinized slides. Conclusions: We envision MPM to become an integral part of regular diagnostic workflow for rapid assessment of tissue. MPM can be used to evaluate the adequacy of biopsies and triage tissues for ancillary studies

  7. Comparison of objective lenses for multiphoton microscopy in turbid samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avtar; McMullen, Jesse D; Doris, Eli A; Zipfel, Warren R

    2015-08-01

    Optimization of illumination and detection optics is pivotal for multiphoton imaging in highly scattering tissue and the objective lens is the central component in both of these pathways. To better understand how basic lens parameters (NA, magnification, field number) affect fluorescence collection and image quality, a two-detector setup was used with a specialized sample cell to separate measurement of total excitation from epifluorescence collection. Our data corroborate earlier findings that low-mag lenses can be superior at collecting scattered photons, and we compare a set of commonly used multiphoton objective lenses in terms of their ability to collect scattered fluorescence, providing guidance for the design of multiphoton imaging systems. For example, our measurements of epi-fluorescence beam divergence in the presence of scattering reveal minimal beam broadening, indicating that often-advocated over-sized collection optics are not as advantageous as previously thought. These experiments also provide a framework for choosing objective lenses for multiphoton imaging by relating the results of our measurements to various design parameters of the objectives lenses used. PMID:26309771

  8. The effects of refractive index heterogeneity within kidney tissue on multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Young, P A; Clendenon, S G; Byars, J M; Dunn, K W

    2011-05-01

    Although multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy has improved the depth at which useful fluorescence images can be collected in biological tissues, the reach of multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy is nonetheless limited by tissue scattering and spherical aberration. Scattering can be reduced in fixed samples by mounting in a medium whose refractive index closely matches that of the fixed material. Using optical 'clearing', the effects of refractive index heterogeneity on signal attenuation with depth are investigated. Quantitative measurements show that by mounting kidney tissue in a high refractive index medium, less than 50% of signal attenuates in 100 μm of depth. PMID:21118239

  9. Demonstration of structural alterations in experimental corneal infectious model using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chang, Yuh-Ling; Sun, Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the application of multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for investigating the structural alterations and the pattern of microbial spreading during corneal infectious process in an in vitro organ culture model. The autofluorescence spectrum derived from pathogens allows us to monitoring the pattern of microbial spreading within corneal lamellae. In addition, the destruction and regeneration of second harmonic generating collagen during infectious process can also be monitored in a non-invasive fashion. Therefore we propose that multiphoton microscopy may potentially be applied as an effective monitoring tool for corneal infection studies.

  10. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  11. Integrated spectrometer design with application to multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Eric V; Durfee, Charles G; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    We present a prism-based spectrometer integrated into a multifocal, multiphoton microscope. The multifocal configuration facilitates interrogation of samples under different excitation conditions. Notably, the image plane of the microscope and the image plane of the spectrometer are coincident eliminating the need for an intermediate image plane containing an entrance slit. An EM-CCD detector provides sufficient gain for spectral interrogation of single-emitters. We employ this spectrometer to observe spectral shifts in the two-photon excitation fluorescence emission of single CdSe nanodots as a function of excitation polarization. PMID:21263548

  12. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy based on a spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Y.; Qin, W.; Liu, H.; Peng, X.; Niu, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new multifocal multiphoton microscope that employs a programmable spatial light modulator to generate dynamic multifocus arrays which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a pair of galvo scanners. Using this microscope, we can rapidly select the number and the spatial density of focal points in a multifocus array, as well as the locations and shapes of arrays according to the features of the areas of interest in the field of view without any change to the hardware. PMID:23894222

  13. Multiphoton Microscopy of Nonfluorescent Nanoparticles In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Steffen; Hermann, Stefanie; Kugel, Yan; Sellner, Sabine; Uhl, Bernd; Hirn, Stephanie; Krombach, Fritz; Rehberg, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology holds great promise for a plethora of potential applications. The interaction of engineered nanomaterials with living cells, tissues, and organisms is, however, only partly understood. Microscopic investigations of nano-bio interactions are mostly performed with a few model nanoparticles (NPs) which are easy to visualize, such as fluorescent quantum dots. Here the possibility to visualize nonfluorescent NPs with multiphoton excitation is investigated. Signals from silver (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2 ), and silica (SiO2 ) NPs in nonbiological environments are characterized to determine signal dependency on excitation wavelength and intensity as well as their signal stability over time. Ag NPs generate plasmon-induced luminescence decaying over time. TiO2 NPs induce photoluminescent signals of variable intensities and in addition strong third harmonic generation (THG). Optimal settings for microscopic detection are determined and then applied for visualization of these two particle types in living cells, in murine muscle tissue, and in the murine blood stream. Silica NPs produce a THG signal, but in living cells it cannot be discriminated sufficiently from endogenous cellular structures. It is concluded that multiphoton excitation is a viable option for studies of nano-bio interactions not only for fluorescent but also for some types of nonfluorescent NPs. PMID:27120195

  14. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  15. Multiphoton Microscopy and Interaction of Intense Light Pulses with Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of soft-matter, such as biological tissues, in its native environment has promising applications in medicine to correct for defects (eg. eye cataracts) or to destroy malignant regions (eg. cancerous tumours). To achieve this we need the ability to first image and then do precise ablation with sub-micron resolution with the same setup. For this purpose, we designed and built a multiphoton microscope and tested it on goldfish gills and bovine cells. We then studied light-matter interaction on a hard polymer (PMMA) because the nature of ablation of soft-matter in its native environment is complex and not well understood. Ablation and modification thresholds for successive laser shots were obtained. The ablation craters revealed 3D nanostructures and polarization dependent orientation. The interaction also induced localized porosity in PMMA that can be controlled.

  16. Nanoparticle-assisted-multiphoton microscopy for in vivo brain imaging of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Neuro/brain study has attracted much attention during past few years, and many optical methods have been utilized in order to obtain accurate and complete neural information inside the brain. Relying on simultaneous absorption of two or more near-infrared photons by a fluorophore, multiphoton microscopy can achieve deep tissue penetration and efficient light detection noninvasively, which makes it very suitable for thick-tissue and in vivo bioimaging. Nanoparticles possess many unique optical and chemical properties, such as anti-photobleaching, large multiphoton absorption cross-section, and high stability in biological environment, which facilitates their applications in long-term multiphoton microscopy as contrast agents. In this paper, we will introduce several typical nanoparticles (e.g. organic dye doped polymer nanoparticles and gold nanorods) with high multiphoton fluorescence efficiency. We further applied them in two- and three-photon in vivo functional brain imaging of mice, such as brain-microglia imaging, 3D architecture reconstruction of brain blood vessel, and blood velocity measurement.

  17. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  18. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy with clearing for three dimensional histology of kidney biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Eben; Levene, Michael J.; Torres, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We present a multiphoton microscopy approach with clearing optimized for pathology evaluation producing image quality comparable to traditional histology. Use of benzyl alcohol/benzyl benzoate with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and eosin in an optimized imaging setup results in optical sections nearly indistinguishable from traditionally-cut sections. Application to human renal tissue demonstrates diagnostic-level image quality can be maintained through 1 millimeter of tissue. Three dimensional perspectives reveal changes of glomerular capsule cells not evident on single sections. Collagen-derived second harmonic generation can be visualized through entire biopsies. Multiphoton microscopy with clearing has potential for increasing the yield of histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens. PMID:27570700

  20. Large field of view multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical examination crucially relies on the ability to quickly examine large tissue areas and rapidly zoom in to regions of interest. Skin lesions often show irregularity in color and appearance in general, especially when they start to progress towards malignancy. Large field of view (FOV) and automatic translation of the imaging area are critical in the assessment of the entire lesion. Imaging of limited FOVs of the lesion can easily result in false negative diagnosis. We present a multiphoton microscope based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation that images FOVs of about 0.8 mm2 (without stitching adjacent FOVs) at speeds of 10 frames/second (800 x 800 pixels) with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5 μm and 2.5 μm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, relay optics, a beam expander and a high NA objective lens. We optimized the system based on the Olympus 25x, 1.05NA water immersion lens, that features a long working distance of 1 mm. Proper tailoring of the beam expander, which consists of the scan and tube lens elements, enables scaling of the FOV. The design criteria include a flat wavefront of the beam, minimum field curvature, and suppressed spherical aberrations. All aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide FOVs in normal human skin.

  1. Continuum generation in ultra high numerical aperture fiber with application to multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, Nicholas

    Nonlinear microscopy benefits from broadband laser sources, enabling efficient excitation of an array of fluorophores, for example. This work demonstrates broadening of a narrow band input pulse (6 nm to 40 nm) centered at 1040 nm with excellent shot-to-shot stability. In a preliminary demonstration, multiphoton imaging with pulses from the fiber is performed. In particular second harmonic imaging of corn starch is performed.

  2. Real-time digital signal processing in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2016-03-01

    The use of multiphoton interactions in biological tissue for imaging contrast requires highly sensitive optical measurements. These often involve signal processing and filtering steps between the photodetector and the data acquisition device, such as photon counting and lock-in amplification. These steps can be implemented as real-time digital signal processing (DSP) elements on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices, an approach that affords much greater flexibility than commercial photon counting or lock-in devices. We will present progress toward developing two new FPGA-based DSP devices for multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy applications. The first is a high-speed multiharmonic lock-in amplifier for transient absorption microscopy, which is being developed for real-time analysis of the intensity-dependence of melanin, with applications in vivo and ex vivo (noninvasive histopathology of melanoma and pigmented lesions). The second device is a kHz lock-in amplifier running on a low cost (50-200) development platform. It is our hope that these FPGA-based DSP devices will enable new, high-speed, low-cost applications in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy.

  3. Intrinsic Indicator of Photodamage during Label-Free Multiphoton Microscopy of Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Elisabeth F.; Geiger, Kathrin D.; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton imaging has evolved as an indispensable tool in cell biology and holds prospects for clinical applications. When addressing endogenous signals such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or second harmonic generation, it requires intense laser irradiation that may cause photodamage. We report that increasing endogenous fluorescence signal upon multiphoton imaging constitutes a marker of photodamage. The effect was studied on mouse brain in vivo and ex vivo, on ex vivo human brain tissue samples, as well as on glioblastoma cells in vitro, demonstrating that this phenomenon is common to a variety of different systems, both ex vivo and in vivo. CARS microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy were used to analyze the photodamage. The development of a standard easy-to-use model that employs rehydrated cryosections allowed the characterization of the irradiation-induced fluorescence and related it to nonlinear photodamage. In conclusion, the monitoring of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence during label-free multiphoton microscopy enables to estimate damage thresholds ex vivo as well as detect photodamage during in vivo experiments. PMID:25343251

  4. Label-free identification of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Wei, J.; Zheng, Z.; Ye, J.; Zeng, S.

    2014-06-01

    The early diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the stomach together with effective therapeutic interventions is crucial to reducing the mortality-rates of the patients associated with gastric cancer. However, it is challenging during conventional white-light endoscopy, and histological analysis remains the ‘gold standard’ for the final diagnosis. Here, we describe a label-free imaging method, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), for the identification of IM in the stomach. It was found that multiphoton imaging provides cellular and subcellular details to the identification of IM from normal gastric tissues. In particular, there is significant difference in the population density of goblet cells between normal and IM gastric tissues, providing substantial potential to become a quantitative intrinsic marker for in vivo clinical diagnosis of early gastric lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the potential of MPM for the identification of IM.

  5. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Martínez-García, M. Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures. PMID:22076258

  6. In vivo multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of epithelial precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2011-03-01

    Most human cancers arise from epithelium, the superficial layer covering the exterior of body or lining the internal body cavities. Endogenous fluorophores such as aromatic amino acids, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavoprotein (FAD), keratin, collagen, and elastin can provide abundant information to reveal the changes in biochemistry, metabolism, and morphology of living tissues. Thus, autofluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy have been recognized as potential tools for discrimination of cancer from normal tissues. However, current fluorescence diagnostic studies mostly rely on spectral analysis or morphological differentiation. It is challenged since the emission spectra of endogenous fluorophores are broad and usually overlapping with each other and the fluorescence intensity could be affected by many factors. In this study, we instrumented a nonlinear optical microscopy system to characterize the morphologic and biochemical features in the epithelial precancer in vivo. The 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracenetreated hamster cheek pouch were used as a living animal carcinogenesis model. And the autofluorescence signals of NADH, collagen and elastin were recorded by a time- and spectral- resolved detection system. The results show that there are obvious differences in the morphology of three-dimensional autofluorescence images between normal and precancerous epithelial tissues. The fluorescence lifetime of NADH and the SHG signal from collagen could provide additional approaches to identify cancer from normal tissue.

  7. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  8. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  9. Analysis of somitogenesis using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Mary E.; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2001-04-01

    In order to study complex cellular interactions in the developing somite and nervous system, we have been refining techniques for labeling and imaging individual cells within the living vertebrate embryo. Most recently, we have been using MPLSM to analyze cellular behaviors, such as cell migration, filopodial extension, cell process collapse, and neuron pathfinding using time-lapse microscopy in 3-dimensions (3-d). To enhance the efficiency of two-photon excitation in these samples, we have been using a Zeiss LSM 510 NLO fiber delivery system with a Grating Dispersion Compensator (GDC). This system not only offers the convenience of fiber delivery for coupling our Ti:Sapphire laser to the microscope, but also affords us precise control over the pulsewidth of the mode- locked beam. In addition, we have developed a novel peptide/non-cationic lipid gene delivery system to introduce GFP plasmid into somite cells. This approach has allowed us to generate detailed 3-d images of somite cell morphologies at various stages of somite development in a way that best preserves the vitality of the cells being imaged.

  10. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  11. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  12. Characterization of corneal damage from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by the use of multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Lin; Chen, Wei-Liang; Lo, Wen; Chen, Shean-Jen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-11-01

    Using multiphoton autofluorescence (MAF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, we investigate the morphology and the structure of the corneal epithelium and stroma collagen of bovine cornea following injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that corneal epithelial cells are damaged and stromal collagen becoming increasingly autofluorescent with time. We also characterized infected cornea cultured for 0, 6, 12, and 24 h by quantitative ratiometric MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) analysis. MAFSI results show that the destruction of the stromal collagen corresponds to a decrease in SHG intensity and increase of MAF signal with time.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy of transdermal quantum dot delivery using two photon polymerization-fabricated polymer microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Gittard, Shaun D; Miller, Philip R; Boehm, Ryan D; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Chichkov, Boris N; Heiser, Jeremy; Gordon, John; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    Due to their ability to serve as fluorophores and drug delivery vehicles, quantum dots are a powerful tool for theranostics-based clinical applications. In this study, microneedle devices for transdermal drug delivery were fabricated by means of two-photon polymerization of an acrylate-based polymer. We examined proliferation of cells on this polymer using neonatal human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts. The microneedle device was used to inject quantum dots into porcine skin; imaging of the quantum dots was performed using multiphoton microscopy. PMID:21413181

  14. Identification of dirty necrosis in colorectal carcinoma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Chen, Zhifen; Feng, Changyin; Li, Hongsheng; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-06-01

    Dirty necrosis within glandular lumina is often considered as a characteristic of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) that is a diagnostically useful feature of CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability (MSI). Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is based on the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence signals, was used to identify dirty necrosis. Our results demonstrated that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of dirty necrosis and the signal intensity as well as an emission spectrum that can help to differentiate dirty necrosis from cancer cells. These findings indicate that MPM may be helpful in distinguishing MSI colorectal carcinoma via the identification of dirty necrosis.

  15. Second and third harmonic generation in few-layer gallium telluride characterized by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susoma, Jannatul; Karvonen, Lasse; Säynätjoki, Antti; Mehravar, Soroush; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Kieu, Khanh; Lipsanen, Harri; Riikonen, Juha

    2016-02-01

    We report on the nonlinear optical properties of few-layer GaTe studied by multiphoton microscopy. Second and third harmonic generation from few-layer GaTe flakes were observed in this study with the laser pump wavelength of 1560 nm. These processes were found to be sensitive to the number of GaTe layers. The second- and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities of 2.7 × 10-9 esu (1.15 pm/V) and 1.4 × 10-8 esu (2 × 10-16 m2/V2) were estimated, respectively.

  16. Multiphoton microscopy using intrinsic signals for pharmacological studies in unstained cardiac and vascular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Boulesteix, Thierry; Pena, Ana-Maria; Pages, Nicole; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2005-03-01

    We report two novel applications of multiphoton microscopy for pharmacological studies of unstained cardiovascular tissue. First, we show that second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of unstained cardiac myocytes can be used to determine the sarcomere length with sub-resolution accuracy, owing to the remarkable contrast of the SHG signal originating from myosin filaments. A measurement precision of 20 nm is achieved, taking the sample variability into account. We used this technique to measure sarcomere contracture in the presence of saxitoxin, and results were in agreement with mechanical measurements of atrial tissue contracture. Second, we characterized multiphoton microscopy of intact unlabeled arteries. We performed simultaneous detection of two-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) from elastin laminae and SHG from collagen fibers upon 860 nm excitation. Combined 2PEF/SHG images provide a highly specific, micron scale description of the architecture of these two major components of the vessel wall. We used this methodology to study the effects of lindane (a pesticide) on the artery wall structure and evidenced structural alteration of the vessel morphology.

  17. Quantitative characterization of articular cartilage using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Pa˚L. Gunnar; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Davies, Catharina De Lange; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-11-01

    The collagen meshwork in articular cartilage of chicken knee is characterized using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy. Direction and degree of dispersion of the collagen fibers in the superficial layer are found using a Fourier transform image-analysis technique of the second-harmonic generated image. Mueller matrix images are used to acquire structural data from the intermediate layer of articular cartilage where the collagen fibers are too small to be resolved by optical microscopy, providing a powerful multimodal measurement technique. Furthermore, we show that Mueller matrix imaging provides more information about the tissue compared to standard polarization microscopy. The combination of these techniques can find use in improved diagnosis of diseases in articular cartilage, improved histopathology, and additional information for accurate biomechanical modeling of cartilage.

  18. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy: behavior of biological specimens under high-intensity illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ping C.; Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2000-07-01

    Recent development in multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy (SHG and THG) and CARS open new dimensions in biological studies. Not only the technologies allow probing the biological specimen both functionally and structurally with increasing spatial and temporal resolution, but also raise the interest in how biological specimens respond to high intensity illumination commonly used in these types of microscopy. We have used maize leaf protoplast as a model system to evaluate the photo-induced response of living sample under high intensity illumination. It was found that cells can be seriously damaged by high intensity NIR irradiation even the linear absorption coefficient in low in these wavelengths. Micro-spectroscopy of single chloroplast also allows us to gain insight on the possible photo-damage mechanism. In addition to fluorescence emission, second harmonic generation was observed in the maize protoplasts.

  19. Signal improvement in multiphoton microscopy by reflection with simple mirrors near the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    In conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy, emitted light is generated not only in the focal plane but also above and below. The situation is different in multiphoton-induced fluorescence and multiphoton-induced higher harmonic generation. Here, restriction of signal generation to a single focal point permits that all emitted photons can contribute to image formation if collected, regardless of their path through the specimen. Often, the intensity of the emitted light is rather low in biological specimens. We present a method to significantly increase the fraction of photons collected by an epi (backward) detector by placing a simple mirror, an aluminum-coated coverslip, directly under the sample. Samples investigated include fluorescent test slides, collagen gels, and thin-layered, intact mouse skeletal muscles. Quantitative analysis revealed an intensity increase of second- and third-harmonic generated signal in skeletal muscle of nine- and sevenfold respectively, and of fluorescent signal in test slides of up to twofold. Our approach thus allows significant signal improvement also for situations were a forward detection is impossible, e.g., due to the anatomy of animals in intravital microscopy.

  20. Deep-tissue multiphoton fluorescence lifetime microscopy for intravital imaging of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruhwirth, G. O.; Matthews, D. R.; Brock, A.; Keppler, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Ng, T.; Ameer-Beg, S.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has proven to be a valuable tool in beating the Rayleigh criterion for light microscopy by measuring Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores. Applying multiphoton FLIM, we previously showed in a human breast cancer cell line that recycling of a membrane receptorgreen fluorescent protein fusion is enhanced concomitantly with the formation of a receptor:protein kinase C α complex in the endosomal compartment. We have extended this established technique to probe direct protein-protein interactions also in vivo. Therefore, we used various expressible fluorescent tags fused to membrane receptor molecules in order to generate stable two-colour breast carcinoma cell lines via controlled retroviral infection. We used these cell lines for establishing a xenograft tumour model in immune-compromised Nude mice. Using this animal model in conjunction with scanning Ti:Sapphire laser-based two-photon excitation, we established deep-tissue multiphoton FLIM in vivo. For the first time, this novel technique enables us to directly assess donor fluorescence lifetime changes in vivo and we show the application of this method for intravital imaging of direct protein-protein interactions.

  1. Monitoring photoaging by use of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Chan, Jung-Yi; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Lo, Wen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Young, Tai-Horng; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    It is a field of great interest to develop therapies to rejuvenate photoaged skin. However, the treatment response can not be ideally determined due to lack of a reliable non-invasive method to quantify photoaging. In this study, the photoaging process of skin is investigated by use of a multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy. We obtain the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation images of superficial dermis from facial skin of individuals of different ages. The results show that autofluorescence signals increase with age while second harmonic generation signals decrease with age. The results are consistent with the histological findings in which collagen is progressively replaced by elastic fibers. In the case of severe photoaging, solar elastosis can be clearly demonstrated by the presence of thick curvy autofluorescent materials in the superficial dermis. We propose a second harmonic generation to autofluorescence aging index of dermis to quantify the photoaging changes. This index is shown to be a good indicator of photoaging. Our results suggest that multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy can be developed into a non-invasive imaging modelity for the clinical evaluation of photoaging.

  2. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic tool for pathological analysis of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemiere, J.; Douady, J.; Estève, F.; Salameire, D.; Lantuejoul, S.; Lorimier, P.; Ricard, C.; van der Sanden, B.; Vial, J.-C.

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has shown a powerful potential for biomedical in vivo and ex vivo analysis of tissue sections and explants. Studies were carried out on several animal organs such as brain, arteries, lungs, and kidneys. One of the current challenges is to transfer to the clinic the knowledge and the methods previously developed in the labs at the preclinical level. For tumour staging, physicians often remove the lymph nodes that are localized at the proximity of the lesion. In case of breast cancer or melanoma, sentinel lymph node protocol is performed: pathologists randomly realize an extensive sampling of formol fixed nodes. However, the duration of this protocol is important and its reliability is not always satisfactory. The aim of our study was to determine if multiphoton microscopy would enable the fast imaging of lymph nodes on important depths, with or without exogenous staining. Experiments were first conducted on pig lymph nodes in order to test various dyes and to determine an appropriate protocol. The same experiments were then performed on thin slices of human lymph nodes bearing metastatic melanoma cells. We obtained relevant images with both endofluorescence plus second-harmonic generation and xanthene dyes. They show a good contrast between tumour and healthy cells. Furthermore, images of pig lymph nodes were recorded up to 120μm below the surface. This new method could then enable a faster diagnosis with higher efficiency for the patient. Experiments on thicker human lymph nodes are currently underway in order to validate these preliminary results.

  3. Spatiotemporal control of degenerate multiphoton fluorescence microscopy with delay-tunable femtosecond pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dhiman; Bhattacharyya, Indrajit; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-07-01

    Selective excitation of a particular fluorophore in an ensemble of different fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectra is shown to be dependent on the time delay of femtosecond pulse pairs in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. In particular, the two-photon fluorescence behavior of the Texas Red and DAPI dye pair inside Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells depends strongly on the center wavelength of the laser, as well as the delay between two identical laser pulses in one-color femtosecond pulse-pair excitation scheme. Thus, we present a novel design concept using pairs of femtosecond pulses at different central wavelengths and tunable pulse separations for controlling the image contrast between two spatially and spectrally overlapping fluorophores. This femtosecond pulse-pair technique is unique in utilizing the variation of dye dynamics inside biological cells as a contrast mode in microscopy of different fluorophores.

  4. Live tissue intrinsic emission microscopy using multiphoton-excited native fluorescence and second harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Christie, Richard; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Hyman, Bradley T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-01-01

    Multicolor nonlinear microscopy of living tissue using two- and three-photon-excited intrinsic fluorescence combined with second harmonic generation by supermolecular structures produces images with the resolution and detail of standard histology without the use of exogenous stains. Imaging of intrinsic indicators within tissue, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, retinol, indoleamines, and collagen provides crucial information for physiology and pathology. The efficient application of multiphoton microscopy to intrinsic imaging requires knowledge of the nonlinear optical properties of specific cell and tissue components. Here we compile and demonstrate applications involving a range of intrinsic molecules and molecular assemblies that enable direct visualization of tissue morphology, cell metabolism, and disease states such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:12756303

  5. Characterizing germania concentration and structure in fiber soot using multiphoton microscopy and spectroscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Ming-Jun; Liu, Anping

    2015-02-01

    Germania doping is commonly used in the core of optical fiber due to its advantages compared to other materials such as superior transparency in near-infrared telecommunication wavelength region. During fiber preform manufacturing using the outside vapor deposition (OVD) process, Ge is doped into a silica soot preform by chemical vapor deposition. Since the Ge doping concentration profile is directly correlated with the fiber refractive index profile, its characterization is critical for the fiber industry. Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) is a conventional analysis method for characterizing the Ge concentration profile. However, it requires extensive sample preparation and lengthy measurement. In this paper, a multiphoton microscopy technique is utilized to measure the Ge doping profile based on the multiphoton fluorescence intensity of the soot layers. Two samples, one with ramped and another with stepped Ge doping profiles were prepared for measurements. Measured results show that the technique is capable of distinguishing ramped and stepped Ge doping profiles with good accuracy. In the ramped soot sample, a sharp increment of doping level was observed in about 2 mm range from soot edge followed by a relative slow gradient doping accretion. As for the stepped doping sample, step sizes ranging from around 1 mm (at soot edge) to 3 mm (at soot center) were observed. All the measured profiles are in close agreement with that of the EPMA measurements. In addition, both multiphoton fluorescence (around 420 nm) and sharp second harmonic generations (at 532 nm) were observed, which indicates the co-existence of crystal and amorphous GeO2.

  6. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  7. Chronic imaging of amyloid plaques in the live mouse brain using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacskai, Brian J.; Kajdasz, Stephen T.; Christie, R. H.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Kasischke, Karl A.; Webb, Watt W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2001-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) develop amyloid plaques as they age. These plaques resemble those found in the human disease. Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy combined with a novel surgical approach was used to measure amyloid plaque dynamics chronically in the cortex of living transgenic mice. Thioflavine S (thioS) was used as a fluorescent marker of amyloid deposits. Multiphoton excitation allowed visualization of amyloid plaques up to 200 micrometers deep into the brain. The surgical site could be imaged repeatedly without overt damage to the tissue, and individual plaques within this volume could be reliably identified over periods of several days to several months. On average, plaque sizes remained constant over time, supporting a model of rapid deposition, followed by relative stability. Alternative reporters for in vivo histology include thiazine red, and FITC-labeled amyloid-(Beta) peptide. We also present examples of multi-color imaging using Hoechst dyes and FITC-labeled tomato lectin. These approaches allow us to observe cell nuclei or microglia simultaneously with amyloid-(Beta) deposits in vivo. Chronic imaging of a variety of reporters in these transgenic mice should provide insight into the dynamics of amyloid-(Beta) activity in the brain.

  8. Use of multiphoton microscopy to diagnose liver cancer and lung metastasis in an orthotopic rat model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Gang; Tan, Changjun; Zhu, Weifeng; Lu, Jianping; Fan, Jia; Chen, Jianxin; Zhou, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Liver or lung biopsy for suspicious lesions has several disadvantages such as bleeding, bile leak or pneumothorax, needle track seeding, and time-consuming histopathological procedure. The ability to directly observe cellular and subcellular details and then perform "optical biopsy" is a major goal in the development of new interventional techniques. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) enables real-time noninvasive visualization of tissue architecture and cell morphology in live tissue. We performed a study to evaluate whether MPMcan make real-time optical diagnosis for liver cancer and lung metastasis using an orthotopic rat model with Morris hepatoma. We found that real-time high-resolution MPMimaging could clearly show tissue architecture and cell morphology. In the normal liver tissue, MPMimaging clearly revealed the blood-filled sinusoids and cords of hepatocytes. In the cancerous tissue, MPMimaging clearly illustrated that cancer cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. MPMimages were comparable to golden standard hematoxylin-eosin staining images. Moreover, MPMimaging had deep penetration with the capability of optical sectioning. In short, MPMcan make real-time optical diagnosis for liver cancer and lung metastasis. This study provides the groundwork for further using multiphoton endoscopy to perform real-time noninvasive "optical biopsy" for liver cancer and lung metastasis in the near future. PMID:22331704

  9. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  10. Visualization of basement membranes in normal breast and breast cancer tissues using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; CHEN, GANG; QIU, JINGTING; LU, JIANPING; ZHU, WEIFENG; CHEN, JIANXIN; ZHUO, SHUANGMU; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Since basement membranes represent a critical barrier during breast cancer progression, timely imaging of these signposts is essential for early diagnosis of breast cancer. A label-free method using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence signals and second harmonic generation signals for analyzing the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues is likely to enable a better understanding of the pathophysiology of breast cancer and facilitate improved clinical management and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPM has the potential for label-free assessment of the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues. A total of 60 tissue section samples (comprising 30 fresh breast cancer specimens and 30 normal breast tissues) were first imaged (fresh, unfixed and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Comparisons were made between MPM imaging and gold standard sections for each specimen stained with H&E. Simply by visualizing morphological features appearing on multiphoton images, cancerous lesions may be readily identified by the loss of basement membrane and tumor cells characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. These results suggest that MPM has potential as a label-free method of imaging the morphology of basement membranes and cell features to effectively distinguish between normal and cancerous breast tissues. PMID:27313695

  11. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  12. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  13. In vivo imaging of spinal cord in contusion injury model mice by multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Y.; Horiuchi, H.; Ogata, T.; Hikita, A.; Miura, H.; Imamura, T.

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent imaging technique is a promising method and has been developed for in vivo applications in cellular biology. In particular, nonlinear optical imaging technique, multi-photon microscopy has make it possible to analyze deep portion of tissues in living animals such as axons of spinal code. Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are usually caused by contusion damages. Therefore, observation of spinal cord tissue after the contusion injury is necessary for understanding cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCI and development of the treatment for traumatic SCI. Our goal is elucidation of mechanism for degeneration of axons after contusion injuries by establishing SCI model and chronic observation of injured axons in the living animals. Firstly we generated and observed acute SCI model by contusion injury. By using a multi-photon microscope, axons in dorsal cord were visualized approximately 140 micron in depth from the surface. Immediately after injury, minimal morphological change of spinal cord was observed. At 3 days after injury, spinal cord was swelling and the axons seem to be fragmented. At 7 days after injury, increased degradation of axons could be observed, although the image was blurred due to accumulation of the connective tissue. In the present study, we successfully observed axon degeneration after the contusion SCI in a living animal in vivo. Our final goal is to understand molecular mechanisms and cellular dynamics in response to traumatic SCIs in acute and chronic stage.

  14. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration. PMID:25950644

  15. Multiphoton microscopy can visualize zonal damage and decreased cellular metabolic activity in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Liu, Xin; Burczynski, Frank J.; Fletcher, Linda M.; Gobe, Glenda C.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a common occurrence in liver surgery. In orthotopic transplantation, the donor liver is exposed to periods of ischemia and when oxygenated blood is reintroduced to the liver, oxidative stress may develop and lead to graft failure. The aim of this project was to investigate whether noninvasive multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, without external markers, were useful in detecting early liver damage caused by I/R injury. Localized hepatic ischemia was induced in rats for 1 h followed by 4 h reperfusion. Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was conducted prior to ischemia and up to 4 h of reperfusion and compared to morphological and biochemical assessment of liver damage. Liver function was significantly impaired at 2 and 4 h of reperfusion. Multiphoton microscopy detected liver damage at 1 h of reperfusion, manifested by vacuolated cells and heterogeneous spread of damage over the liver. The damage was mainly localized in the midzonal region of the liver acinus. In addition, fluorescence lifetime imaging showed a decrease in cellular metabolic activity. Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy detected evidence of early I/R injury both structurally and functionally. This provides a simple noninvasive technique useful for following progressive liver injury without external markers.

  16. Depth profiling of gold nanoparticles and characterization of point spread functions in reconstructed and human skin using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labouta, Hagar I; Hampel, Martina; Thude, Sibylle; Reutlinger, Katharina; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become popular in studying dermal nanoparticle penetration. This necessitates studying the imaging parameters of multiphoton microscopy in skin as an imaging medium, in terms of achievable detection depths and the resolution limit. This would simulate real-case scenarios rather than depending on theoretical values determined under ideal conditions. This study has focused on depth profiling of sub-resolution gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in reconstructed (fixed and unfixed) and human skin using multiphoton microscopy. Point spread functions (PSF) were determined for the used water-immersion objective of 63×/NA = 1.2. Factors such as skin-tissue compactness and the presence of wrinkles were found to deteriorate the accuracy of depth profiling. A broad range of AuNP detectable depths (20-100 μm) in reconstructed skin was observed. AuNP could only be detected up to ∼14 μm depth in human skin. Lateral (0.5 ± 0.1 μm) and axial (1.0 ± 0.3 μm) PSF in reconstructed and human specimens were determined. Skin cells and intercellular components didn't degrade the PSF with depth. In summary, the imaging parameters of multiphoton microscopy in skin and practical limitations encountered in tracking nanoparticle penetration using this approach were investigated. PMID:22147676

  17. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EGGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) is a promising tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stages. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  18. Multiphoton microscopy system with a compact fiber-based femtosecond-pulse laser and handheld probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Kieu, Khanh; Wise, Frank W; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system that integrates a compact and robust fiber laser with a miniature probe. The all normal dispersion fiber femtosecond laser has a central wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse width of 125 fs and average power of more than 1 W. A double cladding photonic crystal fiber was used to deliver the excitation beam and to collect the two-photon signal. The hand-held probe included galvanometer-based mirror scanners, relay lenses and a focusing lens. The packaged probe had a diameter of 16 mm. Second harmonic generation (SHG) images and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of biological tissues were demonstrated using the system. PMID:20635426

  19. Real-time histological imaging of kidneys stained with food dyes using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Yasuaki; Kimura, Kazushi; Wang, Shujie; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a real-time imaging technique for diagnosis of kidney diseases which is composed of two steps, staining renal cells safely with food dyes and optical sectioning of living renal tissue to obtain histological images by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Here, we demonstrated that the MPM imaging with food dyes, including erythrosine and indigo carmine, could be used as fluorescent agents to visualize renal functions and structures such as glomerular bloodstreams, glomerular filtration, and morphology of glomeruli and renal tubules. We also showed that the kidneys of IgA nephropathy model-mice stained with the food dyes presented histopathological characteristics different from those observed in normal kidneys. The use of the food dyes enhances the quality of tissue images obtained by MPM and offers the potential to contribute to a clinical real-time diagnosis of kidney diseases. PMID:26260138

  20. The first decade of using multiphoton microscopy for high-power kidney imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burford, James L.; Hackl, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the major scientific breakthroughs in kidney research achieved using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and summarize the milestones in the technological development of kidney MPM during the past 10 years. Since more and more renal laboratories invest in MPM worldwide, we discuss future directions and provide practical, useful tips and examples for the application of this still-emerging optical sectioning technology. Advantages of using MPM in various kidney preparations that range from freshly dissected individual glomeruli or the whole kidney in vitro to MPM of the intact mouse and rat kidney in vivo are reviewed. Potential combinations of MPM with micromanipulation techniques including microperfusion and micropuncture are also included. However, we emphasize the most advanced and complex, quantitative in vivo imaging applications as the ultimate use of MPM since the true mandate of this technology is to look inside intact organs in live animals and humans. PMID:22031850

  1. Imaging normal and cancerous human gastric muscular layer in transverse and longitudinal sections by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Kang, Deyong; Yang, Zhenrong; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Yongjian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) has been widely used for imaging microstructure of biological tissues. In this article, we used MPM to investigate the microstructure changes of normal and cancerous human gastric muscular layer in transverse and longitudinal sections. The results displayed different patterns of microstructure changes of smooth muscular tissue, cell morphology and interstitial fibers in transverse and longitudinal sections, being similar to standard histopathological images but without the need for tissue processing. Our study demonstrated that MPM can bring more detailed complementary information on tissue architecture through observing transverse and longitudinal sections of tissues, which are the important pathological information when the pathologists diagnose the gastrointestinal lesions. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide real-time pathological diagnosis for gastric cancer in the future. SCANNING 38:357-364, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26435529

  2. Collagen remodeling in photo-thermal damaged skin with optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-lian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-man; Yu, Lili

    2009-08-01

    Cutaneous photo-thermal damage is the common damages in clinical medicine; it is a complex and dynamic process that follows an orderly sequence of events. The sequence can be roughly divided into three distinct, yet sequentially overlapping phases-inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Characteristic structural changes associated with each phase could provide a basis for photo-thermal damage assessment with imaging technologies. Monitoring the skin tissue response during the skin after irradiated by laser and tracing the process of skin remodeling would help to understand the mechanism of photo-thermal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging were used to observe the process of the collagen remodeling in mouse dermis photo-thermal injured which after irradiated by intense pulsed light source (IPLs) in this paper. Our finding showed that the OCT and MPM techniques can image the process of collagen remodeling in mouse dermis.

  3. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  4. Spectral behavior of second harmonic signals from organic and non-organic materials in multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehmke, Tobias; Knebl, Andreas; Reiss, Stephan; Fischinger, Isaak R.; Seiler, Theo G.; Stachs, Oliver; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal nonlinear microscopy allows imaging of highly ordered biological tissue due to spectral separation of nonlinear signals. This requires certain knowledge about the spectral distribution of the different nonlinear signals. In contrast to several publications we demonstrate a factor of 122 relating the full width at half maximum of a gaussian laser pulse spectrum to the corresponding second harmonic pulse spectrum in the spatial domain by using a simple theoretical model. Experiments on monopotassium phosphate crystals (KDP-crystals) and on porcine corneal tissue support our theoretical predictions. Furthermore, no differences in spectral width were found for epi- and trans-detection of the second harmonic signal. Overall, these results may help to build an optimized multiphoton setup for spectral separation of nonlinear signals. PMID:26339527

  5. Four-dimensional multiphoton microscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Schönle, A; Glatz, M; Hell, S W

    2000-12-01

    We report on the implementation of fluorescence-lifetime imaging in multiphoton excitation microscopy that uses PC-compatible modules for time-correlated single-photon counting. Four-dimensional data stacks are produced with each pixel featuring fluorescence-decay curves that consist of as many as 4096 bins. Fluorescence lifetime(s) and their amplitude(s) are extracted by statistical methods at each pixel or in arbitrarily defined regions of interest. When employing an avalanche photodiode the width of the temporal response function is 420 ps. Although this response confines the temporal resolution to values greater than several hundreds of picoseconds, the lifetime precision is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio and can be in the range of tens of picosconds. Lifetime changes are visualized in pulsed-laser-deposited fluorescent layers as well as in cyan fluorescent proteins that transfer energy to yellow fluorescent proteins in live mammalian cells. PMID:18354639

  6. Visualization of dermal alteration in skin lesions with discoid lupus erythematosus by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. H.; Yu, H. B.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, Y. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Chen, J. X.

    2013-04-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic dermatological disease which lacks valid methods for early diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Considering the collagen and elastin disorder due to mucin deposition of DLE, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging techniques were employed to obtain high-resolution collagen and elastin images from the dermis. The content and distribution of collagen and elastin were quantified to characterize the dermal pathological status of skin lesions with DLE in comparison with normal skin. Our results showed a significant difference between skin lesions with DLE and normal skin in terms of the morphological structure of collagen and elastin in the dermis, demonstrating the possibility of MPM for noninvasively tracking the pathological process of DLE even in its early stages and evaluating the therapeutic efficacy at the molecular level.

  7. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a

  8. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  9. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-05-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  10. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed. PMID:27409702

  11. Combining large area fluorescence with multiphoton microscopy for improved detection of oral epithelial neoplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) show promise for revealing indicators of neoplasia representing the complex microstructural organization of mucosa, potentially providing high specificity for detection of neoplasia, but is limited by small imaging area. Large area fluorescence methods on the other hand show high sensitivity appropriate for screening but are hampered by low specificity. In this study, we apply MPAM-SHGM following guidance from large area fluorescence, by either autofluorescence or a targeted metabolic fluorophore, as a potentially clinically viable approach for detection of oral neoplasia. Sites of high neoplastic potentially were identified by large area red/green autofluorescence or by a fluorescently labelled deoxy-glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to highlight areas of high glucose uptake across the buccal pouch of a hamster model for OSCC. Follow-up MPAM-SHGM was conducted on regions of interests (ROIs) to assess whether microscopy would reveal microscopic features associated with neoplasia to confirm or exclude large area fluorescence findings. Parameters for analysis included cytologic metrics, 3D epithelial connective tissue interface metrics (MPAM-SHGM) and intensity of fluorescence (widefield). Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histology and graded by a pathologist. A small sample of human ex vivo tissues were also imaged. A generalized linear model combining image metrics from large area fluorescence and volumetric MPAM-SHGM indicated the ability to delineate normal and inflammation from neoplasia.

  12. Label-free in vivo imaging of Drosophila melanogaster by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiao-Ying; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most valuable organisms in genetic and developmental biology studies. Drosophila is a small organism with a short life cycle, and is inexpensive and easy to maintain. The entire genome of Drosophila has recently been sequenced (cite the reference). These advantages make fruit fly an attractive model organism for biomedical researches. Unlike humans, Drosophila can be subjected to genetic manipulation with relative ease. Originally, Drosophila was mostly used in classical genetics studies. In the model era of molecular biology, the fruit fly has become a model organ for developmental biology researches. In the past, numerous molecularly modified mutants with well defined genetic defects affecting different aspects of the developmental processes have been identified and studied. However, traditionally, the developmental defects of the mutant flies are mostly examined in isolated fixed tissues which preclude the observation of the dynamic interaction of the different cell types and the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the ability to image different organelles of the fruit fly without extrinsic labeling is invaluable for Drosophila biology. In this work, we successfully acquire in vivo images of both developing muscles and axons of motor neurons in the three larval stages by using the minimially invasive imaging modality of multiphoton (SHG) microscopy. We found that while SHG imaging is useful in revealing the muscular architecture of the developing larva, it is the autofluorescence signal that allows label-free imaging of various organelles to be achieved. Our results demonstrate that multiphoton imaging is a powerful technique for investigation the development of Drosophila.

  13. Tunable fibre-coupled multiphoton microscopy with a negative curvature fibre.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Ben; Yu, Fei; Stone, Jim; Warren, Sean; Paterson, Carl; Neil, Mark A A; French, Paul M W; Knight, Jonathan; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Negative curvature fibre (NCF) guides light in its core by inhibiting the coupling of core and cladding modes. In this work, an NCF was designed and fabricated to transmit ultrashort optical pulses for multiphoton microscopy with low group velocity dispersion (GVD) at 800 nm. Its attenuation was measured to be <0.3 dB m(-1) over the range 600-850 nm and the GVD was -180 ± 70 fs(2)  m(-1) at 800 nm. Using an average fibre output power of ∼20 mW and pulse repetition rate of 80 MHz, the NCF enabled pulses with a duration of <200 fs to be transmitted through a length of 1.5 m of fibre over a tuning range of 180 nm without the need for dispersion compensation. In a 4 m fibre, temporal and spectral pulse widths were maintained to within 10% of low power values up to the maximum fibre output power achievable with the laser system used of 278 mW at 700 nm, 808 mW at 800 nm and 420 mW at 860 nm. When coupled to a multiphoton microscope, it enabled imaging of ex vivo tissue using excitation wavelengths from 740 nm to 860 nm without any need for adjustments to the set-up. PMID:26989868

  14. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  15. Multiphoton microscopy for skin wound healing study in terms of cellular metabolism and collagen regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Okano, Kazunori; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed to study normal skin wound healing in live rats noninvasively. Wound healing is a process involving series of biochemical events. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic activity during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), respectively. In eukaryotic cells ATP is the molecule that holds the energy for cellular functioning. Whereas NADH is an electron donor in the metabolic pathways, required to generate ATP. Fluorescence lifetime of NADH free to protein bound ratio was evaluated to determine the relative metabolic activity. The FLIM data were acquired by a TCSPC system using SPCM software and analyzed by SPCImage software. Additionally, polarization resolved SHG signals were also collected to observe the changes in optical birefringence and hence the anisotropy of regenerated collagens from rat wound biopsy samples. Mat lab programming was used to process the data to construct the anisotropy images. Results indicated that, cells involved in healing had higher metabolic activity during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually and become equivalent to normal skin upon healing completes. A net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase and net regeneration starting from day 5 were observed in terms of SHG signal intensity change. Polarization resolved SHG imaging of the wound biopsy sample indicates higher value of anisotropy in proliferative phase, from day 4th to 8th, of wound formation; however the anisotropy decreases upon healing.

  16. Comparing in vivo pump-probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jesse W; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y; Warren, Warren S

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump-probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump-probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump-probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100 μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents. PMID:25415567

  17. Simultaneous multiple-excitation multiphoton microscopy yields increased imaging sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers many advantages over conventional wide-field and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for imaging biological samples such as 3D resolution of excitation, reduced phototoxicity, and deeper tissue imaging. However, adapting MPM for critical multi-color measurements presents a challenge because of the largely overlapping two-photon absorption (TPA) peaks of common biological fluorophores. Currently, most multi-color MPM relies on the absorbance at one intermediate wavelength of multiple dyes, which introduces problems such as decreased and unequal excitation efficiency across the set of dyes. Results Here we describe an MPM system incorporating two, independently controlled sources of two-photon excitation whose wavelengths are adjusted to maximally excite one dye while minimally exciting the other. We report increased signal-to-noise ratios and decreased false positive emission bleed-through using this novel multiple-excitation MPM (ME-MPM) compared to conventional single-excitation MPM (SE-MPM) in a variety of multi-color imaging applications. Conclusions Similar to the tremendous gain in popularity of CLSM after the introduction of multi-color imaging, we anticipate that the ME-MPM system will further increase the popularity of MPM. In addition, ME-MPM provides an excellent tool to more rapidly design and optimize pairs of fluorescence probes for multi-color two-photon imaging, such as CFP/YFP or GFP/DsRed for CLSM. PMID:21366923

  18. Monitoring chemically enhanced transdermal delivery of zinc oxide nanoparticles by using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Wu, Chung-Long; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are commonly used in sunscreens to reduce the risk of skin cancer by blocking ultraviolet radiation. ZnO NPs absorption through the transdermal route may not cause high health risk as inhalation or ingestion. However, in practical usage of sunscreens and cosmetics, ZnO NPs are topically applied to a large area of skin with long periods hence the potential absorption amount of ZnO NPs is still need to be concerned. Therefore, if the ZnO NPs are able the pass the barrier of normal skin, the pathways of transdermal delivery and the factors of enhancements become important issues. In this work, multiphoton microscopy provides us a non-invasive visualization of ZnO NPs in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively analyzed the enhancement of oleic acid and ethanol. Due to the fact that photoluminance of ZnO NPs spectrally overlaps autofluorence from skin stratum corneum (SC) and high turbidity of both ZnO NPs and SC, it is difficult to resolve the distribution of ZnO NPs in skin by using fluorescence microscopy. In this work, the second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from ZnO NPs which double the frequency of excitation source to characterize the delivery pathways and penetration depth in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively compare the ZnO NPs delivery efficiency in normal skin and in skins with three chemically enhancing conditions: ethanol, oleic acid and the combination of ethanol and oleic acid.

  19. Comparing in vivo pump-probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S.; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump-probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump-probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump-probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100 μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents.

  20. Comparing in vivo pump–probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S.; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump–probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump–probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump–probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100  μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents. PMID:25415567

  1. Multiphoton microscopy for imaging infectious keratitis: demonstration of the pattern of microbial spread in an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging and monitoring the disease progress of infectious keratitis in an experimental model, and to investigate the possible correlation of tissue architecture with spreading patterns of pathogens in an experimental model. Porcine eyes are to be obtained from slaughter house and processed and placed in organ culture system. Fungal infections by common pathogens of infectious keratitis are to be induced in porcine cornea buttons. Multiphoton fluorescence and SHG microscopy will be used for imaging and for monitoring the progression and extension of tissue destruction and possibly the pattern of pathogen spreading. We found that SHG imaging is useful in identifying alterations to collagen architecture while autofluorescence microscopy can be used to visualize the fungi and cells within the stroma. In summary, multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy can non-invasively demonstrate and monitor tissue destruction associated with infectious keratitis. The pattern of pathogen spreading and its correlation with the tissue architecture can also be shown, which can be useful for future studies of the tissue-microbial interactions for infectious keratitis.

  2. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in

  3. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea. PMID:27138688

  4. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea. PMID:27138688

  5. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-05-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea.

  6. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  7. Multi-photon microscopy of tobacco-exposed organotypic skin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Belinda; Yamazaki, Alissa; Sun, Chung Ho; Wang, Zifu; Pham, Nguyen; Oldham, Michael; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2006-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most preventable cause of death in the United States. Researchers have extensively studied smoking in regards to its association with cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. In contrast, the impact of cigarette smoking on skin has received much less attention. To provide a better understanding of the effect of cigarette smoking on the human dermal layer, this study used multi-photon microscopy (MPM) to examine collagen in organotypic skin models exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Adult and neonatal organotypic tissue-engineered artificial skin models (RAFTs) were constructed and exposed to varying concentrations of CSC. Imaging of the RAFTs was performed using MPM and second-harmonic generation signals (SHG), which allowed for collagen structure to be viewed and analyzed as well as for collagen density to be assessed from derived depth-dependent decay (DDD) values. RAFT contraction as related to exposure concentration was monitored as well. Results indicated a dose dependent between contraction rates and CSC concentration. Collagen structure showed more preservation of its original structure at a greater depth in RAFTs with higher concentrations of CSC. No clear trends could be drawn from analysis of derived DDD values.

  8. Approach to quantify human dermal skin aging using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Extracellular skin structures in human skin are impaired during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Assessment of these dermal changes is conducted by subjective clinical evaluation and histological and molecular analysis. We aimed to develop a new parameter for the noninvasive quantitative determination of dermal skin alterations utilizing the high-resolution three-dimensional multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) technique. To quantify structural differences between chronically sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, the respective collagen-specific second harmonic generation and the elastin-specific autofluorescence signals were recorded in young and elderly volunteers using the MPLSM technique. After image processing, the elastin-to-collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. Results show that the ELCOR parameter of volar forearm skin significantly increases with age. For elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area is significantly augmented compared to the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on the MPLSM technology, we introduce the ELCOR parameter as a new means to quantify accurately age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix.

  9. Cornea characterization using a combined multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography system

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tom; Tang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    We present a multimodal imaging system which combines multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to visualize the morphological structures, and to quantify the refractive index (RI) and thickness of cornea. The morphological similarities and differences at different corneal layers across various species are identified. In the piscine and human corneas, the stromata exhibit thin fibers that indicate an overall collagen direction. Human corneas display collagen micro-folds which cause increased light attenuation. In the murine, porcine and bovine corneas, the stromata show interwoven collagen patterns. The Bowman’s layer and the Descemet’s membrane are also distinguished in some species. The RI and thicknesses are quantified for the epithelium and the stromal layers respectively, where the epithelium is found to have slightly higher RI than the stroma. The average epithelial and stromal RI are, respectively, 1.371 ± 0.016 and 1.360 ± 0.008 for the murine corneas; 1.502 ± 0.057 and 1.335 ± 0.011 for the piscine corneas; 1.433 ± 0.023 and 1.357 ± 0.013 for the human corneas; 1.476 ± 0.091 and 1.343 ± 0.013 for the porcine corneas; and 1.400 ± 0.007 and 1.376 ± 0.003 for the bovine corneas. The multimodal system can potentially provide a comprehensive characterization of the cornea. PMID:24877011

  10. Wide-field medium-repetition-rate multiphoton microscopy reduces photodamage of living cells.

    PubMed

    Macias-Romero, C; Zubkovs, V; Wang, S; Roke, S

    2016-04-01

    Demands of higher spatial and temporal resolutions in linear and nonlinear imaging keep pushing the limits of optical microscopy. We showed recently that a multiphoton microscope with 200 kHz repetition rate and wide-field illumination has a 2-3 orders of magnitude improved throughput compared to a high repetition rate confocal scanning microscope. Here, we examine the photodamage mechanisms and thresholds in live cell imaging for both systems. We first analyze theoretically the temperature increase in an aqueous solution resulting from illuminating with different repetition rates (keeping the deposited energy and irradiated volume constant). The analysis is complemented with photobleaching experiments of a phenolsulfonphthalein (phenol red) solution. Combining medium repetition rates and wide-field illumination promotes thermal diffusivity, which leads to lower photodamage and allows for higher peak intensities. A three day proliferation assay is also performed on living cells to confirm these results: dwell times can be increased by a factor of 3×10(6) while still preserving cell proliferation. By comparing the proliferation data with the endogenous two-photon fluorescence decay, we propose to use the percentage of the remaining endogenous two-photon fluorescence after exposure as a simple in-situ viability test. These findings enable the possibility of long-term imaging and reduced photodamage. PMID:27446668

  11. Structural analysis of articular cartilage using multiphoton microscopy: input for biomechanical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lilledahl, Magnus B; Pierce, David M; Ricken, Tim; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Davies, Catharina de Lange

    2011-09-01

    The 3-D morphology of chicken articular cartilage was quantified using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) for use in continuum-mechanical modeling. To motivate this morphological study we propose aspects of a new, 3-D finite strain constitutive model for articular cartilage focusing on the essential load-bearing morphology: an inhomogeneous, poro-(visco)elastic solid matrix reinforced by an anisotropic, (visco)elastic dispersed fiber fabric which is saturated by an incompressible fluid residing in strain-dependent pores. Samples of fresh chicken cartilage were sectioned in three orthogonal planes and imaged using MPM, specifically imaging the collagen fibers using second harmonic generation. Employing image analysis techniques based on Fourier analysis, we derived the principal directionality and dispersion of the collagen fiber fabric in the superficial layer. In the middle layer, objective thresholding techniques were used to extract the volume fraction occupied by extracellular collagen matrix. In conjunction with information available in the literature, or additional experimental testing, we show how this data can be used to derive a 3-D map of the initial solid volume fraction and Darcy permeability. PMID:21478075

  12. Wide-field medium-repetition-rate multiphoton microscopy reduces photodamage of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Romero, C.; Zubkovs, V.; Wang, S.; Roke, S.

    2016-01-01

    Demands of higher spatial and temporal resolutions in linear and nonlinear imaging keep pushing the limits of optical microscopy. We showed recently that a multiphoton microscope with 200 kHz repetition rate and wide-field illumination has a 2–3 orders of magnitude improved throughput compared to a high repetition rate confocal scanning microscope. Here, we examine the photodamage mechanisms and thresholds in live cell imaging for both systems. We first analyze theoretically the temperature increase in an aqueous solution resulting from illuminating with different repetition rates (keeping the deposited energy and irradiated volume constant). The analysis is complemented with photobleaching experiments of a phenolsulfonphthalein (phenol red) solution. Combining medium repetition rates and wide-field illumination promotes thermal diffusivity, which leads to lower photodamage and allows for higher peak intensities. A three day proliferation assay is also performed on living cells to confirm these results: dwell times can be increased by a factor of 3×106 while still preserving cell proliferation. By comparing the proliferation data with the endogenous two-photon fluorescence decay, we propose to use the percentage of the remaining endogenous two-photon fluorescence after exposure as a simple in-situ viability test. These findings enable the possibility of long-term imaging and reduced photodamage.

  13. Label-free identification of the hippocampus and surrounding structures by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, Liwei; Du, Huiping; Wang, Xingfu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is one of the essential neuroanatomical substrates and plays an important role in different neurological illnesses. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on intrinsic nonlinear optical processes two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was applied to label-freely detect the entire hippocampus and surrounding structures in high-magnification imaging, as well as acquire large-scale MPM images at subcellular resolution. It was found that MPM has the capability to identify cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus (DG), alveus, and fimbria of the entire hippocampus, choroid plexus in lateral ventricles, and white matter tracts. MPM also can be used to quantitatively describe the differences of the cellular nucleus in the cornu ammonis and the DG, further identify the morphological features of hippocampal subfields. In addition, the surrounding structures of the hippocampus including the lateral ventricles and white matter serve as useful information to determine the position of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that with the development of the clinical feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, MPM has the potential for in vivo intraoperative identification and monitoring of hippocampus-related lesions without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  14. Digital Deconvolution Filter Derived from Linear Discriminant Analysis and Application for Multiphoton Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A digital filter derived from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is developed for recovering impulse responses in photon counting from a high speed photodetector (rise time of ∼1 ns) and applied to remove ringing distortions from impedance mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Training of the digital filter was achieved by defining temporally coincident and noncoincident transients and identifying the projection within filter-space that best separated the two classes. Once trained, data analysis by digital filtering can be performed quickly. Assessment of the reliability of the approach was performed through comparisons of simulated voltage transients, in which the ground truth results were known a priori. The LDA filter was also found to recover deconvolved impulses for single photon counting from highly distorted ringing waveforms from an impedance mismatched photomultiplier tube. The LDA filter was successful in removing these ringing distortions from two-photon excited fluorescence micrographs and through data simulations was found to extend the dynamic range of photon counting by approximately 3 orders of magnitude through minimization of detector paralysis. PMID:24559143

  15. Feasibility of multiphoton microscopy-based quantification of antibiotic uptake into neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adnan; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S; Prow, Tarl W

    2013-07-01

    Antibiotic levels in livestock are usually evaluated through destructive analysis. Taking advantage of the fluorescent properties of marbofloxacin (MBX) and trovafloxacin (TVX), multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was evaluated as a minimally invasive and nondestructive method to determine the penetration of TVX and MBX into sheep neutrophils. Standard curves were measured with drug-only solutions and suggested that MBX was more suited for this type of analysis. The intracellular concentration of both TVX and MBX was higher than the extracellular concentration after incubating neutrophils for 30 min at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100  μg/ml for both the drugs. The intracellular concentration of TVX increased with the extracellular concentration but was always greater than the extracellular concentration, suggesting active internalization. On the other hand, intracellular/extracellular ratio (I/E) peaked at 1.6-fold I/E for 1  μg/ml and then gradually decreased with increased concentration to 1.2-fold I/E at 100  μg/ml. For the first time, this study showed the use of MPM to quantify antibiotic uptake by sheep neutrophils and observed that both antibiotics were taken up by sheep neutrophils beyond extracellular levels. PMID:23824355

  16. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods.

    PubMed

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-12-18

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal excised skin, including applications of fluctuation correlation spectroscopy on transdermal penetration of liposomes are presented and discussed. The data from the different studies reported reveal the intrinsic heterogeneity of skin and also prove these strategies to be powerful noninvasive tools to explore structural and dynamical aspects of the tissue. PMID:23608611

  17. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  18. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  19. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  20. In Vivo Multiphoton Microscopy for Investigating Biomechanical Properties of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing; Graf, Benedikt W.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of living cells depend on their molecular building blocks, and are important for maintaining structure and function in cells, the extracellular matrix, and tissues. These biomechanical properties and forces also shape and modify the cellular and extracellular structures under stress. While many studies have investigated the biomechanics of single cells or small populations of cells in culture, or the properties of organs and tissues, few studies have investigated the biomechanics of complex cell populations in vivo. With the use of advanced multiphoton microscopy to visualize in vivo cell populations in human skin, the biomechanical properties are investigated in a depth-dependent manner in the stratum corneum and epidermis using quasi-static mechanical deformations. A 2D elastic registration algorithm was used to analyze the images before and after deformation to determine displacements in different skin layers. In this feasibility study, the images and results from one human subject demonstrate the potential of the technique for revealing differences in elastic properties between the stratum corneum and the rest of the epidermis. This interrogational imaging methodology has the potential to enable a wide range of investigations for understanding how the biomechanical properties of in vivo cell populations influence function in health and disease. PMID:22468160

  1. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear–cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections. PMID:25216027

  2. Imaging Mitochondrial Organization in Living Primate Oocytes and Embryos using Multiphoton Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squirrell, J. M.; Schramm, R. D.; Paprocki, A. M.; Wokosin, D. L.; Bavister, B. D.

    2003-06-01

    We employed multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) to image changes in mitochondrial distribution in living rhesus monkey embryos. This method of imaging does not impair development; thus, the same specimen can be visualized multiple times at various developmental stages. Not only does this increase the amount of information that can be gathered on a single specimen but it permits the correlation of early events with subsequent development in the same specimen. Here we demonstrate the utility of MPLSM for determining changes in mitochondrial organization at various developmental stages and show that rhesus zygotes possess a distinct accumulation of mitochondria between the pronuclei prior to syngamy. We present evidence that suggests that this pronuclear accumulation may be positively correlated with development to the blastocyst stage—in the same embryo—thereby illustrating how MPLSM can be used to correlate cellular dynamics of primate oocytes and early embryos with their developmental potential. Understanding the relationship between mitochondrial distribution and the subsequent development of mammalian embryos, particularly primates, will increase our ability to improve embryo culture technologies, including those used for human assisted reproduction.

  3. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  4. Studies of new two-photon fluorescent probes suitable for multiphoton microscopy in biological settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, Pnina; Shapiro, Lev; Klug, Jacob T.; Skorka, Jacqueline; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    Multi-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM) requires efficient two-photon absorbing fluorescent (TPF) probes. In particular, probes exhibiting bio-functionality are very attractive for MPLSM studies of biological samples. We have synthesized and studied a new class of TPF probes capable of caging metal ions, such as Ca+2 and Na+, which play an important role in neuronal mechanisms. The TPF probes are based on a tetraketo derivative with a symmetric Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-A-D) structure. The donor is an azacrown moiety, which also serves as a metal ion-caging unit. We studied the linear and the non-linear spectroscopic properties of these TPF probes as a function of conjugation length and the size of the crown ring. We find that this new class of TPF probes possesses very large two-photon excitation cross-section coefficients (~1000GM) at near IR wavelengths as well as affinity to metal ions. In the presence of changing sodium ion concentration the dye spectra reveals four distinguishable forms and the TPF efficiency changes strongly. We therefore conclude that the dye can perform as a sensitive metal ion TPF probe.

  5. Digital deconvolution filter derived from linear discriminant analysis and application for multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shane Z; Schmitt, Paul D; Muir, Ryan D; DeWalt, Emma L; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-04-01

    A digital filter derived from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is developed for recovering impulse responses in photon counting from a high speed photodetector (rise time of ~1 ns) and applied to remove ringing distortions from impedance mismatch in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Training of the digital filter was achieved by defining temporally coincident and noncoincident transients and identifying the projection within filter-space that best separated the two classes. Once trained, data analysis by digital filtering can be performed quickly. Assessment of the reliability of the approach was performed through comparisons of simulated voltage transients, in which the ground truth results were known a priori. The LDA filter was also found to recover deconvolved impulses for single photon counting from highly distorted ringing waveforms from an impedance mismatched photomultiplier tube. The LDA filter was successful in removing these ringing distortions from two-photon excited fluorescence micrographs and through data simulations was found to extend the dynamic range of photon counting by approximately 3 orders of magnitude through minimization of detector paralysis. PMID:24559143

  6. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Kim, Daekeun; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-08-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice.

  7. Multiphoton Microscopy Applied for Real-Time Intravital Imaging of Bacterial Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Ferdinand X.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of bacterial infections, researchers have for long addressed the molecular interactions occurring when the bacterium interacts with host target cells. In these studies, primarily based on in vitro systems, molecular details have been revealed along with increased knowledge regarding the general infection process. With the recent advancements in in vivo imaging techniques, we are now in a position to bridge a transition from classical minimalistic in vitro approaches to allow infections to be studied in its native complexity—the live organ. Techniques such as multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allow cellular-level visualization of the dynamic infection process in real time within the living host. Studies in which all interplaying factors, such as the influences of the immune, lymphatic, and vascular systems can be accounted for, are likely to provide new insights to our current understanding of the infection process. MPM imaging becomes extra powerful when combined with advanced surgical procedure, allowing studies of the illusive early hours of infection. In this chapter, our intention is to provide a general view on how to design and carry out intravital imaging of a bacterial infection. While exemplifying this using a spatiotemporally well-controlled uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection in rat kidneys, we hope to provide the reader with general considerations that can be adapted to other bacterial infections in organs other than the kidney. PMID:22341218

  8. Fringe-free, Background-free, Collinear Third Harmonic Generation FROG Measurements for Multiphoton Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, R; Spahr, E; Squier, J A; Durfee, C G; Walker, B C; Fittinghoff, D N

    2006-07-21

    Collinear pulse measurement tools useful at the full numerical aperture (NA) of multiphoton microscope objectives are a necessity for a quantitative characterization of the femtosecond pulses focused by these systems. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple new technique, for characterizing the pulse at the focus in a multiphoton microscope. This technique, a background-free, fringe-free, form of frequency-resolved optical gating, uses the third harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip. Here it is used to characterize 100 fs pulses (typical values for a multiphoton microscope) at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  9. Imaging the morphological change of tissue structure during the early phase of esophageal tumor progression using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Successful strategies for primary prevention and early detection are critically needed to control this disease. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for imaging tissue architecture and cellular morphology by two-photon excited fluorescence. In this study, we used MPM to image microstructure of human normal esophagus, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and early invasive carcinoma in order to establish the morphological features to differentiate these tissues. The diagnostic features such as the appearance of cancerous cells, the significant loss of stroma, the absence of the basement membrane were extracted to distinguish between normal and cancerous esophagus tissue. These results correlated well with the paired histological findings. With the advancement of clinically miniaturized MPM and the multi-photon probe, combining MPM with standard endoscopy will therefore allow us to make a real-time in vivo diagnosis of early esophageal cancer at the cellular level.

  10. In vivo Delivery of Fluoresceinated Dextrans to the Murine Growth Plate: Imaging of Three Vascular Routes by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia; Lenox, Michelle; Zipfel, Warren; Horton, William; Williams, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Bone elongation by endochondral ossification occurs through the differentiation cascade of chondrocytes of cartilaginous growth plates. Molecules from the systemic vasculature reach the growth plate from three different directions: epiphyseal, metaphyseal, and via a ring vessel and plexus associated with the perichondrium. This study is an analysis of the real-time dynamics of entrance of fluoresceinated tracers of different molecular weights into the growth plate from the systemic vasculature, and tests the hypothesis that molecular weight is a key variable in the determination of both the directionality and the extent of tracer movement into the growth plate. Multiphoton microscopy was used for direct in vivo imaging of the murine proximal tibial growth plate in anesthetized 4-5-week-old transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein linked to the collagen II promoter. Mice were given an intracardiac injection of either fluorescein (332.3 Da), or fluoresceinated dextrans of 3, 10, 40, 70 kDa, singly or sequentially. For each tracer, directionality and rate of arrival, together with extent of movement within the growth plate, were imaged in real time. For small molecules (up to 10 kDa) vascular access from all three directions was observed and entrance was equally permissive from the metaphyseal and the epiphyseal sides. Within our detection limit (a few per cent of vascular concentration) 40 kDa and larger dextrans did not enter. These results have implications both for understanding systemic and paracrine regulation of growth plate chondrocytic differentiation, as well as variables associated with effective drug delivery to growth plate chondrocytes. PMID:16342207

  11. Corneal imaging and refractive index measurement using a combined multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Tom; Chong, Shau Poh; Zhou, Yifeng; Moloney, Gregory; Tang, Shuo

    2013-02-01

    Refractive index (RI) is the optical property of a medium that describes its ability to bend incident light. The corneal refractive index is an especially important measurement in corneal and intraocular refractive surgery where its precise estimation is necessary to obtain accurate surgical outcomes. In this study, we calculated the corneal RI using a combined multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. MPM excites and detects nonlinear signals including two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). TPEF signals are observed from NADH in the cytoplasm, allowing MPM to image the cellular structures in the corneal epithelium and endothelium. SHG signals are observed from collagen, an abundant connective tissue found in the stroma. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) produces cross-sectional, structural images based on the interference fringes created by the reflected light from the sample and reference arms. Our system uses a single sub-10 fs Ti: sapphire laser source which is good for both MPM excitation and OCT resolution. The MPM and OCT images are coregistered when they are taken successively because their axial resolutions are similar and the system shares the laser source and the scanning unit. We can calculate the RI by measuring the optical thickness and the optical path length of the cornea from the MPM and OCT images respectively. We have imaged and calculated the RI of murine and piscine corneas. We were able to see the epithelial, stromal, and endothelial layers and compare their relative thicknesses and the organization of the stromal collagen lamellae. Our results showed that our system can provide both functional and structural information about the cornea and measure the RI of multi-layered tissues.

  12. Promising new wavelengths for multi-photon microscopy: thinking outside the Ti:Sapphire box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Greg; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Amos, William B.; McConnell, Gail

    2013-02-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) imaging is dominated by the Ti:Sapphire laser as the source for excitation. However, it is limited when considering 3PE of common fluorophores and efficient 2PE of UV dyes which require wavelengths beyond the range of the Ti:Sapphire. Two ultra-short pulsed sources are presented as alternatives: a novel optical parametric oscillator (OPO) geometry (1400-1600nm) and the sum-frequency mixing of an OPO and Yb-doped fibre laser, providing a tunable output (626-635nm). For long wavelengths, we report three-photon laser scanning microscopy (3PLSM) using a bi-directional pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with signal wavelength output at 1500 nm. This novel laser was used to overcome the high optical loss in the infrared spectral region observed in laser scanning microscopes and objective lenses that renders them otherwise difficult to use for imaging. To test our system, we performed 3PLSM auto-fluorescence imaging of live plant cells at 1500 nm, specifically Spirogyra, and compared performance with two-photon excitation (2PLSM) imaging using a femtosecond pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser at 780 nm. Analysis of cell viability based on cytoplasmic organelle streaming and structural changes of cells revealed that at similar peak powers, 2PLSM caused gross cell damage after 5 minutes but 3PLSM showed little or no interference with cell function after 15 minutes. The 1500 nm OPO was thus shown to be a practical laser source for live cell imaging. For short wavelengths, we report the use of an all-solid-state ultra-short pulsed source specifically for two-photon microscopy at wavelengths shorter than those of the conventional Ti:Sapphire laser. Our approach involved sumfrequency mixing of the output from the long-wavelength OPO described above with residual pump radiation to generate fs-pulsed output in the red spectral region. We demonstrated the performance of our ultra-short pulsed system using fluorescently labelled and autofluorescent tissue

  13. Characterization of dermal structural assembly in normal and pathological connective tissues by intrinsic signal multiphoton optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubovitsky, Julia G.; Xu, Xiaoman; Sun, Chung-ho; Andersen, Bogi; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2008-02-01

    Employing a reflectance multi-photon microscopy (MPM) technique, we developed novel method to quantitatively study the three-dimensional assembly of structural proteins within bulk of dermal ECMs. Using a structurally simplified model of skin with enzymatically dissected epidermis, we find that low resolution MPM clearly discriminates between normal and pathological dermis. High-resolution images revealed that the backscattered MPM signals are affected by the assembly of collagen fibrils and fibers within this system. Exposure of tissues to high concentrations of potentially denaturing chemicals also resulted in the reduction of SHG signals from structural proteins which coincided with the appearance of aggregated fluorescent structures.

  14. 2D simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy for fast volume imaging with improved sectioning ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiyuan; Isobe, Keisuke; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF) multiphoton microscopy offers us widefield imaging with sectioning ability. As extending the idea to 2D SSTF, people can utilize a 2D spectral disperser. In this study, we use a 2D spectral disperser via a virtually-imaged phased-array (VIPA) and a diffraction grating to fulfill the back aperture of objective lens with a spectrum matrix. This offers us an axial resolution enhanced by a factor of ~1.7 compared with conventional SSTF microscopy. Furthermore, the small free spectral range (FSR) of VIPA will reduce the temporal self-imaging effect around out-of-focus region and thus will reduce the out-of-focus multiphoton excited fluorescence (MPEF) signal of 2D SSTF microscopy. We experimentally show that inside a sample with dense MPEF, the contrast of the sectioning image is increased in our 2D SSTF microscope compared with SSTF microscope. In our microscope, we use a 1 kHz chirped amplification laser, a piezo stage and a sCMOS camera integrated with 2D SSTF to realize high speed volume imaging at a speed of 50 volumes per second as well as improved sectioning ability. Volume imaging of Brownian motions of fluorescent beads as small as 1μm has been demonstrated. Not only the lateral motion but also the axial motion could be traced.

  15. Novel techniques with multiphoton microscopy: Deep-brain imaging with microprisms, neurometabolism of epilepsy, and counterfeit paper money detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Thomas H.

    Multiphoton microscopy is a laser-scanning fluorescence imaging method with extraordinary potential. We describe three innovative multiphoton microscopy techniques across various disciplines. Traditional in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the mammalian brain has a limited penetration depth (<400 microm). We present a method of imaging 1 mm deep into mouse neocortex by using a glass microprism to relay the excitation and emission light. This technique enables simultaneous imaging of multiple cortical layers, including layer V, at an angle typical of slice preparations. At high-magnification imaging using an objective with 1-mm of coverglass correction, resolution was sufficient to resolve dendritic spines on layer V GFP neurons. Functional imaging of blood flow at various neocortical depths is also presented, allowing for quantification of red blood cell flux and velocity. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of NADH reveals information on neurometabolism. NADH, an intrinsic fluorescent molecule and ubiquitous metabolic coenzyme, has a lifetime dependent on enzymatic binding. A novel NADH FLIM algorithm is presented that produces images showing spatially distinct NADH fluorescence lifetimes in mammalian brain slices. This program provides advantages over traditional FLIM processing of multi-component lifetime data. We applied this technique to a GFP-GFAP pilocarpine mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Results indicated significant changes in the neurometabolism of astrocytes and neuropil in the cell and dendritic layers of the hippocampus when compared to control tissue. Data obtained with NADH FLIM were subsequently interpreted based on the abnormal activity reported in epileptic tissue. Genuine U.S. Federal Reserve Notes have a consistent, two-component intrinsic fluorescence lifetime. This allows for detection of counterfeit paper money because of its significant differences in fluorescence lifetime when compared to genuine paper money. We used

  16. Hindlimb heating increases vascular access of large molecules to murine tibial growth plates measured by in vivo multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Efaw, Morgan L.; Williams, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in understanding the molecular regulation of longitudinal growth have led to development of novel drug therapies for growth plate disorders. Despite progress, a major unmet challenge is delivering therapeutic agents to avascular-cartilage plates. Dense extracellular matrix and lack of penetrating blood vessels create a semipermeable “barrier,” which hinders molecular transport at the vascular-cartilage interface. To overcome this obstacle, we used a hindlimb heating model to manipulate bone circulation in 5-wk-old female mice (n = 22). Temperatures represented a physiological range of normal human knee joints. We used in vivo multiphoton microscopy to quantify temperature-enhanced delivery of large molecules into tibial growth plates. We tested the hypothesis that increasing hindlimb temperature from 22°C to 34°C increases vascular access of large systemic molecules, modeled using 10, 40, and 70 kDa dextrans that approximate sizes of physiological regulators. Vascular access was quantified by vessel diameter, velocity, and dextran leakage from subperichondrial plexus vessels and accumulation in growth plate cartilage. Growth plate entry of 10 kDa dextrans increased >150% at 34°C. Entry of 40 and 70 kDa dextrans increased <50%, suggesting a size-dependent temperature enhancement. Total dextran levels in the plexus increased at 34°C, but relative leakage out of vessels was not temperature dependent. Blood velocity and vessel diameter increased 118% and 31%, respectively, at 34°C. These results demonstrate that heat enhances vascular carrying capacity and bioavailability of large molecules around growth plates, suggesting that temperature could be a noninvasive strategy for modulating delivery of therapeutics to impaired growth plates of children. PMID:24371019

  17. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J; Gonchukov, S A; Koenig, K

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  18. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  20. Tri-modal microscopy with multiphoton and optical coherence microscopy/tomography for multi-scale and multi-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shau Poh; Lai, Tom; Zhou, Yifeng; Tang, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-scale multimodal microscopy is a very useful technique by providing multiple imaging contrasts with adjustable field of views and spatial resolutions. Here, we present a tri-modal microscope combining multiphoton microscopy (MPM), optical coherence microscopy (OCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for subsurface visualization of biological tissues. The advantages of the tri-modal system are demonstrated on various biological samples. It enables the visualization of multiple intrinsic contrasts including scattering, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation (SHG). It also enables a rapid scanning over a large tissue area and a high resolution zoom-in for cellular-level structures on regions of interest. The tri-modal microscope can be important for label-free imaging to obtain a sufficient set of parameters for reliable sample analysis. PMID:24049679

  1. High-Resolution Mosaic Imaging with Multifocal, Multiphoton Photon-Counting Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E.; Hoover, E.; Field, J.; Sheetz, K.; Amir, W.; Carriles, R.; Ding, S. Y.; Squier, J.

    2009-04-10

    High-resolution mosaic imaging is performed for the first time to our knowledge with a multifocal, multiphoton, photon-counting imaging system. We present a novel design consisting of a home-built femtosecond Yb-doped KGdWO{sub 4} laser with an optical multiplexer, which is coupled with a commercial Olympus IX-71 microscope frame. Photon counting is performed using single-element detectors and an inexpensive electronic demultiplexer and counters.

  2. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K.; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J.; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  3. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  4. In situ multiphoton microscopy for monitoring femtosecond laser eye surgery in the human cornea and sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamann, Karsten; Albert, Olivier; Giulieri, Damien; Donate, David; May, Frank; Giraud, Jean-Marie; Legeais, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-01

    We present a multiphoton imaging system mounted on a microsurgery experimental set-up using a Nd:glass femtosecond laser. The system permits to induce laser incisions in human cornea and sclera and to perform nonlinear imaging during the intervention. The laser is a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system with a regenerative amplifier delivering pulses at a wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse durations of 400 fs and a maximum energy of 60 μJ at repetition rates up to 10 kHz. The delivery system provides spot sizes down to the micron range. The samples are human corneas retracted from the transplant circuit mounted on a moveable anterior chamber system. Photons generated by non-linear processes in the cornea travel backwards through the beam delivery optics and are captured by a photomultiplier tube behind a dichroic mirror. The signal is filtered by a lock-in amplifier tuned to the laser repetition rate. Scanning the sample permits the acquisition of three-dimensional microscopic images. Above the incision threshold the set-up permits to induce laser cuts in human cornea following complex geometries. Below the threshold the laser pulses create secondary photons by the stimulation of non-linear optical processes in the samples which could be identified as being predominantly second harmonic generation (SHG). The in situ images obtained from the multi-photon module permit to control and optimise the surgical intervention. The combination of multiphoton imaging and corneal surgery necessitates only minimal modifications of the optical system of a femtosecond surgical laser system. A combined system significantly improves parameter control and permits the monitoring of the surgical procedure.

  5. Blind frequency-resolved optical-gating pulse characterization for quantitative differential multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey J; Durfee, Charles G; Squier, Jeff A

    2010-10-15

    We use a unique multifocal multiphoton microscope to directly characterize the pulse in the focal plane of a high-NA objective using second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). Because of the nature of the optical setup, femtosecond laser pulses of orthogonal polarization states are generated in the focal plane, each acquiring a different spectral dispersion. By applying an additional constraint on the phase extraction algorithm, we simultaneously extract both the gate and probe pulses from a single spectrogram with a FROG error of 0.016. PMID:20967069

  6. Multi-photon microscopy based on resonant four-wave mixing of colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masia, F.; Langbein, W.; Borri, P.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel multi-photon imaging modality based on the detection of four-wave mixing (FWM) from colloidal nanoparticles. Four-wave mixing is a third-order signal which can be excited and detected in resonance with the ground-state excitonic transition of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The coherent FWM signal is detected interferometrically to reject incoherent backgrounds for improved image contrast compared to fluorescence methods. We measure transversal and axial resolutions of 140nm and 590nm respectively, significantly beating the one-photon diffraction limit. We also demonstrate optical imaging of quantum-dot-labeled Golgi structures of HepG2 cells.

  7. Optical characters and texture maps of skin and the aging mechanism by use of multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Huang, Yudian; Xu, Xiaohui

    2012-03-01

    Cutaneous aging is a complicated biological process affecting different constituents of skin, which can be divided into two types: the chronological aging and the photo-aging. The two cutaneous aging processes often co-exist accompanying with each other. The effects are often overlapped including changes in epithelium and dermis. The degeneration of collagen is a major factor in dermal alteration with aging. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) with its high resolution imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) with its depth resolved imaging were used to study the anti-aging dermatology in vivo. It was attempted to make the optical parameter and texture feature to evaluate the process of aging skin using mathematical image processing. The links among optical parameter, spectrum and texture feature in collagen with aging process were established to uncover mechanism of aging skin.

  8. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Shuangmu E-mail: hanry-yu@nuhs.edu.sg; Yan, Jie; Kang, Yuzhan; Peng, Qiwen; and others

    2014-07-14

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  9. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jie; Kang, Yuzhan; Xu, Shuoyu; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2014-07-01

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  10. In vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Marion, Samuel L.; Rice, Photini Faith; Bentley, David L.; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia. We hope to use information regarding early tumor development to create a diagnostic test for high-risk patients. In this study we collect in vivo images using OCT, second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence from non-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-dosed and VCD-dosed mice. VCD causes follicular apoptosis (simulating menopause) and leads to tumor development. Using OCT and MPM we visualized the ovarian microstructure and were able to see differences between non-VCD-dosed and VCD-dosed animals. This leads us to believe that OCT and MPM may be useful for detecting changes due to early tumor development.

  11. Compact non-contact total emission detection for in vivo multiphoton excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Combs, C A; Smirnov, A; Glancy, B; Karamzadeh, N S; Gandjbakhche, A H; Redford, G; Kilborn, K; Knutson, J R; Balaban, R S

    2014-02-01

    We describe a compact, non-contact design for a total emission detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multiphoton imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), whereas murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under twofold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a twofold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers, enabled by greater light collection efficiency, yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multiphoton imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  12. Imaging sulfur mustard lesions in human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes by confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2002-06-01

    Topical exposure to sulfur mustard (HD), a known theat agent, produces persistent and debilitating cutaneous blisters. The blisters occur at the dermal-epidermal junction following a dose-dependent latent period of 8-24 h, however, the primary lesions causing vesication remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent images reveal that a 5-min exposure to 400 (mu) M HD disrupts molecules that are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Using keratinocyte cultures and fluorochomes conjugated to two different keratin-14 (K14) antibodies (clones CKB1 and LL002), results have shown a statistically significant (p<0.1) 1-h decrease of 29.2% in expression of the CKB1 epitope, a nearly complete loss of CKB1 expression within 2 h, and progressive cytoskeletal (K14) collapse without loss in expression of the LL002 epitope. With human epidermal tissues, multi-photon images of (alpha) 6 integrin and laminin 5 showed disruptive changes in the cell-surface organization and integrity of these adhesion molecules. At 1 H postexposure, analyses showed a statistically significant (p<0.1) decrease of 27.3% in (alpha) 6 integrin emissions, and a 32% decrease in laminin 5 volume. Multi-photon imaging indicates that molecules essential for epidermal-dermal attachment are early targets in the alkylating events leading to HD-induced vesication.

  13. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  14. Accessible Microscopy Workstation for Students and Scientists with Mobility Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duerstock, Bradley S.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated accessible microscopy workstation was designed and developed to allow persons with mobility impairments to control all aspects of light microscopy with minimal human assistance. This system, named AccessScope, is capable of performing brightfield and fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and tissue morphometry requisite for…

  15. Smart microscope: an adaptive optics learning system for aberration correction in multiphoton confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albert, O; Sherman, L; Mourou, G; Norris, T B; Vdovin, G

    2000-01-01

    Off-axis aberrations in a beam-scanning multiphoton confocal microscope are corrected with a deformable mirror. The optimal mirror shape for each pixel is determined by a genetic learning algorithm, in which the second-harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal from a reference sample is maximized. The speed of the convergence is improved by use of a Zernike polynomial basis for the deformable mirror shape. This adaptive optical correction scheme is implemented in an all-reflective system by use of extremely short (10-fs) optical pulses, and it is shown that the scanning area of an f:1 off-axis parabola can be increased by nine times with this technique. PMID:18059779

  16. In-vivo imaging of psoriatic lesions with polarization multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Prignano, Francesca; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a skin autoimmune disease characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis and dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Healthy skin (5 volunteers) and psoriatic lesions (3 patients) were visualized in vivo, with high contrast and resolution, with a Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope and a Multiphoton Microscope. Psoriatic features were identified and quantified. The effective diameter of the superficial blood vessels was measured at 35.2 ± 7.2 μm and the elongated dermal papillae had an effective diameter of 64.2 ± 22.6 μm. The methodologies developed could be employed for quantitative diagnostic purposes and furthermore serve as a monitoring method of the effect of personalized treatments. PMID:25071974

  17. In-vivo imaging of psoriatic lesions with polarization multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Prignano, Francesca; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S

    2014-07-01

    Psoriasis is a skin autoimmune disease characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis and dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Healthy skin (5 volunteers) and psoriatic lesions (3 patients) were visualized in vivo, with high contrast and resolution, with a Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope and a Multiphoton Microscope. Psoriatic features were identified and quantified. The effective diameter of the superficial blood vessels was measured at 35.2 ± 7.2 μm and the elongated dermal papillae had an effective diameter of 64.2 ± 22.6 μm. The methodologies developed could be employed for quantitative diagnostic purposes and furthermore serve as a monitoring method of the effect of personalized treatments. PMID:25071974

  18. In vivo Clonal Tracking of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Marked by Five Fluorescent Proteins using Confocal and Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Malide, Daniela; Métais, Jean-Yves; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    We developed and validated a fluorescent marking methodology for clonal tracking of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with high spatial and temporal resolution to study in vivo hematopoiesis using the murine bone marrow transplant experimental model. Genetic combinatorial marking using lentiviral vectors encoding fluorescent proteins (FPs) enabled cell fate mapping through advanced microscopy imaging. Vectors encoding five different FPs: Cerulean, EGFP, Venus, tdTomato, and mCherry were used to concurrently transduce HSPCs, creating a diverse palette of color marked cells. Imaging using confocal/two-photon hybrid microscopy enables simultaneous high resolution assessment of uniquely marked cells and their progeny in conjunction with structural components of the tissues. Volumetric analyses over large areas reveal that spectrally coded HSPC-derived cells can be detected non-invasively in various intact tissues, including the bone marrow (BM), for extensive periods of time following transplantation. Live studies combining video-rate multiphoton and confocal time-lapse imaging in 4D demonstrate the possibility of dynamic cellular and clonal tracking in a quantitative manner. PMID:25145579

  19. In vivo measurements of cutaneous melanin across spatial scales: using multiphoton microscopy and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saager, Rolf B.; Balu, Mihaela; Crosignani, Viera; Sharif, Ata; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The combined use of nonlinear optical microscopy and broadband reflectance techniques to assess melanin concentration and distribution thickness in vivo over the full range of Fitzpatrick skin types is presented. Twelve patients were measured using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS) on both dorsal forearm and volar arm, which are generally sun-exposed and non-sun-exposed areas, respectively. Both MPM and SFDS measured melanin volume fractions between ∼5% (skin type I non-sun-exposed) and 20% (skin type VI sun exposed). MPM measured epidermal (anatomical) thickness values ∼30–65  μm, while SFDS measured melanin distribution thickness based on diffuse optical path length. There was a strong correlation between melanin concentration and melanin distribution (epidermal) thickness measurements obtained using the two techniques. While SFDS does not have the ability to match the spatial resolution of MPM, this study demonstrates that melanin content as quantified using SFDS is linearly correlated with epidermal melanin as measured using MPM (R2=0.8895). SFDS melanin distribution thickness is correlated to MPM values (R2=0.8131). These techniques can be used individually and/or in combination to advance our understanding and guide therapies for pigmentation-related conditions as well as light-based treatments across a full range of skin types. PMID:26065839

  20. In vivo measurements of cutaneous melanin across spatial scales: using multiphoton microscopy and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Balu, Mihaela; Crosignani, Viera; Sharif, Ata; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-06-01

    The combined use of nonlinear optical microscopy and broadband reflectance techniques to assess melanin concentration and distribution thickness in vivo over the full range of Fitzpatrick skin types is presented. Twelve patients were measured using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS) on both dorsal forearm and volar arm, which are generally sun-exposed and non-sun-exposed areas, respectively. Both MPM and SFDS measured melanin volume fractions between ˜5% (skin type I non-sun-exposed) and 20% (skin type VI sun exposed). MPM measured epidermal (anatomical) thickness values ˜30-65 μm, while SFDS measured melanin distribution thickness based on diffuse optical path length. There was a strong correlation between melanin concentration and melanin distribution (epidermal) thickness measurements obtained using the two techniques. While SFDS does not have the ability to match the spatial resolution of MPM, this study demonstrates that melanin content as quantified using SFDS is linearly correlated with epidermal melanin as measured using MPM (R2=0.8895). SFDS melanin distribution thickness is correlated to MPM values (R2=0.8131). These techniques can be used individually and/or in combination to advance our understanding and guide therapies for pigmentation-related conditions as well as light-based treatments across a full range of skin types.

  1. Multi-photon microscopy with a low-cost and highly efficient Cr:LiCAF laser

    PubMed Central

    Sakadić, Sava; Demirbas, Umit; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Moore, Anna; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Boas, David A.; Sennaroglu, Alphan; Kartner, Franz X.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-photon microscopy (MPM) is a powerful tool for biomedical imaging, enabling molecular contrast and integrated structural and functional imaging on the cellular and subcellular level. However, the cost and complexity of femtosecond laser sources that are required in MPM are significant hurdles to widespread adoption of this important imaging modality. In this work, we describe femtosecond diode pumped Cr:LiCAF laser technology as a low cost alternative to femtosecond Ti:Sapphire lasers for MPM. Using single mode pump diodes which cost only $150 each, a diode pumped Cr:LiCAF laser generates ~70-fs duration, 1.8-nJ pulses at ~800 nm wavelengths, with a repetition rate of 100 MHz and average output power of 180 mW. Representative examples of MPM imaging in neuroscience, immunology, endocrinology and cancer research using Cr:LiCAF laser technology are presented. These studies demonstrate the potential of this laser source for use in a broad range of MPM applications. PMID:19065223

  2. Multiphoton microscopy study of the morphological and quantity changes of collagen and elastic fiber components in keloid disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Jiang, Xingshan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen; Lin, Bifang; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-05-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was used to study the extracellular matrix of keloid at the molecular level without tissue fixation and staining. Direct imaging of collagen and elastin was achieved by second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence, respectively. The morphology and quantity of collagen and elastin in keloid were characterized and quantitatively analyzed in comparison to normal skin. The study demonstrated that in keloid, collagen content increased in both the upper dermis and the deep dermis, while elastin mostly showed up in the deep dermis and its quantity is higher compared to normal skin. This suggests the possibility that abnormal fibroblasts synthesized an excessive amount of collagen and elastin at the beginning of keloid formation, corresponding to the observed deep dermis, while after a certain time point, the abnormal fibroblast produced mostly collagen, corresponding to the observed upper dermis. The morphology of collagen and elastin in keloid was disrupted and presented different variations. In the deep dermis, elastic fibers showed node structure, while collagen showed obviously regular gaps between adjacent bundles. In the upper dermis, collagen bundles aligned in a preferred direction, while elastin showed as sparse irregular granules. This new molecular information provided fresh insight about the development process of keloid.

  3. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues. PMID:26631592

  4. Multiphoton time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: practical application to protein–protein interactions using global analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, P.R.; Ameer-Beg, S.M.; Gilbey, J.; Carlin, L.M.; Keppler, M.; Ng, T.C.; Vojnovic, B.

    2008-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) detected via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and global analysis provide a way in which protein–protein interactions may be spatially localized and quantified within biological cells. The FRET efficiency and proportion of interacting molecules have been determined using bi-exponential fitting to time-domain FLIM data from a multiphoton time-correlated single-photon counting microscope system. The analysis has been made more robust to noise and significantly faster using global fitting, allowing higher spatial resolutions and/or lower acquisition times. Data have been simulated, as well as acquired from cell experiments, and the accuracy of a modified Levenberg–Marquardt fitting technique has been explored. Multi-image global analysis has been used to follow the epidermal growth factor-induced activation of Cdc42 in a short-image-interval time-lapse FLIM/FRET experiment. Our implementation offers practical analysis and time-resolved-image manipulation, which have been targeted towards providing fast execution, robustness to low photon counts, quantitative results and amenability to automation and batch processing.

  5. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  6. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  7. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  8. Three-Dimensional Morphology by Multiphoton Microscopy with Clearing in a Model of Cisplatin-Induced CKD.

    PubMed

    Torres, Richard; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John J; Levene, Michael J; Moeckel, Gilbert; Desir, Gary V; Safirstein, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Traditional histologic methods are limited in their ability to detect pathologic changes of CKD, of which cisplatin therapy is an important cause. In addition, poor reproducibility of available methods has limited analysis of the role of fibrosis in CKD. Highly labor-intensive serial sectioning studies have demonstrated that three-dimensional perspective can reveal useful morphologic information on cisplatin-induced CKD. By applying the new technique of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) with clearing to a new mouse model of cisplatin-induced CKD, we obtained detailed morphologic and collagen reconstructions of millimeter-thick renal sections that provided new insights into pathophysiology. Quantitative analysis revealed that a major long-term cisplatin effect is reduction in the number of cuboidal cells of the glomerular capsule, a change we term the "uncapped glomerulus lesion." Glomerulotubular disconnection was confirmed, but connection remnants between damaged tubules and atubular glomeruli were observed. Reductions in normal glomerular capsules corresponded to reductions in GFR. Mild increases in collagen were noted, but the fibrosis was not spatially correlated with atubular glomeruli. Glomerular volume and number remained unaltered with cisplatin exposure, but cortical tubulointerstitial mass decreased. In conclusion, new observations were made possible by using clearing MPM, demonstrating the utility of this technique for studies of renal disease. This technique should prove valuable for further characterizing the evolution of CKD with cisplatin therapy and of other conditions. PMID:26303068

  9. Label-free imaging of goblet cells as a marker for differentiating colonic polyps by multiphoton microscopy Label-free imaging of goblet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, S. M.; Wu, G. Z.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Xie, S. S.

    2012-06-01

    Discrimination of adenomas from hyperplastic polyps can reduce the risk of unnecessary complications and healthcare cost. However, it is challenging during colonoscopy screening, and histological analysis remains the ``gold standard'' for the final diagnosis. Here, we describe a label-free imaging method, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), to the discrimination between adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. We find that multiphoton imaging provides cellular and subcellular details to the identification of adenomas from hyperplastic polyps. In particular, there is significant difference in the population density of goblet cells among normal colon, hyperplastic polyp, and adenoma, providing substantial potential to become a quantitative intrinsic marker for in vivo clinical diagnosis of early colonic lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the potential of MPM for differentiation of colonic polyps.

  10. Photo-induced processes in collagen-hypericin system revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, V; Guo, H W; Hovhannisyan, A; Ghukasyan, V; Buryakina, T; Chen, Y F; Dong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the main structural protein and the key determinant of mechanical and functional properties of tissues and organs. Proper balance between synthesis and degradation of collagen molecules is critical for maintaining normal physiological functions. In addition, collagen influences tumor development and drug delivery, which makes it a potential cancer therapy target. Using second harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we show that the natural pigment hypericin induces photosensitized destruction of collagen-based tissues. We demonstrate that hypericin-mediated processes in collagen fibers are irreversible and may be used for the treatment of cancer and collagen-related disorders. PMID:24877000

  11. Non-rigid registration of multiphoton microscopy images using B-splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical microscopy poses many challenges for digital image analysis. One particular challenge includes correction of image artifacts due to respiratory motion from specimens imaged in vivo. We describe a non-rigid registration method using B-splines to correct these motion artifacts. Current attempts at non-rigid medical image registration have typically involved only a single pair of images. Extending these techniques to an entire series of images, possibly comprising hundreds of images, is presented in this paper. Our method involves creating a uniform grid of control points across each image in a stack. Each control point is manipulated by optimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to determine image similarity, and a term to evaluate deformation grid smoothness. This process is repeated for all images in the stack. Analysis is evaluated using block motion estimation and other visualization techniques.

  12. Simultaneous optical coherence and multiphoton microscopy of skin-equivalent tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tang, Shuo; Lim, Ryan; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2007-07-01

    Three-layer skin-equivalent models (rafts) were created consisting of a collagen/fibroblast layer and an air-exposed keratinocyte layer. Rafts were imaged with a tri-modality microscope including optical coherence (OC), two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation (SHG) channels. Some rafts were stained with Hoechst 33343 or rhodamine 123, and some were exposed to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). OC microscopy revealed signal in cell cytoplasm and nuclear membranes, and a characteristic texture in the collagen/fibroblast layer. TPEF showed signal in cell cytoplasm and from collagen, and stained specimens revealed cell nuclei or mitochondria. There was little SHG in the keratinocyte layer, but strong signal from collagen bundles. Endogenous signals were severely attenuated in DMSO treated rafts; stained samples revealed shrunken and distorted cell structure. OC, TPEF, and SHG can provide complementary and non-destructive information about raft structure and effect of chemical agents.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy: an efficient tool for in-situ study of cultural heritage artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël.; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-05-01

    We present multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopies. Three-dimensional (3D) non-contact laser-scanning imaging with micrometer resolution is performed without any preparation of the objects under study. 2PEF signals are emitted by a wide range of fluorophores such as pigments and binder, which can be discriminated thanks to their different emission spectral bands by using suitable spectral filters in the detection channel. SHG signals are specific for dense non-centrosymmetric organizations such as the crystalline cellulose within the wood cell walls. We also show that plaster particles exhibit SHG signals. These particles are bassanite crystals with a non-centrosymmetric crystalline structure, while the other types of calcium sulphates exhibit a centrosymmetric crystalline structure with no SHG signal. In our study, we first characterize model single-layered samples: wood, gelatin-based films containing plaster or cochineal lake and sandarac film containing cochineal lake. We then study multilayered coating systems on wood and show that multimodal nonlinear microscopy successfully reveals the 3D distribution of all components within the stratified sample. We also show that the fine structure of the wood can be assessed, even through a thick multilayered varnish coating. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as an efficient non-destructive and contactless 3D imaging technique for in situ investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  14. Examination of diagnostic features in multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography images of ovarian tumorigenesis in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease owing to the non-specific symptoms and suspected rapid progression, leading to frequent late stage detection and poor prognosis. Medical imaging methods such as CT, MRI and ultrasound as well as serum testing for cancer markers have had extremely poor performance for early disease detection. Due to the poor performance of available screening methods, and the impracticality and ineffectiveness of taking tissue biopsies from the ovary, women at high risk for developing ovarian cancer are often advised to undergo prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. This surgery results in many side effects and is most often unnecessary since only a fraction of high risk women go on to develop ovarian cancer. Better understanding of the early development of ovarian cancer and characterization of morphological changes associated with early disease could lead to the development of an effective screening test for women at high risk. Optical imaging methods including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are excellent tools for studying disease progression owing to the high resolution and depth sectioning capabilities. Further, these techniques are excellent for optical biopsy because they can image in situ non-destructively. In the studies described in this dissertation OCT and MPM are used to identify cellular and tissue morphological changes associated with early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. This work is organized into three specific aims. The first aim is to use the images from the MPM phenomenon of second harmonic generation to quantitatively examine the morphological differences in collagen structure in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The second aim is to examine the differences in endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The third and final aim is to identify changes in ovarian microstructure resulting from early

  15. Quantifying local heterogeneity of in vivo transport dynamics using stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy and segmented spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Y.; Jureller, Justin E.; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Philipson, Louis H.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2008-02-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of insulin granule trafficking in pancreatic β-cells is a critical step in understanding Type II Diabetes and abnormal insulin secretion. In this paper, rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy (SS-MMM) was developed to capture fast insulin granule dynamics in vivo. Stochastic scanning of (a diffractive optic generated) 10×10 hexagonal array of foci with a galvanometer yields a uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. In addition, segmented spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (Segmented STICS) was developed to extract dynamics of insulin granules from the image sequences. Measurements we conducted on MIN6 cells, which exhibit an order of magnitude lower granule number density, allow comparison of particle tracking with Segmented-STICS. Segmentation of the images into 8×8 pixel segments (similar to a size of one granule) allows some amount of spatial averaging, which can reduce the computation time required to calculate the correlation function, yet retains information about the local spatial heterogeneity of transport. This allows the correlation analysis to quantify the dynamics within each of the segments producing a "map" of the localized properties of the cell. The results obtained from Segmented STICS are compared with dynamics determined from particle tracking analysis of the same images. The resulting range of diffusion coefficients of insulin granules are comparable to previously published values indicating that SS-MMM and segmented- STICS will be useful to address the imaging challenges presented by β-cells, particularly the extremely large number density of granules.

  16. Technical parameters of vertical in vivo multiphoton microscopy: a critical evaluation of the flyscanning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekalla, C.; Schönborn, K. H.; Markworth, S.; Ulrich, M.; Göppner, D.; Gollnick, H.; Röwert-Huber, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; Meinke, M. C.

    2015-08-01

    The optical biopsy could be a quick and painless support or alternative to a punch biopsy. In this letter the first in vivo vertical wide field two photon microscopy (2PM) images of healthy volunteers are shown. The 2PM images are fused images of two photon excited auto fluorescence (AF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals given as false-color images of 200 μm  ×  7 mm in size. By using these two nonlinear effects, the epidermis can be easily distinguished from the dermis at a glance. The auto fluorescence provides cellular resolution of the epidermal cells, and elastin fibers are partly visible in the dermis. Collagen, visible by SHG signal, is the dominant structure in the dermis. As contact agent water was evaluated to increase the AF signal, especially in the deeper layers of epidermis and dermis. For further improvement any terminal hairs should be removed by shaving and by taking tape strips of the first five layers of the stratum corneum. The first images illustrated that young skin compared to aged skin shows remarkably different dermal elastin and collagen signals in the dermis.

  17. Real-time histology in liver disease using multiphoton microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Mohammed, Yousuf H.; Thomas, James A.; Bridle, Kim R.; Thorling, Camilla A.; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Xu, Zhi Ping; Liu, Xin; Crawford, Darrell H. G.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional histology with light microscopy is essential in the diagnosis of most liver diseases. Recently, a concept of real-time histology with optical biopsy has been advocated. In this study, live mice livers (normal, with fibrosis, steatosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and ischemia-reperfusion injury) were imaged by MPM-FLIM for stain-free real-time histology. The acquired MPM-FLIM images were compared with conventional histological images. MPM-FLIM imaged subsurface cellular and subcellular histopathological hallmarks of live liver in mice models at high resolution. Additional information such as distribution of stellate cell associated autofluorescence and fluorescence lifetime changes was also gathered by MPM-FLIM simultaneously, which cannot be obtained from conventional histology. MPM-FLIM could simultaneously image and quantify the cellular morphology and microenvironment of live livers without conventional biopsy or fluorescent dyes. We anticipate that in the near future MPM-FLIM will be evaluated from bench to bedside, leading to real-time histology and dynamic monitoring of human liver diseases. PMID:25798303

  18. Dendritic upconverting nanoparticles enable in vivo multiphoton microscopy with low-power continuous wave sources

    PubMed Central

    Esipova, Tatiana V.; Ye, Xingchen; Collins, Joshua E.; Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2012-01-01

    We report a group of optical imaging probes, comprising upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles (UCNPs) and polyanionic dendrimers. Dendrimers with rigid cores and multiple carboxylate groups at the periphery are able to tightly bind to surfaces of UCNPs pretreated with NOBF4, yielding stable, water-soluble, biocompatible nanomaterials. Unlike conventional linear polymers, dendrimers adhere to UCNPs by donating only a fraction of their peripheral groups to the UCNP–surface interactions. The remaining termini make up an interface between the nanoparticle and the aqueous phase, enhancing solubility and offering multiple possibilities for subsequent modification. Using optical probes as dendrimer cores makes it possible to couple the UCNPs signal to analyte-sensitive detection via UCNP-to-chromophore excitation energy transfer (EET). As an example, we demonstrate that UCNPs modified with porphyrin–dendrimers can operate as upconverting ratiometric pH nanosensors. Dendritic UCNPs possess excellent photostability, solubility, and biocompatibility, which make them directly suitable for in vivo imaging. Polyglutamic dendritic UCNPs injected in the blood of a mouse allowed mapping of the cortical vasculature down to 400 μm under the tissue surface, thus demonstrating feasibility of in vivo high-resolution two-photon microscopy with continuous wave (CW) excitation sources. Dendrimerization as a method of solubilization of UCNPs opens up numerous possibilities for use of these unique agents in biological imaging and sensing. PMID:23213211

  19. A direct method for measuring mouse capillary cortical blood volume using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vérant, Pascale; Serduc, Raphaël; Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Rémy, Chantal; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2007-05-01

    Knowledge of the blood volume per unit volume of brain tissue is important for understanding brain function in health and disease. We describe a direct method using two-photon laser scanning microscopy to obtain in vivo the local capillary blood volume in the cortex of anesthetized mouse. We infused fluorescent dyes in the circulating blood and imaged the blood vessels, including the capillaries, to a depth of 600 microm below the dura at the brain surface. Capillary cortical blood volume (CCBV) was calculated without any form recognition and segmentation, by normalizing the total fluorescence measured at each depth and integrating the collected intensities all over the stack. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical simulations were performed to validate this method which was weakly sensitive to background noise. Then, CCBV had been estimated on seven healthy mice between 2%+/-0.3% and 2.4%+/-0.4%. We showed that this measure of CCBV is reproductible and that this method is highly sensitive to the explored zones in the cortex (vessel density and size). This method, which dispenses with form recognition, is rapid and would allow to study in vivo temporal and highly resolute spatial variations of CCBV under different conditions or stimulations. PMID:17063147

  20. New two-photon fluorescent probe for multiphoton microscopy in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, P.; Becker, J. Y.; Sigalov, M.; Shapiro, Lev; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2003-07-01

    An important ingredient in improving Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy, MPLSM, is the development of efficient two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probes. We previously reported on a new class of TPF probes, specifically designed in order to maximize their efficiency in potential MPLSM applications. The fluorophores are based on a tetraketo derivative (TK) with a symmetric structure Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-A-D). Those fluorophores have the following properties: a) Very large two-photon absorption coefficients (δ ~ 1000GM); b) Two-photon excitation (TPE) peak wavelength strongly shifted to the red (λ ~ 1μm) c) High fluorescence quantum efficiency; d) Large Stokes shifts of the fluorescence bands. We extended our work to a new fluorophore from this class that is more suitable for biological settings. This new fluorophore has a structure of crown-TK-crown that incorporates the ability to trap metal ions such as calcium. The TPE wavelength dependence of the TK-crown derivative is very similar to its analogous linear derivative with enhancement in the value of the cross-section, due to the stronger donor moieties. The TPE cross-section for the TK-crown derivative was about δ = 950 GM at λmax = 980 nm.

  1. New long-wave and highly efficient two-photon fluorophores for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, P.; Becker, J. Y.; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2001-04-01

    An important ingredient in improving Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy, MPLSM, is the development of efficient exogenous two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probes. Here we report on a new class of two-photon fluorophores, specifically designed in order to maximize their efficiency in potential MPLSM applications. The fluorophores possess a symmetric Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-n-A-n-D) structure with varying conjugation length and have strong donors and acceptors. We have studied the two-photon excitation (TPE) properties of these fluorophores and found the following properties: (1) Very large two-photon absorption coefficients (6 > 1000 GM); (2) Peak TP excitation wavelength which are strongly shifted to the red ((lambda) 1 micrometer); (3) Large fluorescence quantum efficiency; (4) Large Stokes shifts of the fluorescence bands. These properties make them particularly suitable for imaging thicker samples, relying on the large improvement in TPE cross-sections and the reduced attenuation at both the excitation and emission wavelengths. We also describe TPE fluorescence anisotropy experiments revealing the tensorial shape of the fluorophores.

  2. Functional cardiac imaging by random access microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Crocini, Claudia; Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Pavone, Francesco S.; Sacconi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the development of voltage sensitive dyes and Ca2+ sensors in combination with innovative microscopy techniques allowed researchers to perform functional measurements with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. At the moment, one of the shortcomings of available technologies is their incapability of imaging multiple fast phenomena while controlling the biological determinants involved. In the near future, ultrafast deflectors can be used to rapidly scan laser beams across the sample, performing optical measurements of action potential and Ca2+ release from multiple sites within cardiac cells and tissues. The same scanning modality could also be used to control local Ca2+ release and membrane electrical activity by activation of caged compounds and light-gated ion channels. With this approach, local Ca2+ or voltage perturbations could be induced, simulating arrhythmogenic events, and their impact on physiological cell activity could be explored. The development of this optical methodology will provide fundamental insights in cardiac disease, boosting new therapeutic strategies, and, more generally, it will represent a new approach for the investigation of the physiology of excitable cells. PMID:25368580

  3. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-01-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  4. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-05-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  5. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiphoton laser scanning micrsocopy holds promise as a tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stage development. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  6. Quantitative structural markers of colorectal dysplasia in a cross sectional study of ex vivo murine tissue using label-free multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Lai, Keith K.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon excitation of label-free tissue is of increasing interest, as advances have been made in endoscopic clinical application of multiphoton microscopy, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) scanning endoscopy used to monitor cervical collagen in mice1. We used C57BL mice as a model to investigate the progression of gastrointestinal structures, specifically glandular area and circularity. We used multiphoton microscopy to image ex-vivo label-free murine colon, focusing on the collagen structure changes over time, in mice ranging from 10 to 20 weeks of age. Series of images were acquired within the colonic and intestinal tissue at depth intervals of 20 microns from muscularis to the epithelium, up to a maximum depth of 180 microns. The imaging system comprised a two-photon laser tuned to 800nm wavelength excitation, and the SHG emission was filtered with a 400/40 bandpass filter before reaching the photomultiplier tube. Images were acquired at 15 frames per second, for 200 to 300 cumulative frames, with a field of view of 261um by 261um, and 40mW at sample. Image series were compared to histopathology H&E slides taken from adjacent locations. Quantitative metrics for determining differences between murine glandular structures were applied, specifically glandular area and circularity.

  7. Quantitative structural markers of colorectal dysplasia in a cross sectional study of ex vivo murine tissue using label-free multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Lai, Keith K.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon excitation of label-free tissue is of increasing interest, as advances have been made in endoscopic clinical application of multiphoton microscopy, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) scanning endoscopy used to monitor cervical collagen in mice1. We used C57BL mice as a model to investigate the progression of gastrointestinal structures, specifically glandular area and circularity. We used multiphoton microscopy to image ex-vivo label-free murine colon, focusing on the collagen structure changes over time, in mice ranging from 10 to 20 weeks of age. Series of images were acquired within the colonic and intestinal tissue at depth intervals of 20 microns from muscularis to the epithelium, up to a maximum depth of 180 microns. The imaging system comprised a two-photon laser tuned to 800nm wavelength excitation, and the SHG emission was filtered with a 400/40 bandpass filter before reaching the photomultiplier tube. Images were acquired at 15 frames per second, for 200 to 300 cumulative frames, with a field of view of 261um by 261um, and 40mW at sample. Image series were compared to histopathology H&E slides taken from adjacent locations. Quantitative metrics for determining differences between murine glandular structures were applied, specifically glandular area and circularity. PMID:27134336

  8. Low cost laser system generating 26-fs pulse duration, 30-kW peak power, and tunability from 800 to 1200 nm for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan; Brunner, Felix; Rohrbacher, Andreas; Ammann, Hubert; Weingarten, Kurt J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel low-cost, low-noise, tunable, high-peak-power, ultrafast laser system based on a SESAMmodelocked, solid-state Yb tungstate laser plus spectral broadening via a microstructured fiber followed by pulse compression. The spectral selection, tuning, and pulse compression are performed with a simple prism compressor. The spectral broadening and fiber parameters are chosen to insure low-noise and short pulse operation of the tunable output. The long-term stable output pulses are tunable from 800 to 1200 nm, with a peak power up to 30 kW and pulse duration down to 26 fs. We demonstrate the generation of an output beam with 30 fs pulsewidth and multiple colors in infrared. In particular, we compressed selected spectral slices centered at 960 and 1100 nm suitable for imaging with green fluorescent protein and red dyes. Such a multicolor, 30 fs laser is ideally suited for simultaneous multispectral multiphoton imaging. This system is attractive for variety of applications including multiphoton (TPE, SHG, THG, CARS) and multimodal microscopy, nanosurgery, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Such system is simpler, lower-cost, and much easier to use (fully turn-key) compared to a currently available solutions for near-infrared ultrashort pulses, typically a Ti:sapphire laser-pumped OPO.

  9. Evolution of the three-dimensional collagen structure in vascular walls during deformation: an in situ mechanical testing under multiphoton microscopy observation.

    PubMed

    Nierenberger, Mathieu; Fargier, Guillaume; Ahzi, Saïd; Rémond, Yves

    2015-08-01

    The collagen fibers' three-dimensional architecture has a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of biological tissues. To accurately model this behavior, it is necessary to get some knowledge about the structure of the collagen network. In the present paper, we focus on the in situ characterization of the collagenous structure, which is present in porcine jugular vein walls. An observation of the vessel wall is first proposed in an unloaded configuration. The vein is then put into a mechanical tensile testing device. As the vein is stretched, three-dimensional images of its collagenous structure are acquired using multiphoton microscopy. Orientation analyses are provided for the multiple images recorded during the mechanical test. From these analyses, the reorientation of the two families of collagen fibers existing in the vein wall is quantified. We noticed that the reorientation of the fibers stops as the tissue stiffness starts decreasing, corresponding to the onset of damage. Besides, no relevant evolutions of the out of plane collagen orientations were observed. Due to the applied loading, our analysis also allowed for linking the stress relaxation within the tissue to its internal collagenous structure. Finally, this analysis constitutes the first mechanical test performed under a multiphoton microscope with a continuous three-dimensional observation of the tissue structure all along the test. It allows for a quantitative evaluation of microstructural parameters combined with a measure of the global mechanical behavior. Such data are useful for the development of structural mechanical models for living tissues. PMID:25358413

  10. Low noise laser system generating 26-fs pulse duration, 30-kW peak power, and tunability from 800- to 1200-nm for ultrafast spectroscopy and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan; Brunner, Felix; Rohrbacher, Andreas; Ammann, Hubert; Weingarten, Kurt J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel low noise, tunable, high-peak-power, ultrafast laser system based on a SESAM-modelocked, solid-state Yb tungstate laser plus spectral broadening via a microstructured fiber followed by pulse compression. The spectral selection, tuning, and pulse compression are performed with a simple prism compressor. The spectral broadening and fiber parameters are chosen to insure low-noise operation of the tunable output. The long-term stable output pulses are tunable from 800 to 1200 nm, with a peak power up to 30 kW and pulse duration down to 26 fs. This system is attractive for variety of applications including ultrafast spectroscopy, multiphoton (TPE, SHG, THG, CARS) and multimodal microscopy, nanosurgery, nanostructuring, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Such system is simpler, lower-cost, and much easier to use (fully turn-key) compared to a currently available solutions for near-infrared ultrashort pulses, typically a Ti:sapphire laser-pumped OPO.

  11. Flexible digital signal processing architecture for narrowband and spread-spectrum lock-in detection in multiphoton microscopy and time-resolved spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Park, Jong Kang; Warren, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The lock-in amplifier is a critical component in many different types of experiments, because of its ability to reduce spurious or environmental noise components by restricting detection to a single frequency and phase. One example application is pump-probe microscopy, a multiphoton technique that leverages excited-state dynamics for imaging contrast. With this application in mind, we present here the design and implementation of a high-speed lock-in amplifier on the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) coprocessor of a data acquisition board. The most important advantage is the inherent ability to filter signals based on more complex modulation patterns. As an example, we use the flexibility of the FPGA approach to enable a novel pump-probe detection scheme based on spread-spectrum communications techniques. PMID:25832238

  12. Label-free and depth resolved optical sectioning of iron-complex deposits in sickle cell disease splenic tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil, Genevieve D.; Adami, Alexander J.; Ahmed, Tahsin; Khan, Aamir; Chapman, Sarah; Andemariam, Biree; Thrall, Roger S.; Howard, Scott S.

    2015-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) is performed on humanized sickle cell disease (SCD) mouse model splenic tissue. Distinct morphological and spectral features associated with SCD are identified and discussed in terms of diagnostic relevance. Specifically, spectrally unique splenic iron-complex deposits are identified by MPM; this finding is supported by TPEF spectroscopy and object size to standard histopathological methods. Further, iron deposits are found at higher concentrations in diseased tissue than in healthy tissue by all imaging methods employed here including MPM, and therefore, may provide a useful biomarker related to the disease state. These newly characterized biomarkers allow for further investigations of SCD in live animals as a means to gain insight into the mechanisms impacting immune dysregulation and organ malfunction, which are currently not well understood.

  13. Flexible digital signal processing architecture for narrowband and spread-spectrum lock-in detection in multiphoton microscopy and time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Park, Jong Kang; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2015-03-01

    The lock-in amplifier is a critical component in many different types of experiments, because of its ability to reduce spurious or environmental noise components by restricting detection to a single frequency and phase. One example application is pump-probe microscopy, a multiphoton technique that leverages excited-state dynamics for imaging contrast. With this application in mind, we present here the design and implementation of a high-speed lock-in amplifier on the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) coprocessor of a data acquisition board. The most important advantage is the inherent ability to filter signals based on more complex modulation patterns. As an example, we use the flexibility of the FPGA approach to enable a novel pump-probe detection scheme based on spread-spectrum communications techniques.

  14. Flexible digital signal processing architecture for narrowband and spread-spectrum lock-in detection in multiphoton microscopy and time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jesse W; Park, Jong Kang; Warren, Warren S; Fischer, Martin C

    2015-03-01

    The lock-in amplifier is a critical component in many different types of experiments, because of its ability to reduce spurious or environmental noise components by restricting detection to a single frequency and phase. One example application is pump-probe microscopy, a multiphoton technique that leverages excited-state dynamics for imaging contrast. With this application in mind, we present here the design and implementation of a high-speed lock-in amplifier on the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) coprocessor of a data acquisition board. The most important advantage is the inherent ability to filter signals based on more complex modulation patterns. As an example, we use the flexibility of the FPGA approach to enable a novel pump-probe detection scheme based on spread-spectrum communications techniques. PMID:25832238

  15. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  16. MULTIPHOTON PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-05

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on MULTIPHOTON PROCESSES was held at Tilton School, Tilton, NH. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Deep insights: intravital imaging with two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-09-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy is widely used to assess the structure and function of organs in live animals. Although different tissues vary in their accessibility for intravital multiphoton imaging, considerable progress has been made in the imaging quality of all tissues due to substantial technical improvements in the relevant imaging components, such as optics, excitation laser, detectors, and signal analysis software. In this review, we provide an overview of the technical background of intravital multiphoton microscopy. Then, we note a few seminal findings that were made through the use of multiphoton microscopy. Finally, we address the technical limitations of the method and provide an outlook for how these limitations may be overcome through future technical developments. PMID:27352273

  18. Carcinogenic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid is induced by near-infrared laser pulses in multiphoton microscopy via combination of two- and three-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Thomas, Giju; Van Voskuilen, Johan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging modalities (multiphoton excited fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation) applied in vivo are increasingly promising for clinical diagnostics and the monitoring of cancer and other disorders, as they can probe tissue with high diffraction-limited resolution at near-infrared (IR) wavelengths. However, high peak intensity of femtosecond laser pulses required for two-photon processes causes formation of cyclobutane-pyrimidine-dimers (CPDs) in cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) similar to damage from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light. Inaccurate repair of subsequent mutations increases the risk of carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigate CPD damage that results in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro from imaging them with two-photon excited autofluorescence. The CPD levels are quantified by immunofluorescent staining. We further evaluate the extent of CPD damage with respect to varied wavelength, pulse width at focal plane, and pixel dwell time as compared with more pronounced damage from UV sources. While CPD damage has been expected to result from three-photon absorption, our results reveal that CPDs are induced by competing two- and three-photon absorption processes, where the former accesses UVA absorption band. This finding is independently confirmed by nonlinear dependencies of damage on laser power, wavelength, and pulse width.

  19. Integrated coherent Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy for label-free imaging of the dentin in the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Hsu, Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    We report the implementation of a unique multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF)) platform for label-free imaging of dentin. A picosecond tunable laser together with an OPO is used as the excitation source for simultaneously multimodal imaging. CARS shows similar information as TPEF in dentin, but it has a higher sectioning performance than TPEF and thus it is a good alternative for TPEF. Microtubule structure is revealed nearby dentin enamel junction (DEJ) from the multimodal images. This work demonstrates that combining different nonlinear optical imaging modalities can provide new insights into the understanding of morphological structures and biochemical/biomolecular distributions of the dentine without the need of labeling.

  20. In-vitro visualization of corneal wound healing in an organ culture model using multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Chang, Yuh-Ling; Sun, Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work is to image the wound healing process of cornea in an in vitro organ culture model with noninvasive multiphoton imaging modality. Autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) were respectively used to monitor the alterations of cellular and collagenous components during wound healing processes. Within additional developments, this approach may be applied to in vivo visualization of corneal structural destruction and the subsequent regeneration.

  1. Random access three-dimensional two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Balázs; Katona, Gergely; Vizi, E Sylvester; Várallyay, Zoltán; Sághy, Attila; Valenta, Lásló; Maák, Pál; Fekete, Júlia; Bányász, Akos; Szipocs, Róbert

    2007-04-01

    We propose a two-photon microscope scheme capable of real-time, three-dimensional investigation of the electric activity pattern of neural networks or signal summation rules of individual neurons in a 0.6 mm x 0.6 mm x 0.2 mm volume of the sample. The points of measurement are chosen according to a conventional scanning two-photon image, and they are addressed by separately adjustable optical fibers. This allows scanning at kilohertz repetition rates of as many as 100 data points. Submicrometer spatial resolution is maintained during the measurement similarly to conventional two-photon microscopy. PMID:17356631

  2. Mitigating Phototoxicity during Multiphoton Microscopy of Live Drosophila Embryos in the 1.0–1.2 µm Wavelength Range

    PubMed Central

    Débarre, Delphine; Olivier, Nicolas; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced toxicity is a fundamental bottleneck in microscopic imaging of live embryos. In this article, after a review of photodamage mechanisms in cells and tissues, we assess photo-perturbation under illumination conditions relevant for point-scanning multiphoton imaging of live Drosophila embryos. We use third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging of developmental processes in embryos excited by pulsed near-infrared light in the 1.0–1.2 µm range. We study the influence of imaging rate, wavelength, and pulse duration on the short-term and long-term perturbation of development and define criteria for safe imaging. We show that under illumination conditions typical for multiphoton imaging, photodamage in this system arises through 2- and/or 3-photon absorption processes and in a cumulative manner. Based on this analysis, we derive general guidelines for improving the signal-to-damage ratio in two-photon (2PEF/SHG) or THG imaging by adjusting the pulse duration and/or the imaging rate. Finally, we report label-free time-lapse 3D THG imaging of gastrulating Drosophila embryos with sampling appropriate for the visualisation of morphogenetic movements in wild-type and mutant embryos, and long-term multiharmonic (THG-SHG) imaging of development until hatching. PMID:25111506

  3. Three-dimensional microscopy of the tumor microenvironment in vivo using optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vakoc, Benjamin J; Lanning, Ryan M; Tyrrell, James A; Padera, Timothy P; Bartlett, Lisa A; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Munn, Lance L; Tearney, Guillermo J; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bouma, Brett E

    2009-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided powerful mechanistic insights into health and disease, and has become a common instrument in the modern biological laboratory. The requisite high numerical aperture and exogenous contrast agents that enable multiphoton microscopy, however, limit ability to investigate substantial tissue volumes or to probe dynamic changes repeatedly over prolonged periods. Here, we introduce optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) as an intravital microscopy that circumvents the technical limitations of multiphoton microscopy and, as a result, provides unprecedented access to previously unexplored, critically important aspects of tissue biology. Using novel OFDI-based approaches and entirely intrinsic mechanisms of contrast, we present rapid and repeated measurements of tumor angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, tissue viability and both vascular and cellular responses to therapy, thereby demonstrating the potential of OFDI to facilitate the exploration of physiological and pathological processes and the evaluation of treatment strategies. PMID:19749772

  4. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  5. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  6. Label-free assessment of adipose-derived stem cell differentiation using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouras, Rabah; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Downes, Andrew R.; Elfick, Alistair P. D.

    2012-11-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) hold great potential as likely candidates for disease therapy but also as sources of differentiated human cells in vitro models of disease. In both cases, the label-free assessment of SC differentiation state is highly desirable, either as a quality-control technology ensuring cells to be used clinically are of the desired lineage or to facilitate in vitro time-course studies of cell differentiation. We investigate the potential of nonlinear optical microscopy as a minimally invasive technology to monitor the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) into adipocytes and osteoblasts. The induction of ADSCs toward these two different cell lineages was monitored simultaneously using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation at different time points. Changes in the cell's morphology, together with the appearance of biochemical markers of cell maturity were observed, such as lipid droplet accumulation for adipo-induced cells and the formation of extra-cellular matrix for osteo-induced cells. In addition, TPEF of flavoproteins was identified as a proxy for changes in cell metabolism that occurred throughout ADSC differentiation toward both osteoblasts and adipocytes. These results indicate that multimodal microscopy has significant potential as an enabling technology for the label-free investigation of SC differentiation.

  7. Visualization of in vivo thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin in laser-induced vascular endothelial injury model using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Koike, Yuhki; Matsushita, Kohei; Okigami, Masato; Toiyama, Yuji; Kawamura, Mikio; Saigusa, Susumu; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Enoxaparin is used postoperatively for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. In vitro studies and clinical trials have demonstrated the anticoagulant and antithrombotic efficacy of enoxaparin. In this study, we visualised thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin in a laser-induced thrombus formation model in vivo using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM). Thrombus was induced by the selective irradiation of vascular endothelium in arterioles of the cecum of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. The thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin was visualised in vivo real-time using TPLSM. Platelet adhesion, aggregation, and platelet-dependent thrombus formation were observed in the laser-induced thrombus formation model with reproducibility. Laser-induced thrombus formation was significantly inhibited by enoxaparin pretreatment as the thromboprophylactic agent, as compared with control. The mean thrombus volumes were 652 microcubic meters in mice pretreated with enoxaparin and 8906 microcubic meter in control mice. Enoxaparin reduced the volume of laser-induced thrombus when using it as a thrombolytic agent. The mean rate of reduction was 59 percent. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis model, thromboprophylactic efficacy of enoxaparin was also observed in vivo in real-time. In vivo thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin can be visualised at the single platelet level in the laser-induced endothelium injury model using TPLSM. PMID:25755830

  8. Clinical multiphoton endoscopy with FLIM capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton endoscopy can be applied for intra-corporeal imaging as well as to examine otherwise hard-to-access tissue areas like chronic wounds. Using high-NA (NA = 0.8) gradient-index (GRIN) lens-based endoscopes with a diameter of 1.4 mm and effective lengths of 7 mm and 20 mm, respectively, two-photon excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) is used for multimodal in vivo imaging of human skin. A further imaging modality is fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) which allows functional imaging to investigate the healing mechanism of chronic wounds and the corresponding cell metabolism. We performed first in vivo measurements using FLIM endoscopy with the medically-certified multiphoton tomograph MPTflex® in combination with a computer-controlled motorized scan head and a GRIN-lens endoscope.

  9. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  10. Water-Soluble Quantum Dots for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Daniel R.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Clark, Stephen W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Wise, Frank W.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-05-01

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales.

  11. Water-soluble quantum dots for multiphoton fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larson, Daniel R; Zipfel, Warren R; Williams, Rebecca M; Clark, Stephen W; Bruchez, Marcel P; Wise, Frank W; Webb, Watt W

    2003-05-30

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales. PMID:12775841

  12. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions. PMID:26567131

  13. Optical clearing and multiphoton imaging of paraffin-embedded specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2013-02-01

    New labeling, imaging, or analysis tools could provide new retrospective insights when applied to archived, paraffin-embedded samples. Deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy of paraffin-embedded specimens is achieved using optical clearing with mineral oil. We tested a variety of murine tissue specimens including skin, lung, spleen, kidney, and heart, acquiring multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation, and pump-probe images This technique introduces the capability for non-destructive 3-dimensional microscopic imaging of existing archived pathology specimens, enabling retrospective studies.

  14. Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, Z.; Sun, Y.; Naughton, M. J.; LaFratta, C. N.; Baldacchini, T.; Fourkas, J. T.; Stewart, J.; Saleh, B. E. A.; Teich, M. C.

    2005-02-01

    We have used multiphoton absorption polymerization to fabricate a series of microscale polymer cantilevers. Atomic force microscopy has been used to characterize the mechanical properties of microcantilevers with spring constants that were found to span more than four decades. From these data, we extracted a Young's modulus of E =0.44GPa for these microscale cantilevers. The wide stiffness range and relatively low elastic modulus of the microstructures make them attractive candidates for a range of microcantilever applications, including measurements on soft matter.

  15. Multiphoton imaging with high peak power VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Swift, Samuel; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Smyth, Conor J. C.; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging (MMPI) has become one of thee key non-invasive light microscopy techniques. This technique allows deep tissue imaging with high resolution and less photo-damage than conventional confocal microscopy. MPI is type of laser-scanning microscopy that employs localized nonlinear excitation, so that fluorescence is excited only with is scanned focal volume. For many years, Ti: sapphire femtosecond lasers have been the leading light sources for MPI applications. However, recent developments in laser sources and new types of fluorophores indicate that longer wavelength excitation could be a good alternative for these applications. Mode-locked VECSEELs have the potential to be low cost, compact light sources for MPI systems, with the additional advantage of broad wavelength coverage through use of different semiconductor material systems. Here, we use a femtosecond fibber laser to investigate the effect average power and repetition rate has on MPI image quality, to allow us to optimize our mode-locked VVECSELs for MPI.

  16. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  17. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  18. A novel flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph for early melanoma detection, skin analysis, testing of anti-age products, and in situ nanoparticle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution 3D microscopy based on multiphoton induced autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been introduced in 1990. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have first been launched by JenLab company with the tomography DermaInspect®. This year, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel multiphoton tomograph MPTflex, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. Improved image quality and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are achieved by a very short source-drain spacing, by larger active areas of the detectors and by single photon counting (SPC) technology. Shorter image acquisition time due to improved image quality reduces artifacts and simplifies the operation of the system. The compact folded optical design and the light-weight structure of the optical head eases the handling. Dual channel detectors enable to distinguish between intratissue elastic fibers and collagenous structures simultaneously. Through the use of piezo-driven optics a stack of optical cross-sections (optical sectioning) can be acquired and 3D imaging can be performed. The multiphoton excitation of biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin is done by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key femtosescond near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid high-quality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research.

  19. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Andersen, Peter; Le, Tuan; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become possible. PMID:26534831

  20. Calculation of multiphoton ionization processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Poe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    We propose an accurate and efficient procedure in the calculation of multiphoton ionization processes. In addition to the calculational advantage, this procedure also enables us to study the relative contributions of the resonant and nonresonant intermediate states.

  1. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  2. Multiphoton gonioscopy to image the trabecular meshwork of porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The aqueous outflow system (AOS), including the trabecular meshwork (TM), the collector channels (CC) and the Schlemm's canal (SC), regulates intraocular pressure (IOP) through the drainage of the aqueous humor (AH). Abnormal IOP elevation leads to increased pressure stress to retinal ganglion cells, resulting in cell loss that can ultimately lead to complete loss of eyesight. Therefore, development of imaging tools to detect abnormal structural and functional changes of the AOS is important in early diagnosis and prevention of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), including twophoton autofluorescence (TPAF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), is a label-free microscopic technique that allows molecular specific imaging of biological tissues like the TM. Since the TM and other AOS structures are located behind the highly scattering scleral tissue, transscleral imaging of the TM does not provide enough optical resolution. In this work, a gonioscopic lens is used to allow direct optical access of the TM through the cornea for MPM imaging. Compared to transscleral imaging, the acquired MPM images show improved resolution as individual collagen fiber bundles of the TM can be observed. MPM gonioscopy may have the potential to be developed as a future clinical imaging tool for glaucoma diagnostics.

  3. Multiphoton imaging with a nanosecond supercontinuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Blanquet, Véronique; Baraige, Fabienne; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a well-established technique for biological imaging of several kinds of targets. It is classically based on multiphoton processes allowing two means of contrast simultaneously: two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Today, the quasi exclusive laser technology used in that aim is femtosecond titanium sapphire (Ti: Sa) laser. We experimentally demonstrate that a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source (STM-250-VIS-IR-custom, Leukos, France; 1 ns, 600-2400 nm, 250 kHz, 1 W) allows to obtain the same kind of image quality in the case of both TPF and SHG, since it is properly filtered. The first set of images concerns the muscle of a mouse. It highlights the simultaneous detection of TPF and SHG. TPF is obtained thanks to the labelling of alpha-actinin with Alexa Fluor® 546 by immunochemistry. SHG is created from the non-centrosymmetric organization of myosin. As expected, discs of actin and myosin are superimposed alternatively. The resulting images are compared with those obtained from a standard femtosecond Ti: Sa source. The physical parameters of the supercontinuum are discussed. Finally, all the interest of using an ultra-broadband source is presented with images obtained in vivo on the brain of a mouse where tumor cells labeled with eGFP are grafted. Texas Red® conjugating Dextran is injected into the blood vessels network. Thus, two fluorophores having absorption wavelengths separated by 80 nm are imaged simultaneously with a single laser source.

  4. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, PAM provides absorption contrast instead of scattering contrast. Furthermore, PAM can image more molecules, endogenous or exogenous, at their absorbing wavelengths than fluorescence-based methods, such as wide-field, confocal, and multi-photon microscopy. Most importantly, PAM can simultaneously image anatomical, functional, molecular, flow dynamic and metabolic contrasts in vivo. Focusing on state-of-the-art developments in PAM, this Review discusses the key features of PAM implementations and their applications in biomedical studies. PMID:24416085

  5. Multiphoton Effects in Rutile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royce, Gerald A.

    Multiphoton effects are investigated in crystalline rutile TiO(,2) using Nd:YAG laser photons. The 1.06 micron laser is operated in Q-switched mode with intensities up to 1.4 x 10('6) watts/cm('2) on the rutile crystal. Photoconductivity measurements provide data indicating a mixture of modes for electrons to be photoionized. Assuming aluminum impurity as the contributing sites, the first order photionization cross section is found to be 1.5 x 10('-26) cm('2) and second order cross section is found to be 7.7 x 10('-51) cm('4)-s. No appreciable change in cross section is observed for circular versus linear polarization of the laser. Observations of the photo-emission of the laser illuminated crystal provide radiative relaxation times on the order of 100 nanoseconds with emission peaks at 4500 and 5000 angstroms plus a near infrared continuum out to 1 micron. The thermoluminescence of rutile shows a number of trapping levels between 0.4 and 0.8 eV below the conduction band. These are attributed to an aluminum impurity.

  6. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  7. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  8. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  9. Multiphoton FLIM: a reliable FRET detection tool in cell biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Ramanujan V.; Biener, Eva; Centonze, Victoria E.; Gertler, Arieh; Herman, Brian A.

    2004-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using multiphoton excitation is emerging as a reliable quantitative tool for measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in living cells. By virtue of being free from spectroscopic artifacts encountered in conventional FRET detection methods, multiphoton FLIM methods offer the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, faster data acquisition and data analysis. We compare the FRET results obtained by two different methods namely (i) multiphoton excitation lifetime-based FRET and (ii) single photon excitation intensity-based acceptor photobleaching FRET. Using the same biological samples, we apply these two different methods in understanding the growth hormone receptor dimerization kinetics at the cell surface of human embryonic kidney cells. We conclude that the multiphoton FLIM using the streak-camera approach provides the best ability to monitor FRET in dynamic situations where high temporal and spatial resolution are required with minimal photodamage/phototoxicity.

  10. Multiphoton microspectroscopy of biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Ping C.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, RangWu; Wang, YiMin; Chen, JianCheng; Wang, Yung-Shun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Huang, Mao-Kuo

    2000-07-01

    The non-linear nature of multi-photon fluorescence excitation restricts the fluorescing volume to the vicinity of the focal point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro- spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Chloroplasts in mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular compartments. Time-lapse spectral recording provides a means for studying the response of cell organelles to high intensity illumination.

  11. Multiphoton nanosurgery in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Anhut, Tiemo; Stracke, Frank; Le Harzic, Ronan; Koenig, Karsten

    2005-04-01

    Multiphoton Microscopy with a femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser in the near infrared (NIR) enables the user not only to image cells and tissues with a subcellular resolution but also to perform highly precise nanosurgery. Intratissue compartments, single cells and even cell organelles like mitochondria, membranes or chromosomes can be manipulated and optically knocked out. Working at transient TW/cm2 laser intensities, single cells of tumor-sphaeroids were eliminated efficiently inside the sphaeroid without damaging the neighbour cells. Also single organelles of cells inside tissues could be optically knocked out with the nanoscalpel without collateral damage. Tissue structures inside a human tooth have been ablated with sizes below 1 μm. This method may become a useful instrument for nano-manipulating and surgery in several fields of science, including targeted transfection.

  12. Accessing intermediate ferroelectric switching regimes with time-resolved transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Christopher R.; Jablonski, Michael L.; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Jambunathan, Karthik; Martin, Lane W.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2012-09-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) is one of the most widely studied magneto-electric multiferroics. The magneto-electric coupling in BiFeO3, which allows for the control of the ferroelectric and magnetic domain structures via applied electric fields, can be used to incorporate BiFeO3 into novel spintronics devices and sensors. Before BiFeO3 can be integrated into such devices, however, a better understanding of the dynamics of ferroelectric switching, particularly in the vicinity of extended defects, is needed. We use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the response of ferroelectric domains within BiFeO3 thin films to applied electric fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. This technique is well suited to imaging the observed intermediate ferroelectric switching regimes, which occur on a time- and length-scale that are too fine to study via conventional scanning-probe techniques. Additionally, the spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy allows for the direct study of the dynamics of domain nucleation and propagation in the presence of structural defects. In this article, we show how this high resolution technique captures transient ferroelectric structures forming during biasing, and how defects can both pin domains and act as a nucleation source. The observation of continuing domain coalescence over a range of times qualitatively agrees with the nucleation-limited-switching model proposed by Tagantsev et al. We demonstrate that our in situ transmission electron microscopy technique is well-suited to studying the dynamics of ferroelectric domains in BiFeO3 and other ferroelectric materials. These biasing experiments provide a real-time view of the complex dynamics of domain switching and complement scanning-probe techniques.

  13. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  14. Accessibility of gonococcal and meningococcal surface antigens: immunogold labeling for quantitative electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, M; Teppema, J S; Beuvery, E C; Abdillahi, H; Poolman, J T; Verkleij, A J

    1989-01-01

    The parallel application of two electron microscopic immunogold labeling procedures was used to assess the surface exposure and accessibility of gonococcal and meningococcal surface antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were used as markers for the surface antigens, i.e., outer membrane proteins and lipooligosaccharides. To evaluate the labeling densities obtained after incubation of whole bacteria in suspension or ultrathin cryosections of bacteria, a method of electron microscopic quantitation was developed. Incubation of whole bacterial suspensions with monoclonal antibodies and protein A-gold resulted in specific labeling of the bacterial surfaces. However, the labeling densities varied largely in each cell. By contrast, cryosections showed uniform heavy labeling densities at the surface of the outer membranes of all cells. Apparently, by sectioning the cells the antigen-masking barrier could be evaded, and steric hindrance was no longer restrictive. Thus, a better estimate of both the presence and the surface exposure, i.e., the accessibility of antigens, could be made. Such information is essential for us to better understand host-bacterial interactions and to develop new vaccines. Images PMID:2492264

  15. Analysis of the metabolic deterioration of ex vivo skin from ischemic necrosis through the imaging of intracellular NAD(P)H by multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Washington Y.; Prow, Tarl W.; Sanchez, Washington H.; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo human skin has been used extensively for cosmeceutical and drug delivery studies, transplantable skin allografts, or skin flaps. However, it has a half-life of a few days due to ischemic necrosis. Traditional methods of assessing viability can be time-consuming and provide limited metabolic information. Using multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) we assess ischemic necrosis of ex vivo skin by NAD(P)H autofluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime. Ex vivo skin is stored in the presence and absence of nutrient media (Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium) at -20, 4, and 37 °C and room temperature over a 7-day time course to establish different rates of metabolic deterioration. At higher temperatures we observe a decrease in NAD(P)H autofluorescence, higher image noise, and a significant increase in the average fluorescence lifetime (τm) from ~1000 to 2000 ps. Additionally, significant distortions in NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime histograms correspond to the reduction in autofluorescence. Skin kept at 4 °C, with or without media, showed the least change. Our findings suggest that MPT-FLIM enables useful noninvasive optical biopsies to monitor the metabolic state and deterioration of human skin for research and clinical purposes.

  16. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/accessibility.html MedlinePlus Accessibility To use the sharing features on this page, ... Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs ...

  17. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  18. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  19. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T C; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  20. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  1. Multiphoton gradient index endoscopy for evaluation of diseased human prostatic tissue ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huland, David M.; Jain, Manu; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Robinson, Brian D.; Harya, Diana S.; Shevchuk, Maria M.; Singhal, Paras; Xu, Chris; Tewari, Ashutosh K.

    2014-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy can instantly visualize cellular details in unstained tissues. Multiphoton probes with clinical potential have been developed. This study evaluates the suitability of multiphoton gradient index (GRIN) endoscopy as a diagnostic tool for prostatic tissue. A portable and compact multiphoton endoscope based on a 1-mm diameter, 8-cm length GRIN lens system probe was used. Fresh ex vivo samples were obtained from 14 radical prostatectomy patients and benign and malignant areas were imaged and correlated with subsequent H&E sections. Multiphoton GRIN endoscopy images of unfixed and unprocessed prostate tissue at a subcellular resolution are presented. We note several differences and identifying features of benign versus low-grade versus high-grade tumors and are able to identify periprostatic tissues such as adipocytes, periprostatic nerves, and blood vessels. Multiphoton GRIN endoscopy can be used to identify both benign and malignant lesions in ex vivo human prostate tissue and may be a valuable diagnostic tool for real-time visualization of suspicious areas of the prostate.

  2. Heuristically optimal path scanning for high-speed multiphoton circuit imaging.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Alexander J; Kruskal, Peter B; Kimmel, Joseph M; Ostmeyer, Jared; Neubauer, Florian B; MacLean, Jason N

    2011-09-01

    Population dynamics of patterned neuronal firing are fundamental to information processing in the brain. Multiphoton microscopy in combination with calcium indicator dyes allows circuit dynamics to be imaged with single-neuron resolution. However, the temporal resolution of fluorescent measures is constrained by the imaging frequency imposed by standard raster scanning techniques. As a result, traditional raster scans limit the ability to detect the relative timing of action potentials in the imaged neuronal population. To maximize the speed of fluorescence measures from large populations of neurons using a standard multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) setup, we have developed heuristically optimal path scanning (HOPS). HOPS optimizes the laser travel path length, and thus the temporal resolution of neuronal fluorescent measures, using standard galvanometer scan mirrors. Minimizing the scan path alone is insufficient for prolonged high-speed imaging of neuronal populations. Path stability and the signal-to-noise ratio become increasingly important factors as scan rates increase. HOPS addresses this by characterizing the scan mirror galvanometers to achieve prolonged path stability. In addition, the neuronal dwell time is optimized to sharpen the detection of action potentials while maximizing scan rate. The combination of shortest path calculation and minimization of mirror positioning time allows us to optically monitor a population of neurons in a field of view at high rates with single-spike resolution, ∼ 125 Hz for 50 neurons and ∼ 8.5 Hz for 1,000 neurons. Our approach introduces an accessible method for rapid imaging of large neuronal populations using traditional MPLSMs, facilitating new insights into neuronal circuit dynamics. PMID:21715667

  3. In vivo multiphoton imaging of human skin: assessment of topical corticosteroid-induced epidermis atrophy and depigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait El Madani, Hassan; Tancrède-Bohin, Emmanuelle; Bensussan, Armand; Colonna, Anne; Dupuy, Alain; Bagot, Martine; Pena, Ana-Maria

    2012-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising tool for noninvasive skin imaging. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy to detect topical corticosteroids side effects within the epidermis and to provide new insights into their dynamics. Healthy volunteers were topically treated with clobetasol propionate on a small region of their forearms under overnight occlusion for three weeks. The treated region of each patient was investigated at D0, D7, D15, D22 (end of the treatment), and D60. Our study shows that multiphoton microscopy allows for the detection of corticoid-induced epidermis modifications: thinning of stratum corneum compactum and epidermis, decrease of keratinocytes size, and changes in their morphology from D7 to D22. We also show that multiphoton microscopy enables in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative assessment of melanin content. We observe that melanin density decreases during treatment and almost completely disappears at D22. Moreover, these alterations are reversible as they are no longer present at D60. Our study demonstrates that multiphoton microscopy is a convenient and powerful tool for noninvasive 3-D dynamical studies of skin integrity and pigmentation.

  4. Mixed-Color Multiphoton Transitions as Additional Quantum Channels for Electron Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate mixed-color electron photoemission from tungsten nanotips. In the experiment, second-harmonic photons were introduced to modify the multiphoton emission process. A twofold increase in quantum efficiency results from the opening up of an additional three-photon quantum channel. The super-additive photoelectron signal can be controlled by input power, field polarization, and pulse overlap. The results of our study provide new prospects for quantum photonics, multiphoton microscopy, and spin-polarized electron sources. We acknowledge supports from NSF, Grant Number 1306565, 1430519. NSF Grant Number 1306565, 1430519.

  5. Multiphoton adaptation of a commercial low-cost confocal microscope for live tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, James J.; Larson, Adam M.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Saggau, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The Nikon C1 confocal laser scanning microscope is a relatively inexpensive and user-friendly instrument. We describe a straightforward method to convert the C1 for multiphoton microscopy utilizing direct coupling of a femtosecond near-infrared laser into the scan head and fiber optic transmission of emission light to the three-channel detector box. Our adapted system can be rapidly switched between confocal and multiphoton mode, requires no modification to the original system, and uses only a few custom-made parts. The entire system, including scan mirrors and detector box, remain under the control of the user-friendly Nikon EZ-C1 software without modification.

  6. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  7. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin C; Wilson, Jesse W; Robles, Francisco E; Warren, Warren S

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  8. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  9. Two-photon imaging of intact living plants during freezing with a flexible multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; König, K.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the combination of a flexible multiphoton tomograph (MPTflex) with a heating and cooling stage. The stage allows temperature control in the range of (-196 °C) (77 K) to +600 °C (873 K) with selectable heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K min-1 and 150 K min-1. To illustrate the imaging capabilities of the combined system, fluorescence intensity and lifetime of intrinsic molecules from a plant leaf were imaged with submicron resolution during freezing in vivo without detaching the leaf from the plant. An increase of fluorescence intensity and decay times with decreasing temperature was observed. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging as a non-invasive online tool to investigate temperature-induced effects. The flexible multiphoton tomograph with its adjustable mechano-optical arm and scan head allows imaging at otherwise hardly accessible sample regions.

  10. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  11. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  12. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon

  13. The multiphoton AC Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, T. G.; Ficek, Z.; Freedhoff, H. S.

    1998-02-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with two intense lasers: a strong laser of Rabi frequency 2Ω on resonance with the atomic transition, and a weaker laser detuned by 2Ω/n, i.e. by a subharmonic of the Rabi frequency of the first. The second laser "dresses" the dressed states created by the first in an n-photon process. We calculate the energy levels and eigenstates of this "doubly-dressed" atom, and find a new phenomenon: the splitting of the energy levels due to an n-photon coupling between them, resulting in a multiphoton AC Stark effect. We illustrate this effect in the fluorescence spectrum, and show that the spectrum contains triplets at the subharmonic as well as harmonic resonance frequencies with a clear dependence on the order n of the resonance and the ratio α of the Rabi frequencies of the lasers

  14. Multiphoton-Excited Serotonin Photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gostkowski, Michael L.; Allen, Richard; Plenert, Matthew L.; Okerberg, Eric; Gordon, Mary Jane; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-01-01

    We report photochemical and photophysical studies of a multiphoton-excited reaction of serotonin that previously has been shown to generate a photoproduct capable of emitting broadly in the visible spectral region. The current studies demonstrate that absorption of near-infrared light by an intermediate state prepared via three-photon absorption enhances the photoproduct formation yield, with the largest action cross sections (∼10−19 cm2) observed at the short-wavelength limit of the titanium:sapphire excitation source. The intermediate state is shown to persist for at least tens of nanoseconds and likely to be different from a previously reported oxygen-sensitive intermediate. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence action spectrum for the fluorescent photoproduct was determined and found to have a maximum at ∼780 nm (3.2 eV). A general mechanism for this photochemical process is proposed. PMID:15111435

  15. In vivo multiphoton imaging of collagen remodeling after microablative fractional rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Troiano, Michela; Campolmi, Piero; Morini, Cristiano; Cosci, Alessandro; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    The potential of multiphoton microscopy in providing in-vivo early diagnosis of skin lesions has already been demonstrated, while its capability in therapy follow-up has not been deeply explored so far. Two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in combination to follow-up collagen remodeling after laser micro-ablative rejuvenation. Treated regions of volunteers were imaged with multiphoton microscopy before and after treatment, and we found a strong age-dependence of the treatment effectiveness. In particular, the photorejuvenating effect was negligible in young subjects (< 30 years), whereas a significant production of new collagen was observed in aged subjects (> 70 years). Quantification of the amount of newly produced collagen and its organization were performed by means of visual examination of two-photon images. The obtained results demonstrate the performance of laser fractional micro-ablative rejuvenation without the need of an invasive biopsy as well as the wide applicability range of applications for multiphoton microscopy in clinical dermatology.

  16. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  17. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. P.; Harkins, D. A.; Compton, R. N.; Ding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1-4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1-3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (``neutral ladder'' or the ``ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**. The excitation of highly excited UF6** is proposed to be facilitated by the well known ``giant resonance,'' whose energy level lies in the range of 12-14 eV above that of ground state UF6. The highly excited molecule then primarily dissociates, via multiple channels, into Un+, UF+x, fluorine atoms, and ``slow'' electrons, although dissociation

  18. Stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanoma imaging for dermatologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Lian, Christine; Ma, Jie; Yu, Jingyi; Gu, Zetong; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in a mouse hair and a formalin fixed mouse melanoma were compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) images and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) images, all of which were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 920 nm, to further prove the effectiveness of SMPAF in detecting melanin. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection to MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF can be a promising technology to enable melanoma imaging for dermatologists.

  19. High speed microscopy techniques for signaling detection in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, Giulia; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-05-01

    Alterations in intracellular cardiomyocyte calcium handling have a key role in initiating and sustaining arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenic calcium leak from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be attributed to all means by which calcium exits the SR store in an abnormal fashion. Abnormal SR calcium exit maymanifest as intracellular Ca2+ sparks and/or Ca2+ waves. Ca2+ signaling in arrhythmogenesis has been mainly studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and given that the extracellular matrix influences both Ca2+ and membrane potential dynamics in the intact heart and underlies environmentally mediated changes, understanding how Ca2+ and voltage are regulated in the intact heart will represent a tremendous advancement in the understanding of arrhythmogenic mechanisms. Using novel high-speed multiphoton microscopy techinques, such as multispot and random access, we investigated animal models with inherited and acquired arrhythmias to assess the role of Ca2+ and voltage signals as arrhythmia triggers in cell and subcellular components of the intact heart and correlate these with electrophysiology.

  20. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  1. Imaging the bone marrow stem cells morphogenesis in PGA scaffold by multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic (SHG) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Teng, Shu-Wen; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Lo, Wen; Sun, Yen; Lin, Tze-Yu; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The ability to image tissue engineering products without damaging histological procedures is important for the understanding of the dynamics of tissue reorganization and formation. In this work, we test the ability of multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy to image engineered tissues following chrondrogenic induction. The system we used is human bone marrow stem cells seeded in the scaffold polyglycolic acid (PGA). Our results show that autofluorescence can be used to image cells while second harmonic generation signal can be used to visualize the synthesis of extracellular matrix. This approach demonstrates the ability of multiphoton imaging in the study of tissue engineering products.

  2. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  3. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  4. Multiphoton fluorescence imaging of NADH to quantify metabolic changes in epileptic tissue in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph; Spencer, Dennis D.; Williamson, Anne; Levene, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    A powerful advantage of multiphoton microscopy is its ability to image endogenous fluorophores such as the ubiquitous coenzyme NADH in discrete cellular populations. NADH is integral in both oxidative and non-oxidative cellular metabolism. NADH loses fluorescence upon oxidation to NAD +; thus changes in NADH fluorescence can be used to monitor metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that hypo metabolic astrocytes play an important role in cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Current theories suggest this may be due to defective and/or a reduced number of mitochondria or dysfunction of the neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling. Measuring NADH fluorescence changes following chemical stimulation enables the quantification of the cellular distribution of metabolic anomalies in epileptic brain tissue compared to healthy tissue. We present what we believe to be the first multiphoton microscopy images of NADH from the human brain. We also present images of NADH fluorescence from the hippocampus of the kainate-treated rat TLE model. In some experiments, human and rat astrocytes were selectively labeled with the fluorescent dye sulforhodamine 101 (SR101). Our results demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool for assaying the metabolic pathologies associated with temporal lobe epilepsy in humans and in rodent models.

  5. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  6. Multiphoton coherent control in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Control of multiphoton transitions is demonstrated for a multilevel system by generalizing the instantaneous phase of any chirped pulse as individual terms of a Taylor series expansion. In the case of a simple two-level system, all odd terms in the series lead to population inversion while the even terms lead to self-induced transparency. The results hold for multiphoton transitions that do not have any lower-order photon resonance or any intermediate virtual state dynamics within the laser pulse width. PMID:17396157

  7. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  8. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators for multi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.; Zadoyan, R.; Baldacchini, T.; Franke, T.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years two-photon microscopy with fixed-wavelength has raised increasing interest in life-sciences: Two-photon (2P) absorption spectra of common dyes are broader than single-photon ones. Therefore, excitation of several dyes simultaneously with a single IR laser wavelength is feasible and could be seen as an advantage in 2P microscopy. We used pulsed fixed-wavelength infrared lasers with center wavelength at 1040 nm, for two-photon microscopy in a variety of biologically relevant samples, among these a mouse brain sample, a mouse artery (within the animal, acute preparation), and a preparation of mouse bladder. The 1040 nm laser proved to be efficient not only in exciting fluorescence from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and red fluorescent dyes, but also for second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from muscle tissue and collagen. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint fixedwavelength lasers can present an interesting alternative to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy.

  9. Molecule-specific darkfield and multiphoton imaging using gold nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powless, Amy J.; Jenkins, Samir V.; McKay, Mary Lee; Chen, Jingyi; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Due to their robust optical properties, biological inertness, and readily adjustable surface chemistry, gold nanostructures have been demonstrated as contrast agents in a variety of biomedical imaging applications. One application is dynamic imaging of live cells using bioconjugated gold nanoparticles to monitor molecule trafficking mechanisms within cells; for instance, the regulatory pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoing endocytosis. In this paper, we have demonstrated a method to track endocytosis of EGFR in MDA-MB-468 breast adenocarcinoma cells using bioconjugated gold nanocages (AuNCs) and multiphoton microscopy. Dynamic imaging was performed using a time series capture of 4 images every minute for one hour. Specific binding and internalization of the bioconjugated AuNCs was observed while the two control groups showed non-specific binding at fewer surface sites, leading to fewer bound AuNCs and no internalization.

  10. Watching stem cells at work with a flexible multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Hoffmann, Robert; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    There is a high demand for non-invasive imaging techniques that allow observation of stem cells in their native environment without significant input on cell metabolism, reproduction, and behavior. Easy accessible hair follicle pluripotent stem cells in the bulge area and dermal papilla are potential sources for stem cell based therapy. It has been shown that these cells are able to generate hair, non-follicle skin cells, nerves, vessels, smooth muscles etc. and may participate in wound healing processes. We report on the finding of nestin-GFP expressing stem cells in their native niche in the bulge of the hair follicle of living mice by using high-resolution in-vivo multiphoton tomography. The 3D imaging with submicron resolution was based on two-photon induced fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen. Migrating stem cells from the bulge to their microenvironment have been detected inside the skin during optical deep tissue sectioning.

  11. Early development of cutaneous cancer revealed by intravital nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    We performed intravital multiphoton microscopy to image and analyze normal and carcinogen treated skin tissues of nude mice in vivo. Using intravital images and the quantitative pixel to pixel ratiometric processing of multiphoton autofluorescence to second harmonic generation index (MAFSI), we can visualize the interaction between epithelial cells and extracellular matrix. We found that as the imaging depth increases, MAFSI has different distribution in normal and treated cutaneous specimens. Since the treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma, our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy.

  12. Achieving molecular selectivity in imaging using multiphoton Raman spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holtom, Gary R. ); Thrall, Brian D. ); Chin, Beek Yoke ); Wiley, H Steven ); Colson, Steven D. )

    2000-12-01

    In the case of most imaging methods, contrast is generated either by physical properties of the sample (Differential Image Contrast, Phase Contrast), or by fluorescent labels that are localized to a particular protein or organelle. Standard Raman and infrared methods for obtaining images are based upon the intrinsic vibrational properties of molecules, and thus obviate the need for attached flurophores. Unfortunately, they have significant limitations for live-cell imaging. However, an active Raman method, called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), is well suited for microscopy, and provides a new means for imaging specific molecules. Vibrational imaging techniques, such as CARS, avoid problems associated with photobleaching and photo-induced toxicity often associated with the use of fluorescent labels with live cells. Because the laser configuration needed to implement CARS technology is similar to that used in other multiphoton microscopy methods, such as two -photon fluorescence and harmonic generation, it is possible to combine imaging modalities, thus generating simultaneous CARS and fluorescence images. A particularly powerful aspect of CARS microscopy is its ability to selectively image deuterated compounds, thus allowing the visualization of molecules, such as lipids, that are chemically indistinguishable from the native species.

  13. Enabling Multiphoton and Second Harmonic Generation Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded and Histologically Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael G.; Kroll, Sebastian; Brucker, Sara Y.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy, namely multiphoton imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG), is an established noninvasive technique useful for the imaging of extracellular matrix (ECM). Typically, measurements are performed in vivo on freshly excised tissues or biopsies. In this article, we describe the effect of rehydrating paraffin-embedded sections on multiphoton and SHG emission signals and the acquisition of nonlinear images from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections before and after a destaining protocol. Our results reveal that bringing tissue sections to a physiological state yields a significant improvement in nonlinear signals, particularly in SHG. Additionally, the destaining of sections previously processed with H&E staining significantly improves their SHG emission signals during imaging, thereby allowing sufficient analysis of collagen in these sections. These results are important for researchers and pathologists to obtain additional information from paraffin-embedded tissues and archived samples to perform retrospective analysis of the ECM or gain additional information from rare samples. PMID:27018844

  14. Correlative transmission electron microscopy and electrical properties study of switchable phase-change random access memory line cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Voogt, F. C.; Attenborough, K.; Verheijen, M. A.; Hurkx, G. A. M.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-02-14

    Phase-change memory line cells, where the active material has a thickness of 15 nm, were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation such that they still could be switched and characterized electrically after the preparation. The result of these observations in comparison with detailed electrical characterization showed (i) normal behavior for relatively long amorphous marks, resulting in a hyperbolic dependence between SET resistance and SET current, indicating a switching mechanism based on initially long and thin nanoscale crystalline filaments which thicken gradually, and (ii) anomalous behavior, which holds for relatively short amorphous marks, where initially directly a massive crystalline filament is formed that consumes most of the width of the amorphous mark only leaving minor residual amorphous regions at its edges. The present results demonstrate that even in (purposely) thick TEM samples, the TEM sample preparation hampers the probability to observe normal behavior and it can be debated whether it is possible to produce electrically switchable TEM specimen in which the memory cells behave the same as in their original bulk embedded state.

  15. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  16. Brain plasticity and functionality explored by nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Allegra, L.; Buffelli, M.; Cesare, P.; D'Angelo, E.; Gandolfi, D.; Grasselli, G.; Lotti, J.; Mapelli, J.; Strata, P.; Pavone, F. S.

    2010-02-01

    In combination with fluorescent protein (XFP) expression techniques, two-photon microscopy has become an indispensable tool to image cortical plasticity in living mice. In parallel to its application in imaging, multi-photon absorption has also been used as a tool for the dissection of single neurites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. In this work, multi-photon nanosurgery is applied to dissect single climbing fibers expressing GFP in the cerebellar cortex. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-dimensional two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. Preliminary investigations show that the laser induced fiber dissection recalls a regenerative process in the fiber itself over a period of days. These results show the possibility of this innovative technique to investigate regenerative processes in adult brain. In parallel with imaging and manipulation technique, non-linear microscopy offers the opportunity to optically record electrical activity in intact neuronal networks. In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RASH) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field of view. The RASH microscope, in combination with bulk loading of tissue with FM4-64 dye, was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells in acute cerebellar slices. Complex spikes, both synchronous and asynchronous, were optically recorded simultaneously across a given population of neurons. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where action potentials were recorded without averaging across trials. These results show the strength of this technique in describing the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies, opening promising

  17. Formalism for multiphoton plasmon excitation in jellium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2002-07-01

    We present a formalism for the description of multiphoton plasmon excitation processes in jellium clusters. By using our method, we demonstrate that, in addition to dipole plasmon excitations, the multipole plasmons (quadrupole, octupole, etc.) can be excited in a cluster by multiphoton absorption processes, which results in a significant difference between plasmon resonance profiles in the cross sections for multiphoton as compared to single-photon absorption. We calculate the cross sections for multiphoton absorption and analyze the balance between the surface and volume plasmon contributions to multipole plasmons.

  18. In vivo multiphoton tomography of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Buckle, Rainer; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Fluhr, Joachim; Elsner, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect was used to perform first clinical studies on the early non-invasive detection of skin cancer based on non-invasive optical sectioning of skin by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation. In particular, deep-tissue pigmented lesions -nevi- have been imaged with intracellular resolution using near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser radiation. So far, more than 250 patients have been investigated. Cancerous tissues showed significant morphological differences compared to normal skin layers. In the case of malignant melanoma, the occurrence of luminescent melanocytes has been detected. Multiphoton tomography will become a novel non-invasive method to obtain high-resolution 3D optical biopsies for early cancer detection, treatment control, and in situ drug screening.

  19. Multiphoton tomography of intratissue tattoo nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Most of today's intratissue tattoo pigments are unknown nanoparticles. So far, there was no real control of their use due to the absence of regulations. Some of the tattoo pigments contain carcinogenic amines e.g. azo pigment Red 22. Nowadays, the European Union starts to control the administration of tattoo pigments. There is an interest to obtain information on the intratissue distribution, their interaction with living cells and the extracellular matrix, and the mechanisms behind laser tattoo removal. Multiphoton tomographs are novel biosafety and imaging tools that can provide such information non-invasively and without further labeling. When using the spectral FLIM module, spatially-resolved emission spectra, excitation spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes can pr provided. Multiphoton tomographs are used by all major cosmetic comapanies to test the biosafety of sunscreen nanoparticles.

  20. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  1. Multiphoton Microwave Ionization of Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurian, Joshua Houston

    This thesis describes a series of multiphoton microwave experiments on Rydberg atoms when the microwave frequency is much greater than the classical Kepler frequency of the excited atoms. A new kHz pulse repetition frequency dye laser system was constructed for Rydberg lithium excitation with a linewidth as narrow as 3 GHz. This new laser system is used for first experiments of multiphoton microwave ionization of Rydberg lithium approaching the photoionization limit using 17 and 36 GHz microwave pulses. A multi-channel quantum defect model is presented that well describes the experimental results, indicating that these results are due to the coherent coupling of many atomic levels both above and below the classical ionization limit. Finally, preliminary results of measuring the final-state distributions of high lying Rydberg states after 17 GHz microwave pulses are presented.

  2. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  3. Medium-induced multi-photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Molière limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

  4. Fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    For several years the authors have performed fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization (MPI). We will present a potpourri of techniques and results chosen to illustrate the interesting complexities of molecular MPI. Techniques used include time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, supersonic expansion cooling of molecular beams, harmonic generation, two-color laser MPI, and polarization spectroscopy. Whenever possible the relevance of these results to resonance ionization spectroscopy schemes will be delineated. 23 references, 10 figures.

  5. Multiphoton harvesting metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quah, Hong Sheng; Chen, Weiqiang; Schreyer, Martin K.; Yang, Hui; Wong, Ming Wah; Ji, Wei; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2015-08-01

    Multiphoton upconversion is a process where two or more photons are absorbed simultaneously to excite an electron to an excited state and, subsequently, the relaxation of electron gives rise to the emission of a photon with frequency greater than those of the absorbed photons. Materials possessing such property attracted attention due to applications in biological imaging, photodynamic therapy, three-dimensional optical data storage, frequency-upconverted lasing and optical power limiting. Here we report four-photon upconversion in metal-organic frameworks containing the ligand, trans, trans-9,10-bis(4-pyridylethenyl)anthracene. The ligand has a symmetrical acceptor-π-donor-π-acceptor structure and a singlet biradical electronic ground state, which boosted its multiphoton absorption cross-sections. We demonstrate that the upconversion efficiency can be enhanced by Förster resonance energy transfer within host-guest metal-organic frameworks consisting of encapsulated high quantum yielding guest molecules. Using these strategies, metal-organic framework materials, which can exhibit frequency-upconverted photoluminescence excited by simultaneous multiphoton absorption, can be rationally designed and synthesized.

  6. Multiphoton harvesting metal–organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Hong Sheng; Chen, Weiqiang; Schreyer, Martin K.; Yang, Hui; Wong, Ming Wah; Ji, Wei; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiphoton upconversion is a process where two or more photons are absorbed simultaneously to excite an electron to an excited state and, subsequently, the relaxation of electron gives rise to the emission of a photon with frequency greater than those of the absorbed photons. Materials possessing such property attracted attention due to applications in biological imaging, photodynamic therapy, three-dimensional optical data storage, frequency-upconverted lasing and optical power limiting. Here we report four-photon upconversion in metal–organic frameworks containing the ligand, trans, trans-9,10-bis(4-pyridylethenyl)anthracene. The ligand has a symmetrical acceptor–π–donor–π–acceptor structure and a singlet biradical electronic ground state, which boosted its multiphoton absorption cross-sections. We demonstrate that the upconversion efficiency can be enhanced by Förster resonance energy transfer within host–guest metal–organic frameworks consisting of encapsulated high quantum yielding guest molecules. Using these strategies, metal–organic framework materials, which can exhibit frequency-upconverted photoluminescence excited by simultaneous multiphoton absorption, can be rationally designed and synthesized. PMID:26245741

  7. Multiphoton imaging of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles in three dimensional models of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainer, Christian F.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    While upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles have numerous advantages over other exogenous contrast agents used in scanned multiphoton imaging, their long luminescence lifetimes cause images collected with non-descanned detection to be greatly blurred. We demonstrate herein the use of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to deblur luminescence images obtained via multiphoton scanning microscopy. Images were taken of three dimensional models of colon and ovarian cancer following incubation with NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles functionalized with an antibody for EGFR and folic acid respectively. Following deconvolution, images had a lateral resolution on par with the optimal performance of the imaging system used, ~1.2 μm, and an axial resolution of ~5 μm. Due to the relatively high multiphoton excitation efficiency of these nanoparticles, it is possible to follow binding of individual particles in tissue. In addition, their extreme photostability allows for prolonged imaging without significant loss in luminescence signal. With these advantageous properties in mind, we also discuss the potential application of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles for tracking of specific, cancer relevant receptors in tissue.

  8. Multiphoton Imaging of Upconverting Lanthanide Nanoparticles in Three Dimensional Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Christian F.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    While upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles have numerous advantages over other exogenous contrast agents used in scanned multiphoton imaging, their long luminescence lifetimes cause images collected with non-descanned detection to be greatly blurred. We demonstrate herein the use of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to deblur luminescence images obtained via multiphoton scanning microscopy. Images were taken of three dimensional models of colon and ovarian cancer following incubation with NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles functionalized with an antibody for EGFR and folic acid respectively. Following deconvolution, images had a lateral resolution on par with the optimal performance of the imaging system used, ~1.2 μm, and an axial resolution of ~5 μm. Due to the relatively high multiphoton excitation efficiency of these nanoparticles, it is possible to follow binding of individual particles in tissue. In addition, their extreme photostability allows for prolonged imaging without significant loss in luminescence signal. With these advantageous properties in mind, we also discuss the potential application of upconverting lanthanide nanoparticles for tracking of specific, cancer relevant receptors in tissue. PMID:24353385

  9. Arbitrary two-dimensional multiphoton excitation patterns with temporally focused digital holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oron, Dan; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; de-Sars, Vincent; Emiliani, Valentina

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton excitation has recently found application in the fields of bioimaging, uncaging and lithography. In order to fully exploit the advantages of nonlinear excitation, in particular the axial resolution due to nonlinearity, most systems to date operate with point or multipoint excitation, while scanning either the laser beam or the sample to generate the illumination pattern. Here we combine the recently introduced technique of scanningless multiphoton excitation by temporal focusing with recent advances in digital holography to generate arbitrarily shaped, depth resolved, two-dimensional excitation patterns completely without scanning. This is of particular importance in applications requiring uniform excitation of large areas over short time scales, such as neuronal activation by multiphoton uncaging of neurotransmitters. We present an experimental and theoretical analysis of the effect of spatial patterning on the depth resolution achieved in temporal focusing microscopy. It is shown that the depth resolution for holographic excitation is somewhat worse than that achieved for uniform illumination. This is also accompanied by the appearance of a speckle pattern at the temporal focal plane. The origin of the two effects, as well as means to overcome them, are discussed.

  10. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  11. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  12. Objective, comparative assessment of the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy for imaging various organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, Christopher J.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-06-01

    Temporal focusing is a technique for performing axially resolved widefield multiphoton microscopy with a large field of view. Despite significant advantages over conventional point-scanning multiphoton microscopy in terms of imaging speed, the need to collect the whole image simultaneously means that it is expected to achieve a lower penetration depth in common biological samples compared to point-scanning. We assess the penetration depth using a rigorous objective criterion based on the modulation transfer function, comparing it to point-scanning multiphoton microscopy. Measurements are performed in a variety of mouse organs in order to provide practical guidance as to the achievable penetration depth for both imaging techniques. It is found that two-photon scanning microscopy has approximately twice the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy, and that penetration depth is organ-specific; the heart has the lowest penetration depth, followed by the liver, lungs, and kidneys, then the spleen, and finally white adipose tissue.

  13. Objective, comparative assessment of the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy for imaging various organs

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Christopher J.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Temporal focusing is a technique for performing axially resolved widefield multiphoton microscopy with a large field of view. Despite significant advantages over conventional point-scanning multiphoton microscopy in terms of imaging speed, the need to collect the whole image simultaneously means that it is expected to achieve a lower penetration depth in common biological samples compared to point-scanning. We assess the penetration depth using a rigorous objective criterion based on the modulation transfer function, comparing it to point-scanning multiphoton microscopy. Measurements are performed in a variety of mouse organs in order to provide practical guidance as to the achievable penetration depth for both imaging techniques. It is found that two-photon scanning microscopy has approximately twice the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy, and that penetration depth is organ-specific; the heart has the lowest penetration depth, followed by the liver, lungs, and kidneys, then the spleen, and finally white adipose tissue. PMID:25844509

  14. Some simple mechanisms of multiphoton excitation in many - level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, E. A.; Marquardt, R.; Quack, M.; Stohner, J.; Thanopulos, I.; Wallenborn, E.-U.

    Results are reported on coherent monochromatic multiphoton excitation in many-level systems, which are representative for some of the basic mechanisms for atomic and molecular multiphoton processes. Numerical solutions are discussed that use the Floquet and quasiresonant approximations in the framework of the URIMIR program package. The excitation schemes include direct three-photon excitation, two-photon excitation with diagonal coupling, Göppert-Mayer-type two-photon processes, multiphoton excitation with off-resonant intermediates, and practically irreversible coherent excitation into dense spectral structures. Several interesting phenomena are observed, such as nonlinear line shifts and broadenings of multiphoton resonances of relevance for multiphoton spectroscopy and almost constant intermediate population inversions, potentially useful for laser design. The accurate numerical results are compared with approximate solutions from perturbation theory, and with simple analytical solutions from Rabi-type formulae.

  15. Characterizing collagen-based materials modified by glycation: a multiphoton optical image guided spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu-Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Flores, Christina; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2011-02-01

    In spite of the adverse ageing effects of glycation in vivo, in vitro this process is widely employed to increase stiffness and strength of tissues' and artificial scaffolds'. In-situ optical characterization methods that report on the structures within these materials could clarify the effects of glycation. We employed one-photon fluorescence and multiphoton microscopy method that combined two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals to characterize collagen hydrogels modified with glyceraldehyde, ribose and glucose. We observed an increase in the in situ fluorescence as well as structural alterations within the materials during the course of glycation.

  16. Multiphoton imaging to distinguish grana and starch inside an intact leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Yu; Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Chen, Po-Fu; Wu, Pei-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-01

    We have demonstrated a straightforward and noninvasive method to identify the distribution of grana and starch within an intact leaf. Grana and starch are the major functional structures for photosynthesis and energy storage of plant, respectively. Both exhibit highly ordered molecular structures and appear as micrometer-sized granules inside chloroplasts. In order to distinguish grana and starch, we used multiphoton microscopy, with simultaneous acquisition of two photon fluorescence (2PF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Consequently, SHG is found on both grana and starch while 2PF from chlorophyll indicates the identity of grana.

  17. Calcium and voltage imaging in arrhythmia models by high-speed microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, G.; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in intracellular cardiomyocyte calcium handling have a key role in initiating and sustaining arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenic calcium leak from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be attributed to all means by which calcium exits the SR store in an abnormal fashion. Abnormal SR calcium exit maymanifest as intracellular Ca2+ sparks and/or Ca2+ waves. Ca2+ signaling in arrhythmogenesis has been mainly studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and given that the extracellular matrix influences both Ca2+ and membrane potential dynamics in the intact heart and underlies environmentally mediated changes, understanding how Ca2+ and voltage are regulated in the intact heart will represent a tremendous advancement in the understanding of arrhythmogenic mechanisms. Using novel high-speed multiphoton microscopy techinques, such as multispot and random access, we investigated animal models with inherited and acquired arrhythmias to assess the role of Ca2+ and voltage signals as arrhythmia triggers in cell and subcellular components of the intact heart and correlate these with electrophysiology.

  18. Label-free multi-photon imaging using a compact femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Mehravar, S.; Gowda, R.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate label-free multi-photon imaging of biological samples using a compact Er3+-doped femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). These compact and low cost lasers have been developed by various groups but they have not been exploited for multiphoton microscopy. Here, it is shown that various multiphoton imaging modalities (e.g. second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and three-photon excitation fluorescence (3PEF)) can be effectively performed on various biological samples using a compact handheld CNT mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser operating in the telecommunication window near 1560nm. We also show for the first time that chlorophyll fluorescence in plant leaves and diatoms can be observed using 1560nm laser excitation via three-photon absorption. PMID:24156074

  19. Direct trabecular meshwork imaging in porcine eyes through multiphoton gonioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The development of technologies to characterize the ocular aqueous outflow system (AOS) is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers the advantage of high-resolution, label-free imaging with intrinsic image contrast because the emitted signals result from the specific biomolecular content of the tissue. Previous attempts to use MPM to image the murine irido-corneal region directly through the sclera have suffered from degradation in image resolution due to scattering of the focused laser light. As a result, transscleral MPM has limited ability to observe fine structures in the AOS. In this work, the porcine irido-corneal angle was successfully imaged through the transparent cornea using a gonioscopic lens to circumvent the highly scattering scleral tissue. The resulting high-resolution images allowed the detailed structures in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to be observed. Multimodal imaging by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation allowed visualization of different features in the TM without labels and without disruption of the TM or surrounding tissues. MPM gonioscopy is a promising noninvasive imaging tool for high-resolution studies of the AOS, and research continues to explore the potential for future clinical applications in humans.

  20. Multiphoton and photothermal imaging of molecular events in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa

    2010-10-01

    Optical techniques are attractive for monitoring disease processes in living tissues because they are relatively cheap, non-invasive and provide a wealth of functional information. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are two types of three-dimensional optical imaging modalities that have demonstrated great utility in pre-clinical models of disease. These techniques are particularly useful for identifying metabolic and molecular biomarkers in cancer. These biomarkers can be used to identify the mechanisms of tumor growth, and to predict the response of a particular tumor to treatment. Specifically, MPM of the co-enzymes NADH and FAD was used to quantify metabolic changes associated with developing cancers in vivo. This imaging technique exploits intrinsic sources of tissue contrast and thus does not require contrast agents. Ongoing work combines this metabolic imaging technique with vascular imaging to provide a comprehensive picture of oxygen supply and demand with tumor therapy. Molecular signaling represents a third critical component in tumor physiology. To this end we have recently developed photothermal OCT, which combines coherent detection with laser-heated gold nanoparticles to achieve high-resolution molecular contrast at deeper depths than MPM. This multi-functional imaging platform will provide unprecedented insight into oxygen supply and demand, and molecular signaling in response to tumor growth and targeted cancer therapies in pre-clinical models.

  1. Multiphoton imaging the disruptive nature of sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J.; Braue, Catherine R.; Dillman, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide] is a vesicating agent first used as a weapon of war in WWI. It causes debilitating blisters at the epidermal-dermal junction and involves molecules that are also disrupted by junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and other blistering skin diseases. Despite its recurring use in global conflicts, there is still no completely effective treatment. We have shown by imaging human keratinocytes in cell culture and in intact epidermal tissues that the basal cells of skin contain well-organized molecules (keratins K5/K14, α6β4 integrin, laminin 5 and α3β1 integrin) that are early targets of sulfur mustard. Disruption and collapse of these molecules is coincident with nuclear displacement, loss of functional asymmetry, and loss of polarized mobility. The progression of this pathology precedes basal cell detachment by 8-24 h, a time equivalent to the "clinical latent phase" that defines the extant period between agent exposure and vesication. Our images indicate that disruption of adhesion-complex molecules also impairs cytoskeletal proteins and the integration of structures required for signal transduction and tissue repair. We have recently developed an optical system to test this hypothesis, i.e., to determine whether and how the early disruption of target molecules alters signal transduction. This environmentally controlled on-line system provides a nexus for real-time correlation of imaged lesions with DNA microarray analysis, and for using multiphoton microscopy to facilitate development of more effective treatment strategies.

  2. Complete QED theory of multiphoton Trident pair production in strong laser fields.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huayu; Müller, Carsten; Keitel, Christoph H

    2010-08-20

    Electron-positron pair creation by multiphoton absorption in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam is calculated within laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. We study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain which is shown accessible to future experiments utilizing the electron beam lines at novel x-ray laser facilities or all-optical setups based on laser acceleration. Our theory moreover allows us to add further insights into the experimental data from SLAC [D. Burke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1626 (1997).]. PMID:20868080

  3. The infrared multiphoton dissociation of three nitrolkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodtke, A. M.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation in a molecular beam has been studied in order to elucidate the collision free, 'thermal' chemistry and dynamics of nitromethane, nitroethane and 2-nitropropane. The isomerization of CH3NO2 to CH3ONO was observed by detecting the CH3O and NO products from the dissociation of the very internally hot, isomerized nitromethane. A novel application of RRKM theory was used to estimate the barrier height to isomerization at 55.5 kcal/mol. The barrier height determination method was tested and found to give excellent results by applying it to the determintaion of the barrier height to HONO elimination from nitroethane, a value which is well known from activation energy measurements. The method was then applied to the case of HONO elimination from 2-nitropropane and it appears that there is good to believe that the barrier height is 3-5 kcal/mol lower in 2-nitropropane than in nitroethane. The success of this method for determining barrier heights shows how a microscopic molecular beam experiment, using infrared multiphoton dissociation where the concept of temperature has no place, can be quantitatively related to pyrolysis experiments which are conducted under collisional, thermal conditions and measure phenomenological quantities such as activation energies.

  4. Controllable infrared continuum source for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Alfieri, D.; Arrigoni, M.; Armstrong, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2010-02-01

    We report on multiphoton imaging of biological samples performed with continuum infrared source generated in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). We studied the spectra generated in PCFs with dispersion profiles designed to maximize the power density in the 700-1000 nm region, where the two-photon absorption cross sections of the most common dyes lie. Pumping in normal dispersion region, with <140 femtosecond pulses delivered by a tunable Ti:Sa laser (Chameleon Ultra II by Coherent Inc.), results in a limitation of nonlinear broadening up to a mean power density above 2 mW/nm. Axial and lateral resolution obtained with a scanning multiphoton system has been measureed to be near the theoretical limit. The possibility of simultaneous two-photon excitation of different dyes in the same sample and high image resolution are demonstrated at tens of microns in depth. Signal-to-noise ratio and general performances are found to be comparable with those of a single wavelength system, used for comparison.

  5. Development of an applicator for multiphoton PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Bastian, Matthias; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Balanos, Evangelos; Schlag, Peter M.; Steinmeyer, Gunter; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    Multiphoton excitation of photosensitizers for laser induced fluorescence diagnosis (LIFD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors has the advantage of greater tissue penetration due to the longer wavelength of irradiation. However, multiphoton LIFD and PDT are presently not clinically applicable as there are no applicators available for the delivery of the pulsed laser radiation to the operating room. As an approach, in this contribution the beam delivery through photonic crystal fibers has been investigated. Pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser of 100 fs pulse duration and an average power of 150 mW have been transported through such a fiber of 25 m length and the resulting pulses show the absence of nonlinear contributions but still a broadening of the pulse to 2 ps due to the dispersion of the fiber. It is planned to compensate this broadening by a grating in front of the fiber. Alternatively, the transport of laser radiation of 150 fs and 100 mW through a mirror-joint-arm used for conventional CO2 lasers has been tested showing no broadening of the laser pulses. Two-photon photodynamic activity of mTHPC-CMPEG4 shall serve as a test of the laser light transport system.

  6. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  7. Design, synthesis, characterization and applications of multi-photon absorbing chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingdong

    Recent development in multi-photon based applications including optical power limiting, frequency up-conversion lasing, three-dimensional data storage, two-photon fluorescence microscopy and two-photon photodynamic therapy has benefited a lot from a number of chromophores with large multi-photon absorption. This thesis was focused on the development of novel two- and three-photon active chromophores and their applications. Chapter 1 describes a theoretical background of multi-photon absorption, and recent development of multi-photon based applications. Some molecular design strategies were proposed after a literature review of chromophores with large two-photon absorption. In Chapter 2, a series of stilbazolium salts with varying electron donors and anions were synthesized and characterized. The two-photon absorption and two-photon pumped cavity lasing properties for these dyes were studied by using 1064 nm nano-second laser beam. By using tunable femto-second laser, three-photon pumped cavity-less lasing properties of these dyes have also been comprehensively studied. Four-photon pumped stimulated emission was achieved in some of these stilbazolium dyes. Unsymmetrical emission behaviors under 3- and 4-photon pump conditions for all these stilbazolium dyes were observed, explained and verified. In Chapter 3, DNA was successfully used as a matrix for one-, two-, and three-photon pumped stimulated emission or lasing by intercalating a multi-photon active chromophore. In Chapter 4, it is experimentally shown that both two- and three-photon absorption in a highly concentrated chromophore system can be more efficiently utilized to accomplish optical power limiting and stabilization at laser wavelengths of 1.064 mum and ˜1.3 mum, respectively. In Chapter 5, three novel 1,10-phenanthroline containing pi-conjugated chromophores with varied electron donors were synthesized and characterized together with their corresponding nickel(II) chelated complexes. Large two

  8. Spectral imaging microscopy web sites and data.

    PubMed

    McNamara, George; Gupta, Amit; Reynaert, James; Coates, Thomas D; Boswell, Carl

    2006-08-01

    The Internet is enabling greater access to spectral imaging publications, spectral graphs, and data than that was available a generation ago. The spectral imaging systems discussed in this issue of Cytometry work because reagent and hardware spectra are reproducible, reusable, and provide input to spectral unmixing and spectral components recognition algorithms. These spectra need to be readily available in order to determine what to purchase, how to use it, and what the output means. We refer to several commercially sponsored and academic spectral web sites and discuss our spectral graphing and data sites. Sites include fluorescent dye graph servers from Invitrogen/Molecular Probes, BD Biosciences, Zeiss/Bio-Rad Cell Sciences, and filter set servers from Chroma Technology and Omega Optical. Several of these sites include data download capabilities. Recently, two microscope manufacturers have published on their web sites transmission curves for select objective lenses-crucial data for anyone doing multiphoton excitation microscopy. Notable among the academic sites, PhotoChemCAD 2.0 has over 200 dyes and a downloadable database/graphing program, and the USC-A Chemistry UV-vis Database displays absorption spectra of many dyes and indicators used in clinical histology and pathology. Our Fluorescent Spectra graphing/calculator site presents dyes, filters, and illumination data from many of these and additional sources. PubSpectra is our free download site which uses Microsoft Excel files as standardized human/machine readable format with over 2,000 biomedical spectra. The principle that data is not subject to copyright provides a framework in which all scientific data should be made freely accessible. PMID:16969821

  9. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching.

  10. In vivo multiphoton tomography of inflammatory tissue and melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Fluhr, Joachim; Elsner, Peter; Kobow, Jens; Konig, Karsten

    2005-04-01

    Multiphoton optical tomography provides the capability of non-invasive optical sectioning of skin with high spatial and intracellular resolution as well as high NIR (near infrared) light penetration into pigmented skin areas. The imaging system DermaInspect based on femtosecond laser pulses was used to perform multiphoton optical tomography in clinical studies. Patients with abnormal pigmented tissues were imaged in vivo. After the multiphoton imaging procedure, biopsies were taken, imaged again and further processed with standard histological methods. We report on preliminary results. The visualization of pigmented cell clusters based on non-linear luminescence using the novel multiphoton device was possible. These clusters could be clearly distinguished from non-pigmented cells. Cancerous tissues showed significant differences in the cell structure of the epidermal layers. The system DermaInspect might become a high resolution diagnostic tool for melanoma diagnostics.

  11. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE Multiphoton polymerization of hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-12-01

    Multiphoton polymerization has been developed as a direct laser writing technique for the preparation of complex 3D structures with resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. The combination of two or more hybrid materials with different functionalities in the same system has allowed the preparation of structures with advanced properties and functions. Furthermore, the surface functionalization of the 3D structures opens new avenues for their applications in a variety of nanobiotechnological fields. This paper describes the principles of 2PP and the experimental set-up used for 3D structure fabrication. It also gives an overview of the materials that have been employed in 2PP so far and depicts the perspectives of this technique in the development of new active components.

  13. Enhancing Multiphoton Rates with Quantum Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Champion, T. F. M.; Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P. S.; Jin, X.-M.; England, D. G.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    Single photons are a vital resource for optical quantum information processing. Efficient and deterministic single photon sources do not yet exist, however. To date, experimental demonstrations of quantum processing primitives have been implemented using nondeterministic sources combined with heralding and/or postselection. Unfortunately, even for eight photons, the data rates are already so low as to make most experiments impracticable. It is well known that quantum memories, capable of storing photons until they are needed, are a potential solution to this “scaling catastrophe.” Here, we analyze in detail the benefits of quantum memories for producing multiphoton states, showing how the production rates can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. We identify the quantity ηB as the most important figure of merit in this connection, where η and B are the efficiency and time-bandwidth product of the memories, respectively.

  14. Point spread function engineering with multiphoton SPIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsing, Keith A.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende-Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    MultiPhoton SPatIal Frequency modulated Imaging (MP-SPIFI) has recently demonstrated the ability to simultaneously obtain super-resolved images in both coherent and incoherent scattering processes -- namely, second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence, respectively.1 In our previous analysis, we considered image formation produced by the zero and first diffracted orders from the SPIFI modulator. However, the modulator is a binary amplitude mask, and therefore produces multiple diffracted orders. In this work, we extend our analysis to image formation in the presence of higher diffracted orders. We find that tuning the mask duty cycle offers a measure of control over the shape of super-resolved point spread functions in an MP-SPIFI microscope.

  15. Multi-photon entanglement in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Erhard, Manuel; Huber, Marcus; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Forming the backbone of quantum technologies today, entanglement has been demonstrated in physical systems as diverse as photons, ions and superconducting circuits. Although steadily pushing the boundary of the number of particles entangled, these experiments have remained in a two-dimensional space for each particle. Here we show the experimental generation of the first multi-photon entangled state where both the number of particles and dimensions are greater than two. Two photons in our state reside in a three-dimensional space, whereas the third lives in two dimensions. This asymmetric entanglement structure only appears in multiparticle entangled states with d > 2. Our method relies on combining two pairs of photons, high-dimensionally entangled in their orbital angular momentum. In addition, we show how this state enables a new type of ‘layered’ quantum communication protocol. Entangled states such as these serve as a manifestation of the complex dance of correlations that can exist within quantum mechanics.

  16. Multiphoton double ionization of the He atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations are made for the multiphoton double ionization of the He atom under the influence of a fast pulse XUV laser. One set of TDCC calculations employs l1m1l2m2 coupling on a 2D (r1 ,r2) numerical lattice, a second set of TDCC calculations employs m1m2 coupling on a 4D (r1 ,θ1 ,r2 ,θ2) numerical lattice, and a third set of TDCC calculations employs m1m2 coupling on a 4D (ρ1 ,z1 ,ρ2 ,z2) numerical lattice. Studies are made to see which TDCC method is the most efficient at explaining measurements as the number of photons absorbed is increased. Work supported in part by Grants from NASA, NSF, and DOE.

  17. Intravital microscopy of the lung: minimizing invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiole, Daniel; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In vivo microscopy has recently become a gold standard in lung immunology studies involving small animals, largely benefiting from the democratization of multiphoton microscopy allowing for deep tissue imaging. This technology represents currently our only way of exploring the lungs and inferring what happens in human respiratory medicine. The interest of lung in vivo microscopy essentially relies upon its relevance as a study model, fulfilling physiological requirements in comparison with in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, strategies developed in order to overcome movements of the thorax caused by breathing and heartbeats remain the chief drawback of the technique and a major source of invasiveness. In this context, minimizing invasiveness is an unavoidable prerequisite for any improvement of lung in vivo microscopy. This review puts into perspective the main techniques enabling lung in vivo microscopy, providing pros and cons regarding invasiveness. PMID:26846880

  18. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin.

    PubMed

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R; Feger, Julia S; Fallah, Mohammad A; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients' bedsides. These 'optical biopsies' generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  19. High-resolution multiphoton optical tomography of tissues: an in vitro and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Ehlers, Alexander; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Martin, Sven; König, Karsten

    2006-03-01

    Multiphoton optical tomography based on NIR (near-infrared) femtosecond laser pulses provides non-invasive optical sectioning of skin with high spatial intracellular resolution and high tissue penetration. The imaging system DermaInspect was used to perform this technology in clinical studies in vivo on patients with suspicious melanoma. Pigmented cell clusters based on non-linear luminescence were clearly distinguished from non-pigmented cells in the epidermis using the autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, elastin, collagen and melanin. Some of the investigated tissues showed differences in the structure of the epidermal layers and the presence of dendritic cells compared to normal skin. Multiphoton laser microscopy was used to visualize extracellular matrix (ECM) structures of native and tissueengineered heart valves. The quality of the resulting 3-D images allowed an exact differentiation between collagenous and elastic fibers. The analysis of heart valve tissues of patients with cardiomyopathy revealed a dramatic loss of its capability to generate SH (second harmonic), indicating a structural deformation of the collagenous fibers, which was virtually impossible to obtain by routine histological or immunohistological staining. These results indicate that NIR femtosecond laser scanning systems can be employed as novel non-invasive optical technology for 3-D resolved ECM component imaging and in vitro and in vivo tissue diagnosis.

  20. In vivo multiphoton NADH fluorescence reveals depth-dependent keratinocyte metabolism in human skin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Mihaela; Mazhar, Amaan; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mittal, Richa; Krasieva, Tatiana B; König, Karsten; Venugopalan, Vasan; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    We employ a clinical multiphoton microscope to monitor in vivo and noninvasively the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence of human epidermal cells during arterial occlusion. We correlate these results with measurements of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration during oxygen deprivation using spatial frequency domain imaging. During arterial occlusion, a decrease in oxyhemoglobin corresponds to an increase in NADH fluorescence in the basal epidermal cells, implying a reduction in basal cell oxidative phosphorylation. The ischemia-induced oxygen deprivation is associated with a strong increase in NADH fluorescence of keratinocytes in layers close to the stratum basale, whereas keratinocytes from epidermal layers closer to the skin surface are not affected. Spatial frequency domain imaging optical property measurements, combined with a multilayer Monte Carlo-based radiative transport model of multiphoton microscopy signal collection in skin, establish that localized tissue optical property changes during occlusion do not impact the observed NADH signal increase. This outcome supports the hypothesis that the vascular contribution to the basal layer oxygen supply is significant and these cells engage in oxidative metabolism. Keratinocytes in the more superficial stratum granulosum are either supplied by atmospheric oxygen or are functionally anaerobic. Based on combined hemodynamic and two-photon excited fluorescence data, the oxygen consumption rate in the stratum basale is estimated to be ∼0.035 μmoles/10(6) cells/h. PMID:23332078

  1. In Vivo Multiphoton NADH Fluorescence Reveals Depth-Dependent Keratinocyte Metabolism in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Mazhar, Amaan; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mittal, Richa; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Venugopalan, Vasan; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a clinical multiphoton microscope to monitor in vivo and noninvasively the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence of human epidermal cells during arterial occlusion. We correlate these results with measurements of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration during oxygen deprivation using spatial frequency domain imaging. During arterial occlusion, a decrease in oxyhemoglobin corresponds to an increase in NADH fluorescence in the basal epidermal cells, implying a reduction in basal cell oxidative phosphorylation. The ischemia-induced oxygen deprivation is associated with a strong increase in NADH fluorescence of keratinocytes in layers close to the stratum basale, whereas keratinocytes from epidermal layers closer to the skin surface are not affected. Spatial frequency domain imaging optical property measurements, combined with a multilayer Monte Carlo-based radiative transport model of multiphoton microscopy signal collection in skin, establish that localized tissue optical property changes during occlusion do not impact the observed NADH signal increase. This outcome supports the hypothesis that the vascular contribution to the basal layer oxygen supply is significant and these cells engage in oxidative metabolism. Keratinocytes in the more superficial stratum granulosum are either supplied by atmospheric oxygen or are functionally anaerobic. Based on combined hemodynamic and two-photon excited fluorescence data, the oxygen consumption rate in the stratum basale is estimated to be ∼0.035 μmoles/106 cells/h. PMID:23332078

  2. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    During the proliferation of breast cancer, the desmoplastic can evoke a fibrosis response by invading healthy tissue. Fibrotic focus (FF) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast had been reported to be associated with significantly poorer survival rate than IDC without FF. As an important prognosis indicator, it's difficult to obtain the exact fibrotic information from traditional detection method such as mammography. Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been recently employed for microscopic examination of unstained tissue. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma tissue. The morphology and distribution of collagen in fibrotic focus can be demonstrated by the SHG signal. Variation of collagen between IDC with and without FF will be examined and further characterized, which may be greatly related to the metastasis of breast cancer. Our result suggested that the MPM can be efficient in identifying and locating the fibrotic focus in IDC. Combining with the pathology analysis and other detecting methods, MPM owns potential in becoming an advanced histological tool for detecting the fibrotic focus in IDC and collecting prognosis information, which may guide the subsequent surgery option and therapy procedure for patients.

  3. Hybrid multiphoton volumetric functional imaging of large-scale bioengineered neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Hod; Marom, Anat; Paluch, Shir; Dvorkin, Roman; Brosh, Inbar; Shoham, Shy

    2014-06-01

    Planar neural networks and interfaces serve as versatile in vitro models of central nervous system physiology, but adaptations of related methods to three dimensions (3D) have met with limited success. Here, we demonstrate for the first time volumetric functional imaging in a bioengineered neural tissue growing in a transparent hydrogel with cortical cellular and synaptic densities, by introducing complementary new developments in nonlinear microscopy and neural tissue engineering. Our system uses a novel hybrid multiphoton microscope design combining a 3D scanning-line temporal-focusing subsystem and a conventional laser-scanning multiphoton microscope to provide functional and structural volumetric imaging capabilities: dense microscopic 3D sampling at tens of volumes per second of structures with mm-scale dimensions containing a network of over 1,000 developing cells with complex spontaneous activity patterns. These developments open new opportunities for large-scale neuronal interfacing and for applications of 3D engineered networks ranging from basic neuroscience to the screening of neuroactive substances.

  4. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  5. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P. . UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.)

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  6. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2006-07-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5×10-50 cm4s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  7. Preparation of metallo-dielectric photonic crystals by multi-photon direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, Stephen M.; Tal, Amir; Chen, Yun-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Metallo-dielectric photonic crystals (MDPCs) can exhibit intriguing and potentially useful optical properties, including ultra-wide photonic bandgaps, engineered thermal emission, and negative refractive index. But access to such materials has been limited by the lack of suitable methods for their preparation. We have developed a route to three-dimensional (3D) MDPCs that involves fabricating a polymeric pre-form by multi-photon direct laser writing and then conformally depositing metal onto the pre-form by electroless metallization. We use the approach to prepare silver- and copper-plated "woodpile" PCs having face-centered tetragonal symmetry and unit-cell period of several micrometers. The resulting 3D metallized structures exhibit mid-infrared reflectance that is consistent with theory and experimental observations obtained for MDPCs prepared by other routes. These data indicate that multi-photon direct laser writing coupled with electroless metallization is a viable route to complex 3D MDPCs of many symmetries and basis sets and provides a path for integrating such structures with other micron-scale optical elements.

  8. Evaluation of multiphoton effects in down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-04-15

    Multiphoton effects in down-conversion are investigated based on the full-quantum multimode formalism by considering a three-level system as a prototype nonlinear system. We analytically derive the three-photon output wave function for two input photons, where one of the two input photons is down-converted and the other one is not. Using this output wave function, we calculate the down-conversion probability, the purity, and the fidelity to evaluate the entanglement between a down-converted photon pair and a non-down-converted photon. It is shown that the saturation effect occurs by multiphoton input and that it affects both the down-conversion probability and the quantum correlation between the down-converted photon pair and the non-down-converted photon. We also reveal the necessary conditions for multiphoton effects to be strong.

  9. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  10. Convergent perturbation analysis of intense coherent multiphoton interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, M. C.; Yee, T. K.; Gustafson, T. K.; Fan, B.

    1979-01-01

    Use has been made of flow graphs to deduce Feenberg perturbation expansions for radiative interactions. It is demonstrated that these expansions can in certain cases be summed to provide closed form expressions for the molecular response. In particular, it is shown that the coherent state response can be obtained by the summation of a continued fraction perturbation expansion for the harmonic oscillator. Anharmonicity in the lower levels is treated and its shown to introduce Rabi flopping identifiable with multiphoton transitions among isolated tightly coupled subsystems of levels. Relevance to laser induced multiphoton excitation and energy level shift calculations in the presence of a strong field are also discussed.

  11. Effect of multiphoton ionization on performance of crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D; Campbell, M C W; Sharma, R P

    2014-12-15

    This Letter presents a model for propagation of a laser pulse in a human crystalline lens. The model contains a transverse beam diffraction effect, laser-induced optical breakdown for the creation of plasma via a multiphoton ionization process, and the gradient index (GRIN) structure. Plasma introduces the nonlinearity in the crystalline lens which affects the propagation of the beam. The multiphoton ionization process generates plasma that changes the refractive index and hence leads to the defocusing of the laser beam. The Letter also points out the relevance of the present investigation to cavitation bubble formation for restoring the elasticity of the eyes. PMID:25502994

  12. Fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with adaptive motion compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean; Stone, James; Neil, Mark; Paterson, Carl; Knight, Jonathan; French, Paul; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of sample motion during in vivo imaging, we present a fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with active axial motion compensation. The position of the sample surface is measured using optical coherence tomography and fed back to a piezo actuator that adjusts the axial location of the objective to compensate for sample motion. We characterise the system’s performance and demonstrate that it can compensate for axial sample velocities up to 700 µm/s. Finally we illustrate the impact of motion compensation when imaging multiphoton excited autofluorescence in ex vivo mouse skin. PMID:26137387

  13. Unambiguous atomic Bell measurement assisted by multiphoton states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Bernád, József Zsolt; Alber, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate an unambiguous Bell measurement of atomic qubits assisted by multiphoton states. The atoms interact resonantly with the electromagnetic field inside two spatially separated optical cavities in a Ramsey-type interaction sequence. The qubit states are postselected by measuring the photonic states inside the resonators. We show that if one is able to project the photonic field onto two coherent states on opposite sites of phase space, an unambiguous Bell measurement can be implemented. Thus, our proposal may provide a core element for future components of quantum information technology such as a quantum repeater based on coherent multiphoton states, atomic qubits and matter-field interaction.

  14. Multiphoton interband excitations of quantum gases in driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Sträter, C.; Prelle, S.; Eckardt, A.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of multiphoton interband absorption processes for quantum gases in shaken light crystals. Periodic inertial forcing, induced by a spatial motion of the lattice potential, drives multiphoton interband excitations of up to the ninth order. The occurrence of such excitation features is systematically investigated with respect to the potential depth and the driving amplitude. Ab initio calculations of resonance positions as well as numerical evaluation of their strengths exhibit good agreement with experimental data. In addition our findings could make it possible to reach novel phases of quantum matter by tailoring appropriate driving schemes.

  15. Marginal characteristics of skin scarred dermis quantitatively extracted from multiphoton microscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Chen, Jianxin; Lin, Bifang

    2010-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) was applied to examine the marginal regions at dermis of normal, atrophic and keloid scars. High-contrast, high-resolution image showed an obvious boundary at scar margin and different morphological patterns of collagen or elastin on the two sides. Since the degree of the morphological alteration between the two sides of boundary at scar margin was varied among different types of scars, alteration degree of SHG-to-TPEF index was defined as a quantitative indicator for discrimination. It will help to determine the most appropriate clinical treatment strategy for different types of scars and potentially monitor therapy in vivo.

  16. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Laser tweezers and multiphoton microscopes in life sciences.

    PubMed

    König, K

    2000-08-01

    Near infrared (NIR) laser microscopy enables optical micromanipulation, piconewton force determination, and sensitive fluorescence studies by laser tweezers. Otherwise, fluorescence images with high spatial and temporal resolution of living cells and tissues can be obtained via non-resonant fluorophore excitation with multiphoton NIR laser scanning microscopes. Furthermore, NIR femtosecond laser pulses at TW/cm2 intensities can be used to realize non-invasive contact-free surgery of nanometer-sized structures within living cells and tissues. Applications of these novel versatile NIR laser-based tools for the determination of motility forces, coenzyme and chlorophyll imaging, three-dimensional multigene detection, non-invasive optical sectioning of tissues ("optical biopsy"), functional protein imaging, and nanosurgery of chromosomes are described. PMID:11052257

  17. Generation of multiphoton entangled quantum states by means of integrated frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Christian; Kues, Michael; Roztocki, Piotr; Wetzel, Benjamin; Grazioso, Fabio; Little, Brent E; Chu, Sai T; Johnston, Tudor; Bromberg, Yaron; Caspani, Lucia; Moss, David J; Morandotti, Roberto

    2016-03-11

    Complex optical photon states with entanglement shared among several modes are critical to improving our fundamental understanding of quantum mechanics and have applications for quantum information processing, imaging, and microscopy. We demonstrate that optical integrated Kerr frequency combs can be used to generate several bi- and multiphoton entangled qubits, with direct applications for quantum communication and computation. Our method is compatible with contemporary fiber and quantum memory infrastructures and with chip-scale semiconductor technology, enabling compact, low-cost, and scalable implementations. The exploitation of integrated Kerr frequency combs, with their ability to generate multiple, customizable, and complex quantum states, can provide a scalable, practical, and compact platform for quantum technologies. PMID:26965623

  18. Label-free multi-photon imaging of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Mehravar, Soroush; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Chatrath, Hemant; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Patel, Krunal; Patel, Charmi; Norwood, Robert A; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Kieu, Khanh

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic disorder where dysplastic and early cancerous changes are invisible to the naked eye and where the practice of blind biopsy is hampered by large sampling errors. Multi-photon microscopy (MPM) has emerged as an alternative solution for fast and label-free diagnostic capability for identifying the histological features with sub-micron accuracy. We developed a compact, inexpensive MPM system by using a handheld mode-locked fiber laser operating at 1560nm to study mucosal biopsies of BE. The combination of back-scattered THG, back-reflected forward THG and SHG signals generate images of cell nuclei and collagen, leading to label-free diagnosis in Barrett’s. PMID:26819824

  19. Multiphoton Coherent Manipulation in Large Spin Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiorescu, Irinel

    2009-03-01

    Manipulation of quantum information allows certain algorithms to be performed at unparalleled speeds. Photons are an ideal choice to manipulate qubits as they interact with quantum systems in predictable ways. They are a versatile tool for manipulating, reading/coupling qubits and for encoding/transferring quantum information over long distances. Spin-based qubits have well known behavior under photon driving and can be potentially operated up to room temperature. When diluted enough to avoid uncontrolled spin-spin interactions, a variety of spin qubits show long coherence times, e.g. the nitrogen vacancies in pure diamonds (1,2), nitrogen atoms trapped in a C60 cage (3), Ho3+ and Cr5+ ions (4,5) and molecular magnets (6,7). We have used large spin Mn2+ ions (S=5/2) to realize a six level system that can be operated by means of single as well as multi-photon coherent Rabi oscillations (8). This spin system has a very small anisotropy whose effect can be tuned in-situ to turn the system into a multi-level harmonic system. This offer new ways of manipulating, reading and resetting a spin qubit. Decoherence effects are strongly reduced by the quasi-isotropic electron interaction with the crystal field and with the 55Mn nuclear spins. [0pt] 1. R. Hanson et al., Science 320, 352 (2008). [0pt] 2. M.V. Gurudev Dutt et al., Science 316, 1312 (2007). [0pt] 3. G.W. Morley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 220501 (2007). [0pt] 4. S. Bertaina et al., Nat. Nanotech. 2, 39 (2007). [0pt] 5. S. Nellutla et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 137601 (2007). [0pt] 6. A. Ardavan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 057201 (2007). [0pt] 7. S. Bertaina et al., Nature 453, 203,(2008). [0pt] 8. S. Bertaina et al., submitted.

  20. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  1. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  2. Multimodal microscopy of immune cells and melanoma for longitudinal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entenberg, David; Aranda, Iana; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Schaer, David; Li, Yanyun

    2006-02-01

    Intravital microscopy of cancer is a well established tool that provides direct visualization of the tumor cycle. It traditionally involves one of several strategies: invasive subcutaneous (SC) implantation of tumors followed by surgical opening of skin flaps for imaging, techniques utilizing skin fold chambers and implanted optical windows or intradermal injections under 200μm from the skin surface. All of these techniques allow the use of fluorescent proteins as markers for biologically significant constituents. However, observation methods utilizing skin-flaps, skin-fold chambers and optical windows are invasive and tend to alter the immune environment of the tissue and/or limit the duration of studies that can be performed. If implanted correctly, intradermally injected tumors can be minimally invasive, will not require biopsies or surgical intervention to observe and are accessible for direct transdermal imaging with a number of in vivo modalities. We present our work in the development of a small animal intravital microscopy workstation that allows the acquisition of different contrast imaging modalities: reflectance confocal, wide field epifluorescence, multiphoton and second harmonic generation (SHG). The images are acquired pair-wise simultaneously and sequentially in time. The aim of our instrumentation is to gather all information generated by the single probing beam via the reflected or back-scattered signal, SHG signal and various fluorescence signals. Additionally, we also present our development of a microscopic tissue navigation technique to mark, label and track sites of interest. This technique enables us to revisit sites periodically and record, with different imaging contrasts, their biological changes over time.

  3. Influence of Vacuum Cooling on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infiltration in Fresh Leafy Greens via a Multiphoton-Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vonasek, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogen infiltration in fresh leafy greens is a significant food safety risk factor. In various postharvest operations, vacuum cooling is a critical process for maintaining the quality of fresh produce. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of vacuum cooling-induced infiltration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into lettuce using multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton imaging was chosen as the method to locate E. coli O157:H7 within an intact lettuce leaf due to its high spatial resolution, low background fluorescence, and near-infrared (NIR) excitation source compared to those of conventional confocal microscopy. The variables vacuum cooling, surface moisture, and leaf side were evaluated in a three-way factorial study with E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce. A total of 188 image stacks were collected. The images were analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 association with stomata and E. coli O157:H7 infiltration. The quantitative imaging data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that the low-moisture condition led to an increased risk of microbial association with stomata (P < 0.05). Additionally, the interaction between vacuum cooling levels and moisture levels led to an increased risk of infiltration (P < 0.05). This study also demonstrates the potential of multiphoton imaging for improving sensitivity and resolution of imaging-based measurements of microbial interactions with intact leaf structures, including infiltration. PMID:26475109

  4. Highly Resolved Intravital Striped-illumination Microscopy of Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Sporbert, Anje

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring cellular communication by intravital deep-tissue multi-photon microscopy is the key for understanding the fate of immune cells within thick tissue samples and organs in health and disease. By controlling the scanning pattern in multi-photon microscopy and applying appropriate numerical algorithms, we developed a striped-illumination approach, which enabled us to achieve 3-fold better axial resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. contrast, in more than 100 µm tissue depth within highly scattering tissue of lymphoid organs as compared to standard multi-photon microscopy. The acquisition speed as well as photobleaching and photodamage effects were similar to standard photo-multiplier-based technique, whereas the imaging depth was slightly lower due to the use of field detectors. By using the striped-illumination approach, we are able to observe the dynamics of immune complex deposits on secondary follicular dendritic cells – on the level of a few protein molecules in germinal centers. PMID:24748007

  5. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences. PMID:23733020

  6. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  7. Probing Ordered Lipid Assemblies with Polarized Third-Harmonic-Generation Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerley, Maxwell; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Ordered lipid assemblies are responsible for important physiological functions including skin barrier and axon conductivity. However, techniques commonly used to probe molecular order such as X-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance are not suited for in-situ tissue studies. Here, we identify and characterize a novel contrast mechanism in nonlinear optical microscopy which is sensitive to molecular ordering in multilamellar lipid vesicles (MLVs) and in samples obtained from human skin biopsy: polarized third-harmonic generation (P-THG). We develop a multiscale theoretical framework to calculate the anisotropic, nonlinear optical response of lipid arrays as a function of molecular order. This analysis reveals that conserved carbon-carbon bond and aliphatic tail directionality are the atomic- and molecular-scale sources of the observed P-THG response, respectively. Agreement between calculations and experiments on lipid droplets and MLVs validates the use of P-THG as a probe of lipid ordering. Finally, we show that P-THG can be used to map molecular ordering in the multilamellar, intercorneocyte lipid matrix of the stratum corneum of human skin. These results provide the foundation for the use of P-THG in probing molecular order and highlight a novel biomedical application of multiphoton microscopy in an optically accessible tissue relevant to monitoring lipid-related disorder.

  8. Multiphoton imaging of excised normal skin and keloid scar: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Michael B.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Torkian, Behrooz; Sun, Chung-Ho; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2004-07-01

    Wound healing is a physiologic process that acts to repair disruptions in the continuity of tissue caused by injury or surgical incision. Keloids and hypertrophic scars are forms of aberrant wound healing, which are characterized by the overproduction of collagen, resulting in an excessive amount of scar tissue. Keloid tumors, by definition, grow outside the boundary of the original tissue damage. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an imaging technique which allows imaging of living specimens, without the use of fixation or stains. Images of collagen fibers are produced by the second harmonic signal intensity generated by endogenous fluorescence through excitation by infrared laser light. A postauricular keloid tumor was excised from a patient. The tissue was dissected, and a portion was imaged using MPM. Normal skin tissue was isolated from a patient undergoing a facelift. A portion of this tissue was also dissected and imaged using MPM. MPM images were taken using a 63X water immersion objective lens on a two-photon microscope and a titanium-sapphire laser. Images were taken beginning at the surface of the tissue and moving in at intervals of 200 nm to a final depth of 30 μm. The two-photon images were used to reconstruct three-dimensional representations of the collagen matrix within the tissues, which are readily contrasted. Density of the collagen within each tissue was also ascertained using depth dependant decay of the image intensity. Multiphoton imaging was successfully used to image the collagen matrix of normal skin and a keloid scar, demonstrating differences in their microstructures.

  9. Multiphoton dynamics of qutrits in the ultrastrong coupling regime with a quantized photonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Avetissian, A. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.; Kibis, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton resonant excitation of a three-state quantum system (a qutrit) with a single-mode photonic field is considered in the ultrastrong coupling regime, when the qutrit-photonic field coupling rate is comparable to appreciable fractions of the photon frequency. For ultrastrong couplings, the obtained solutions of the Schrödinger equation that reveal multiphoton Rabi oscillations in qutrits with the interference effects leading to the collapse and revival of atomic excitation probabilities at the direct multiphoton resonant transitions.

  10. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  11. Multi-photon Intracellular Sodium Imaging Combined with UV-mediated Focal Uncaging of Glutamate in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has enabled the analysis of morphological and physiological parameters of brain cells in the intact tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with electrophysiology, it is widely used to study activity-related calcium signals in small subcellular compartments such as dendrites and dendritic spines. In addition to calcium transients, synaptic activity also induces postsynaptic sodium signals, the properties of which are only marginally understood. Here, we describe a method for combined whole-cell patch-clamp and multi-photon sodium imaging in cellular micro domains of central neurons. Furthermore, we introduce a modified procedure for ultra-violet (UV)-light-induced uncaging of glutamate, which allows reliable and focal activation of glutamate receptors in the tissue. To this end, whole-cell recordings were performed on Cornu Ammonis subdivision 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons in acute tissue slices of the mouse hippocampus. Neurons were filled with the sodium-sensitive fluorescent dye SBFI through the patch-pipette, and multi-photon excitation of SBFI enabled the visualization of dendrites and adjacent spines. To establish UV-induced focal uncaging, several parameters including light intensity, volume affected by the UV uncaging beam, positioning of the beam as well as concentration of the caged compound were tested and optimized. Our results show that local perfusion with caged glutamate (MNI-Glutamate) and its focal UV-uncaging result in inward currents and sodium transients in dendrites and spines. Time course and amplitude of both inward currents and sodium signals correlate with the duration of the uncaging pulse. Furthermore, our results show that intracellular sodium signals are blocked in the presence of blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors, demonstrating that they are mediated by sodium influx though this pathway. In summary, our method provides a reliable tool for the investigation of intracellular

  12. The role of resonances in strong-field multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Kulander, K.C.

    1990-10-01

    Resonantly-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) has been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical study since the invention of the laser. Until recently, the overwhelming majority of REMPI research have been conducted at intensities less than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. At these intensities, the strength of the applied field remains less than one percent of the atomic Coulomb field experienced by the outer electrons in a typical noble gas atom. In this regime, treatment of the applied field as a weak perturbation on the atomic system yields excellent agreement with experiment. Here, we investigate the role of resonances in multiphoton ionization at much higher intensities, specifically, we examine the behavior and influence of resonances as the strength of the applied field becomes a significant fraction of the atomic field. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A simple model of multiphoton micromachining in silk hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Alonzo, Carlo; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution three-dimensional voids can be directly written into transparent silk fibroin hydrogels using ultrashort pulses of near-infrared (NIR) light. Here, we propose a simple finite-element model that can be used to predict the size and shape of individual features under various exposure conditions. We compare predicted and measured feature volumes for a wide range of parameters and use the model to determine optimum conditions for maximum material removal. The simplicity of the model implies that the mechanism of multiphoton induced void creation in silk is due to direct absorption of light energy rather than diffusion of heat or other photoproducts, and confirms that multiphoton absorption of NIR light in silk is purely a 3-photon process.

  14. Nanoparticle metrology in sol-gels using multiphoton excited fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolin, J.; Geddes, C. D.; Wynne, K.; Birch, D. J. S.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a method of measuring the growth of nanoparticles during sol-gel glass formation based on labelling the particle with a fluorescent dye and determining the multiphoton excited decay of fluorescence anisotropy due to Brownian rotation. Multiphoton excitation is shown to give a higher dynamic range of measurement than one-photon excitation. We illustrate the sub-nanometre resolution and stability of our approach by detecting a 0.8-1.1 nm silica particle hydrodynamic mean radius increase in a tetramethylorthosilicate sol at pH 2.3 labelled with rhodamine 6G and observed over ≈4 weeks and also with a stable silica colloid of radius 6 nm, pH 8.9, labelled with a 6-methoxyquinoline-type dye.

  15. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Experimental Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) studies of small molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehmer, J. L.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Ohalloran, M. A.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. An overview of current studies of excited molecular states is given to illustrate the principles and prospects of REMPI.

  17. Does Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Vinyl Chloride Yield Cold Vinylidene?

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ravin; Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2015-07-01

    Velocity map imaging of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride shows the formation of HCl in rotational levels below J = 10 that are associated with the three-center elimination pathway. The total translational energy release is observed to peak at 3-5 kcal/mol, which is consistent with the low reverse barrier predicted for the formation of HCl with vinylidene coproducts. Direct dynamics trajectory studies from the three-center transition state reproduce the observed distributions and show that the associated vinylidene is formed with only modest rotational excitation, precluding Coriolis-induced mixing among the excited vibrational levels of acetylene that would lead to distribution of vinylidene character into many vibrationally mixed acetylene vibrational levels. The results suggest that infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride is an efficient route to synthesis of stable, cold vinylidene. PMID:26266719

  18. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  19. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  20. Femtosecond Light Source for Phase-Controlled Multiphoton Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A. V.; Walker, D. R.; Yavuz, D. D.; Yin, G. Y.; Harris, S. E.

    2001-07-16

    We describe a femtosecond Raman light source with more than an octave of optical bandwidth. We use this source to demonstrate phase control of multiphoton ionization under conditions where ionization requires eleven photons of the lowest frequency of the spectrum or five photons of the highest frequency. The nonlinearity of the photoionization process allows us to characterize the light source. Experiment-to-theory comparison implies generation of a near single-cycle waveform.

  1. Single- and multiphoton infrared laser spectroscopy of atomic negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Michael

    A pulsed, tunable infrared laser source (0.6-5.2 μm) has been developed on the basis of a commercial dye laser and non-linear optical conversion techniques. This laser source was combined with a keV negative ion beam apparatus in a crossed-beam geometry, with the aim to systematically study several atomic negative ions through a variety of single- and multiphoton detachment experiments. Photodetachment threshold spectra of 21 ionic species (B- , C-, O-, Al- , Si-, Cr-, Co- , Ni-, Cu-, Ge- , Mo-, Rh-, Pd- , Ag-, Sn-, Sb- , Te-, Cs-, Ir- , Pt-, and Bi-) have been recorded, in most cases resulting in very accurate determinations of ionic binding energies, marking substantial improvements over previous experimental values. In fact, several ionic states investigated here had not been observed previously. Different schemes for resonant multiphoton detachment of atomic negative ions were demonstrated for the first time. These studies were conducted with several anions (Si-, Sri- , Sb-, Te-, Ir- , and Pt-) providing highly accurate ionic energy level splittings and clearly demonstrating that multiphoton probes are generally applicable to negative ion structure.

  2. Record Multiphoton Absorption Cross-Sections by Dendrimer Organometalation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Peter V; Watson, Laurance A; Barlow, Adam; Wang, Genmiao; Cifuentes, Marie P; Humphrey, Mark G

    2016-02-12

    Large increases in molecular two-photon absorption, the onset of measurable molecular three-photon absorption, and record molecular four-photon absorption in organic π-delocalizable frameworks are achieved by incorporation of bis(diphosphine)ruthenium units with alkynyl linkages. The resultant ruthenium alkynyl-containing dendrimers exhibit strong multiphoton absorption activity through the biological and telecommunications windows in the near-infrared region. The ligated ruthenium units significantly enhance solubility and introduce fully reversible redox switchability to the optical properties. Increasing the ruthenium content leads to substantial increases in multiphoton absorption properties without any loss of optical transparency. This significant improvement in multiphoton absorption performance by incorporation of the organometallic units into the organic π-framework is maintained when the relevant parameters are scaled by molecular weights or number of delocalizable π-electrons. The four-photon absorption cross-section of the most metal-rich dendrimer is an order of magnitude greater than the previous record value. PMID:26797727

  3. Multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Imasaka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-08-01

    In order to suppress the fragmentation and improve the sensitivity for determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), the mechanism of multiphoton ionization was studied for the following representative NPAHs, 9-nitroanthracene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, and 1-nitropyrene. The analytes were extracted from the PM2.5 on the sampling filter ultrasonically, and were measured using gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a femtosecond tunable laser in the range from 267 to 405 nm. As a result, a molecular ion was observed as the major ion and fragmentation was suppressed at wavelengths longer than 345 nm. Furthermore, the detection limit measured at 345 nm was measured to be the subpicogram level. The organic compounds were extracted from a 2.19 mg sample of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5), and the extract was subjected to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry after gas chromatograph separation. The background signals were drastically suppressed at 345 nm, and the target NPAHs, including 9-nitroanthracene and 1-nitropyrene, were detected, and their concentrations were determined to be 5 and 3 pg/m(3), respectively. PMID:26048831

  4. Advanced multiphoton methods for in vitro and in vivo functional imaging of mouse retinal neurons (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Noam; Schejter, Adi; Farah, Nairouz; Shoham, Shy

    2016-03-01

    Studying the responses of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations has major significance in vision research. Multiphoton imaging of optogenetic probes has recently become the leading approach for visualizing neural populations and has specific advantages for imaging retinal activity during visual stimulation, because it leads to reduced direct photoreceptor excitation. However, multiphoton retinal activity imaging is not straightforward: point-by-point scanning leads to repeated neural excitation while optical access through the rodent eye in vivo has proven highly challenging. Here, we present two enabling optical designs for multiphoton imaging of responses to visual stimuli in mouse retinas expressing calcium indicators. First, we present an imaging solution based on Scanning Line Temporal Focusing (SLITE) for rapidly imaging neuronal activity in vitro. In this design, we scan a temporally focused line rather than a point, increasing the scan speed and reducing the impact of repeated excitation, while maintaining high optical sectioning. Second, we present the first in vivo demonstration of two-photon imaging of RGC activity in the mouse retina. To obtain these cellular resolution recordings we integrated an illumination path into a correction-free imaging system designed using an optical model of the mouse eye. This system can image at multiple depths using an electronically tunable lens integrated into its optical path. The new optical designs presented here overcome a number of outstanding obstacles, allowing the study of rapid calcium- and potentially even voltage-indicator signals both in vitro and in vivo, thereby bringing us a step closer toward distributed monitoring of action potentials.

  5. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  6. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy applied to lipid biology.

    PubMed

    Zumbusch, Andreas; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2013-10-01

    Optical microscopy is an indispensable tool that is driving progress in cell biology. It still is the only practical means of obtaining spatial and temporal resolution within living cells and tissues. Most prominently, fluorescence microscopy based on dye-labeling or protein fusions with fluorescent tags is a highly sensitive and specific method of visualizing biomolecules within sub-cellular structures. It is however severely limited by labeling artifacts, photo-bleaching and cytotoxicity of the labels. Coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) has emerged in the last decade as a new multiphoton microscopy technique suited for imaging unlabeled living cells in real time with high three-dimensional spatial resolution and chemical specificity. This technique has proven to be particularly successful in imaging unstained lipids from artificial membrane model systems, to living cells and tissues to whole organisms. In this article, we will review the experimental implementations of CRS microscopy and their application to imaging lipids. We will cover the theoretical background of linear and non-linear vibrational micro-spectroscopy necessary for the understanding of CRS microscopy. The different experimental implementations of CRS will be compared in terms of sensitivity limits and excitation and detection methods. Finally, we will provide an overview of the applications of CRS microscopy to lipid biology. PMID:24051337

  8. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  9. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Husvogt, Lennart; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E.; Hornegger, Joachim; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems. PMID:27500636

  10. Correlative Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  11. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  12. Post-processing strategies in image scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    McGregor, J E; Mitchell, C A; Hartell, N A

    2015-10-15

    Image scanning microscopy (ISM) coupled with pixel reassignment offers a resolution improvement of √2 over standard widefield imaging. By scanning point-wise across the specimen and capturing an image of the fluorescent signal generated at each scan position, additional information about specimen structure is recorded and the highest accessible spatial frequency is doubled. Pixel reassignment can be achieved optically in real time or computationally a posteriori and is frequently combined with the use of a physical or digital pinhole to reject out of focus light. Here, we simulate an ISM dataset using a test image and apply standard and non-standard processing methods to address problems typically encountered in computational pixel reassignment and pinholing. We demonstrate that the predicted improvement in resolution is achieved by applying standard pixel reassignment to a simulated dataset and explore the effect of realistic displacements between the reference and true excitation positions. By identifying the position of the detected fluorescence maximum using localisation software and centring the digital pinhole on this co-ordinate before scaling around translated excitation positions, we can recover signal that would otherwise be degraded by the use of a pinhole aligned to an inaccurate excitation reference. This strategy is demonstrated using experimental data from a multiphoton ISM instrument. Finally we investigate the effect that imaging through tissue has on the positions of excitation foci at depth and observe a global scaling with respect to the applied reference grid. Using simulated and experimental data we explore the impact of a globally scaled reference on the ISM image and, by pinholing around the detected maxima, recover the signal across the whole field of view. PMID:25962644

  13. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  14. Adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy: comparison of two, three and four photon fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P; Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Bifano, Thomas G; Xu, Chris

    2015-11-30

    We demonstrate adaptive optics system based on nonlinear feedback from 3- and 4-photon fluorescence. The system is based on femtosecond pulses created by soliton self-frequency shift of a 1550-nm fiber-based femtosecond laser together with micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) phase spatial light modulator (SLM). We perturb the 1020-segment SLM using an orthogonal Walsh sequence basis set with a modified version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. We show the improvement after aberrations correction in 3-photon signal from fluorescent beads. In addition, we compare the improvement obtained in the same adaptive optical system for 2-, 3- and 4-photon fluorescence using dye pool. We show that signal improvement resulting from aberration correction grows exponentially as a function of the order of nonlinearity. PMID:26698772

  15. Investigation of prostate cancer cells using NADH and Tryptophan as biomarker: multiphoton FLIM-FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Shagufta; O'Melia, Meghan J.; Wallrabe, Horst; Svindrych, Zdenek; Chandra, Dhyan; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) can be used to understand the metabolic activity in cancer. Prostate cancer is one of the leading cancers in men in the USA. This research focuses on FLIM measurements of NAD(P)H and Tryptophan, used as biomarkers to understand the metabolic activity in prostate cancer cells. Two prostate cancers and one normal cell line were used for live-cell FLIM measurements on Zeiss780 2P confocal microscope with SPCM FLIM board. Glucose uptake and glycolysis proceeds about ten times faster in cancer than in non-cancerous tissues. Therefore, we assessed the glycolytic activity in the prostate cancer in comparison to the normal cells upon glucose stimulation by analyzing the NAD(P)H and Trp lifetime distribution and efficiency of energy transfer (E%). Furthermore, we treated the prostate cancer cells with 1μM Doxorubicin, a commonly used anti-cancer chemotherapeutic. Increase in NADH a2%, an indicator of increased glycolysis and increased E% between Trp and NAD(P)H were seen upon glucose stimulation for 30min. The magnitude of shift to the right for NAD(P)H a2% and E% distribution was higher in prostate cancer versus the normal cells. Upon treatment with Doxorubicin decrease in cellular metabolism was seen at 15 and 30 minutes. The histogram for NAD(P)H a2% post-treatment for prostate cancer cells showed a left shift compared to the untreated control suggesting decrease in glycolysis and metabolic activity opposite to what was observed after glucose stimulation. Hence, NAD(P)H and Trp lifetimes can be used biomarkers to understand metabolic activity in prostate cancer and upon chemotherapeutic interventions.

  16. Incoherent structured illumination improves optical sectioning and contrast in multiphoton super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter W.; Chandris, Panagiotis; Fischer, Robert S; Wu, Yicong; Waterman, Clare M; Shroff, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging in thick, semi-transparent biological specimens is hindered by light scattering, which increases background and degrades both contrast and optical sectioning. We describe a simple method that mitigates these issues, improving image quality in our recently developed two-photon instant structured illumination microscope without requiring any hardware modifications to the instrument. By exciting the specimen with three laterally-structured, phase-shifted illumination patterns and post-processing the resulting images, we digitally remove both scattered and out-of-focus emissions that would otherwise contaminate our raw data. We demonstrate the improved performance of our approach in biological samples, including pollen grains, primary mouse aortic endothelial cells cultured in a three–dimensional collagen matrix and live tumor-like cell spheroids. PMID:25836564

  17. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  18. Multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohoon, Gregory A.; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the observation of multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble whispering gallery mode resonators. High-Q microbubble resonators are a formed by heating a pressurized fused silica capillary to form a hollow bubble which can be filled with liquid. In this case, the microbubble is filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G dye. The resonator and dye are excited by evanescently coupling CW light from a 980nm laser diode using a tapered optical fiber. The two-photon fluorescence of the dye can be seen with pump powers as low as 1 mW.

  19. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1995-12-28

    A multiyear research program investigating molecular detection methods based on multiphoton spectroscopy has been completed under DOE sponsorship. A number of new laser-based spectroscopic methods were developed and applied to a variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, including monomer and cluster species. The objectives of sensitivities approaching single molecule detection combined with high selectivity were achieved. This report references the status of the field at the beginning of this work and summarizes the significant progress during the period from 1987 onward. Detailed scientific findings from the studies are presented in the published literature referenced throughout this report.

  20. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  1. Exploration of multiphoton entangled states by using weak nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying-Qiu; Ding, Dong; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    We propose a fruitful scheme for exploring multiphoton entangled states based on linear optics and weak nonlinearities. Compared with the previous schemes the present method is more feasible because there are only small phase shifts instead of a series of related functions of photon numbers in the process of interaction with Kerr nonlinearities. In the absence of decoherence we analyze the error probabilities induced by homodyne measurement and show that the maximal error probability can be made small enough even when the number of photons is large. This implies that the present scheme is quite tractable and it is possible to produce entangled states involving a large number of photons.

  2. Exploration of multiphoton entangled states by using weak nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Qiu; Ding, Dong; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    We propose a fruitful scheme for exploring multiphoton entangled states based on linear optics and weak nonlinearities. Compared with the previous schemes the present method is more feasible because there are only small phase shifts instead of a series of related functions of photon numbers in the process of interaction with Kerr nonlinearities. In the absence of decoherence we analyze the error probabilities induced by homodyne measurement and show that the maximal error probability can be made small enough even when the number of photons is large. This implies that the present scheme is quite tractable and it is possible to produce entangled states involving a large number of photons. PMID:26751044

  3. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  4. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  5. Intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Milberg, Oleg; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Sramkova, Monika; Wigand, Tim; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an extremely powerful tool that enables imaging several biological processes in live animals. Recently, the ability to image subcellular structures in several organs combined with the development of sophisticated genetic tools has made possible extending this approach to investigate several aspects of cell biology. Here we provide a general overview of intravital microscopy with the goal of highlighting its potential and challenges. Specifically, this review is geared toward researchers that are new to intravital microscopy and focuses on practical aspects of carrying out imaging in live animals. Here we share the know-how that comes from first-hand experience, including topics such as choosing the right imaging platform and modality, surgery and stabilization techniques, anesthesia and temperature control. Moreover, we highlight some of the approaches that facilitate subcellular imaging in live animals by providing numerous examples of imaging selected organelles and the actin cytoskeleton in multiple organs. PMID:22992750

  6. Lung alveolar wall disruption in three-dimensional space identified using second-harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Hogg, James

    2010-02-01

    Second harmonic generation and multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy methods were used to examine structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix in human lung alveolar walls undergoing emphysematous destruction. Fresh lung samples removed from a patient undergoing lung transplantation for very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were compared to similar samples from an unused donor lung that served as a control. The generated spatially resolved 3D images show the spatial distribution of collagen, elastin and other endogenously fluorescent tissue components such as macrophages. In the case of control lung tissue, we found well ordered alveolar walls with composite type structure made up of collagen matrix and relatively fine elastic fibers. In contrast, lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction was highly disorganized with increased alveolar wall thickness compared to control lung tissue.

  7. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  8. Ultrafast optical pulse delivery with fibers for nonlinear microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daekeun; Choi, Heejin; Yazdanfar, Siavash; So, Peter T. C.

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopies including multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy and multiple-harmonic generation microscopy have recently gained popularity for cellular and tissue imaging. The optimization of these imaging methods for minimally invasive use will require optical fibers to conduct light into tight space where free space delivery is difficult. The delivery of high peak power laser pulses with optical fibers is limited by dispersion resulting from nonlinear refractive index responses. In this paper, we characterize a variety of commonly used optical fibers in terms of how they affect pulse profile and imaging performance of nonlinear microscopy; the following parameters are quantified: spectral bandwidth and temporal pulse width, two-photon excitation efficiency, and optical resolution. A theoretical explanation for the measured performance of these is also provided. PMID:18816597

  9. Multiphoton imaging to identify grana, stroma thylakoid, and starch inside an intact leaf

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grana and starch are major functional structures for photosynthesis and energy storage of plant, respectively. Both exhibit highly ordered molecular structures and appear as micrometer-sized granules inside chloroplasts. In order to distinguish grana and starch, we used multiphoton microscopy, with simultaneous acquisition of two-photon fluorescence (2PF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. SHG is sensitive to crystallized structures while 2PF selectively reveals the distribution of chlorophyll. Result Three distinct microstructures with different contrasts were observed, i.e. “SHG dominates”, “2PF dominates”, and “SHG collocated with 2PF”. It is known that starch and grana both emit SHG due to their highly crystallized structures, and no autofluorescence is emitted from starch, so the “SHG dominates” contrast should correspond to starch. The contrast of “SHG collocated with 2PF” is assigned to be grana, which exhibit crystallized structure with autofluorescent chlorophyll. The “2PF dominates” contrast should correspond to stroma thylakoid, which is a non-packed membrane structure with chrolophyll. The contrast assignment is further supported by fluorescence lifetime measurement. Conclusion We have demonstrated a straightforward and noninvasive method to identify the distribution of grana and starch within an intact leaf. By merging the 2PF and SHG images, grana, starch and stroma thylakoid can be visually distinguished. This approach can be extended to the observation of 3D grana distribution and their dynamics in living plants. PMID:24969621

  10. Application of multiphoton steady state and lifetime imaging to mapping of tumor vascular architecture in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameer-Beg, Simon; Barber, Paul R.; Hodgkiss, R. J.; Locke, R. J.; Newman, Robert G.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Wilson, J.

    2002-06-01

    Recent interest in vascular targeting and anti-angiogenic drug treatments for cancer has stimulated fundamental research regarding the modes of action of these drugs as well as studies of the development and re-modeling of the vascular network following treatment. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is employed for in vivo mapping of three-dimensional blood vessel distribution in tumors grown in rodent dorsal skin-flap window chamber preparations. Accurate visualization of the vasculature in three-dimensions allows us to perform dynamic experiments in thick biological specimens in vivo. Examples of in vivo imaging of tumor vasculature are given and compared to normal tissue vasculature. The dynamic responses of blood vessels to treatment with the vascular targeting drug combretastatin A4-P are presented and discussed. The implementation of time-domain imaging by reversed stop-start time-correlated single photon counting (RSS-TCSPC) is discussed as a method for feature extraction in the presence of exogenous and endogenous fluorophores. In particular, the segmentation of the vascular network is demonstrated. Additional contrast, indicative of probe environmental factors, may also be realized. We present examples of in vivo lifetime imaging as a method to elucidate the physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment.

  11. A phasor approach analysis of multiphoton FLIM measurements of three-dimensional cell culture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakner, P. H.; Möller, Y.; Olayioye, M. A.; Brucker, S. Y.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Monaghan, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a useful approach to obtain information regarding the endogenous fluorophores present in biological samples. The concise evaluation of FLIM data requires the use of robust mathematical algorithms. In this study, we developed a user-friendly phasor approach for analyzing FLIM data and applied this method on three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 models of polarized epithelial luminal cysts in a supporting extracellular matrix environment. These Caco-2 based models were treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), to stimulate proliferation in order to determine if FLIM could detect such a change in cell behavior. Autofluorescence from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) in luminal Caco-2 cysts was stimulated by 2-photon laser excitation. Using a phasor approach, the lifetimes of involved fluorophores and their contribution were calculated with fewer initial assumptions when compared to multiexponential decay fitting. The phasor approach simplified FLIM data analysis, making it an interesting tool for non-experts in numerical data analysis. We observed that an increased proliferation stimulated by EGF led to a significant shift in fluorescence lifetime and a significant alteration of the phasor data shape. Our data demonstrates that multiphoton FLIM analysis with the phasor approach is a suitable method for the non-invasive analysis of 3D in vitro cell culture models qualifying this method for monitoring basic cellular features and the effect of external factors.

  12. Signal enhancement in multiphoton imaging by the use of coated glass substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Lin; Guo, Han-Wen; Chen, Yang-Fan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In nonlinear optical imaging of biological specimens, more than half of the generated luminescence signal is lost, when signal collection is performed in the epi-illuminated geometry. In this study, we enhanced the collected luminescence signal by the use of alternating multiply-coated layers of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) on standard microscope cover glasses that has high transmission in the near-infrared wavelength region and high reflection of the visible, luminescence signal. Our coating is biocompatible, allows visual examination of the specimens and optimize collection of the luminescence signal. We demonstrated this approach on a number of specimens including sulforhodamine solution, fluorescence microspheres, and labeled 3T3 cells. In all cases, the use of coated cover glass enhanced signal, optimally by a factor of about 2. Image analysis of labeled 3T3 cells also shows signal enhancement did not contribute to additional photobleaching. Our results show that properly designed coated cover glass can enhance detected signal in multiphoton microscopy and result in improved image quality. PMID:26417521

  13. Structural and functional imaging of engineered tissue development using an integrated OCT and multiphoton microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrner, Lester J., IV; Tan, Wei; Vinegoni, Claudio; Eurell, Thomas E.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2004-07-01

    Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have led to the development of complex three-dimensional tissue constructs. It has become clear, however, that the traditional tools used for studying standard cell cultures are not always adequate for diagnostically studying thick, highly-scattering cultured tissues. Furthermore, many techniques used for studying three-dimensional constructs are invasive or require exogenous fluorophores, which damage the tissue and prevent time-course studies of tissue development. An integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multi-photon microscope (MPM) has been constructed for visualizing 3-D engineered tissues. OCT was used for imaging structure and cell organization, while MPM was used for assessing functional properties of cells. We demonstrate technical developments involved in the construction of this instrument and its use in the non-destructive investigation of cell movement and tissue organization in engineered tissues. Cells labeled with GFP and exogenous fluorescent probes have also been imaged with OCT and confocal microscopy. Studies indicate that an integrated microscope has the potential to be an enabling diagnostic tool for future studies in the growth and organization of engineering tissues and in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  14. Signal enhancement in multiphoton imaging by the use of coated glass substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Lin; Guo, Han-Wen; Chen, Yang-Fan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    In nonlinear optical imaging of biological specimens, more than half of the generated luminescence signal is lost, when signal collection is performed in the epi-illuminated geometry. In this study, we enhanced the collected luminescence signal by the use of alternating multiply-coated layers of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) on standard microscope cover glasses that has high transmission in the near-infrared wavelength region and high reflection of the visible, luminescence signal. Our coating is biocompatible, allows visual examination of the specimens and optimize collection of the luminescence signal. We demonstrated this approach on a number of specimens including sulforhodamine solution, fluorescence microspheres, and labeled 3T3 cells. In all cases, the use of coated cover glass enhanced signal, optimally by a factor of about 2. Image analysis of labeled 3T3 cells also shows signal enhancement did not contribute to additional photobleaching. Our results show that properly designed coated cover glass can enhance detected signal in multiphoton microscopy and result in improved image quality. PMID:26417521

  15. Combined multiphoton imaging and automated functional enucleation of porcine oocytes using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Petersen, Bjoern; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Niemann, Heiner; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Since the birth of ``Dolly'' as the first mammal cloned from a differentiated cell, somatic cell cloning has been successful in several mammalian species, albeit at low success rates. The highly invasive mechanical enucleation step of a cloning protocol requires sophisticated, expensive equipment and considerable micromanipulation skill. We present a novel noninvasive method for combined oocyte imaging and automated functional enucleation using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After three-dimensional imaging of Hoechst-labeled porcine oocytes by multiphoton microscopy, our self-developed software automatically identified the metaphase plate. Subsequent irradiation of the metaphase chromosomes with the very same laser at higher pulse energies in the low-density-plasma regime was used for metaphase plate ablation (functional enucleation). We show that fs laser-based functional enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibited the parthenogenetic development without affecting the oocyte morphology. In contrast, nonirradiated oocytes were able to develop parthenogenetically to the blastocyst stage without significant differences to controls. Our results indicate that fs laser systems have great potential for oocyte imaging and functional enucleation and may improve the efficiency of somatic cell cloning.

  16. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  17. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  18. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  19. Multi-photon absorption in the channeling of electrons in an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaralov, V.

    2016-07-01

    Following the methods developed for atom ionization by alternating electric field the probability of multi-photon absorption of photons of the strong external laser field by channeled electron (extraction of electron from the channel) have been calculated for different strengths of the monochromatic external field. The emission spectra of 54 MeV electron channeled in diamond crystal planes (110) are shown for different values of the resonant laser field of a frequency close to the transition frequency in the channel taking into account multi-photon absorption. It is shown that the multi-photon phenomena give some contribution to the total level width.

  20. Generating Nanostructures with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Fardel, Romain; Schmidt, Michael; Arnold, Craig B.

    The need to generate sub 100 nm features is of interest for a variety of applications including optics, optoelectronics, and plasmonics. To address this requirement, several advanced optical lithography techniques have been developed based on either multiphoton absorption polymerization or near-field effects. In this paper, we combine strengths from multiphoton absorption and near field using optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN). A Gaussian beam is used to position a microsphere in a polymer precursor fluid near a substrate. An ultrafast laser is focused by that microsphere to induce multiphoton polymerization in the near field, leading additive direct-write nanoscale processing.

  1. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  2. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  3. A series of flexible design adaptations to the Nikon E-C1 and E-C2 confocal microscope systems for UV, multiphoton and FLIM imaging.

    PubMed

    Botchway, Stanley W; Scherer, Kathrin M; Hook, Steve; Stubbs, Christopher D; Weston, Eleanor; Bisby, Roger H; Parker, Anthony W

    2015-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is widely employed in the life sciences using extrinsic fluorescence of low- and high-molecular weight labels with excitation and emission spectra in the visible and near infrared regions. For imaging of intrinsic and extrinsic fluorophores with excitation spectra in the ultraviolet region, multiphoton excitation with one- or two-colour lasers avoids the need for ultraviolet-transmitting excitation optics and has advantages in terms of optical penetration in the sample and reduced phototoxicity. Excitation and detection of ultraviolet emission around 300 nm and below in a typical inverted confocal microscope is more difficult and requires the use of expensive quartz optics including the objective. In this technical note we describe the adaptation of a commercial confocal microscope (Nikon, Japan E-C1 or E-C2) for versatile use with Ti-sapphire and OPO laser sources and the addition of a second detection channel that enables detection of ultraviolet fluorescence and increases detection sensitivity in a typical fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy experiment. Results from some experiments with this setup illustrate the resulting capabilities. PMID:25664385

  4. Monitoring femtosecond laser microscopic photothermolysis with multimodal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Lui, Harvey; Zhao, Jianhua; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    Photothermolysis induced by femtosecond (fs) lasers may be a promising modality in dermatology because of its advantages of high precision due to multiphoton absorption and deeper penetration due to the use of near infrared wavelengths. Although multiphoton absorption nonlinear effects are capable of precision targeting, the femtosecond laser photothermolysis could still have effects beyond the targeted area if a sufficiently high dose of laser light is used. Such unintended effects could be minimized by real time monitoring photothermolysis during the treatment. Targeted photothermolytic treatment of ex vivo mouse skin dermis was performed with tightly focused fs laser beams. Images of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), second harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) of the mouse skins were obtained with integrated multimodal microscopy before, during, and after the laser treatment. The RCM, SHG, and TPF signal intensities of the treatment areas changed after high power femtosecond laser irradiation. The intensities of the RCM and SHG signals decreased when the tissue was damaged, while the intensity of the TPF signal increased when the photothermolysis was achieved. Moreover, the TPF signal was more susceptible to the degree of the photothermolysis than the RCM and SHG signals. The results suggested that multimodal microscopy is a potentially useful tool to monitor and assess the femtosecond laser treatment of the skin to achieve microscopic photothermolysis with high precision.

  5. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  6. Multiphoton Processes: ICOMP VIII: 8th International Conference, AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 525 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Freeman, R.R.; Kulander, K.C.

    2000-12-31

    Topics include: atoms in strong fields; stabilization; double ionization and multi-electron calculations; high-order harmonics; molecules in strong fields; multiphoton processes in clusters; coherent control; light sources; and relativistic effects.

  7. Resolution doubling using confocal microscopy via analogy with structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with a 2-fold higher lateral resolution than conventional wide-field fluorescence (WF) microscopy. Confocal fluorescence (CF) microscopy has approximately the same optical cutoff frequency as SIM; however, the maximum theoretical increase in lateral resolution over that of WF is 1.4-fold with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Quantitative comparisons based on an analytical imaging formula revealed that modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of SIM reconstructed images before postprocessing are nearly identical to those of CF images recorded with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Here, we propose a new method using an adequate pinhole diameter combined with the use of an apodized Fourier inverse filter to increase the lateral resolution of CF images to as much as that SIM images without significant noise degradation in practice. Furthermore, the proposed method does not require a posteriori parameterization and has reproducibility. This approach can be easily applied to conventional laser scanning CF, spinning disk CF, and multiphoton microscopies.

  8. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  9. Multimodal light-sheet microscopy for fluorescence live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Y.; Kajiura-Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-sheet microscopy, it is known as single plane illumination microscope (SPIM), is a fluorescence imaging technique which can avoid phototoxic effects to living cells and gives high contrast and high spatial resolution by optical sectioning with light-sheet illumination in developmental biology. We have been developed a multifunctional light-sheet fluorescence microscopy system with a near infrared femto-second fiber laser, a high sensitive image sensor and a high throughput spectrometer. We performed that multiphoton fluorescence images of a transgenic fish and a mouse embryo were observed on the light-sheet microscope. As the results, two photon images with high contrast and high spatial resolution were successfully obtained in the microscopy system. The system has multimodality, not only mutiphoton fluorescence imaging, but also hyperspectral imaging, which can be applicable to fluorescence unmixing analysis and Raman imaging. It enables to obtain high specific and high throughput molecular imaging in vivo and in vitro.

  10. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  11. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  12. Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

  13. Multiphoton-state-assisted entanglement purification of material qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernád, József Zsolt; Torres, Juan Mauricio; Kunz, Ludwig; Alber, Gernot

    2016-03-01

    We propose an entanglement purification scheme based on material qubits and ancillary coherent multiphoton states. We consider a typical QED scenario where material qubits implemented by two-level atoms fly sequentially through a cavity and interact resonantly with a single mode of the radiation field. We explore the theoretical possibilities of realizing a high-fidelity two-qubit quantum operation necessary for the purification protocol with the help of a postselective balanced homodyne photodetection. We demonstrate that the obtained probabilistic quantum operation can be used as a bilateral operation in the proposed purification scheme. It is shown that the probabilistic nature of this quantum operation is counterbalanced in the last step of the scheme where qubits are not discarded after inadequate qubit measurements. As this protocol requires present-day experimental setups and generates high-fidelity entangled pairs with high repetition rates, it may offer interesting perspectives for applications in quantum information theory.

  14. Guided Homing of Cells in Multi-Photon Microfabricated Bioscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A; Liu, Man-Chi; Wu, Yuelong; Dixit, Atray; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-05-01

    Tissues contain exquisite vascular microstructures, and patterns of chemical cues for directing cell migration, homing, and differentiation for organ development and function. 3D microfabrication by multi-photon photolithography is a flexible, high-resolution tool for generating 3D bioscaffolds. However, the combined fabrication of scaffold microstructure simultaneously with patterning of cues to create both geometrically and chemically defined microenvironments remains to be demonstrated. This study presents a high-speed method for micron-resolution fabrication of scaffold microstructure and patterning of protein cues simultaneously using native scaffold materials. By the simultaneous microfabrication of arbitrary microvasculature geometries, and patterning selected regions of the microvasculature with the homing ligand P-selectin, this study demonstrates adhesion, rolling, and selective homing of cells in defined 3D regions. This novel ability to generate high-resolution geometries replete with patterned cues at high speed enables the construction of biomimetic microenvironments for complex 3D assays of cellular behavior. PMID:27059425

  15. Theory of multiphoton and tunnel ionization in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bagulov, D. S.; Kotelnikov, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    The imaginary-time method [6, 7] is used to calculate the multiphoton and tunnel ionization probabilities for atoms in a laser radiation field part of which is converted into the second harmonic. We assume that the first harmonic has a linear or elliptical polarization and the second harmonic is polarized linearly, with its polarization vector making an arbitrary angle with that of the first harmonic. The mean momentum of the photoelectrons knocked out from atoms is shown to depend on the phase shift between the first and second harmonics and their mutual polarization and to be identically equal to zero for a monochromatic field. An important difference between the case of elliptical polarization and the case of linear polarization of both harmonics is the absence of conditions under which the conditions for dominance of one of the two generation mechanisms considered here can be identified during the generation of terahertz radiation from the region of optical breakdown in a gas.

  16. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  17. Multiphoton quantum Rabi oscillations in ultrastrong cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garziano, Luigi; Stassi, Roberto; Macrı, Vincenzo; Kockum, Anton Frisk; Savasta, Salvatore; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    When an atom is strongly coupled to a cavity, the two systems can exchange a single photon through a coherent Rabi oscillation. This process enables precise quantum-state engineering and manipulation of atoms and photons in a cavity, which play a central role in quantum information and measurement. Recently, a new regime of cavity QED was reached experimentally where the strength of the interaction between light and artificial atoms (qubits) becomes comparable to the atomic transition frequency or the resonance frequency of the cavity mode. Here we show that this regime can strongly modify the concept of vacuum Rabi oscillations, enabling multiphoton exchanges between the qubit and the resonator. We find that experimental state-of-the-art circuit-QED systems can undergo two- and three-photon vacuum Rabi oscillations. These anomalous Rabi oscillations can be exploited for the realization of efficient Fock-state sources of light and complex entangled states of qubits.

  18. High-Resolution Multiphoton Imaging of Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo. PMID:21969629

  19. Multiphoton ionization and third-harmonic generation in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) provides a powerful new method for investigating atomic and molecular energy levels. The method is particularly useful in discovering and characterizing certain optically forbidden transitions. The method is particularly well suited for studying Rydberg transitions in molecules and is experimentally easier than the traditional use of far ultraviolet radiation in conventional spectroscopy. Research on multiphoton ionization and third-harmonic generation is reviewed. (WHK)

  20. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively. PMID:26817674

  1. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively. PMID:26817674

  2. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Shuoyu; Tai, Dean; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-11-01

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for label-free monitoring of the progression of liver steatosis and fibrosis generated in a bile duct ligation (BDL) rat model. Among the 21 adult rats used in this study, 18 rats were performed with BDL surgery and sacrificed each week from weeks 1 to 6 (n = 3 per week), respectively; whereas 3 rats as control were sacrificed at week 0. Colocalized imaging of the aggregated hepatic fats, collagen fibrils, and hepatocyte morphologies in liver tissue is realized by using the integrated CARS, SHG, and TPEF technique. The results show that there are significant accumulations of hepatic lipid droplets and collagen fibrils associated with severe hepatocyte necrosis in BDL rat liver as compared to a normal liver tissue. The volume of normal hepatocytes keeps decreasing and the fiber collagen content in BDL rat liver follows a growing trend until week 6; whereas the hepatic fat content reaches a maximum in week 4 and then appears to stop growing in week 6, indicating that liver steatosis and fibrosis induced in a BDL rat liver model may develop at different rates. This work demonstrates that the integrated CARS and multiphoton microscopy imaging technique has the potential to provide an effective means for early diagnosis and detection of liver steatosis and fibrosis without labeling.

  3. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively.

  4. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  5. Long-term marker-free multiphoton imaging, targeted transfection, optical cleaning of stem cell clusters, and optical transport of microRNA with extreme ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Földes-Papp, Zeno; Kostner, Gerhard M.; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    The novel utrashort femtosecond laser scanning microscope FemtOgene (JenLab GmbH, Germany) with 12 femtoseconds at the focal plane have been employed in marker-free imaging and optical manipulation of stem cells as well as for the non-contact introduction of microRNA in cancer cells. Human adult pancreatic stem cells, salivary gland stem cells, and human dental pulp stem cells have been investigated by femtosecond laser multiphoton microscopy. Autofluorescence based on NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and second harmonic generation due to collagen have been imaged with submicron spatial resolution, 270 ps temporal resolution, and 10 nm spectral resolution. Major emission peaks at 460 nm and 530 nm with typical mean fluorescence lifetimes of 1.8 ns and 2.0 ns, respectively, were measured in a variety of stem cells using spectral imaging and time-correlated single photon counting. During differentiation, the ratios of bound to free NAD(P)H and NAD(P)H/flavoproteins changed. In addition, the biosynthesis of lipids and collagen was detected over a long period of time of up to 5 weeks. Nanoprocessing was performed with 12 femtosecond laser pulses and low picojoule pulse energies to realize targeted transfection and optical cleaning of human adult stem cell populations. Multiphoton sub-20fs microscopes may become novel non-invasive tools for marker-free optical stem cell characterization, for on-line monitoring of differentiation within a three-dimensional microenvironment, and for optical manipulation.

  6. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n-mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  7. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n -mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)
    ], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  8. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  9. Single and Multiphoton Infrared Laser Sectroscopy of Atomic Negative Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, René C.; Scheer, Michael; Brodie, Cicely A.; Haugen, Harold K.

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated several atomic negative ion species with the aid of a pulsed, tunable infrared laser source (M. Scheer, H.K. Haugen, and D.R. Beck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 4104 (1997); M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 684 (1998).. In a comprehensive study of the carbon group negative ions (C^-, Si^-, Ge^-, Sn^-, Pb^-) a combination of single and multiphoton techniques was utilized to determine the bound terms and fine structure levels of the p^3 (ground state) configuration. The results comprise accurate electron affinities and the first experimental data on the fine structure of the ^2DJ terms in Si^-, Ge^-, and Sn^-. In addition, photodetachment threshold spectroscopy provided significantly impoved electron affinities for B, Cr, Mo, Ru, Rh, W, and Bi. The detachment cross section of B^-(^3P_J) appeared as a sequence of closely spaced thresholds which enabled the first experimental determination of the ionic fine structure. The detachment cross section of W^- indicates the presence of unexpected and previously unobserved resonances just below the W(5d^56s ^7S_3) threshold.

  10. The polarization effect of a laser in multiphoton Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Lü, Qing-Zheng; Teng, Ai-Ping; Li, Ying-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The multiphoton Compton scattering in a high-intensity laser beam is studied by using the laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics (QED) method, which is a non-perturbative theory for the interaction between a plane electromagnetic field and a charged particle. In order to analyze in the real experimental condition, a Lorentz transformation for the cross section of this process is derived between the laboratory frame and the initial rest frame of electrons. The energy of the scattered photon is analyzed, as well as the cross sections for different laser intensities and polarizations and different electron velocities. The angular distribution of the emitted photon is investigated in a special velocity of the electron, in which for a fixed number of absorbed photons, the electron energy will not change after the scattering in the lab frame. We obtain the conclusion that higher laser intensities suppress few-laser-photon absorption and enhance more-laser-photon absorption. A comparison between different polarizations is also made, and we find that the linearly polarized laser is more suitable to generate nonlinear Compton scattering.

  11. Security of quantum key distribution with multiphoton components

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Most qubit-based quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols extract the secure key merely from single-photon component of the attenuated lasers. However, with the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, the unconditionally secure key can be extracted from the two-photon component by modifying the classical post-processing procedure in the BB84 protocol. Employing the merits of SARG04 QKD protocol and six-state preparation, one can extract secure key from the components of single photon up to four photons. In this paper, we provide the exact relations between the secure key rate and the bit error rate in a six-state SARG04 protocol with single-photon, two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon sources. By restricting the mutual information between the phase error and bit error, we obtain a higher secure bit error rate threshold of the multiphoton components than previous works. Besides, we compare the performances of the six-state SARG04 with other prepare-and-measure QKD protocols using decoy states. PMID:27383014

  12. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  13. Tunneling dynamics in multiphoton ionization and attoclock calibration.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, Michael; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-02-27

    The intermediate domain of strong-field ionization between the tunneling and multiphoton regimes is investigated using the strong-field approximation and the imaginary-time method. An intuitive model for the dynamics is developed which describes the ionization process within a nonadiabatic tunneling picture with a coordinate dependent electron energy during the under-the-barrier motion. The nonadiabatic effects in the elliptically polarized laser field induce a transversal momentum shift of the tunneled electron wave packet at the tunnel exit and a delayed appearance in the continuum as well as a shift of the tunneling exit towards the ionic core. The latter significantly modifies the Coulomb focusing during the electron excursion in the laser field after exiting the ionization tunnel. We show that nonadiabatic effects are especially large when the Coulomb field of the ionic core is taken into account during the under-the-barrier motion. The simple man model modified with these nonadiabatic corrections provides an intuitive background for exact theories and has direct implications for the calibration of the attoclock technique. PMID:25768761

  14. Multiphoton population transfer between rovibrational states of HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Turker; Robicheaux, Francis

    2011-05-01

    Efficient population transfer by adiabatically chirping through a multiphoton resonance in microwave driven and impulsively kicked Rydberg atoms has been reported both experimentally and theoretically. Previous work has demonstrated that the physical mechanism responsible for the transition can be viewed as a classical process in phase space as well as a quantum mechanical resonant transition. Here we report on our classical and quantum mechanical simulations in which we have exploited this mechanism to vibrationally excite an HF molecule up to | ν = 4 , J > from its ground state using an intense IR pulse. We compare one-dimensional quantum and classical models where there are no rotational degrees of freedom. We find that for low laser intensities, the transition is classically forbidden although it occurs quantum mechanically through tunneling. We show that for larger peak intensities, the transfer can be looked upon as a classical transition in phase space, similar to that observed in the atomic case. We extend our simulations to fully three-dimensional quantum calculations and investigate the effect of coupling between different rotational pathways. We briefly discuss the effect of thermal averaging over the final J-states. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration. PMID:26469361

  16. Security of quantum key distribution with multiphoton components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Most qubit-based quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols extract the secure key merely from single-photon component of the attenuated lasers. However, with the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, the unconditionally secure key can be extracted from the two-photon component by modifying the classical post-processing procedure in the BB84 protocol. Employing the merits of SARG04 QKD protocol and six-state preparation, one can extract secure key from the components of single photon up to four photons. In this paper, we provide the exact relations between the secure key rate and the bit error rate in a six-state SARG04 protocol with single-photon, two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon sources. By restricting the mutual information between the phase error and bit error, we obtain a higher secure bit error rate threshold of the multiphoton components than previous works. Besides, we compare the performances of the six-state SARG04 with other prepare-and-measure QKD protocols using decoy states.

  17. Security of quantum key distribution with multiphoton components.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Most qubit-based quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols extract the secure key merely from single-photon component of the attenuated lasers. However, with the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, the unconditionally secure key can be extracted from the two-photon component by modifying the classical post-processing procedure in the BB84 protocol. Employing the merits of SARG04 QKD protocol and six-state preparation, one can extract secure key from the components of single photon up to four photons. In this paper, we provide the exact relations between the secure key rate and the bit error rate in a six-state SARG04 protocol with single-photon, two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon sources. By restricting the mutual information between the phase error and bit error, we obtain a higher secure bit error rate threshold of the multiphoton components than previous works. Besides, we compare the performances of the six-state SARG04 with other prepare-and-measure QKD protocols using decoy states. PMID:27383014

  18. In Vivo Two-Photon Microscopy of Single Nerve Endings in Skin

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Molotkov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Nerve endings in skin are involved in physiological processes such as sensing1 as well as in pathological processes such as neuropathic pain2. Their close-to-surface positioning facilitates microscopic imaging of skin nerve endings in living intact animal. Using multiphoton microscopy, it is possible to obtain fine images overcoming the problem of strong light scattering of the skin tissue. Reporter transgenic mice that express EYFP under the control of Thy-1 promoter in neurons (including periphery sensory neurons) are well suited for the longitudinal studies of individual nerve endings over extended periods of time up to several months or even life-long. Furthermore, using the same femtosecond laser as for the imaging, it is possible to produce highly selective lesions of nerve fibers for the studies of the nerve fiber restructuring. Here, we present a simple and reliable protocol for longitudinal multiphoton in vivo imaging and laser-based microsurgery on mouse skin nerve endings. PMID:25178088

  19. Label-free multiphoton imaging and photoablation of preinvasive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Wu, Guizhu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Xie, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Detection and treatment of early lesions in epithelial tissue offer several possibilities for curing cancer, but it is challenging. Here, we present an optical technique, the combination of multiphoton imaging and absorption, to label-freely detect and ablate preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. We find that multiphoton imaging can label-freely visualize the principal features of nuclear atypia associated with epithelial precancerous lesions, and the spatial localization of multiphoton absorption can perform targeted ablation of preinvasive cancer cells with micrometer-sized volume precision. These results indicate that this optical technique has the capability to label-freely visualize and remove preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a "seek-and-treat" tool for early lesions in epithelial tissue.

  20. Real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with serosal invasion using multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Zheng, Yu; Zheng, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhangyuanzhu; Liu, Wenju; Chen, Dexin; Dong, Xiaoyu; Li, Kai; Liu, Xiumin; Chen, Gang; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    A real-time optical biopsy, which could determine tissue histopathology, would be of extraordinary benefit to staging laparoscopy for gastric cancer with serosal invasion (T4) that requires downstage treatment. We investigated the feasibility of using multiphoton imaging to perform a real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion. First, a pilot study was performed to establish the optical diagnostic features of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion using multiphoton imaging compared with hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome staining. Second, a blinded study was performed to compare the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of multiphoton imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for T4 gastric cancer. In the pilot study, multiphoton imaging revealed collagen loss and degradation and cellular and nuclear pleomorphism in gastric cancer with serosal invasion. The collagen content in gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion was 0.36 ± 0.18 and 0.79 ± 0.16 (p < 0.001), respectively. In the blinded study, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EUS and multiphoton imaging for T4 gastric cancer were 70% and 90% (p = 0.029), 66.67% and 96.67% (p = 0.003), and 68.33% and 93.33% (p = 0.001), respectively. It is feasible to use multiphoton imaging to make a real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion. PMID:27499365

  1. Diagrammatic analysis of multiphoton processes in a ladder-type three-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Moon, Han Seb

    2011-11-15

    We present a diagrammatic method for complete characterization of multiphoton processes in three-level atomic systems. By considering the interaction routes of the coupling and probe photons for a ladder-type, three-level, noncycling (or cycling) atomic system, we are able to completely discriminate between the pure one-photon and the pure two-photon resonance effects, and the effect of their combination in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using our diagrammatic method. We show that the proposed diagrammatic method is very useful for the analysis of multiphoton processes in ladder-type EIT.

  2. Fermi-coupled spherically adapted effective states in the collisionless multiphoton excitation of SF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lauro, C.; Lattanzi, F.

    1982-10-01

    A calculation method for the collisionless multiphoton excitation of SF 6 by intense CO 2 laser light up to a chain of parallel nv3, ( n - 1) v3 + v2 + v6 … vibrational-rotational ladders linked by Fermi interaction is described. Spherically adapted effective states suitable to the purpose are defined, and matrix elements for multiphoton excitation in the rotatingwave approximation effective hamiltonian formalism are given in this basis. The method is aimed at the investigation of population transfer between the cited parallel vibrational ladders, and is suitable for computer-calculation programmation.

  3. Effect of Multiphoton Processes on Geometric Quantum Computation in Superconducting Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Yong

    2012-11-01

    We study the influence of multi-photon processes on the geometric quantum computation in the systems of superconducting qubits based on the displacement-like and the general squeezed operator methods. As an example, we focus on the question about how to implement a two-qubit geometric phase gate using superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics with both single- and two-photon interaction between the qubits and the cavity modes. We find that the multiphoton processes are not only controllable but also improve the gating speed. The comparison with other physical systems and experimental feasibility are discussed in detail.

  4. Multiphoton ionization-fragmentation patterns of tertiary amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. H.; Bernstein, R. B.; Lichtin, D. A.

    1981-09-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI)-fragmentation patterns are reported for a series of normal and caged tertiary amines. Ionization is enhanced by two-photon resonance with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of trimethylamine, triethylamine, and the caged amines quinuclidine and triethylenediamine. Over the wavelength region λ = 400-530 nm, N(CH3)3 ionizes to the parent ion (P) and fragments only by the loss of a H atom to yield the P-H daughter ion; N(C2H5)3 ionizes to its parent ion and fragments by the loss of a methyl to form the P-CH3 ion. The branching ratio of daughter to parent ions is found to be essentially independent of laser intensity but strongly dependent on laser wavelength. The caged amines quinuclidine [N(C2H4)3CH, or ABCO] and triethylenediamine [N(C2H4)3N, or DABCO] fragment extensively over this λ range in a manner dependent on both laser wavelength and intensity. The extent of daughter ion formation in N(CH3)3 and N(C2H5)3 can be understood by consideration of the wavelength regions in which the total available energy from the initial three- or four-photon ionization event exceeds the appearance potential of the given daughter ion. For the caged amines direct observation of this mechanism is masked by fragmentation due to sequential absorption of photons (during the ˜5 ns pulse duration) by the parent and/or daughter ions. The present results show that even for molecules with broad, unstructured UV absorption and MPI spectra such as N(CH3)3 and N(C2H5)3, considerable information on photon-molecule and photon-ion interactions can still be gained by the MPI mass spectrometry technique.

  5. Multiphoton-scattering theory and generalized master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tao; Chang, Darrick E.; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    We develop a scattering theory to investigate the multiphoton transmission in a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of quantum emitters. It is based on a path integral formalism, uses displacement transformations, and does not require the Markov approximation. We obtain the full time evolution of the global system, including the emitters and the photonic field. Our theory allows us to compute the transition amplitude between arbitrary initial and final states, as well as the S matrix of the asymptotic in and out states. For the case of few incident photons in the waveguide, we also rederive a generalized master equation in the Markov limit. We compare the predictions of the developed scattering theory and that with the Markov approximation. We illustrate our methods with five examples of few-photon scattering: (i) by a two-level emitter, (ii) in the Jaynes-Cummings model; (iii) by an array of two-level emitters; (iv) by a two-level emitter in the half-end waveguide; and (v) by an array of atoms coupled to Rydberg levels. In the first two, we show the application of the scattering theory in the photon scattering by a single emitter, and examine the correctness of our theory with the well-known results. In the third example, we analyze the condition of the Markov approximation for the photon scattering in the array of emitters. In the fourth one, we show how a quantum emitter can generate entanglement of outgoing photons. Finally, we highlight the interplay between the phenomenon of electromagnetic-induced transparency and the Rydberg interaction, and show how this results in a rich variety of possibilities in the quantum statistics of the scattering photons.

  6. Energetics from Slow Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Jockusch, Rebecca A.; Paech, Kolja

    2005-01-01

    Photodissociation kinetics of the protonated pentapeptide leucine enkephalin measured using a cw CO2 laser and a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer are reported. A short induction period, corresponding to the time required to raise the internal energy of the ion population to a (dissociating) steady state, is observed. After this induction period, the dissociation data are accurately fit by first-order kinetics. A plot of the log of the unimolecular dissociation rate constant, kuni, as a function of the log of laser power is linear at low laser powers (<9 W, kuni <0.05 s−1), but tapers off at high laser power (9–33 W, kuni = 0.05–7 s−1). The entire measured dissociation curve can be accurately fit by an exponential function plus a constant. The experiment is simulated using a master equation formalism. In the model, the laser radiation is described as an energetically flat-topped distribution which is spatially uniform. This description is consistent with experimental results which indicate that ion motion within the cell averages out spatial inhomogeneities in the laser light. The model has several adjustable parameters. The effect of varying these parameters on the calculated kinetics and power dependence curves is discussed. A procedure for determining a limited range of threshold dissociation energy, Eo, which fits both the measured induction period and power dependence curves, is presented. Using this procedure, Eo of leucine enkephalin is determined to be 1.12–1.46 eV. This result is consistent with, although less precise than, values measured previously using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation. Although the blackbody dissociation results were used as a starting point to search for fits of the master equation model to experiment, these results demonstrate that it is, in principle, possible to determine a limited range of Eo from slow infrared multiphoton dissociation data alone. PMID:16467893

  7. Multiphoton spectral analysis of benzo[a]pyrene uptake and metabolism in a rat liver cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Barhoumi, Rola; Mouneimne, Youssef; Ramos, Ernesto; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Safe, Stephen; Parrish, Alan R.; Burghardt, Robert C.

    2011-05-15

    Dynamic analysis of the uptake and metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites within live cells in real time has the potential to provide novel insights into genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms of cellular injury caused by PAHs. The present work, combining the use of metabolite spectra generated from metabolite standards using multiphoton spectral analysis and an 'advanced unmixing process', identifies and quantifies the uptake, partitioning, and metabolite formation of one of the most important PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, BaP) in viable cultured rat liver cells over a period of 24 h. The application of the advanced unmixing process resulted in the simultaneous identification of 8 metabolites in live cells at any single time. The accuracy of this unmixing process was verified using specific microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, glucuronidation and sulfation inhibitors as well as several mixtures of metabolite standards. Our findings prove that the two-photon microscopy imaging surpasses the conventional fluorescence imaging techniques and the unmixing process is a mathematical technique that seems applicable to the analysis of BaP metabolites in living cells especially for analysis of changes of the ultimate carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8-dihydrodiol-t-9,10-epoxide. Therefore, the combination of the two-photon acquisition with the unmixing process should provide important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which BaP and other PAHs alter cellular homeostasis.

  8. Intravital multiphoton imaging of the selective uptake of water-dispersible quantum dots into sinusoidal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaowen; Grice, Jeffrey E; Zhu, Yian; Liu, David; Sanchez, Washington Y; Li, Zhen; Crawford, Darrell H G; Le Couteur, David G; Cogger, Victoria C; Liu, Xin; Xu, Zhi Ping; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Although many studies reporting the organ-level biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) in animals, very few have addressed the fate of NPs in organs at the cellular level. The liver appears to be the main organ for accumulation of NPs after intravenous injection. In this study, for the first time, the in vivo spatiotemporal disposition of recently developed mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide (CdTe/CdS) quantum dots (QDs) is explored in rat liver using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) coupled with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), with subcellular resolution (∼1 μm). With high fluorescence efficiency and largely improved stability in the biological environment, these QDs show a distinct distribution pattern in the liver compared to organic dyes, rhodamine 123 and fluorescein. After intravenous injection, fluorescent molecules are taken up by hepatocytes and excreted into the bile, while negatively charged QDs are retained in the sinusoids and selectively taken up by sinusoidal cells (Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells), but not by hepatocytes within 3 h. The results could help design NPs targeting the specific types of liver cells and choose the fluorescent markers for appropriate cellular imaging. PMID:25504510

  9. Third harmonic generation microscopy of a mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Domingue, Scott R.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Bartels, Randy A.; Ammar, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate lipid-specific imaging of the retina through the use of third harmonic generation (THG), a multiphoton microscopic technique in which tissue contrast is generated from optical inhomogeneities. Methods A custom fiber laser and multiphoton microscope was constructed and optimized for simultaneous two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF) and THG retinal imaging. Imaging was performed using fixed-frozen sections of mouse eyes without the use of exogenous fluorescent dyes. In parallel experiments, a fluorescent nuclear stain was used to verify the location of the retinal cell nuclei. Results Simultaneous THG and TPAF images revealed all retinal layers with subcellular resolution. In BALB/c strains, the THG signal stems from the lipidic organelles of the cellular and nuclear membranes. In the C57BL/6 strain, the THG signal from the RPE cells originates from the pigmented granules. Conclusions THG microscopy can be used to image structures of the mouse retina using contrast inherent to the tissue and without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. PMID:25999681

  10. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles. PMID:23889391

  11. Semiclassical analysis of long-wavelength multiphoton processes: The Rydberg atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela-Arevalo, Luz V.; Fox, Ronald F.

    2004-06-01

    We study the problem of multiphoton processes for intense, long-wavelength irradiation of atomic and molecular electrons. An exact, nonperturbative approach is applied to the standard vector potential coupling Hamiltonian for a three-dimensional hydrogenlike atom in a microwave field treated semiclassically. Multiphoton probability exchange is calculated in both the velocity and the length gauges, by applying the Goeppert-Mayer gauge transformation. The expansion of the time-dependent solution in terms of Floquet states delineates the mechanism of multiphoton transitions. A detailed analysis of the Floquet states and quasienergies as functions of the field parameters allows us to describe the relation between avoided quasienergy crossings and multiphoton probability exchange. We formulate analytical expressions for the variation of quasienergies and Floquet states with respect to the field parameters, and demonstrate that avoided quasienergy crossings are accompanied by dramatic changes in the Floquet states. Analysis of the Floquet states, for small values of the field strength, yields selection rules for the avoided quasienergy crossings. In the case of strong fields, the simultaneous choice of frequency and strength of the field producing an avoided crossing results in improved ionization probability.

  12. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  13. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  14. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)
    ], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  15. The Multiphoton Interaction of Lambda Model Atom and Two-Mode Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tang-Kun

    1996-01-01

    The system of two-mode fields interacting with atom by means of multiphotons is addressed, and the non-classical statistic quality of two-mode fields with interaction is discussed. Through mathematical calculation, some new rules of non-classical effects of two-mode fields which evolue with time, are established.

  16. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    PubMed

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. PMID:26295168

  17. Clinical combination of multiphoton tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging for evaluation of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Speicher, M.; Koehler, M. J.; Scharenberg, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.

    2010-02-01

    For the first time, high frequency ultrasound imaging, multiphoton tomography, and dermoscopy were combined in a clinical study. Different dermatoses such as benign and malign skin cancers, connective tissue diseases, inflammatory skin diseases and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art and highly sophisticated ultrasound systems for dermatology, (ii) the femtosecond-laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color imaging of the skin surface with a magnification up to 70x. Ultrasound images are generated from reflections of the emitted ultrasound signal, based on inhomogeneities of the tissue. These echoes are converted to electrical signals. Depending on the ultrasound frequency the penetration depth varies from about 1 mm to 16 mm in dermatological application. The 100-MHz-ultrasound system provided an axial resolution down to 16 μm and a lateral resolution down to 32 μm. In contrast to the wide-field ultrasound images, multiphoton tomography provided horizontal optical sections of 0.36×0.36 mm2 down to 200 μm tissue depth with submicron resolution. The autofluorescence of mitochondrial coenzymes, melanin, and elastin as well as the secondharmonic- generation signal of the collagen network were imaged. The combination of ultrasound and multiphoton tomography provides a novel opportunity for diagnostics of skin disorders.

  18. Photoelectron momentum spectra for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Serge; Macek, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Full three-dimensional electron momentum distribution for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses are calculated by solving the time-dependent solutions of Schr"odinger equation on a three-dimensional lattice in a scaled coordinate representation (CSLTDSE). This approach allows one to circumvent many difficulties related to the propagation of wave function to macroscopic distances.

  19. Supersonic jet/multiphoton ionization spectrometry of chemical species resulting from thermal decomposition and laser ablation of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Masami; Murata, Yoshiaki; Cheng-Huang Lin, Imasaka, Totaro

    1995-04-01

    The chemical species resulting from thermal decomposition and laser ablation of polymers are measured by excitation/fluorescence and multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometries after supersonic jet expansion for rotational cooling to simply the optical spectrum. The signal of minor chemical species occurred is strongly enhanced by resonant excitation and multiphoton ionization, and even the isomer can be clearly differentiated. For example, p-cresol occurred by thermal decomposition of polycarbonate is detected selectively by mass-selected resonant multiphoton ionization spectrometry. Various chemical species occurred by laser ablation of even a polystyrene foam are also measured by this technique.

  20. Exploring the potential of Multiphoton Laser Ablation Lithography (MP-LAL) as a reliable technique for sub-50nm patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manouras, Theodoros; Angelakos, Evangelos; Vamvakaki, Maria; Argitis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    In this work, direct-write, high-resolution multiphoton photolithography using doped random methacrylic co-polymer thin films is demonstrated, using a continuous wave ultraviolet (UV) 375 nm diode laser source. The random copolymers are specifically designed for enhancing resolution and addressing issues arising from laser ablation processes, such as the berm-formation around the created holes in the film, which can be accessed by tuning the polymeric material properties including Tg, surface adhesion etc. The methacrylic copolymer is composed of monomers, each of them especially selected to improve individual properties. The material formulations comprise perylene molecules absorbing at the exposure wavelength where the polymeric matrix is transparent. It was found that if the radiation intensity exceeds a certain threshold, the perylene molecules transfer the absorbed light energy to the acrylate polymer matrix leading to polymer degradation and ablation of the exposed areas. The non-linear nature of the light absorption and energy transfer processes resulted in the creation of holes with critical dimensions well below the used wavelength reaching the sub 50 nm domain. Arrays of holes having various dimensions were fabricated in the laser ablation experiments using a directwrite laser system developed specifically for the purposes of this project.

  1. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  2. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae.

    PubMed

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  3. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae

    PubMed Central

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  4. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  5. Soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, Daniel; Frömter, Robert; Stillrich, Holger; Menk, Christian; Tieg, Carsten; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Sprung, Michael; Gutt, Christian; Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Leupold, Olaf; Grübel, Gerhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a new x-ray microscopy technique based on Fourier transform holography (FTH), where the sample is separate from the optics part of the setup. The sample can be shifted with respect to the holography optics, thus large-scale or randomly distributed objects become accessible. As this extends FTH into a true microscopy technique, we call it x-ray holographic microscopy (XHM). FTH allows nanoscale imaging without the need for nanometer-size beams. Simple Fourier transform yields an unambiguous image reconstruction. We demonstrate XHM by studying the magnetic domain evolution of a Co/Pt multilayer film as function of locally varied iron overlayer thickness.

  6. Fringe-free, background-free, collinear third-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating measurements for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Rebecca; Spahr, Erik; Squier, Jeff A.; Durfee, Charles G.; Walker, Barry C.; Fittinghoff, David N.

    2006-11-01

    A background-free, fringe-free form of frequency-resolved optical gating using the third-harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip is used to characterize 100 fs pulses at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  7. Intravital imaging of amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    We report optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. Validation using conventional fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy shows that OR-PAM has sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to identify amyloid plaques in living brains. In addition, with dual-wavelength OR-PAM, the three-dimensional morphology of amyloid plaques and the surrounding microvasculature are imaged simultaneously through a cranial window without angiographic contrast agents. OR-PAM, capable of providing both exogenous molecular contrast and endogenous hemoglobin contrast, has the potential to serve as a new technology for in vivo microscopic observations of cerebral plaque deposits. PMID:20016651

  8. Multimodal fiber source for nonlinear microscopy based on a dissipative soliton laser

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Erin S.; Wise, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in high energy femtosecond fiber lasers have enabled robust and lower-cost sources for multiphoton-fluorescence and harmonic-generation imaging. However, picosecond pulses are better suited for Raman scattering microscopy, so the ideal multimodal source for nonlinear microcopy needs to provide both durations. Here we present spectral compression of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser as a route to producing transform-limited picosecond pulses. These pulses pump a fiber optical parametric oscillator to yield a robust fiber source capable of providing the synchronized picosecond pulse trains needed for Raman scattering microscopy. Thus, this system can be used as a multimodal platform for nonlinear microscopy techniques. PMID:26417497

  9. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  10. Multimodal fiber source for nonlinear microscopy based on a dissipative soliton laser.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Erin S; Wise, Frank W

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in high energy femtosecond fiber lasers have enabled robust and lower-cost sources for multiphoton-fluorescence and harmonic-generation imaging. However, picosecond pulses are better suited for Raman scattering microscopy, so the ideal multimodal source for nonlinear microcopy needs to provide both durations. Here we present spectral compression of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser as a route to producing transform-limited picosecond pulses. These pulses pump a fiber optical parametric oscillator to yield a robust fiber source capable of providing the synchronized picosecond pulse trains needed for Raman scattering microscopy. Thus, this system can be used as a multimodal platform for nonlinear microscopy techniques. PMID:26417497

  11. High Resolution Phase-Sensitive Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Microscopy for Tracking Magnetic Microbeads and Cellular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Crecea, Vasilica; Graf, Benedikt W.; Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a real-time multimodal near-infrared imaging technology that tracks externally induced axial motion of magnetic microbeads in single cells in culture. The integrated multimodal imaging technique consists of phase-sensitive magnetomotive optical coherence microscopy (MM-OCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM).MPMis utilized for the visualization of multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic microbeads, while MM-OCM detects, with nanometer-scale sensitivity, periodic displacements of the microbeads induced by the modulation of an external magnetic field. Magnetomotive signals are measured from mouse macrophages, human breast primary ductal carcinoma cells, and human breast epithelial cells in culture, and validated with full-field phase-sensitive microscopy. This methodology demonstrates the capability for imaging controlled cell dynamics and has the potential for measuring cell biomechanical properties, which are important in assessing the health and pathological state of cells. PMID:25400496

  12. Combination of widefield fluorescence imaging and nonlinear optical microscopy of oral epithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rahul; Edward, Kert; Brown, Tyra; Ma, Liang; Yang, Jinping; McCammon, Susan; Motamedi, Massoud; Vargas, Gracie

    2013-03-01

    Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) have shown the potential for noninvasive assessment of oral precancers and cancers. We have explored a combination of these nonlinear optical microscopic imaging techniques with widefield fluorescence imaging to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as information from endogenous fluorophores, which are altered with neoplastic transformation. Widefield fluorescence revealed areas of interest corresponding to sites with precancers or early tumors, generally resulting in a decrease in green emission or increase in red emission. Subsequent microscopy revealed significant differences in morphology between normal, dysplastic/neoplastic mucosa for all layers. Combination of a widefield and a microscopic technique provides a novel approach for tissue morphometric analysis along with large area assessment of tissue autofluorescence properties.

  13. High-fidelity spatially resolved multiphoton counting for quantum imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Banaszek, Konrad

    2014-09-01

    We present a method for spatially resolved multiphoton counting based on an intensified camera with the retrieval of multimode photon statistics fully accounting for nonlinearities in the detection process. The scheme relies on one-time quantum tomographic calibration of the detector. Faithful, high-fidelity reconstruction of single- and two-mode statistics of multiphoton states is demonstrated for coherent states and their statistical mixtures. The results consistently exhibit classical values of the Mandel parameter and the noise reduction factor in contrast to raw statistics of camera photo-events. Detector operation is reliable for illumination levels up to the average of one detected photon per an event area-substantially higher than in previous approaches to characterize quantum statistical properties of light with spatial resolution. PMID:25166081

  14. Semiclassical analysis of long-wavelength multiphoton processes: The periodically driven harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Ronald F.; Vela-Arevalo, Luz V.

    2002-11-01

    The problem of multiphoton processes for intense, long-wavelength irradiation of atomic and molecular electrons is presented. The recently developed method of quasiadiabatic time evolution is used to obtain a nonperturbative analysis. When applied to the standard vector potential coupling, an exact auxiliary equation is obtained that is in the electric dipole coupling form. This is achieved through application of the Goeppert-Mayer gauge. While the analysis to this point is general and aimed at microwave irradiation of Rydberg atoms, a Floquet analysis of the auxiliary equation is presented for the special case of the periodically driven harmonic oscillator. Closed form expressions for a complete set of Floquet states are obtained. These are used to demonstrate that for the oscillator case there are no multiphoton resonances.

  15. In vitro imaging of embryonic stem cells using multiphoton luminescence of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nagesha, D; Laevsky, GS; Lampton, P; Banyal, R; Warner, C; DiMarzio, C; Sridhar, S

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in nonlinear optical techniques and materials such as quantum wells, nanowires and noble-metal nanoparticles have led to advances in cellular imaging wherein various nanoparticles have been shown to improve both in vitro and in vivo visualization. In this paper, we demonstrate in vitro imaging using multi-photon photoluminescence of gold nanoparticles from two different cell types – Dictyostelium discoideum and mouse embryonic stem cells. By observing nanoparticles we show that embryonic stem cells maintained their ability to proliferate for several passages while grown in the presence of gold nanoparticles. The advantages of multi-photon luminescence using gold nanoparticles have important implications for use in stem cell proliferation experiments and in vitro experiments to monitor differentiation. PMID:18203448

  16. Statistical properties of multiphoton time-dependent three-boson coupled oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Perina, Jan; Krepelka, Jaromir

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the quantum statistics of three time-dependent coupled oscillators in the presence of multiphoton processes. The system is connected with the two-atom multiphoton Tavis-Cummings model. The solution of the Heisenberg equations of the motion is obtained in a compact form. We assume that the modes are initially prepared in coherent states, and we discuss nonclassical phenomena (squeezing and sub-Poissonian behavior). Further, we examine the joint quasi-distribution functions as well as photon-number distribution and its factorial moments. The system has shown that the nonclassical effect is apparent in compound modes (1,3) and (2,3). Moreover, the superstructure phenomenon is observed when the photon transition is increased.

  17. Multiphoton ac Stark effect in a bichromatically driven two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, T. G.; Freedhoff, H. S.; Ficek, Z.

    1998-08-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with two lasers of different frequencies and amplitudes: a strong laser of Rabi frequency 2Ω1 on resonance with the atomic transition, and a weaker laser detuned by subharmonics (2Ω1/n) of the Rabi frequency of the first. We find that under these conditions the second laser couples the dressed states created by the first in an n-photon process, resulting in ``doubly dressed'' states and in a ``multiphoton ac Stark'' effect. We calculate the eigenstates of the doubly dressed atom and their energies, and illustrate the role of this multiphoton ac Stark effect in its fluorescence, absorption, and Autler-Townes spectra.

  18. Cell damage in near-infrared multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Liang, H.; Berns, M. W.; Tromberg, B. J.

    1996-07-01

    We report on cell damage of single cells confined in continuous-wave (cw), near-infrared (NIR) multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption phenomena. Trapping beams at NIR wavelengths less than 800 nm are capable of damaging cells through a two-photon absorption process. Cell damage is more pronounced in multimode cw traps compared with single-frequency true cw NIR traps because of transient power enhancement by longitudinal mode beating. Partial mode locking in tunable cw Ti:sapphire lasers used as trapping beam sources can produce unstable subnanosecond pulses at certain wavelengths that amplify multiphoton absorption effects significantly. We recommend the use of single-frequency long-wavelength NIR trapping beams for optical micromanipulation of vital cells.

  19. Photoelectron circular dichroism of bicyclic ketones from multiphoton ionization with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lux, Christian; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Sarpe, Cristian; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-12

    Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) is a CD effect up to the ten-percent regime and shows contributions from higher-order Legendre polynomials when multiphoton ionization is compared to single-photon ionization. We give a full account of our experimental methodology for measuring the multiphoton PECD and derive quantitative measures that we apply on camphor, fenchone and norcamphor. Different modulations and amplitudes of the contributing Legendre polynomials are observed despite the similarity in chemical structure. In addition, we study PECD for elliptically polarized light employing tomographic reconstruction methods. Intensity studies reveal dissociative ionization as the origin of the observed PECD effect, whereas ionization of the intermediate resonance is dominating the signal. As a perspective, we suggest to make use of our tomographic data as an experimental basis for a complete photoionization experiment and give a prospect of PECD as an analytic tool. PMID:25492564

  20. Two-color multiphoton ionization of diazabicyclooctane in a supersonic free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masaaki; Ebata, Takayuki; Mikami, Naohiko; Ito, Mitsuo

    1983-11-01

    Two-color multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectroscopy has been applied for diazabicyclooctane (DABCO) in a supersonic free jet. The MPI spectra due to transitions from the various vibronic levels of the S 1 (3s Rydberg) state which were excited by the first laser revealed the high Rydberg states above the adiabatic ionization potential. The ionization process and the vibrational potential of the ion are discussed.