Science.gov

Sample records for accident management procedures

  1. Accident management information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. )

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  3. Procedural accidents: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover procedural accidents, including perforation repairs, separated instrument, and accidents with irrigants and endodontic materials. PMID:18457710

  4. The Fukushima radiation accident: consequences for radiation accident medical management.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Viktor; Dörr, Harald

    2012-08-01

    The March 2011 radiation accident in Fukushima, Japan, is a textbook example of a radiation accident of global significance. In view of the global dimensions of the accident, it is important to consider the lessons learned. In this context, emphasis must be placed on consequences for planning appropriate medical management for radiation accidents including, for example, estimates of necessary human and material resources. The specific characteristics of the radiation accident in Fukushima are thematically divided into five groups: the exceptional environmental influences on the Fukushima radiation accident, particular circumstances of the accident, differences in risk perception, changed psychosocial factors in the age of the Internet and globalization, and the ignorance of the effects of ionizing radiation both among the general public and health care professionals. Conclusions like the need for reviewing international communication, interfacing, and interface definitions will be drawn from the Fukushima radiation accident. PMID:22951483

  5. Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

  6. Recommended Procedures for Handling Emergency Illnesses and Accidents at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Health, Bismarck.

    Recommended procedures for handling emergency illnesses and accidents are provided in this guide for school personnel prepared by the North Dakota State Department of Health. Following five general recommendations for steps to take in emergency situations, advice and techniques are given for handling: nose bleeds; abdominal pain; toothaches and…

  7. Simulation of Accident Sequences Including Emergency Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Queral, Cesar; Exposito, Antonio; Hortal, Javier

    2004-07-01

    Operator actions play an important role in accident sequences. However, design analysis (Safety Analysis Report, SAR) seldom includes consideration of operator actions, although they are required by compulsory Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) to perform some checks and actions from the very beginning of the accident. The basic aim of the project is to develop a procedure validation system which consists of the combination of three elements: a plant transient simulation code TRETA (a C based modular program) developed by the CSN, a computerized procedure system COPMA-III (Java technology based program) developed by the OECD-Halden Reactor Project and adapted for simulation with the contribution of our group and a software interface that provides the communication between COPMA-III and TRETA. The new combined system is going to be applied in a pilot study in order to analyze sequences initiated by secondary side breaks in a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plant. (authors)

  8. Relation of managers' personality to accident and injury rates.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Peg; Venkataraman, Ray R

    2002-12-01

    Previous research has explored the link between certain aspects of individuals' personalities and their safety behavior and accident rates. We predicted a relation between 23 managers' scores on Big Five personality dimensions and departmental accident and injury rates in a manufacturing company. Accident and injury data were provided by the organization. We found a relation between managers' personality profiles and both injury and accident rates in their departments. The findings suggest that managers with certain types of personalities may have safer work units. This has implications for the selection of managers in work environments with safety risks. PMID:12585521

  9. Network-Based Management Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Allen L.

    Network-based management procedures serve as valuable aids in organizational management, achievement of objectives, problem solving, and decisionmaking. Network techniques especially applicable to educational management systems are the program evaluation and review technique (PERT) and the critical path method (CPM). Other network charting…

  10. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  11. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  12. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Jae, M.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Xing, L.; Dhir, V.K.; Lim, H.; Okrent, D.; Swider, J.; Yu, D.

    1991-11-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategies there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrument behavior during an accident. During the period September 26--28, 1990, a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings.

  13. French policy for managing the post-accident phase of a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Gallay, F; Godet, J L; Niel, J C

    2015-06-01

    In 2005, at the request of the French Government, the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) established a Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident or a Radiological Emergency, with the objective of establishing a policy framework. Under the supervision of ASN, this Committee, involving several tens of experts from different backgrounds (e.g. relevant ministerial offices, expert agencies, local information commissions around nuclear installations, non-governmental organisations, elected officials, licensees, and international experts), developed a number of recommendations over a 7-year period. First published in November 2012, these recommendations cover the immediate post-emergency situation, and the transition and longer-term periods of the post-accident phase in the case of medium-scale nuclear accidents causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 h) that might occur at French nuclear facilities. They also apply to actions to be undertaken in the event of accidents during the transportation of radioactive materials. These recommendations are an important first step in preparation for the management of a post-accident situation in France in the case of a nuclear accident. PMID:25915552

  14. The role of NUREG-1150 in accident management

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, A.L.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    NUREG-1150 is being prepared by the NRC and its contractors to estimate the risk from five commercial light water reactors: Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, Grand Gulf, and Zion. Level 3 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being prepared for each of these plants. These PRAs provide a framework for evaluating accident management alternatives from a risk standpoint. This paper describes the accident management benefits that NUREG-1150 is providing.

  15. Analysis of Convair 990 rejected-takeoff accident with emphasis on decision making, training and procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batthauer, Byron E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes a NASA Convair 990 (CV-990) accident with emphasis on rejected-takeoff (RTO) decision making, training, procedures, and accident statistics. The NASA Aircraft Accident Investigation Board was somewhat perplexed that an aircraft could be destroyed as a result of blown tires during the takeoff roll. To provide a better understanding of tire failure RTO's, The Board obtained accident reports, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) studies, and other pertinent information related to the elements of this accident. This material enhanced the analysis process and convinced the Accident Board that high-speed RTO's in transport aircraft should be given more emphasis during pilot training. Pilots should be made aware of various RTO situations and statistics with emphasis on failed-tire RTO's. This background information could enhance the split-second decision-making process that is required prior to initiating an RTO.

  16. An operational centre for managing major chemical industrial accidents.

    PubMed

    Kiranoudis, C T; Kourniotis, S P; Christolis, M; Markatos, N C; Zografos, K G; Giannouli, I M; Androutsopoulos, K N; Ziomas, I; Kosmidis, E; Simeonidis, P; Poupkou, N

    2002-01-28

    The most important characteristic of major chemical accidents, from a societal perspective, is their tendency to produce off-site effects. The extent and severity of the accident may significantly affect the population and the environment of the adjacent areas. Following an accident event, effort should be made to limit such effects. Management decisions should be based on rational and quantitative information based on the site specific circumstances and the possible consequences. To produce such information we have developed an operational centre for managing large-scale industrial accidents. Its architecture involves an integrated framework of geographical information system (GIS) and RDBMS technology systems equipped with interactive communication capabilities. The operational centre was developed for Windows 98 platforms, for the region of Thriasion Pedion of West Attica, where the concentration of industrial activity and storage of toxic chemical is immense within areas of high population density. An appropriate case study is given in order to illuminate the use and necessity of the operational centre. PMID:11744201

  17. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  18. Using cost/risk procedures to establish recovery criteria following a nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tawil, J J; Strenge, D L

    1987-02-01

    In the event of a major accidental release of radionuclides at a nuclear power plant, large populated areas could become seriously contaminated. Local officials would be responsible for establishing radiation recovery criteria that would permit the evacuated population to return safely to their jobs and homes. The range of acceptable criteria could imply variations in property losses in the billions of dollars. Given the likely public concern over the health consequences and the enormity of the potential property losses, a cost/risk analysis can provide important input to establishing the recovery criteria. This paper describes procedures for conducting a cost/risk analysis of a site radiologically contaminated by a nuclear power plant accident. The procedures are illustrated by analyzing a hypothetically contaminated site, using software developed for determining the property and health effects of major reactor accidents. PMID:3818283

  19. Development of the preliminary procedure for a national nuclear safety authority staff acting during the PWR NPP accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinov, V.

    1997-12-01

    We present the development of the new preliminary procedure for a National Nuclear Safety Authority staff preparedness for action in the case of a Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant accident. The procedures are generic and equally applicable for advanced nuclear plants. The basic goal of the procedure is systematic determination of the responsibilities of the staff expert group(s) members for accident analysis and consequences prediction. Moreover, the procedure describes anticipated practices of an expert group acting during a plant accident. Different sources will define the state(s) of the plant as: the plant form for initial notification of an accident, the particular form for specific plant information, etc. By this procedure we propose three expert groups successively to work up to eight hours each, in the circumstances of an accident. We suppose the expert group to have mostly five members each. The members should have different tasks for resolution, defined by the procedure. The head of the group will coordinate group members work during an accident. Group members have to be qualified and acquainted with all adequate references. In the paper we present a newly devised agenda with presumed duties of each member of the group. Furthermore, we also composed a special form for information exchange between the utility and regulatory staff member during an accident. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, J S; Harrison, D G; Morgenstern, M

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents.

  1. Management of a sandbag accident in an MRI unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee Hwee; Lin, Ming-Fang; Chan, Wing P

    2015-11-01

    Our aim is to report the cause and management of a ferromagnetic sandbag accident that occurred when an unconscious patient was sent for brain MRI. A 2-kg sandbag had been placed in the vicinity of his right groin to aid hemostasis after a femoral venous puncture for thrombocytopenia. His clothing and blanket had not been examined thoroughly before he was moved to the scanner and the sandbag went unnoticed. Its attraction to the scanner and adherence to the scanner rim resulted in a minor abrasion and bruise on the patient's face. We decided to manually remove some of the pellets from the sandbag after cutting the vinyl bag at one corner with a nonferromagnetic screwdriver. Piece-meal removal of about two-thirds of the pellets facilitated removal of the remaining pellets and the sandbag as a whole. The word "sandbag" is misleading and led to a lack of communication between the clinical team and the MRI staff and failure by the MRI staff to recognize a sandbag as a ferromagnetic object. Careful manual removal of small amounts of pellets can be used to avoid more time- and labor-intensive strategies to deal with a sandbag accident (e.g., magnet quench or ramp-down). Installation of a ferromagnetic material detector to screen patients before entering the scanner room is recommended. PMID:26226646

  2. Management Procedures for Anticipated Work Stoppages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Matthew R.; And Others

    This document is a guide for school administrators in New York State in preparation for a district strike plan. The forms provided in the appendix may be reproduced for use within the school district. Information on strike management procedures are provided for superintendents and principals, including such topics as legal measures to take,…

  3. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.F.; Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTE{underscore}ACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTE{underscore}ACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark}. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTE{underscore}ACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTE{underscore}ACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTE{underscore}MGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes.

  4. 77 FR 31615 - Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide... Services Administration (GSA) has issued Federal Management Regulation (FMR) Bulletin G-03 which provides guidance to Executive Branch agencies for improving mail management policies, procedures, and...

  5. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented. PMID:26150919

  6. Future synergism in diving accident management: The Singapore model.

    PubMed

    Chong, Si Jack; Liang, Weihao; Kim, Soo Jang; Kang, Wee Lee

    2010-03-01

    The popularity of diving as a leisure activity has been an increasing trend in recent years. With the rise of this sport inevitably comes increasing numbers and risk of diving-related injuries and demand for professional medical treatment of such injuries. Concurrently, with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) being more readily available, new applications for HBOT have been proven for the treatment of various medical conditions. In Singapore, diving and hyperbaric medicine was largely a military medicine specialty and its practice confined to the Singapore Armed Forces for many years. The new Hyperbaric and Diving Medicine Centre set up in Singapore General Hospital (SGH) offers an excellent opportunity for collaboration between the Singapore Navy Medical Service (NMS) and SGH. This combines the expertise in the field of diving and hyperbaric medicine that NMS provides, with the resources and specialized services available at SGH. This collaboration was officially formalized by the recent signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the two organisations. The partnership will allow both organisations to leverage on each other's strengths and enhance the development of research and training capabilities. This collaboration will also be an important step towards formal recognition and accreditation of diving and hyperbaric medicine as a medical subspecialty in the foreseeable future, thus helping to develop and promote diving and hyperbaric medicine in Singapore. This synergistic approach in diving accident management will also promote and establish Singapore as a leader in the field of diving and hyperbaric medicine in the region. PMID:23111838

  7. The research of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianping; Zhang, Tiejun; Wan, Jiaonan; Zhang, Juwen; Wang, Rui

    For the rigorous traffic safety issues resulting from rapid transportation development, as well as the more and more attention paid to the traffic accidents dynamic analysis and pre-alarm methods, combined with the practical needs of the highway safety management, this paper summarizes the experience of traffic safety pre-alarm research both in domestic and abroad, designs the frame of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system from the function and software engineering requirement, and refines kernel modules such as accident prone section judgement, traffic safety pre-alarm analysis and perfecting safety measures analysis, in order to guide the exploitation and application of the system.

  8. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.; Jackson, R.

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences.

  9. Diagnostic Procedures and Management of Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Salopek-Rabatić, Jasminka; Novak, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye disease or dysfunctional tear syndrome is among the most frequent diagnoses in ophthalmology. It is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface and tear film which results in ocular discomfort, visual disturbances, and tear instability with potential damage to the cornea and conjunctiva. Risk factors for dry eye syndrome include age, sex (female gender), race, contact lens wear, environment with low humidity, systemic medications, and autoimmune disorders. The aim of this paper is to present the systematic classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and advances in the management of dry eye disease. The recent improvements in comprehending the underlying etiologic factors will inevitably improve future classifications and diagnostic abilities leading to more effective therapeutic options. Treatment of this highly prevalent condition can drastically improve the quality of life of individuals and prevent damage to the ocular surface. PMID:24024186

  10. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  11. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  12. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1996-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives.

  13. Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

    2012-06-25

    The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

  14. Radiation accidents and their management: emphasis on the role of nuclear medicine professionals

    PubMed Central

    Novruzov, Fuad; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale radiation accidents are few in number, but those that have occurred have subsequently led to strict regulation in most countries. Here, different accident scenarios involving exposure to radiation have been reviewed. A triage of injured persons has been summarized and guidance on management has been provided in accordance with the early symptoms. Types of casualty to be expected in atomic blasts have been discussed. Management at the scene of an accident has been described, with explanation of the role of the radiation protection officer, the nature of contaminants, and monitoring for surface contamination. Methods for early diagnosis of radiation injuries have been then described. The need for individualization of treatment according to the nature and grade of the combined injuries has been emphasized, and different approaches to the treatment of internal contamination have been presented. The role of nuclear medicine professionals, including physicians and physicists, has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the management of radiation accidents is a very challenging process and that nuclear medicine physicians have to be well organized in order to deliver suitable management in any type of radiation accident. PMID:25004166

  15. Communicating worst-case scenarios: neighbors' views of industrial accident management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B; Chess, Caron

    2003-08-01

    The prospect of industrial accidents motivated the U.S. Congress to require in the Clean Air Act of 1990 that manufacturing facilities develop Risk Management Plans (RMP) to submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) by July 1999. Industry worried that the requirement to communicate to the public a "worst-case scenario" would arouse unnecessary and counterproductive fears among industry neighbors. We report here the results of focus groups and surveys with such neighbors, focusing particularly upon their reactions to messages about a hypothetical worst-case scenario and management of these risks by industry, government, and other parties. Our findings confirmed our hypotheses that citizens would be skeptical of the competence and trustworthiness of these managers and that this stance would color their views of industrial-facility accident risks. People with job ties to industry or who saw industrial benefits to the community as exceeding its risks had more positive views of industrial risks, but still expressed great concern about the risk and doubt about accident management. Notwithstanding these reactions, overall respondents welcomed this and other related information, which they wanted their local industries to supply. Respondents were not more reassured by additional text describing management of accidents by government and industry. However, respondents did react very positively to the concept of community oversight to review plant safety. Claims about the firm's moral obligation or financial self-interest in preventing accidents were also received positively. Further research on innovative communication and management of accident risks is warranted by these results, even before recent terrorist attacks made this topic more salient. PMID:12926575

  16. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management. PMID:22719047

  17. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management. PMID:22719047

  18. Risk management: Role of societal factors in major industrial accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Hovden, J.; Rausand, M.; Sergeev, G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses factors influencing the occurrence of major accidents in complex technological systems. Societal factors are identified as most significant in this context. Important types of societal factors are pin-pointed and discussed. The safety situation in the former Soviet Union and in today`s Russian is described. The calamities at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and partly also Bhopal are discussed, and the role of societal factors identified. A main point of view is that it is not surprising that these catastrophes happened in the then existing conditions. What is surprising is that they did not happen earlier!

  19. Managing moral hazard in motor vehicle accident insurance claims.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Shanil; Busse, Jason W; Guyatt, Gordon H; Birch, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    Motor vehicle accident (MVA) insurance in Canada is based primarily on two different compensation systems: (i) no-fault, in which policyholders are unable to seek recovery for losses caused by other parties (unless they have specified dollar or verbal thresholds) and (ii) tort, in which policyholders may seek general damages. As insurance companies pay for MVA-related health care costs, excess use of health care services may occur as a result of consumers' (accident victims) and/or producers' (health care providers) behavior - often referred to as the moral hazard of insurance. In the United States, moral hazard is greater for low dollar threshold no-fault insurance compared with tort systems. In Canada, high dollar threshold or pure no-fault versus tort systems are associated with faster patient recovery and reduced MVA claims. These findings suggest that high threshold no-fault or pure no-fault compensation systems may be associated with improved outcomes for patients and reduced moral hazard. PMID:23639998

  20. IAEA Activities in the Area of Safety Analysis and Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; El-Shanawany, M.

    2006-07-01

    Safety analysis is a means of demonstrating how critical safety functions, the integrity of barriers against the release of radioactive materials, and various other safety requirements are fulfilled for a broad range of operating conditions and initiating events. Accordingly, performing safety analysis for a nuclear power plant is one of the most important safety principles. Thermal-hydraulic computer codes are extensively used worldwide for safety analysis by utilities, regulatory authorities, power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, and technical support organizations. Safety analysis methodology and computer codes have seen a significant development over the last two decades. This fact is also reflected in the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that aims at increasing the quality and international harmonization of the approaches used in safety analysis. The paper provides an overview of activities and of examples of results obtained recently or planned in the near future in the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety in the field of safety analysis for both design basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents as well as accident management. In this paper, specific technical guidance on the safety assessments in the IAEA Safety Standards such as safety analysis methodologies, probabilistic safety assessment, and development of accident management programmes are described. Future trends and related activities in safety analysis and accident management are also introduced. (authors)

  1. Military Curricula for Vocational and Technical Education. Traffic Management and Accident Investigation, 17-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force, Washington, DC.

    This teaching guide and student workbook for a postsecondary level course in traffic management and accident investigation is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the 132-hour course is to expose students to…

  2. Uncertainty quantification for accident management using ACE surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Varuttamaseni, A.; Lee, J. C.; Youngblood, R. W.

    2012-07-01

    The alternating conditional expectation (ACE) regression method is used to generate RELAP5 surrogates which are then used to determine the distribution of the peak clad temperature (PCT) during the loss of feedwater accident coupled with a subsequent initiation of the feed and bleed (F and B) operation in the Zion-1 nuclear power plant. The construction of the surrogates assumes conditional independence relations among key reactor parameters. The choice of parameters to model is based on the macroscopic balance statements governing the behavior of the reactor. The peak clad temperature is calculated based on the independent variables that are known to be important in determining the success of the F and B operation. The relationship between these independent variables and the plant parameters such as coolant pressure and temperature is represented by surrogates that are constructed based on 45 RELAP5 cases. The time-dependent PCT for different values of F and B parameters is calculated by sampling the independent variables from their probability distributions and propagating the information through two layers of surrogates. The results of our analysis show that the ACE surrogates are able to satisfactorily reproduce the behavior of the plant parameters even though a quasi-static assumption is primarily used in their construction. The PCT is found to be lower in cases where the F and B operation is initiated, compared to the case without F and B, regardless of the F and B parameters used. (authors)

  3. Motor vehicle accidents: how should cirrhotic patients be managed?

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2012-06-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are serious social issues worldwide and driver illness is an important cause of MVAs. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a complex cognitive dysfunction with attention deficit, which frequently occurs in cirrhotic patients independent of severity of liver disease. Although MHE is known as a risk factor for MVAs, the impact of diagnosis and treatment of MHE on MVA-related societal costs is largely unknown. Recently, Bajaj et al demonstrated valuable findings that the diagnosis of MHE by rapid screening using the inhibitory control test (ICT), and subsequent treatment with lactulose could substantially reduce the societal costs by preventing MVAs. Besides the ICT and lactulose, there are various diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies for MHE. In this commentary, we discussed a current issue of diagnostic tools for MHE, including neuropsychological tests. We also discussed the advantages of the other therapeutic strategies for MHE, such as intake of a regular breakfast and coffee, and supplementation with zinc and branched chain amino acids, on the MVA-related societal costs. PMID:22690067

  4. Criticality accident alarm system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.; Wooldridge, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the staus of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) criticality alarm system. A new radiation detection alarm system was installed in 1990. The anunciation system, calibration and maintenance, and detector placement is described.

  5. Fukushima nuclear power plant accident and comprehensive health risk management-global radiocontamination and information disaster.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-06-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, besides further studying the appropriateness of the initial response and post-countermeasures against the severe Fukushima nuclear accident, has now increased the importance of the epidemiological study in comprehensive health risk management and radiation protection; lessons learnt from the Chernobyl accident should be also implemented. Therefore, since May 2011, Fukushima Prefecture has started the "Fukushima Health Management Survey Project" for the purpose of long-term health care administration and early diagnosis/treatment for the prefectural residents. Basic survey is under investigation on a retrospective estimation of external exposure of the first four months. As one of the four detailed surveys, the thyroid ultrasound examination has clarified the increased detection rate of childhood thyroid cancers as a screening effect in the past three years and so thyroid cancer occurrence by Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, especially due to radioactive iodine will be discussed despite of difficult challenge of accurate estimation of low dose and low-dose rate radiation exposures. Through the on-site valuable experience and a difficult challenge for recovery, we should learn the lessons from this severe and large-scale nuclear accident, especially how to countermeasure against public health emergency at the standpoint of health risk and also social risk management. PMID:25425958

  6. Developing a Minimum Data Set for an Information Management System to Study Traffic Accidents in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ali; Ahmadi, Maryam; Gharagozlu, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Each year, around 1.2 million people die in the road traffic incidents. Reducing traffic accidents requires an exact understanding of the risk factors associated with traffic patterns and behaviors. Properly analyzing these factors calls for a comprehensive system for collecting and processing accident data. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a minimum data set (MDS) for an information management system to study traffic accidents in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014. Data were collected from the traffic police, trauma centers, medical emergency centers, and via the internet. The investigated resources for this study were forms, databases, and documents retrieved from the internet. Forms and databases were identical, and one sample of each was evaluated. The related internet-sourced data were evaluated in their entirety. Data were collected using three checklists. In order to arrive at a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied using questionnaires. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaires were assessed by experts’ opinions and the test-retest method, respectively. Results: An (MDS) of a traffic accident information management system was assigned to three sections: a minimum data set for traffic police with six classes, including 118 data elements; a trauma center with five data classes, including 57 data elements; and a medical emergency center, with 11 classes, including 64 data elements. Conclusions: Planning for the prevention of traffic accidents requires standardized data. As the foundation for crash prevention efforts, existing standard data infrastructures present policymakers and government officials with a great opportunity to strengthen and integrate existing accident information systems to better track road traffic injuries and fatalities. PMID:27247791

  7. Managing uncertainty in complex interventional fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Ronald; Meade, Jason A

    2014-11-01

    There was a concern for potential patient skin burns indicated by air kerma as recorded by fluoroscopy equipment during two interventional fluoroscopic procedures. Two sentinel events as defined by The Joint Commission were indicated. Dose reconstruction based on measurements of machine output showed the air kerma readings were high by approximately a factor of four and no patient injury or sentinel event occurred. The radiation safety program in effect at the time of the incidents allowed discovery of equipment problems before a serious patient injury occurred, but additional controls have been implemented as a result, including quality control checks performed by cardiology, additional training, a database for tracking equipment maintenance, and mandatory entry of patient dose into electronic health records with follow-up orders automatically generated by the electronic health records. Most unexpected injuries are a result of multiple failures, but there are also multiple opportunities to prevent the injury. This paper provides a comprehensive look at patient safety concerns during two interventional cardiology fluoroscopic procedures and offers ways to further reduce risks to patients. It focuses on lessons learned and a systems-based approach to improving and promoting radiation safety during complex interventional fluoroscopic procedures. PMID:25272028

  8. Removal of criticality accident alarm systems at the Y-12 Plant waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses why criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs) were installed in certain waste management buildings at the Y-12 Plant, why the plant now wants to remove them, and what steps were taken to allow the US Department of Energy (DOE) to authorize the removal of the systems. To begin with, the systems in question were installed in the mid- to late-1980s. Some of the facilities were new, and there was no operating experience with the processes. A CAAS, although expensive, is an absolute necessity where criticality accidents are credible. But, they are a superfluous and unnecessary expense in those facilities where it has been determined that a criticality accident is incredible (defined as having a probability of <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr). The PRAs have been performed to evaluate six Y-12 Plant waste management facilities, five storage facilities, and a nondestructive analysis facility, with an additional study now being performed on the West End Treatment Facility. The results to date have shown that the probability of various criticality accident scenarios at these facilities is <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr and that the CAASs are not needed in these facilities.

  9. [Intraoperative risk management during thoracic procedures].

    PubMed

    Tsuzaki, Koichi

    2009-05-01

    Risk management in clinical practice is an impor part of medical audit. Although, medical audit consists of monitoring, data collection, peer review and establishing standards, these four steps should be regarded as a series of cyclical process. As a general rule, this concept should be applied to any field of clinical medicine and will contribute to the development of sound quality control scheme. Several complications are known to occur in thoracic anesthesia, especially in one-lung ventilation. For example, malposition of double-lumen endotracheal tube, severe hypoxia and higher airway pressure are relatively common problems, and it would be better for us to prepare for these adverse events beforehand. Auscultation, fiber-optic visualization and proper ventilatory management (eg. lower tidal volume with dependent lung PEEP, alveolar recruitment maneuver, application of CPAP to non-dependent lung) are the recommended technique required to correct these abnormalities. When life-threatening hypoxia is imminent, we should convert to two-lung ventilation without any delay. In this regard, verbal communication between surgical teams should be kept on even ground, each playing key roles in the management of such a critical situation. PMID:19462793

  10. Non-Procedural Languages for Information Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearley, William L.

    The future of information resources management requires new approaches to implementing systems which will include a type of data base management that frees users to solve data processing problems logically by telling the system what they want, together with powerful non-procedural languages that will permit communication in simple, concise…

  11. Comprehensive Health Risk Management after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on 11 March 2011. Countermeasures aimed at human protection during the emergency period, including evacuation, sheltering and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese Government. However, there is an apparent need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection, and also in the management of radiation health risk during and even after the accident. Continuous monitoring and characterisation of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and foods in Fukushima are now essential for obtaining informed consent to the decisions on living in the radio-contaminated areas and also on returning back to the evacuated areas once re-entry is allowed; it is also important to carry out a realistic assessment of the radiation doses on the basis of measurements. Until now, various types of radiation health risk management projects and research have been implemented in Fukushima, among which the Fukushima Health Management Survey is the largest health monitoring project. It includes the Basic Survey for the estimation of external radiation doses received during the first 4 months after the accident and four detailed surveys: thyroid ultrasound examination, comprehensive health check-up, mental health and lifestyle survey, and survey on pregnant women and nursing mothers, with the aim to prospectively take care of the health of all the residents of Fukushima Prefecture for a long time. In particular, among evacuees of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, concern about radiation risk is associated with psychological stresses. Here, ongoing health risk management will be reviewed, focusing on the difficult challenge of post-disaster recovery and resilience in Fukushima. PMID:26817782

  12. Spacecraft momentum management procedures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.; Davenport, P. B.; Sturch, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques appropriate for implementation onboard the space telescope and other spacecraft to manage the accumulation of momentum in reaction wheel control systems using magnetic torquing coils are described. Generalized analytical equations are derived for momentum control laws that command the magnetic torquers. These control laws naturally fall into two main categories according to the methods used for updating the magnetic dipole command: closed loop, in which the update is based on current measurements to achieve a desired torque instantaneously, and open-loop, in which the update is based on predicted information to achieve a desired momentum at the end of a period of time. Physical interpretations of control laws in general and of the Space Telescope cross product and minimum energy control laws in particular are presented, and their merits and drawbacks are discussed. A technique for retaining the advantages of both the open-loop and the closed-loop control laws is introduced. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of these control laws in the Space Telescope environment.

  13. Experience and current issues with recovery management from the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Kai, M

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the experiences of, and issues with, recovery management following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The Fukushima accident has brought about socio-economic consequences with inevitable changes to daily life, as well as psychological effects. There is heightened concern amongst the population about the risk and effects of radiation at low doses. Experience has shown that the direct involvement of the affected population and local professionals is a decisive factor for management of the recovery phase. The radiological protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) seems to be relevant to the recovery requirements of the Fukushima accident, although some problems remain in implementation. Reference levels could play a role in improving the situation by requiring an iterative optimisation process. The Fukushima experience indicated that a routine, top-down approach using radiological criteria alone was unable to deal with the complexity of the problems, and that stakeholder engagement should be explored. The technical knowledge gap between radiation experts and the public caused a lot of confusion. Experts should understand the ethical values attached to recovery, and ICRP should be more active in promoting trustworthy radiological protection advice. PMID:25816269

  14. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-10-01

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone {open_quotes}at fault{close_quotes} for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that {open_quotes}all accidents can be prevented.{close_quotes} They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker`s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers` compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers` compensation expenditures.

  15. Safety culture and accident analysis--a socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suman

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, the key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization--seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly. PMID:16911855

  16. Self-Management Procedures: A Comparison across the Autism Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southall, Candice M.; Gast, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty generalizing learned behavior to varied environments with independence. This review of 24 empirical studies compares self-management as a systematic procedure for modifying one's own behavior, to increase target behaviors in students with either autistic disorder (AD) or…

  17. School Building Maintenance Procedures. School Plant Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finchum, R.N.

    One of a series dealing with school management, the publication identifies and describes the function of, and outlines maintenance procedures for many components of school buildings. The purpose of maintenance is to safeguard the public's investment, increase the functional life of the building, and provide the best possible environment for…

  18. Management and Accountability Procedures: DEEP - The New Mexico State Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education.

    Presented is a description of how DEEP (Developmental Economic Education Program) monitors activity and achievements to ensure that objectives are met effectively and efficiently, and that evidence of achievement is available for reports. The purposes of DEEP management and accountability procedures are: (1) to maintain both long term and short…

  19. Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling: Procedures and Techniques. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    2006-01-01

    "Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling" discusses procedures that are useful to rehabilitation professionals working in many settings. Specifically, this book reviews the finer points relating to diagnosing, arranging services, monitoring program outcomes, arranging for placement, planning for accommodations, ethical decision making,…

  20. Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Genn Saji

    2006-07-01

    The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition

  2. A personal overview of accidents and risk management in the recreational diving industry.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Bret

    2010-09-01

    Recently the recreational diving industry has experienced an increase in accidents and fatalities (per capita, based on reliable estimates of diver populations). Many of these incidents have resulted from a degradation of training standards for 'performance-based' learning of skills and knowledge, both for students and the instructors, dive masters, and assistants who are responsible for their initial training and subsequent courses aimed at 'advanced' curricula. The industry has also seen a decline in the experience and practical expertise of diving leadership staff responsible for the management of resorts and liveaboard diving operations. The resulting incidents have led to a rise in legal actions and settlement costs or trial verdicts. The important contributing issues in accident causation are discussed. A fundamental lack of understanding of how to effectively use the tools of risk management (waivers and releases, defensive teaching, good record keeping), as well as inadequate pre-training screening that might eliminate some participants based on age, physical condition, or pre-existing medical issues, are contributing to this increase. These factors also complicate the efficient management of litigation through the courts. The costs associated with litigation are now causing increased insurance premiums, reduced scope of coverage for some activities, and outright denial to some seeking insurance. This paper provides a personal perspective based on a 40-year involvement in all aspects of the diving industry and extensive experience in the litigation process as a consultant and expert witness. PMID:23111912

  3. Complications of Minimally Invasive Cosmetic Procedures: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, facial rejuvenation procedures to circumvent traditional surgery have become increasingly popular. Office-based, minimally invasive procedures can promote a youthful appearance with minimal downtime and low risk of complications. Injectable botulinum toxin (BoNT), soft-tissue fillers, and chemical peels are among the most popular non-invasive rejuvenation procedures, and each has unique applications for improving facial aesthetics. Despite the simplicity and reliability of office-based procedures, complications can occur even with an astute and experienced injector. The goal of any procedure is to perform it properly and safely; thus, early recognition of complications when they do occur is paramount in dictating prevention of long-term sequelae. The most common complications from BoNT and soft-tissue filler injection are bruising, erythema and pain. With chemical peels, it is not uncommon to have erythema, irritation and burning. Fortunately, these side effects are normally transient and have simple remedies. More serious complications include muscle paralysis from BoNT, granuloma formation from soft-tissue filler placement and scarring from chemical peels. Thankfully, these complications are rare and can be avoided with excellent procedure technique, knowledge of facial anatomy, proper patient selection, and appropriate pre- and post-skin care. This article reviews complications of office-based, minimally invasive procedures, with emphasis on prevention and management. Practitioners providing these treatments should be well versed in this subject matter in order to deliver the highest quality care. PMID:23060707

  4. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  5. A Comprehensive Surgical Procedure in Conservative Management of Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Kelekci, Sefa; Ekmekci, Emre; Aydogmus, Serpil; Gencdal, Servet

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to present a combined surgical procedure in conservative treatment of placenta accreta based on surgical outcomes in our cohort of patients. The study was designed as a prospective cohort series study. The setting involved two education and research hospitals in Turkey. This study included 12 patients with placenta accreta who were prenatally diagnosed and managed. We offered the patients the choice of conservative or nonconservative treatment. We then offered 2 choices for patients who had preferred conservative treatment, leaving the placenta in situ as is the classical procedure, or our surgical procedure. One patient preferred nonconservative treatment, the others opted for our procedure. We evaluated demographic and obstetric characteristics of patients, sonographic and operative parameters of patients, and surgical outcomes. We operated on 11 patients using this surgical procedure that we have developed for placenta accreta cases. We found that there was no need for hysterectomy in any patient, and we preserved the uterus for all of these patients. No patient presented any septic complication or secondary vaginal bleeding. Our surgical procedure seems to be effective and useful in the conservative treatment of placenta accreta. PMID:25700315

  6. The accident at Chernobyl; Health and environmental consequences and the implications for risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, C. )

    1988-01-01

    The accident at Chernobyl constituted the largest release of radioactivity ever recorded in a single technological accident. It was caused by a combination of design and management errors, and produced a highly variable pattern of fallout, strongly correlated with local rainfall. Even at 1500 km, fallout in some places far exceeded the levels recorded during the period of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The burden of 31 acute deaths was surprisingly small, and was limited to emergency workers who had to cope with the fire at the plant. The cost of potential chronic health effects, including as many as 28,000 cancers worldwide, in contrast, is surprisingly large, and is localized in Soviet Europe and non-Soviet Europe in approximately equal parts. The author discusses how the pattern of dispersion and exposure due to Chernobyl demands reconsideration of emergency planning for nuclear power stations, not only in the Soviet Union, but also in the West. Revised emergency plans should involve the combination of decentralized and centralized response efforts capable of providing not only acute risk management but also adequate protection against chronic exposure, particularly via ingestion.

  7. Acceptability of Flight Deck-Based Interval Management Crew Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Sara R.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Smail, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The Interval Management for Near-term Operations Validation of Acceptability (IM-NOVA) experiment was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) in support of the NASA Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Airspace Systems Program's Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration - 1 (ATD-1). ATD-1 is intended to showcase an integrated set of technologies that provide an efficient arrival solution for managing aircraft using NextGen surveillance, navigation, procedures, and automation for both airborne and ground-based systems. The goal of the IM-NOVA experiment was to assess if procedures outlined by the ATD-1 Concept of Operations, when used with a minimum set of Flight deck-based Interval Management (FIM) equipment and a prototype crew interface, were acceptable to and feasible for use by flight crews in a voice communications environment. To investigate an integrated arrival solution using ground-based air traffic control tools and aircraft automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) tools, the LaRC FIM system and the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering and Controller Managed Spacing tools developed at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) were integrated in LaRC's Air Traffic Operations Laboratory. Data were collected from 10 crews of current, qualified 757/767 pilots asked to fly a high-fidelity, fixed based simulator during scenarios conducted within an airspace environment modeled on the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Terminal Radar Approach Control area. The aircraft simulator was equipped with the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Area Routes algorithm and a FIM crew interface consisting of electronic flight bags and ADS-B guidance displays. Researchers used "pseudo-pilot" stations to control 24 simulated aircraft that provided multiple air traffic flows into DFW, and recently retired DFW air traffic controllers served as confederate Center, Feeder, Final, and Tower

  8. Gadolinium Use in Spine Pain Management Procedures for Patients with Contrast Allergies: Results in 527 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safriel, Yair Ang, Roberto; Ali, Muhammed

    2008-03-15

    Introduction. To review the safety and efficacy of gadolinium in spine pain management procedures in patients at high risk for a contrast reaction and who are not suitable candidates for the use of standard non-ionic contrast. Methods. We reviewed records over a 61-month period of all image-guided spinal pain management procedures where patients had allergies making them unsuitable candidates for standard non-ionic contrast and where gadolinium was used to confirm needle tip placement prior to injection of medication. Results. Three hundred and four outpatients underwent 527 procedures. A spinal needle was used in all but 41 procedures. Gadolinium was visualized using portable C-arm fluoroscopy in vivo allowing for confirmation of needle tip location. The gadolinium dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 ml per level. The highest dose received by one patient was 15.83 ml intradiscally during a three-level discogram. Three hundred and one patients were discharged without complication or known delayed complications. One patient had documented intrathecal injection but without sequelae and 2 patients who underwent cervical procedures experienced seizures requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Both the latter patients were discharged without any further complications. Conclusion. Based on our experience we recommend using gadolinium judiciously for needle tip confirmation. We feel more confident using gadolinium in the lumbar spine and in cervical nerve blocks. Gadolinium should probably not be used as an injectate volume expander. The indications for gadolinium use in cervical needle-guided spine procedures are less clear and use of a blunt-tipped needle should be considered.

  9. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  10. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  11. An Examination of Commercial Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Thomas, Megan A.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project is one of the four projects within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe). The IVHM Project conducts research to develop validated tools and technologies for automated detection, diagnosis, and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight. Adverse events include those that arise from system, subsystem, or component failure, faults, and malfunctions due to damage, degradation, or environmental hazards that occur during flight. Determining the causal factors and adverse events related to IVHM technologies will help in the formulation of research requirements and establish a list of example adverse conditions against which IVHM technologies can be evaluated. This paper documents the results of an examination of the most recent statistical/prognostic accident and incident data that is available from the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) System to determine the causal factors of system/component failures and/or malfunctions in U.S. commercial aviation accidents and incidents.

  12. Managing Errors to Reduce Accidents in High Consequence Networked Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ganter, J.H.

    1999-02-01

    Computers have always helped to amplify and propagate errors made by people. The emergence of Networked Information Systems (NISs), which allow people and systems to quickly interact worldwide, has made understanding and minimizing human error more critical. This paper applies concepts from system safety to analyze how hazards (from hackers to power disruptions) penetrate NIS defenses (e.g., firewalls and operating systems) to cause accidents. Such events usually result from both active, easily identified failures and more subtle latent conditions that have resided in the system for long periods. Both active failures and latent conditions result from human errors. We classify these into several types (slips, lapses, mistakes, etc.) and provide NIS examples of how they occur. Next we examine error minimization throughout the NIS lifecycle, from design through operation to reengineering. At each stage, steps can be taken to minimize the occurrence and effects of human errors. These include defensive design philosophies, architectural patterns to guide developers, and collaborative design that incorporates operational experiences and surprises into design efforts. We conclude by looking at three aspects of NISs that will cause continuing challenges in error and accident management: immaturity of the industry, limited risk perception, and resource tradeoffs.

  13. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  14. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  15. Radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, Boris Y; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zinkevich, Lubov I; Proskura, Nikolai I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities in the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste-related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and, in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. PMID:21878768

  16. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  17. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  18. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  19. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  20. Applying hierarchical loglinear models to nonfatal underground coal mine accidents for safety management.

    PubMed

    Onder, Mustafa; Onder, Seyhan; Adiguzel, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Underground mining is considered to be one of the most dangerous industries and mining remains the most hazardous occupation. Categorical analysis of accident records may present valuable information for preventing accidents. In this study, hierarchical loglinear analysis was applied to occupational injuries that occurred in an underground coal mine. The main factors affecting the accidents were defined as occupation, area, reason, accident time and part of body affected. By considering subfactors of the main factors, multiway contingency tables were prepared and, thus, the probabilities that might affect nonfatal injuries were investigated. At the end of the study, important accident risk factors and job groups with a high probability of being exposed to those risk factors were determined. This article presents important information on decreasing the number accidents in underground coal mines. PMID:24934420

  1. A computerized maintenance management system's requirements for standard operating procedures.

    PubMed

    Barta, R A

    2001-01-01

    From this review of the 6 aspects of opportunity for inconsistency to corrupt or skew the reliability of data, it becomes apparent why members of management must provide the standards of operation and use within the CMMS for their employees. The possibility of poor data integrity due to any one of these aspects may not be severe; however, the severity is compounded and inevitable when different aspects are combined. Responding to information collected through the CMMS can be effective only if the data are reliable. With SOPs, management has provided their personnel with the necessary tools to ensure department-wide consistency. Management cannot afford to allow any one [table: see text] individual to apply personal interpretations of the importance and requirements in their approach to using the CMMS. If this is permitted, the loss of integrity due to one individual's judgment grows rapidly when data are analyzed at the departmental level. Standard operating procedures go beyond creating a "how to" for the CMMS; they provide the critical elements for collecting responsible and reliable data. PMID:11233309

  2. A swine integrator's perspective on nutrient management procedures.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M T

    1999-02-01

    The goal of pork producers is to operate in a sustainable manner that includes among other requirements, environmental soundness, social acceptability, and profitability. Gains in efficiency have reduced nutrient by-products per pig, but competitive forces have led to specialization, larger farms, and concentrated areas of production that have resulted in new opportunities related to nutrient management. Available technology uses on-farm processing or storage facilities, and manure is applied to the land as an organic fertilizer. Knowledge of nutrient content of soils and crop uptake of nutrients is incorporated into manure application and crop removal plans to prevent either runoff or nutrient buildup on the land. This is to ensure water quality protection. Existing systems are adequate but lack flexibility, require effective management, may not have been incorporated into older farms, and do not offer obvious solutions to odor concerns. Cost-effective alternatives should address those needs. Advancement in nutrient management procedures will likely accelerate the ongoing changes in the structure of the swine industry. PMID:10100675

  3. Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents.

  4. 12 CFR 563.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 563... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for...

  5. 12 CFR 563.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 563... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for...

  6. 12 CFR 390.353 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 390... Associations-Operations § 390.353 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. State savings associations shall... management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for the management...

  7. 12 CFR 390.353 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 390... Associations-Operations § 390.353 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. State savings associations shall... management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for the management...

  8. 12 CFR 563.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 563... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for...

  9. 12 CFR 390.353 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 390... Associations-Operations § 390.353 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. State savings associations shall... management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for the management...

  10. 12 CFR 563.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 563... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for...

  11. 12 CFR 163.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 163... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 163.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... savings association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formally adopt a...

  12. 12 CFR 163.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 163... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 163.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... savings association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formally adopt a...

  13. 12 CFR 163.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 163... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 163.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... savings association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formally adopt a...

  14. 12 CFR 563.176 - Interest-rate-risk-management procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interest-rate-risk-management procedures. 563... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.176 Interest-rate-risk-management procedures... association's management of that risk. (b) The board of directors shall formerly adopt a policy for...

  15. Work Incapacity and Treatment Costs After Severe Accidents: Standard Versus Intensive Case Management in a 6-Year Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan M; Andermatt, Peter; Tobler, Benno L; Spinnler, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Purpose Case management is widely accepted as an effective method to support medical rehabilitation and vocational reintegration of accident victims with musculoskeletal injuries. This study investigates whether more intensive case management improves outcomes such as work incapacity and treatment costs for severely injured patients. Methods 8,050 patients were randomly allocated either to standard case management (SCM, administered by claims specialists) or intensive case management (ICM, administered by case managers). These study groups differ mainly by caseload, which was approximately 100 cases in SCM and 35 in ICM. The setting is equivalent to a prospective randomized controlled trial. A 6-year follow-up period was chosen in order to encompass both short-term insurance benefits and permanent disability costs. All data were extracted from administrative insurance databases. Results Average work incapacity over the 6-year follow-up, including contributions from daily allowances and permanent losses from disability, was slightly but insignificantly higher under ICM than under SCM (21.6 vs. 21.3 % of pre-accident work capacity). Remaining work incapacity after 6 years of follow-up showed no difference between ICM and SCM (8.9 vs. 8.8 % of pre-accident work incapacity). Treatment costs were 43,500 Swiss Francs (CHF) in ICM compared to 39,800 in SCM (+9.4 %, p = 0.01). The number of care providers involved in ICM was 10.5 compared to 10.0 in ICM (+5.0 %, p < 0.001). Conclusions Contrary to expectations, ICM did not reduce work incapacity as compared to SCM, but did increase healthcare consumption and treatment costs. It is concluded that the intensity of case management alone is not sufficient to improve rehabilitation and vocational reintegration of accident victims. PMID:26687330

  16. A balance procedure for calculating the model fuel assemblies reflooding during design basis accident and its verification on PARAMETER test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Ignat'ev, D. N.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    A balance procedure is proposed for estimating the main parameters characterizing the process of model fuel assemblies reflooding of a VVER reactor made on different scales under the conditions of a design basis accident by subjecting them to bottom reflooding1. The proposed procedure satisfactorily describes the experimental data obtained on PARAMETER test facility in the temperature range up to 1200°C. The times of fuel assemblies quenching by bottom reflooding calculated using the proposed procedure are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data obtained on model fuel assemblies of VVER- and PWR-type reactors and can be used in developing measures aimed at enhancing the safety of nuclear power stations.

  17. Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Policastro, A.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Marmer, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mueller, C.; Freeman, W.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the process of comparing alternative management strategies in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Such strategies involve regionalization, decentralization, and centralization of waste treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Potential accidents at the HWSFs at the DOE sites are divided into categories of spill alone, spill plus fire, and other event combinations including spill plus fire plus explosion, fire only, spill and explosion, and fire and explosion. One or more accidents are chosen to represent the types of accidents for FY 1992 for 12 DOE sites were studied to determine the most representative set of possible accidents at all DOE sites. Each accident scenario is given a probability of occurrence that is adjusted, depending on the throughput and waste composition that passes through the HWSF at the particular site. The justification for the probabilities chosen is presented.

  18. Tenth Warren K. Sinclair keynote address-the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident and comprehensive health risk management.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    Just two years have passed since the Tokyo Electric Power Company-Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, a multidimensional disaster that combined to destroy the local infrastructure on which the safety system depended and gave a serious impact to the world. Countermeasures including evacuation, sheltering, and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese government. However, there is a clear need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection and also in the management of the radiation health risk during and even after the accident. To date there have been no acute radiation injuries. The radiation-related physical health consequences to the general public, including evacuees, are likely to be much lower than those arising from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, because the radiation fallout and the subsequent environmental contamination were much more limited. However, the social, psychological, and economic impacts of the Fukushima NPP accident are expected to be considerable. Currently, continued monitoring and characterization of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and foods in Fukushima are vital for obtaining informed consent to the decisions on living in the areas already radiocontaminated and returning back to the evacuated areas once re-entry is permitted; it is also important to perform a realistic assessment of the radiation doses on the basis of measurements. We are currently implementing the official plans of the Fukushima Health Management Survey, which includes a basic survey for the estimation of the external doses that were received during the first 4 mo after the accident and four more detailed surveys (thyroid ultrasound examination, comprehensive health check-up, mental health and life-style survey, and survey of pregnant women and nursing mothers), with the aim to take care of the health of all of the residents of the Fukushima Prefecture for a long time

  19. Analysis of Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China: Characteristics and Lessons for Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Tongzhu; Liu, Bo; Lu, Feng; Fang, Shurong; You, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding historical accidents is important for accident prevention and risk mitigation; however, there are no public databases of pollution accidents in China, and no detailed information regarding such incidents is readily available. Thus, 653 representative cases of surface water pollution accidents in China were identified and described as a function of time, location, materials involved, origin, and causes. The severity and other features of the accidents, frequency and quantities of chemicals involved, frequency and number of people poisoned, frequency and number of people affected, frequency and time for which pollution lasted, and frequency and length of pollution zone were effectively used to value and estimate the accumulated probabilities. The probabilities of occurrences of various types based on origin and causes were also summarized based on these observations. The following conclusions can be drawn from these analyses: (1) There was a high proportion of accidents involving multi-district boundary regions and drinking water crises, indicating that more attention should be paid to environmental risk prevention and the mitigation of such incidents. (2) A high proportion of accidents originated from small-sized chemical plants, indicating that these types of enterprises should be considered during policy making. (3) The most common cause (49.8 % of the total) was intentional acts (illegal discharge); accordingly, efforts to increase environmental consciousness in China should be enhanced.

  20. Analysis of Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China: Characteristics and Lessons for Risk Management.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Tongzhu; Liu, Bo; Lu, Feng; Fang, Shurong; You, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding historical accidents is important for accident prevention and risk mitigation; however, there are no public databases of pollution accidents in China, and no detailed information regarding such incidents is readily available. Thus, 653 representative cases of surface water pollution accidents in China were identified and described as a function of time, location, materials involved, origin, and causes. The severity and other features of the accidents, frequency and quantities of chemicals involved, frequency and number of people poisoned, frequency and number of people affected, frequency and time for which pollution lasted, and frequency and length of pollution zone were effectively used to value and estimate the accumulated probabilities. The probabilities of occurrences of various types based on origin and causes were also summarized based on these observations. The following conclusions can be drawn from these analyses: (1) There was a high proportion of accidents involving multi-district boundary regions and drinking water crises, indicating that more attention should be paid to environmental risk prevention and the mitigation of such incidents. (2) A high proportion of accidents originated from small-sized chemical plants, indicating that these types of enterprises should be considered during policy making. (3) The most common cause (49.8% of the total) was intentional acts (illegal discharge); accordingly, efforts to increase environmental consciousness in China should be enhanced. PMID:26739714

  1. 5 CFR 9701.512 - Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conferring on procedures for the exercise... Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights. (a) As provided by § 9701.511(c), management... this section will delay the exercise of a management right under § 9701.511(a)(1) and (2)....

  2. 5 CFR 9701.512 - Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferring on procedures for the exercise... Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights. (a) As provided by § 9701.511(c), management... this section will delay the exercise of a management right under § 9701.511(a)(1) and (2)....

  3. 5 CFR 9701.512 - Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conferring on procedures for the exercise... Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights. (a) As provided by § 9701.511(c), management... this section will delay the exercise of a management right under § 9701.511(a)(1) and (2)....

  4. 5 CFR 9701.512 - Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conferring on procedures for the exercise... Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights. (a) As provided by § 9701.511(c), management... this section will delay the exercise of a management right under § 9701.511(a)(1) and (2)....

  5. 5 CFR 9701.512 - Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conferring on procedures for the exercise... Conferring on procedures for the exercise of management rights. (a) As provided by § 9701.511(c), management... this section will delay the exercise of a management right under § 9701.511(a)(1) and (2)....

  6. A Cost Management Control Procedure for Initial Training in Surface Ship Acquisition Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, Roger V.; And Others

    A study was conducted to develop a cost management control procedure to assist Navy managers in making decisions about initial training development and implementation in surface ship acquisition programs. Objectives were (1) develop and illustrate a cost management control procedure for centralized collection, storage, and control of cost data for…

  7. 20 CFR 670.960 - What are the procedures for management of student records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the procedures for management of..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative and Management Provisions § 670.960 What are the procedures for management of student records? The Secretary...

  8. 20 CFR 670.960 - What are the procedures for management of student records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the procedures for management of..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative and Management Provisions § 670.960 What are the procedures for management of student records? The Secretary...

  9. 44 CFR 207.7 - Procedures for requesting management cost funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... management cost funding. 207.7 Section 207.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... requesting management cost funding. (a) General. This section describes the procedures to be used by the grantee in requesting management cost funding. (b) State Administrative Plan Requirements....

  10. 44 CFR 207.7 - Procedures for requesting management cost funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... management cost funding. 207.7 Section 207.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... requesting management cost funding. (a) General. This section describes the procedures to be used by the grantee in requesting management cost funding. (b) State Administrative Plan Requirements....

  11. 44 CFR 207.7 - Procedures for requesting management cost funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... management cost funding. 207.7 Section 207.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... requesting management cost funding. (a) General. This section describes the procedures to be used by the grantee in requesting management cost funding. (b) State Administrative Plan Requirements....

  12. 44 CFR 207.7 - Procedures for requesting management cost funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... management cost funding. 207.7 Section 207.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... requesting management cost funding. (a) General. This section describes the procedures to be used by the grantee in requesting management cost funding. (b) State Administrative Plan Requirements....

  13. 44 CFR 207.7 - Procedures for requesting management cost funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... management cost funding. 207.7 Section 207.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... requesting management cost funding. (a) General. This section describes the procedures to be used by the grantee in requesting management cost funding. (b) State Administrative Plan Requirements....

  14. Environmental risk management for radiological accidents: integrating risk assessment and decision analysis for remediation at different spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Yatsalo, Boris; Sullivan, Terrence; Didenko, Vladimir; Linkov, Igor

    2011-07-01

    The consequences of the Tohuku earthquake and subsequent tsunami in March 2011 caused a loss of power at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Japan, and led to the release of radioactive materials into the environment. Although the full extent of the contamination is not currently known, the highly complex nature of the environmental contamination (radionuclides in water, soil, and agricultural produce) typical of nuclear accidents requires a detailed geospatial analysis of information with the ability to extrapolate across different scales with applications to risk assessment models and decision making support. This article briefly summarizes the approach used to inform risk-based land management and remediation decision making after the Chernobyl, Soviet Ukraine, accident in 1986. PMID:21608109

  15. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok J.; Lin, Hsing K.; Chen, Gang; Yi, Shinjea; Choi, Jeawook; Rui, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to investigate the current status of the occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) in the construction industry and the effect of OHSMS on accident rates. Differences of awareness levels on safety issues among site general managers and occupational health and safety (OHS) managers are identified through surveys. Methods The accident rates for the OHSMS-certified construction companies from 2006 to 2011, when the construction OHSMS became widely available, were analyzed to understand the effect of OHSMS on the work-related injury rates in the construction industry. The Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency 18001 is the certification to these companies performing OHSMS in South Korea. The questionnaire was created to analyze the differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers of construction companies. Results The implementation of OHSMS among the top 100 construction companies in South Korea shows that the accident rate decreased by 67% and the fatal accident rate decreased by 10.3% during the period from 2006 to 2011. The survey in this study shows different OHSMS awareness levels between site general managers and OHS managers. The differences were motivation for developing OHSMS, external support needed for implementing OHSMS, problems and effectiveness of implementing OHSMS. Conclusion Both work-related accident and fatal accident rates were found to be significantly reduced by implementing OHSMS in this study. The differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers were identified through a survey. The effect of these differences on safety and other benefits warrants further research with proper data collection. PMID:24422176

  16. Code portability and data management considerations in the SAS3D LMFBR accident-analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The SAS3D code was produced from a predecessor in order to reduce or eliminate interrelated problems in the areas of code portability, the large size of the code, inflexibility in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, code maintenance, and running speed. Many conventional solutions, such as variable dimensioning, disk storage, virtual memory, and existing code-maintenance utilities were not feasible or did not help in this case. A new data management scheme was developed, coding standards and procedures were adopted, special machine-dependent routines were written, and a portable source code processing code was written. The resulting code is quite portable, quite flexible in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, much easier to maintain, and faster running. SAS3D is still a large, long running code that only runs well if sufficient main memory is available.

  17. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures....

  18. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures....

  19. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures....

  20. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures....

  1. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. 630.1106 Section 630.1106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106 Policy and procedures for work zone...

  2. Lessons learned: medical and health care management for emergency workers at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP accident.

    PubMed

    Koerner, John; Yasui, Shojiro

    2014-01-01

    During the emergency work at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant (APP), the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and the Japanese government experienced various problems in medical and health care management issues, including special medical examinations, on-site triage and initial treatment, patient transportation, lodging and food, and long-term health care for emergency workers. To resolve these problems, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) issued a series of compulsory directives and provided administrative guidance to TEPCO. Based on the experiences and lessons learned, the MHLW recognized that the proper management and implementation of medical and health care management in response to a similar accident would require sufficient measures and systematic preparation, including the following: 1. In case of large-scale nuclear accidents, the government needs to assist in dispatching medical staff to the affected plants. 2. Nuclear facility operators, medical facilities and fire departments should make an agreement to clarify the division of the roles played prior to the accident and should conduct emergency drills periodically with the full attendance of related personnel to identify and resolve the problems. 3. Operators need to develop a support base at a safe distance from the plant and to prepare to develop makeshift lodgings in case of emergency. 4. Operators need to come to an agreement to share food stocks among closely located nuclear plants and prepare cooking equipment that can be used in case of blackout to provide warm foods and drinks to as many workers as possible. 5. It is necessary to conduct long-term follow-up for emergency workers, including health care system, medical examinations and mental health consultations. PMID:24467339

  3. Medical Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Postprocedural Pain, and Venous Thromboembolism Following Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B.; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  4. Tranexamic Acid in Anesthetic Management of Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Mayeux, Jessica; Alwon, Kathy; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Blood loss during surgical procedures poses a grave risk to the patient, but transfusion is costly and associated with adverse outcomes. Antifibrinolytics, however, offer an economical and effective means of decreasing blood loss associated with surgical procedures. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic that blocks lysine-binding sites of fibrinogen and fibrin, preventing the breakdown of existing clots. This journal course reviews extensive research demonstrating that antifibrinolytics such as TXA decrease blood loss and in some studies reduce allogeneic transfusion requirements. In addition, this journal course addresses concerns that use of antifibrinolytics increases embolic events, reviews research that demonstrates TXA does not increase the incidence of vascular occlusive events, and describes methods of TXA use in cardiac and orthopedic surgical procedures, neurosurgery, and obstetrics. The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist should consider the possibility, on a case-by-case basis, of using TXA in surgical procedures to reduce blood loss with minimal adverse effects. PMID:27501656

  5. Process for controlling accidents in chemical laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Delvin, W.L.

    1980-10-01

    Most laboratory safety programs include inspections to identify hazards and thereby control accidents. There are certain elements that must be a part of a successful inspection and control process. These are a systematic and consistent inspection procedure, a reliable evaluation of identified hazards, and effective follow-up actions. Laboratory management, through its responsibility for the total system, has a key role in the inspection and control process for follow-up actions and accepting risks. If any of the above requirements are missing, the process will be less than adequate. Understanding the relationship between accidents, hazards, and risks is important in establishing an effective inspection and control program. Hazards are potential sources of accidents (accidents waiting to happen). Associated with each is a risk, which has two components: probability and consequence. Probability refers to the likelihood that a hazard will turn into an accident and consequence is the result of such an accident. In assessing the seriousness of a hazard, both probability and consequence must be considered in terms of risk level and acceptability. This paper presents a process that can be used by laboratory management to establish an effective inspection and control program for the laboratory. A discussion of safety concepts and their relationships that affect the process is included.

  6. Improving Academic and Behavior Skills through Self-Management Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Mary Anne

    1994-01-01

    Techniques for developing self-management skills in students with learning and/or behavioral difficulties are explained, including self-monitoring and self-instruction. Development of self-management skills is seen to facilitate mainstreaming and provide prereferral intervention assistance. (DB)

  7. An intelligent flight-management aid for procedure execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program is described that contains a model of the procedures used in the operation of a twin engine aircraft. This program, by comparing the model to the aircraft state, can determine when a procedure (or checklist) should be or is invoked and when each step (detectable by a change in the aircraft state) is completed. Thus, the program tracks the flight crew's procedure execution through changes in the aircraft state. Data were used for evaluation from an earlier experiment on a Link GAT-II simulator. The program had been able to identify practically all of the errors identified by human judges as well as locate some missed by them. It is felt that this model could significantly aid flight crews.

  8. Management of the sodium hypochlorite accident: a rare but significant complication of root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Jonathan; Walsh, Stephen; Wilson, Alan

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old female patient presented to the accident and emergency department, 3 h following a dental appointment. Significant right-sided facial swelling, bruising and pain were present. The patient had been sent by her general dental practitioner with a covering letter explaining that a hypochlorite accident had occurred during root canal treatment of the upper right first premolar tooth. An iatrogenic perforation was suspected. The patient was admitted under the care of the maxillofacial team and intravenous antibiotics, analgesia and steroids were administered. The patient was prepared for the possibility of requiring surgical intervention under a general anaesthetic. No nerve injury was encountered and the periorbital tissues were spared. A full recovery was made by the patient with no surgical intervention required but significant bruising and swelling were present up to 4 weeks following the incident. PMID:25809429

  9. Use of an influence diagram and fuzzy probability for evaluating accident management in a boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D. . Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Dept.)

    1994-06-01

    A new approach is presented for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in severe accident management strategies. At first, this analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., applying a strategy compared with do nothing) and uses an influence diagram. To evaluate imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram, the analysis introduces the concept of a fuzzy probability. When fuzzy logic is applied, fuzzy probabilities are easily propagated to obtain results. In addition, the results obtained provide not only information similar to the classical approach, which uses point-estimate values, but also additional information regarding the impact of using imprecise input data. As an illustrative example, the proposed methodology is applied to the evaluation of the drywell flooding strategy for a long-term station blackout sequence at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant. The results show that the drywell flooding strategy is beneficial for preventing reactor vessel breach. It is also effective for reducing the probability of containment failure for both liner melt-through and late overpressurization. Even though uncertainty exists in the results, flooding is preferred to do nothing when evaluated in terms of two risk measures: early and late fatalities.

  10. Dialogue procedures for the management of odour related community conflicts.

    PubMed

    Sucker, K

    2009-01-01

    In the German Guideline on Odour in Ambient Air (GOAA) statements about the degree of residential odour annoyance are based on the frequency of recognisable odours and hedonic tone. The use of olfactory standards to adequately estimate the annoyance impact is limited if, for example, worry about adverse health outcomes significantly influences the annoyance response of the population. This report introduces dialogue procedures as complementary measures to consider the complainants' subjective perceptions and worries adequately. At first, it is illustrated that odour exposure and number of odour complaints are not necessarily correlated. Then the "interest analysis" and the five steps of a dialogue procedure are presented. A dialogue procedure can be initiated in "quiet times" - where the focus is on trust building and on the development of adequate communication strategies to promote realistic risk reception - as well as in order to establish a successful conflict resolution process if the issue is complex and emotionally discussed. After that, two examples of handling odour complaints are shown. Finally, considerations applying dialogue procedures as a tool to advance odour annoyance mitigation are outlined. PMID:19273885

  11. Diagnosis and management of transient ischaemic attacks in accident and emergency.

    PubMed Central

    Libetta, C; Venables, G S

    1998-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Often the first presentation of cerebrovascular disease is a TIA which will present to the A&E department. Patients who have had a TIA are at increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death. The risk of stroke after a TIA is greatest in the first year (approximately 11.6%) with a risk of approximately 5.9% per year over the first five years. As the risk is highest in the first months following a TIA it is important that the patients are diagnosed accurately, investigated promptly, and referred appropriately for treatment in order that valuable time is not lost. For this reason A&E physicians have a valuable role in the initial assessment and management of the patient. It has been advocated that patients should be seen by a neurologist or physician with an interest in cerebrovascular disease within days of their symptoms and be prepared for surgery within two weeks after a TIA. While it is usually not possible to achieve this ideal, improved cooperation between A&E physicians and these neurologists, general physicians, and geriatricians should lead to the implementation of speedy efficient referral procedures which can only improve patient care. When you next see a patient with a TIA in the A&E department remember what they have to lose. Three questions relating to this article are: (1) How are TIAs subdivided and what clinical features allow this differentation? (2) What are the initial investigations that should be performed in A&E? (3) When are the risks of completed stroke greatest after a TIA? Enumerate these risks. How effective is aspirin at reducting this risks? PMID:9825274

  12. Analytical procedures to detect 2,3,7,8-TCDD at Seveso after the industrial accident of July 10, 1976

    SciTech Connect

    Cattabeni, F.; di Domenico, A.; Merli, F.

    1986-08-01

    The analytical procedures used at Seveso (Milan, Italy) for the determination of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, and some isomers, in biological and environmental samples are reviewed in this paper. During the emergency period, up until the first 10 days of August, the extracts, mostly from soil or vegetation samples, were evaporated to dryness and then mixed with less than or equal to 10-ml solvent. Of these solutions, aliquots up to 10 microliter were injected into a low-resolution gas chromatograph (GC) combined with a low-resolution mass spectrometer (MS). Analytical sensitivity for vegetation and soil was less than 10 ppb and approximately 100 ppt, respectively. After the emergency period, the greatest improvement in environmental sample analysis was the introduction of cleanup procedure which greatly reduced the presence of unwanted material in samples. Cleanup was followed by the complete removal of the solvent. Dry samples could be taken up with rather small volumes (greater than or equal to 0.1 ml) of solvent, of which an aliquot was used for GC-MS analysis. The instrumental setup was kept as above. For animal samples, extraction entailed preliminary alkaline digestion followed by a number of cleanup steps. The final dry sample was taken to desired volume by adding solvent (greater than or equal to 0.1 ml), of which a few microliters were injected in GC-MS apparatuses. Detection thresholds improved markedly and were less than 10 ppt for agricultural soil and sediment, less than or equal to 0.05 ppt for water, in the range of 60 to 200 ppt for air dust, less than 10 ng/m2 and 10 ppt for wipe and scrape tests, respectively, less than 50 ppt for vegetation, and 250 ppt for biological substrata. Major later improvements in TCDD assay were the use of high-resolution gas chromatography (hrGC-MS), in some cases combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (hrGC-hrMS).

  13. China's Classification-Based Forest Management: Procedures, Problems, and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Limin; Zhao, Fuqiang; Shao, Guofan; Zhou, Li; Tang, Lina

    2009-06-01

    China’s new Classification-Based Forest Management (CFM) is a two-class system, including Commodity Forest (CoF) and Ecological Welfare Forest (EWF) lands, so named according to differences in their distinct functions and services. The purposes of CFM are to improve forestry economic systems, strengthen resource management in a market economy, ease the conflicts between wood demands and public welfare, and meet the diversified needs for forest services in China. The formative process of China’s CFM has involved a series of trials and revisions. China’s central government accelerated the reform of CFM in the year 2000 and completed the final version in 2003. CFM was implemented at the provincial level with the aid of subsidies from the central government. About a quarter of the forestland in China was approved as National EWF lands by the State Forestry Administration in 2006 and 2007. Logging is prohibited on National EWF lands, and their landowners or managers receive subsidies of about 70 RMB (US10) per hectare from the central government. CFM represents a new forestry strategy in China and its implementation inevitably faces challenges in promoting the understanding of forest ecological services, generalizing nationwide criteria for identifying EWF and CoF lands, setting up forest-specific compensation mechanisms for ecological benefits, enhancing the knowledge of administrators and the general public about CFM, and sustaining EWF lands under China’s current forestland tenure system. CFM does, however, offer a viable pathway toward sustainable forest management in China.

  14. 45 CFR 1304.51 - Management systems and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (ii) The formulation of both multi-year (long-range) program goals and short..., Family and Community Partnerships, and Program Design and Management). See the requirements of 45 CFR... consistent with the philosophy of Early Head Start and Head Start, and reflect the findings of the...

  15. Management Aids and Procedures for Strategic Planning. Staff Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Robert G.

    Management aids required in strategic planning are divided into three categories: (1) assessing the environment, (2) providing a process for reaching decisions, and (3) presenting criteria to evaluate strategic decisions. A model for scanning the environment has four dimensions that concern economic, social, knowledge-technology, and public policy…

  16. Evaluation and management of voiding dysfunction after midurethral sling procedures

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Hatice; Harmanlı, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Midurethral slings have become the most popular surgical procedure for the correction of stress urinary incontinence in women. Urinary retention or obstructive voiding symptoms may arise from partial urethral obstruction as a result of oversuspension of the urethra or exaggerated tension. Fortunately, most cases of voiding dysfunction are transient and resolve spontaneously within days. Clean intermittent self-catheterization is the mainstay of conservative treatment. If symptoms persist, tape mobilization, incision or urethrolysis may be performed. Recurrent stress urinary incontinence may occur in a small group of patients, who may benefit from another incontinence treatment. PMID:24592021

  17. Student Opinions about the Seven-Step Procedure in Problem-Based Hospitality Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaal, Wichard; Otting, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how hospitality management students appreciate the role and application of the seven-step procedure in problem-based learning. A survey was developed containing sections about personal characteristics, recall of the seven steps, overall report marks, and 30 statements about the seven-step procedure. The survey was…

  18. Data management procedures for Tiepoint Registration, pre and post processing, and ICD116

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, B. S.

    1983-01-01

    The data management procedures for tiepoint registration, pre and post processing, and "ICD116' are described. With each procedure description, the pertinent execs are listed and purposes defined. An example run of each of the 32 execs is included with user inputs identified.

  19. Safety Is No Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Monty L.

    1985-01-01

    Liability suits involving accidents in park and recreation areas are expensive and intangible costs are incalculable. Risk management practices related to park planning, personnel, and administrative practices are discussed. (MT)

  20. Procedure for assessing visual quality for landscape planning and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimblett, H. Randal; Fitzgibbon, John E.; Bechard, Kevin P.; Wightman, J. A.; Itami, Robert M.

    1987-07-01

    Incorporation of aesthetic considerations in the process of landscape planning and development has frequently met with poor results due to its lack of theoretical basis, public involvement, and failure to deal with spatial implications. This problem has been especially evident when dealing with large areas, for example, the Adirondacks, Scenic Highways, and National Forests and Parks. This study made use of public participation to evaluate scenic quality in a portion of the Niagara Escarpment in Southern Ontario, Canada. The results of this study were analyzed using the visual management model proposed by Brown and Itami (1982) as a means of assessing and evaluating scenic quality. The map analysis package formulated by Tomlin (1980) was then applied to this assessment for the purpose of spatial mapping of visual impact. The results of this study illustrate that it is possible to assess visual quality for landscape/management, preservation, and protection using a theoretical basis, public participation, and a systematic spatial mapping process.

  1. Managing the identification of the mortal victims run over by a train in the Castelldefels railway accident (Barcelona).

    PubMed

    Barbería, Eneko; Martin-Fumadó, Carles; Galtés, Ignasi; Subirana-Domenech, Mercé; Puigbarraca-Sol, Lourdes; Vidal-Gutiérrez, Claudina; Valverde-Villarreal, Juan Luis; Castellà-García, Josep; Medallo-Muñiz, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    The identification of disaster victims is the formal, organized process of identifying multiple bodies after an incident with multiple victims. The appropriate management of these incidents, particularly of the bodies, is one of the most crucial aspects of disaster response and its importance has led to the evolution of the concept of Disaster Victim Management. The aim of this study is to report how the process of identifying the 12 mortal victims of a railway accident in June 2010 in Castelldefels (Barcelona) was managed. The methodology used complied with the National Protocol for medical forensic and scientific police response to mass casualty incidents. The family assistance center also served as an ante mortem (AM) office. Despite the fragmentation of the bodies, all the victims were identified satisfactorily. The main problems observed during the management of the disaster were due to the state of the bodies, which raised many doubts as to the number of fatalities. The experience prompted a proposal to establish some recommendations on limiting the number of fragments to be analyzed genetically. We would like to stress the importance of setting up a Data Integration Center which brought together all the participating institutions, and collected and supervised all the different identification reports in a single comprehensive text addressed to the competent legal authority. PMID:26026775

  2. In-vessel melt retention as a severe accident management strategy for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1997-02-01

    The concept of lower head coolability and in-vessel retention of corium has been approved as a basic element of the severe accident management strategy for IVO`s Loviisa Plant (VVER-440) in Finland. The selected approach takes advantage of the unique features of the plant such as low power density, reactor pressure vessel without penetrations at the bottom and ice-condenser containment which ensures flooded cavity in all risk significant sequences. The thermal analyses, which are supported by experimental program, demonstrate that in Loviisa the molten corium on the lower head of the reactor vessel is coolable externally with wide margins. This paper summarizes the approach and the plant modifications being implemented. During the approval process some technical concerns were raised, particularly with regard to thermal loadings caused by contact of cool cavity water and hot corium with the reactor vessel. Resolution of these concerns is also discussed.

  3. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  4. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  5. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  6. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  7. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  8. Cochlear implantation and management of chronic suppurative otitis media: single stage procedure?

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, S; Shanks, M; Sivaji, N; Allen, Agnes A

    2005-10-01

    In a series of 360 patients who underwent cochlear implantation at our center, four patients (five procedures) had cochlear implantation with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and management of cholesteatoma as a single-staged procedure. Three patients were bilaterally deaf secondary to CSOM and had bilateral mastoid cavities, and in one patient congenital cholesteatoma was identified during cochlear implantation. A mastoidectomy or revision mastoidectomy with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and cochlear implantation was performed as a single stage procedure. Cholesteatoma reoccurred in one patient 9 years after cochlear implantation. Surgical procedures, complications, follow-up and outcomes are discussed. PMID:15756568

  9. Anesthetic management of an ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure: a novel balanced approach.

    PubMed

    Braden, Adam; Maani, Christopher; Nagy, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedures are therapeutic interventions for fetuses with life-threatening airway abnormalities and/or other prenatally diagnosed congenital malformations requiring immediate neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Although certain anesthetic goals are common among EXIT procedures, many different approaches to their management have been described in the literature. Herein, we present a novel anesthetic approach to an EXIT procedure for fetal micrognathia and retrognathia. We also review the indications and anesthetic considerations for these procedures and highlight the need for multidisciplinary collaboration to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27185679

  10. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  11. Radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Saenger, E L

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity. PMID:3526994

  12. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  13. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Accident records. 101-39...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records of vehicle accidents indicate that a particular activity has had an unusually high accident...

  14. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Accident records. 101-39...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records of vehicle accidents indicate that a particular activity has had an unusually high accident...

  15. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A. J.

    1988-02-01

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

  16. Tools for improving safety management in the Norwegian Fishing Fleet occupational accidents analysis period of 1998-2006.

    PubMed

    Aasjord, Halvard L

    2006-01-01

    Reporting of human accidents in the Norwegian Fishing Fleet has always been very difficult because there has been no tradition in making reports on all types of working accidents among fishermen, if the accident does not seem to be very serious or there is no economical incentive to report. Therefore reports are only written when the accidents are serious or if the fisherman is reported sick. Reports about an accident are sent to the insurance company, but another report should also be sent to the Norwegian Maritime Directorate (NMD). Comparing of data from one former insurance company and NMD shows that the real numbers of injuries or serious accidents among Norwegian fishermen could be up to two times more than the numbers reported to NMD. Special analyses of 1690 accidents from the so called PUS-database (NMD) for the period 1998-2002, show that the calculated risk was 23.6 accidents per 1000 man-years. This is quite a high risk level, and most of the accidents in the fishing fleet were rather serious. The calculated risks are highest for fishermen on board the deep sea fleet of trawlers (28.6 accidents per 1000 man-years) and also on the deep sea fleet of purse seiners (28.9 accidents per 1000 man-years). Fatal accidents over a longer period of 51.5 years from 1955 to 2006 are also roughly analysed. These data from SINTEF's own database show that the numbers of fatal accidents have been decreasing over this long period, except for the two periods 1980-84 and 1990-94 where we had some casualties with total losses of larger vessels with the loss of most of the crew, but also many others typical work accidents on smaller vessels. The total numbers of registered Norwegian fishermen and also the numbers of man-years have been drastically reduced over the 51.5 years from 1955 to 2006. The risks of fatal accidents have been very steady over time at a high level, although there has been a marked risk reduction since 1990-94. For the last 8.5-year period of January 1998

  17. Assessment and management of asthma in an accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, S; Diggle, S; Cushley, M J; Sleet, R A; Tattersfield, A E

    1985-01-01

    Patients with asthma presenting to the accident and emergency department at Southampton General Hospital during 12 months were reviewed retrospectively to determine how many patients attended, when and how patients were assessed and treated, and what factors appeared to influence whether a patient was admitted to a medical ward or not. Thirty five visits were made by patients requesting a repeat prescription for a metered dose inhaler. A further 193 visits were made by 152 patients (93 male, 59 female); only data on the first visit of any individual were analysed in this study. Patients were more likely to visit in the autumn, at the weekend, and in the evenings. Observations and measurements used to assess the severity of asthma were recorded with variable frequency--heart rate in 84% of examinations, pulsus paradoxus in 13%, and peak flow rate in 11%. Blood pressure was five times more likely to be recorded than peak flow rate. The drugs used to treat asthma were, in order of frequency, a beta agonist (120 patients), intravenous aminophylline (39), and intravenous corticosteroids (30). Sixty (39%) of the patients were admitted to a medical ward. Admission was more likely to occur when patients arrived during the week than at the weekend, when they had cyanosis or pulsus paradoxus, and after receiving parenteral treatment. There was no difference in mean heart rate between patients admitted to the ward and those discharged home. Although there was no specific evidence of inappropriate admission to or discharge from hospital in this retrospective study, the failure to record more objective measurements of the severity of asthma and, in particular, the extent of the airflow obstruction, is cause for concern. PMID:2869594

  18. Accident investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laynor, William G. Bud

    1987-01-01

    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has attributed wind shear as a cause or contributing factor in 15 accidents involving transport-categroy airplanes since 1970. Nine of these were nonfatal; but the other six accounted for 440 lives. Five of the fatal accidents and seven of the nonfatal accidents involved encounters with convective downbursts or microbursts. Of other accidents, two which were nonfatal were encounters with a frontal system shear, and one which was fatal was the result of a terrain induced wind shear. These accidents are discussed with reference to helping the aircraft to avoid the wind shear or if impossible to help the pilot to get through the wind shear.

  19. 78 FR 73756 - Process Safety Management and Prevention of Major Chemical Accidents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... operations (48 FR 57202). However, the Agency subsequently removed the oil and gas well drilling and... Management Systems (SEMS II) final rule (78 FR 20423; 04/05/2013), which revised a number of requirements in... would have required employers to follow commonly accepted consensus standards and industry codes. 55...

  20. Human factors review for Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA)

    SciTech Connect

    Krois, P.A.; Haas, P.M.; Manning, J.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper will discuss work being conducted during this human factors review including: (1) support of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program based on an assessment of operator actions, and (2) development of a descriptive model of operator severe accident management. Research by SASA analysts on the Browns Ferry Unit One (BF1) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) was supported through a concurrent assessment of operator performance to demonstrate contributions to SASA analyses from human factors data and methods. A descriptive model was developed called the Function Oriented Accident Management (FOAM) model, which serves as a structure for bridging human factors, operations, and engineering expertise and which is useful for identifying needs/deficiencies in the area of accident management. The assessment of human factors issues related to ATWS required extensive coordination with SASA analysts. The analysis was consolidated primarily to six operator actions identified in the Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) as being the most critical to the accident sequence. These actions were assessed through simulator exercises, qualitative reviews, and quantitative human reliability analyses. The FOAM descriptive model assumes as a starting point that multiple operator/system failures exceed the scope of procedures and necessitates a knowledge-based emergency response by the operators. The FOAM model provides a functionally-oriented structure for assembling human factors, operations, and engineering data and expertise into operator guidance for unconventional emergency responses to mitigate severe accident progression and avoid/minimize core degradation. Operators must also respond to potential radiological release beyond plant protective barriers. Research needs in accident management and potential uses of the FOAM model are described. 11 references, 1 figure.

  1. Relative risk impacts of facility accidents in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared. A principal focus of the EM PEIS is the evaluation of strategies for remediating DOE sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and environment. A specific objective of DOE in implementing an integrated waste management program is to {open_quotes}reduce or eliminate risks to human health and safety and to the environment for environmental restoration and waste operation activities.{close_quotes} The EM PEIS calls for separate evaluations of the risk impacts for managing six different waste types: greater-than-Class-C low-level, hazardous, high-level, low-level mixed, low-level, and transuranic. For each waste type, four categorical strategies have been devised for consolidating wastes for treatment and storage: (a) no action, where existing sites will generally store and treat their own wastes consistent with approved plans, (b) decentralization, (c) regionalization, and (d) centralization. The last three alternatives refer to the degree of consolidation and affect the number of sites that will be used to treat, store, and dispose of a given waste type. Each consolidation strategy has associated siting options, and each option involves existing facilities, facilities in the design phase, and new facilities. Each siting option also implies unique inventories of waste to be stored and treated at each site and associated facilities. Finally, a number of treatment technologies and storage and disposal options for each waste type are to be evaluated for each alternative.

  2. The Effect of Contingency Management Procedures on the Rate of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.; And Others

    Two different groups of subjects--incarcerated adult offenders and freshman nursing students--participated in an academic experiment which employed an individually prescribed learning system. The system featured programmed instructional materials and contingency management procedures to obtain stable cumulative records of learning performance.…

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PROBLEM MANAGEMENT (G06)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe problem management, and to define a set of reporting actions to be taken in the event of a problem during any phase of the study. This procedure outlines the steps for making a problem known in order that it may be systematically resolved b...

  4. Development of Criteria and Procedures for Management of Classified Document Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Jack C.

    The report describes work done in development of criteria and procedures for management of collections of classified documents. Material is presented on philosophy of operation, concept of user service, accession and retention. Much of the discussion is based upon the concept of conversion to a microfiche-oriented library; however, hard copy…

  5. 75 FR 6818 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-11

    ...), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158, when requesting frequency assignments for use of the radio...: Authority: 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p... Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management AGENCY:...

  6. 78 FR 52097 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, 77 FR 75567, 75567-68 (Dec... U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised to read...

  7. School Building Maintenance Procedures. School Plant Management Series. Bulletin, 1964, No. 17. OE-21027

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finchum, R. N.

    1964-01-01

    Adequate maintenance of school buildings representing a public investment of billions of dollars is a problem of grave concern to both taxpayers and school officials. This publication, one of a series dealing with school plant management problems, identifies, describes, shows the function of, and outlines maintenance procedures for many components…

  8. Regional Office Procedures. Stage I Final Report for the Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. (Volume III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.

    Volume III of a study of program management procedures in the campus-based and Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) programs provides a description of procedures employed within the U.S. Office of Education regional offices to administer the Basic Grant and campus-based student financial assistance programs. The objective of the report is to…

  9. "Defence-in-Depth" Strategy in Transport Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanek, Andrzej

    Safety management is a kind of system management, that is management by purposes. Taking "defence-in-depth" strategy, DDS - there can be defined four main aims and four method groups of risk management in transport: 1. minimizing transport accidents risk; 2. minimizing number of undesirable transport events (incidents, conflicts, collisions, accidents). Above purposes relate stages of safety management in transport. At each level of management should be elaborated methods, procedures and technologies of minimizing transport accidents risk. According to DDS any management system of transport safety should have a structure of multilevel chain protections which supervise main transport processes. About those problems in the paper.

  10. Investigation and management of patients with pleuritic chest pain presenting to the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K; Raghuram, A

    1999-01-01

    The assessment of a patient with pleuritic chest pain calls for a high degree of clinical acumen and a high degree of suspicion that the diagnosis might be pulmonary embolism. This area is one of the most difficult in A&E medicine (and indeed chest medicine). One error is to "think the best" when considering the diagnosis in such patients but experience soon teaches to "think PE" and diagnose less serious conditions only when pulmonary embolism has been excluded. A key consideration is the presence of risk factors. Because the diagnosis is difficult, there should be no hesitation in requesting a senior opinion or referring to the inpatient medical team. We have produced an algorithm (fig 1) for the investigation and management of pleuritic chest pain as discussed in this article. Three questions relating to this article are: (1) Can pulmonary embolism be the diagnosis in a patient with pleuritic chest pain but a normal chest radiograph, ECG, and arterial blood gases? (2) What is the chest radiograph abnormality which is most likely to alert you to the possibility of pulmonary embolism? (3) What percentage of patients with a low clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism but a high probability V/Q scan will have pulmonary embolism demonstrated on pulmonary angiography? The three key references are The PIOPED Investigators, Dalen, and Fennerty. PMID:9918289

  11. The Euratom-Rosatom ERCOSAM-SAMARA projects on containment thermal-hydraulics of current and future LWRs for severe accident management

    SciTech Connect

    Paladino, D.; Guentay, S.; Andreani, M.; Tkatschenko, I.; Brinster, J.; Dabbene, F.; Kelm, S.; Allelein, H. J.; Visser, D. C.; Benz, S.; Jordan, T.; Liang, Z.; Porcheron, E.; Malet, J.; Bentaib, A.; Kiselev, A.; Yudina, T.; Filippov, A.; Khizbullin, A.; Kamnev, M.; Zaytsev, A.; Loukianov, A.

    2012-07-01

    During a postulated severe accident with core degradation, hydrogen would form in the reactor pressure vessel mainly due to high temperatures zirconium-steam reaction and flow together with steam into the containment where it will mix with the containment atmosphere (steam-air). The hydrogen transport into the containment is a safety concern because it can lead to explosive mixtures through the associated phenomena of condensation, mixing and stratification. The ERCOSAM and SAMARA projects, co-financed by the European Union and the Russia, include various experiments addressing accident scenarios scaled down from existing plant calculations to different thermal-hydraulics facilities (TOSQAN, MISTRA, PANDA, SPOT). The tests sequences aim to investigate hydrogen concentration build-up and stratification during a postulated accident and the effect of the activation of Severe Accident Management systems (SAMs), e.g. sprays, coolers and Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiners (PARs). Analytical activities, performed by the project participants, are an essential component of the projects, as they aim to improve and validate various computational methods. They accompany the projects in the various phases; plant calculations, scaling to generic containment and to the different facilities, planning pre-test and post-test simulations are performed. Code benchmark activities on the basis of conceptual near full scale HYMIX facility will finally provide a further opportunity to evaluate the applicability of the various methods to the study of scaling issues. (authors)

  12. Air Traffic Management Technology Demostration: 1 Research and Procedural Testing of Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sara R.; Kibler, Jennifer L.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Smail, James W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1) will operationally demonstrate the feasibility of efficient arrival operations combining ground-based and airborne NASA technologies. The ATD-1 integrated system consists of the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering which generates precise time-based schedules to the runway and merge points; Controller Managed Spacing decision support tools which provide controllers with speed advisories and other information needed to meet the schedule; and Flight deck-based Interval Management avionics and procedures which allow flight crews to adjust their speed to achieve precise relative spacing. Initial studies identified air-ground challenges related to the integration of these three scheduling and spacing technologies, and NASA's airborne spacing algorithm was modified to address some of these challenges. The Research and Procedural Testing of Routes human-in-the-loop experiment was then conducted to assess the performance of the new spacing algorithm. The results of this experiment indicate that the algorithm performed as designed, and the pilot participants found the airborne spacing concept, air-ground procedures, and crew interface to be acceptable. However, the researchers concluded that the data revealed issues with the frequency of speed changes and speed reversals.

  13. 44 CFR 204.52 - Application and approval procedures for a subgrant under a fire management assistance grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application and approval procedures for a subgrant under a fire management assistance grant. 204.52 Section 204.52 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  14. 44 CFR 204.52 - Application and approval procedures for a subgrant under a fire management assistance grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application and approval procedures for a subgrant under a fire management assistance grant. 204.52 Section 204.52 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  15. Evaluation of Flight Deck-Based Interval Management Crew Procedure Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sara R.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Swieringa, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic demand is predicted to increase over the next 20 years, creating a need for new technologies and procedures to support this growth in a safe and efficient manner. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration - 1 (ATD-1) will operationally demonstrate the feasibility of efficient arrival operations combining ground-based and airborne NASA technologies. The integration of these technologies will increase throughput, reduce delay, conserve fuel, and minimize environmental impacts. The ground-based tools include Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering for precise time-based scheduling and Controller Managed Spacing decision support tools for better managing aircraft delay with speed control. The core airborne technology in ATD-1 is Flight deck-based Interval Management (FIM). FIM tools provide pilots with speed commands calculated using information from Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast. The precise merging and spacing enabled by FIM avionics and flight crew procedures will reduce excess spacing buffers and result in higher terminal throughput. This paper describes a human-in-the-loop experiment designed to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the ATD-1 procedures used in a voice communications environment. This experiment utilized the ATD-1 integrated system of ground-based and airborne technologies. Pilot participants flew a high-fidelity fixed base simulator equipped with an airborne spacing algorithm and a FIM crew interface. Experiment scenarios involved multiple air traffic flows into the Dallas-Fort Worth Terminal Radar Control airspace. Results indicate that the proposed procedures were feasible for use by flight crews in a voice communications environment. The delivery accuracy at the achieve-by point was within +/- five seconds and the delivery precision was less than five seconds. Furthermore, FIM speed commands occurred at a rate of less than one per minute

  16. Using Numerical Models in the Development of Software Tools for Risk Management of Accidents with Oil and Inert Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P. C.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Galvão, P.; Neves, R.

    2012-04-01

    The increasing ship traffic and maritime transport of dangerous substances make it more difficult to significantly reduce the environmental, economic and social risks posed by potential spills, although the security rules are becoming more restrictive (ships with double hull, etc.) and the surveillance systems are becoming more developed (VTS, AIS). In fact, the problematic associated to spills is and will always be a main topic: spill events are continuously happening, most of them unknown for the general public because of their small scale impact, but with some of them (in a much smaller number) becoming authentic media phenomena in this information era, due to their large dimensions and environmental and social-economic impacts on ecosystems and local communities, and also due to some spectacular or shocking pictures generated. Hence, the adverse consequences posed by these type of accidents, increase the preoccupation of avoiding them in the future, or minimize their impacts, using not only surveillance and monitoring tools, but also increasing the capacity to predict the fate and behaviour of bodies, objects, or substances in the following hours after the accident - numerical models can have now a leading role in operational oceanography applied to safety and pollution response in the ocean because of their predictive potential. Search and rescue operation, oil, inert (ship debris, or floating containers), and HNS (hazardous and noxious substances) spills risk analysis are the main areas where models can be used. Model applications have been widely used in emergency or planning issues associated to pollution risks, and contingency and mitigation measures. Before a spill, in the planning stage, modelling simulations are used in environmental impact studies, or risk maps, using historical data, reference situations, and typical scenarios. After a spill, the use of fast and simple modelling applications allow to understand the fate and behaviour of the spilt

  17. Perioperative atrial fibrillation: A systematic review of evolving therapeutic options in pharmacologic and procedural management

    PubMed Central

    Schleifer, J. William; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Given the high incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the surgical population and the associated morbidity, physicians managing these complicated patients in the perioperative period need to be aware of the new and emerging trends in its therapy. The cornerstones of AF management have always been rate/rhythm control as well as anticoagulation. Restoration of sinus rhythm remains the fundamental philosophy as it maintains the atrial contribution to cardiac output and improves ventricular function. The recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of randomized AF trials that have made significant advances to our understanding of both pharmacologic and procedural management, from the introduction of the new generation of oral anticoagulants (NOAC's) to catheter approaches for AF ablation. This paper will summarize the newest data that will affect the perioperative management of these patients. PMID:26440243

  18. Multi-procedure management in an eyeglasses-related open globe injury.

    PubMed

    Skopiński, Piotr; Woronkowicz, Małgorzata; Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Korwin, Magdalena; Kołodziejczyk, Wojciech; Ambroziak, Anna Maria

    2014-03-01

    We present a case of successful multi-procedure management of a patient with an open globe injury. A 47-year-old man sustained an injury to his left eye caused by glass fragments of his own spectacles shattered while he was protecting an unknown woman from physical assault at a bus stop. Over a span of 65 months the patient underwent multiple procedures including primary wound repair, penetrating keratoplasty combined with extracapsular cataract extraction, neodymium: YAG laser capsulotomy, and laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK), and had a successfully treated episode of corneal graft rejection. This sequence of treatment substantially improved his left eye vision from hand movements at the time of admission to 0.9-0.5 × 90 at the last follow-up nearly 10 years after the trauma. Proper initial surgical management of an open globe injury can create the possibility for virtually complete vision restoration. PMID:24729818

  19. Hypnosis for the management of chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Miró, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review published controlled trials of hypnotic treatments for chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children. Trials were included if participants were 18 years of age or below, were randomized and had populations with chronic pain or cancer procedure-related pain. After the studies were assessed, 12 were selected for review. Although the evidence is limited, the findings indicate that hypnosis is an effective pain-control technique when used with children suffering from cancer procedure-related pain or chronic pain. Further research into the use of hypnosis to manage chronic pain in children should be a priority so that empirically based conclusions can be drawn about the effects of hypnosis on children. PMID:22917107

  20. 41 CFR 101-39.401 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Reporting of accidents...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.401 Reporting of accidents. (a) The..., by telephone, or by facsimile machine of any accident in which the vehicle may be involved: (1)...

  1. 41 CFR 101-39.401 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reporting of accidents...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.401 Reporting of accidents. (a) The..., by telephone, or by facsimile machine of any accident in which the vehicle may be involved: (1)...

  2. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

  3. Human-Centered Technologies and Procedures for Future Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Philip; Woods, David; McCoy, Elaine; Billings, Charles; Sarter, Nadine; Denning, Rebecca; Dekker, Sidney

    1997-01-01

    The use of various methodologies to predict the impact of future Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts and technologies is explored. The emphasis has been on the importance of modeling coordination and cooperation among multiple agents within this system, and on understanding how the interactions among these agents will be influenced as new roles, responsibilities, procedures and technologies are introduced. To accomplish this, we have been collecting data on performance under the current air traffic management system, identifying critical problem areas and looking for examples suggestive of general approaches for solving such problems. Using the results of these field studies, we have developed a set of concrete scenarios centered around future designs, and have studied performance in these scenarios with a set of 40 controllers, dispatchers, pilots and traffic managers.

  4. Urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures: A surgical management case series

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Fotios; Jarlshammar, Björn; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and the surgical management of urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures. METHODS: This study encompasses a retrospective review of nine patients presented with urethral complications after midurethral sling procedures. The patients underwent the procedures during a period from 1999 to 2012 in three different regional hospitals in the southwest part of Sweden. The time from sling placement to diagnosis, the risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, surgical management, and functional outcome are presented. The presenting symptoms were described as either early onset (< 12 mo) or late onset (> 12 mo) according to when they were first reported. RESULTS: Eight cases of urethral erosion and one case of bladder-neck erosion were detected. The mean interval for diagnoses of the erosions ranged from 3 mo to 11 years. The most common presenting symptoms included de novo urgency with or without incontinence (7/9 patients), urinary retention/voiding dysfunction (4/9 patients), urethritis (4/9 patients), relapse of stress-incontinence (3/9 patients), recurrent urinary tract infections (5/9 patients), and hematuria (1/9 patient). In most cases, voiding dysfunction and urethritis occurred early after the operation. The surgical management applied in most cases was transurethral resection of the intraurethral part of the mesh. The removal of the intraurethral mesh resulted in improvement or complete cure of urgency symptoms in 5/7 patients with urgency. Four patients were reoperated with a new stress-incontinence surgery, one with laparoscopic Burch, and three with retropubic tension-free vaginal tape procedures. CONCLUSION: Urethral complications should be suspected in the case of de novo urgency and relapse of stress-incontinence. Transurethral excision of the intraurethral mesh is the recommended treatment. PMID:26167464

  5. Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

  6. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident means— (a) Any casualty or accident involving...

  7. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident means— (a) Any casualty or accident involving...

  8. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... key employees and primary management officials to the Commission. 558.3 Section 558.3 Indians NATIONAL... KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.3 Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and...

  9. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... key employees and primary management officials to the Commission. 558.3 Section 558.3 Indians NATIONAL... KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.3 Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and...

  10. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... key employees and primary management officials to the Commission. 558.3 Section 558.3 Indians NATIONAL... KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.3 Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and...

  11. Methodology and computational framework used for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Huttenga, A.; Jackson, R.; TenBrook, W.; Russell, J. |

    1994-02-01

    A methodology, computational framework, and integrated PC-based database have been developed to assess the risks of facility accidents in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. The methodology includes the following interrelated elements: (1) screening of storage and treatment processes and related waste inventories to determine risk-dominant facilities across the DOE complex, (2) development and frequency estimation of the risk-dominant sequences of accidents, and (3) determination of the evolution of and final compositions of radiological or chemically hazardous source terms predicted to be released as a function of the storage inventory or treatment process throughput. The computational framework automates these elements to provide source term input for the second part of the analysis which includes (1) development or integration of existing site-specific demographics and meteorological data and calculation of attendant unit-risk factors and (2) assessment of the radiological or toxicological consequences of accident releases to the general public and to the occupational work force.

  12. Prevention and Management of Procedural Pain in the Neonate: An Update.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The prevention of pain in neonates should be the goal of all pediatricians and health care professionals who work with neonates, not only because it is ethical but also because repeated painful exposures have the potential for deleterious consequences. Neonates at greatest risk of neurodevelopmental impairment as a result of preterm birth (ie, the smallest and sickest) are also those most likely to be exposed to the greatest number of painful stimuli in the NICU. Although there are major gaps in knowledge regarding the most effective way to prevent and relieve pain in neonates, proven and safe therapies are currently underused for routine minor, yet painful procedures. Therefore, every health care facility caring for neonates should implement (1) a pain-prevention program that includes strategies for minimizing the number of painful procedures performed and (2) a pain assessment and management plan that includes routine assessment of pain, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for the prevention of pain associated with routine minor procedures, and measures for minimizing pain associated with surgery and other major procedures. PMID:26810788

  13. Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Eating Disorders: The Use of Contingency Management Procedures to Manage Dialectical Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise D

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have adapted and/or applied dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for populations with eating disorders. There is a growing body of research that indicates that DBT is an effective treatment option for this population, including those who have co-occurring Axis II disorders. The goal of the current paper is to summarize the research conducted in the area of DBT with those individuals who present with eating disorders only as well as those who present with both eating disorders and Axis II disorders. We also describe a dialectical dilemma, apparent compliance vs. active defiance, which is commonly observed in the group with comorbidities A DBT change strategy, contingency management, is discussed as an intervention to target apparent compliance and active defiance. PMID:26160619

  14. Pain management procedures used by dental and maxillofacial surgeons: an investigation with special regard to odontalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wirz, Stefan; Wartenberg, Hans Christian; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Background Little is known about the procedures used by German dental and maxillofacial surgeons treating patients suffering from chronic orofacial pain (COP). This study aimed to evaluate the ambulatory management of COP. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire we collected data of dental and maxillofacial surgeons treating patients with COP. Therapists described variables as patients' demographics, chronic pain disorders and their aetiologies, own diagnostic and treatment principles during a period of 3 months. Results Although only 13.5% of the 520 addressed therapists returned completely evaluable questionnaires, 985 patients with COP could be identified. An orofacial pain syndrome named atypical odontalgia (17.0 %) was frequent. Although those patients revealed signs of chronification, pain therapists were rarely involved (12.5%). For assessing pain the use of Analogue Scales (7%) or interventional diagnostics (4.6%) was uncommon. Despite the fact that surgical procedures are cofactors of COP therapists preferred further surgery (41.9%) and neglected the prescription of analgesics (15.7%). However, most therapists self-evaluated the efficacy of their pain management as good (69.7 %). Conclusion Often ambulatory dental and maxillofacial surgeons do not follow guidelines for COP management despite a high prevalence of severe orofacial pain syndromes. PMID:16372908

  15. Using Numerical Models in the Development of Software Tools for Risk Management of Accidents with Oil and Inert Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P. C.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Galvão, P.; Neves, R.

    2012-04-01

    The increasing ship traffic and maritime transport of dangerous substances make it more difficult to significantly reduce the environmental, economic and social risks posed by potential spills, although the security rules are becoming more restrictive (ships with double hull, etc.) and the surveillance systems are becoming more developed (VTS, AIS). In fact, the problematic associated to spills is and will always be a main topic: spill events are continuously happening, most of them unknown for the general public because of their small scale impact, but with some of them (in a much smaller number) becoming authentic media phenomena in this information era, due to their large dimensions and environmental and social-economic impacts on ecosystems and local communities, and also due to some spectacular or shocking pictures generated. Hence, the adverse consequences posed by these type of accidents, increase the preoccupation of avoiding them in the future, or minimize their impacts, using not only surveillance and monitoring tools, but also increasing the capacity to predict the fate and behaviour of bodies, objects, or substances in the following hours after the accident - numerical models can have now a leading role in operational oceanography applied to safety and pollution response in the ocean because of their predictive potential. Search and rescue operation, oil, inert (ship debris, or floating containers), and HNS (hazardous and noxious substances) spills risk analysis are the main areas where models can be used. Model applications have been widely used in emergency or planning issues associated to pollution risks, and contingency and mitigation measures. Before a spill, in the planning stage, modelling simulations are used in environmental impact studies, or risk maps, using historical data, reference situations, and typical scenarios. After a spill, the use of fast and simple modelling applications allow to understand the fate and behaviour of the spilt

  16. Application of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures for the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Gonzalez, J-L; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Etxebarria, N; Nieto, O; Franco, J

    2013-06-15

    This study refers to the performance of Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify the contaminants (i.e. organic compounds, metals and ammonia) exerting toxicity in marine sediments from the Pasaia harbor (Oiartzun estuary, northern Spain). The effectiveness of the manipulations to reduce toxicity was proved with the marine amphipod survival test (whole-sediment) and the sea urchin embryo-larval assay (elutriates). By means of TIEs it was concluded that organic compounds were the major contaminants exerting toxicity, although toxic effects by metals was also demonstrated. Additionally, the combination of Phase I treatments allowed to investigate the toxicity changes associated to the mobility of contaminants during dredging activities. Therefore, the performance of TIE procedures as another line of evidence in the decision-making process is recommended. They show a great potential to be implemented at different steps of the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments. PMID:23465571

  17. [Microbiological procedures for the diagnosis, management, and study of invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Canton, Emilia; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Guinea, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are difficult to diagnose and cause a high mortality to an expanding spectrum of patients. Culture of clinical samples has limitations for the diagnosis of IFI and alternative procedures have been developed. Among them, serum determination of galactomannan or beta-1,3-d-glucan, and antimicelium and antimannan antibodies are relevant. The use of molecular procedures and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) are encouraging tools for the optimization of the diagnosis and management of patients with IFI. The proposal of species-specific breakpoint to classify the isolates as resistant or susceptible to antifungal agents and the necessity of monitor the azole serum levels deserve greater attention. PMID:23499525

  18. Pain and anxiety management for pediatric dental procedures using various combinations of sedative drugs: A review.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Giath; Fareed, Wamiq Musheer; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2016-07-01

    For fearful and uncooperative children behavioral management techniques are used. In order to control the pain and anxiety in pedodontic patients, pharmacologic sedation, anesthesia and analgesia are commonly used. Midazolam is commonly used as an oral sedation agent in children; it has several features such as safety of use, quick onset and certain degree of amnesia that makes it a desirable sedation agent in children. This review paper discusses various aspects of oral midazolam, ketamine and their combinations in conscious sedation including, advantages of oral route of sedation, pharmacokinetics, range of oral doses, and antagonists for clinical dental treatment procedures. PMID:27330369

  19. Interventional Spine Procedures for Management of Chronic Low Back Pain—A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Iannuccilli, Jason D.; Prince, Ethan A.; Soares, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition. Percutaneous fluoroscopic-guided interventions are safe and effective procedures for the management of chronic low back pain, which can be performed in an outpatient setting. Interventional radiologists already possess the technical skills necessary to perform these interventions effectively so that they may be incorporated into a busy outpatient practice. This article provides a basic approach to the evaluation of patients with low back pain, as well as a review of techniques used to perform the most common interventions using fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:24436553

  20. System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    SciTech Connect

    GARRISON, R.C.

    2000-11-28

    This document provides configuration management for the Distributed Control System (DCS), the Gaseous Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS-100) System, the Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), the Canister Receiving Crane (CRC) CRN-001 PLC, and both North and South vestibule door interlock system PLCs at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This procedure identifies and defines software configuration items in the CSB control and monitoring systems, and defines configuration control throughout the system life cycle. Components of this control include: configuration status accounting; physical protection and control; and verification of the completeness and correctness of these items.

  1. CT-guided interventional procedures for pain management in the lumbosacral spine.

    PubMed

    Gangi, A; Dietemann, J L; Mortazavi, R; Pfleger, D; Kauff, C; Roy, C

    1998-01-01

    The lumbosacral spine is the source of pain, suffering, and disability more frequently than any other part of the body. Pain in the lower back can be managed with computed tomography-guided analgesic interventional procedures, such as periradicular infiltration, percutaneous laser disk decompression, facet joint block, and percutaneous vertebroplasty. Periradicular injection of steroids provides short-term and sometimes even long-term relief of low back pain. Percutaneous laser disk decompression is used to treat radiculalgia caused by disk herniation. Facet joint block is useful in diagnosis and treatment of facet syndrome. Percutaneous vertebroplasty provides short- and long-term pain relief in patients with vertebral body disease. However, precise patient selection is essential to the success of each of these techniques. The interventional radiologist has an active role to play in minimally invasive management of lower back pain and should be part of an interdisciplinary team that determines the appropriate therapy. PMID:9599387

  2. Advanced medical countermeasures for radiological accidents and nuclear disasters: prevention, prophylaxis, treatment and pre- and post-exposure management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Countermeasures against nuclear terrorism to prevent or limit the number of irradiated human population or radiation intoxications include early identification of the nuclear terrorism event and all persons which exposed by radiation, decontamination program and procedures, radiation control, and medical countermeasures which include medical diagnosis,differential diagnosis of Acute Radiation Syndromes by Immune Enzyme Assay , pre-exposure vaccination with Human Antiradiation Vaccine, post-exposure specific treatment - de-intoxication with Radiation Antidote IgG (blocking Antiradiation Antibodies). Our Advanced Medical Technology elaborated as a part of effective countermeasure include Plan of Action.Countermeasures against nuclear terrorism to prevent or limit the number of high level of lethality and severe forms of radiation illness or intoxications include A.early identification of the nuclear terrorism event and persons exposed,b. appropriate decontamination, c. radiation control, and d.medical countermeasures and medical management of ARS. Medical countermeasures, which include medical interventions such as active immuneprophylaxis with Human Antiradiation Vaccine , passive immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Antitoxins immune-globulins IgG , and chemoprophylaxis - post-exposure antioxidants prophylaxis and antibioticprophylaxis. Medical countermeasures with Antiradiation Vaccine should be initiated before an exposure (if individuals are identified as being at high risk for exposure)but after a confirmed exposure event Antiradiation Vaccine not effective and Antiradiation Antidot IgG must be applyed for treatment of Acute Radiation Syndromes.

  3. Simulation of time-control procedures for terminal area flow management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcabin, M.; Erzberger, H.; Tobias, L.; Obrien, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Simulations of a terminal area traffic-management system incorporating automated scheduling and time-control (four-dimensional) techniques conducted at NASA Ames Research Center jointly with the Federal Aviation Administration, have shown that efficient procedures can be developed for handling a mix of 4D-equipped and conventionally equipped aircraft. A crucial role in this system is played by an ATC host computer algorithm, referred to as a speed advisory, that allows controllers to maintain accurate time schedules of the conventionally equipped aircraft in the traffic mix. Results are of the most recent simulations in which two important special cases were investigated. First, the effects of a speed advisory on touchdown time scheduling are examined, when unequipped aircraft are constrained to follow fuel-optimized profiles in the near-terminal area, and rescheduling procedures are developed to handle missed approaches of 4D-equipped aircraft. Various performance measures, including controller opinion, are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedures.

  4. Identification and evaluation of competencies of health professionals in the hospital emergency management of the radiation accident victim

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary list of ten competency and forty-six sub-competency statements derived from literature and consultation with experts and based on the general areas of clinical performance defined by the National Board of Medical Examiners were the concern of Phase I of this study. Forty-eight experts in nuclear medicine, radiology, radiotherapy, health physics, medical physics, radiation biology, public and occupational health, surgery, and emergency medicine and nursing considered this preliminary list of competencies and sub-competencies to determine which were essential for health professionals who may be caring for radiation accident victims in hospital emergency departments. Eight competencies and thirty-three sub-competencies were rated as Essential competencies. Competencies dealing with establishing priorities in patient care and initiating treatment, assessment, contamination control, and decontamination were highly rated. In the second part of this study, the Essential competencies were utilized in the development of an original evaluation instrument designed to identify deficiencies and continuing education needs during radiation accident drills or exercises. The instrument was designed for use in sixteen possible patient care situations in which the radiation accident victims have varying medical and radiological conditions. Development of the evaluation instrument was described.

  5. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Accident records....

  6. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accident records....

  7. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Accident records....

  8. PTSD in post-road traffic accident patients requiring hospitalization in Indian subcontinent: A review on magnitude of the problem and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Undavalli, Chaitanya; Das, Piyush; Dutt, Taru; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kashyap, Rahul

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic events after a road traffic accident (RTA) can be physical and/or psychological. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the major psychological conditions which affect accident victims. Psychological issues may not be addressed in the emergency department(ED) immediately. There have been reports about a mismatch between the timely referrals from ED to occupational or primary care services for these issues. If left untreated, there may be adverse effects on quality of life (QOL) and work productivity. Hospital expenses, loss of income, and loss of work could create a never ending cycle for financial difficulties and burden in trauma victims. The aim of our review is to address the magnitude of PTSD in post-RTA hospitalized patients in Indian subcontinent population. We also attempted to emphasis on few management guidelines. A comprehensive search was conducted on major databases with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term 'PTSD or post-traumatic stress' and Emergency department and vehicle or road or highway or automobile or car or truck or trauma and India. Out of 120 studies, a total of six studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Our interpretation of the problem is that; hospital expenditure due to trauma, time away from work during hospitalization, and reduction in work performance, are three major hits that can lead RTA victims to financial crisis. Proposed management guidelines are; establish a coordinated triage, implementing a screening tool in the ED, and provide psychological counseling. PMID:25400398

  9. Cold and compression in the management of musculoskeletal injuries and orthopedic operative procedures: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Jon E

    2010-01-01

    Cold and compression are routinely applied immediately after acute injury or following surgery to alleviate pain, reduce swelling and speed functional recovery. The objective of this literature review is to describe the published clinical findings regarding combined cold and compression therapy in the management of musculoskeletal injuries and after orthopedic operative procedures. Of 33 potential articles triaged, the findings of 21 randomized controlled trials were assessed and summarized. The findings reported by these 21 studies were largely subjective pain outcomes and, to a lesser degree, swelling and range of motion, and were inconsistent and divergent, making it difficult to recommend the most appropriate, effective clinical application of cold and compression. Further, 18 of the 21 reported studies evaluated cold and static compression, where the extent and duration of the compression was not uniform within or across studies. Operative procedures may offer a more controlled environment for rigorous investigations. However, such studies must be powered sufficiently to account for variations in surgical procedure that could affect outcomes. More uniform operative procedures, such as total knee arthroplasty, represent a well circumscribed intervention for studying the clinical utility of cold compression therapy because the operative technique is standardized, surgical tissue damage is extensive, intraoperative blood loss is high, and post-operative edema and pain are severe. Findings from randomized controlled trials of knee arthroplasty generally showed cold compression therapy provides better outcomes such as pain relief than alternative interventions. While the effects of cold and static compression are clearly better than no treatment, they do not appear to be directly additive. PMID:24198548

  10. 50 CFR 25.72 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., but in no event later than 24 hours after the accident, by the persons involved, to the refuge manager... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting of accidents. 25.72 Section 25... Reporting of accidents. Accidents involving damage to property, injury to the public or injury to...

  11. 50 CFR 25.72 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., but in no event later than 24 hours after the accident, by the persons involved, to the refuge manager... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of accidents. 25.72 Section 25... Reporting of accidents. Accidents involving damage to property, injury to the public or injury to...

  12. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  13. Severe Psychological Distress of Evacuees in Evacuation Zone Caused by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kunii, Yasuto; Suzuki, Yuriko; Shiga, Tetsuya; Yabe, Hirooki; Yasumura, Seiji; Maeda, Masaharu; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Otsuru, Akira; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has continued to affect the mental health status of residents in the evacuation zone. To examine the mental health status of evacuee after the nuclear accident, we conducted the Mental Health and Lifestyle Survey as part of the ongoing Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods We measured mental health status using the Kessler 6-item psychological distress scale (K6) in a total of 73,569 (response rate: 40.7%) evacuees aged 15 and over who lived in the evacuation zone in Fukushima Prefecture. We then dichotomized responders using a 12/13 cutoff on the K6, and compared the proportion of K6 scores ≥13 and ≤12 in each risk factor including demographic information, socioeconomic variables, and disaster-related variables. We also performed bivariate analyses between mental health status and possible risk factors using the chi-square test. Furthermore, we performed multivariate regression analysis using modified Poisson regression models. Results The median K6 score was 5 (interquartile range: 1–10). The number of psychological distress was 8,717 (14.6%). We found that significant differences in the prevalence of psychological distress by almost all survey items, including disaster-related risk factors, most of which were also associated with increased Prevalence ratios (PRs). Additionally, we found that psychological distress in each evacuation zone was significantly positively associated with the radiation levels in their environment (r = 0.768, p = 0.002). Conclusion The earthquake, tsunami and subsequent nuclear accident likely caused severe psychological distress among residents in the evacuation zone in Fukushima Prefecture. The close association between psychological distress and the radiation levels shows that the nuclear accident seriously influenced the mental health of the residents, which might be exacerbated by

  14. Quantitative evaluation of geodiversity: development of methodological procedures with application to territorial management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J.; Brilha, J.; Pereira, D.; Nolasco, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although geodiversity is considered the setting for biodiversity, there is still a huge gap in the social recognition of these two concepts. The concept of geodiversity, less developed, is now making its own way as a robust and fundamental idea concerning the abiotic component of nature. From a conservationist point of view, the lack of a broader knowledge concerning the type and spatial variation of geodiversity, as well as its relationship with biodiversity, makes the protection and management of natural or semi-natural areas incomplete. There is a growing need to understand the patterns of geodiversity in different landscapes and to translate this knowledge for territorial management in a practical and effective point of view. This kind of management can also represent an important tool for the development of sustainable tourism, particularly geotourism, which can bring benefits not only for the environment, but also for social and economic purposes. The quantification of geodiversity is an important step in all this process but still few researchers are investing in the development of a proper methodology. The assessment methodologies that were published so far are mainly focused on the evaluation of geomorphological elements, sometimes complemented with information about lithology, soils, hidrology, morphometric variables, climatic surfaces and geosites. This results in very dissimilar areas at very different spatial scales, showing the complexity of the task and the need of further research. This current work aims the development of an effective methodology for the assessment of the maximum elements of geodiversity possible (rocks, minerals, fossils, landforms, soils), based on GIS routines. The main determinant factor for the quantitative assessment is scale, but other factors are also very important, such as the existence of suitable spatial data with sufficient degree of detail. It is expected to attain the proper procedures in order to assess geodiversity

  15. High condylectomy procedure: a valuable resource for surgical management of the mandibular condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Santos, Darklilson; De Melo, Willian Morais; Souza, Francisley Avila; de Moura, Walter Leal; Cravinhos, Julio César de Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Condylar hyperplasia is an overdevelopment of the condyle, which may manifest unilaterally or bilaterally. This pathological condition can lead to facial asymmetry, malocclusion, and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology and pathogenesis of condylar hyperplasia remain uncertain, but it has been suggested that its etiology may be associated with hormonal factors, trauma, and hereditary hypervascularity, affecting both genders. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination, and radiological imaging, and additionally, bone scintigraphy, is a fundamental resource for determining whether the affected condyle shows active growth. Patients with active condylar hyperplasia management have better results when they are subjected to the high condylectomy procedure. The authors report a case in a 20-year-old female subject with unilateral active condylar hyperplasia who was treated by high condylectomy. The patient has been followed up for 4 years without signs of recurrence and with good functional stability of the occlusion. PMID:23851829

  16. Peroral endoscopic myotomy—initial experience with anesthetic management of 24 procedures and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Gouda, Gowri; Sinha, Ashish C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel method of treating achalasia of the esophagus. Very little data are available to guide the anesthesia providers caring for these patients. The anesthetic challenges are primarily related to the risk of pulmonary aspiration. There is also a potential risk of pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum, subcutaneous, or submucosal emphysema, as a result of carbon dioxide tracking into the soft tissues surrounding the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Methods: In this retrospective study, electronic charts of 24 patients who underwent POEM over 18 months were reviewed. Demographic data, fasting status, relevant aspiration risks, anesthetic technique, and postoperative care measures were extracted. Results: Fasting times for both solids and liquids were variable. None of the patients underwent preprocedural esophageal emptying. Standard induction and intubation were performed in 16, rapid sequence induction (RSI) with cricoid pressure in seven, and modified rapid sequence without application of cricoid pressure in one of the patients. One of the patients aspirated at induction, and the procedure was aborted. However, the procedure was performed successfully after a few weeks, this time a RSI with cricoid pressure was chosen. Conclusion: As there are no guidelines for the perioperative management of patients presenting for POEM presently, certain recommendations can be made. Preprocedural esophageal emptying should be considered in patients considered as high-risk, although cultural factors might preclude such an approach. Induction and intubation in a semi-reclining position might be useful. Although debatable, use of RSI with cricoid pressure should be strongly considered. PMID:27212764

  17. Performance of Core Exit Thermocouple for PWR Accident Management Action in Vessel Top Break LOCA Simulation Experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is the first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reasons of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection.

  18. Anaesthetic management of extra-pleural pneumonectomy and hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy procedure

    PubMed Central

    Ramegowda, Jalaja Koppa; Salam, Mohammed Abdul; Nayak, Vasant; Zaveri, Shabber

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare tumour with survival of 9–17 months after diagnosis. Radical surgical resection by extra-pleural pneumonectomy combined with hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy has shown to improve patient survival and better microscopic tumour control. Anaesthetic management of this procedure is challenging due to the complex pathophysiological changes associated with prolonged duration of surgery, one- lung ventilation, haemodynamic instability due to major blood loss, temperature variations including heat loss during pneumonectomy and rapid rise in temperature during hyperthermic chemotherapy, cardiac arrhythmias due to exposure to heated chemotherapeutics, cisplatin toxicity and acid-base changes. Intra-operative management involves protective ventilation, regulation of temperature and haemodynamics along with prevention of complications associated with ‘heated chemotherapeutics’. Thorough pre-operative assessment and preparation, advanced intra-operative monitoring with prompt corrective interventions, will help in improved patient outcome in the immediate post-operative period. We present one such case done for the 1st time in India. PMID:26903675

  19. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  20. Anesthetic management in atrial fibrillation ablation procedure: Adding non-invasive ventilation to deep sedation.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Francesco; Ripoli, Andrea; Formichi, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation has specific requirements. The feasibility of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) added to deep sedation procedure was evaluated. Seventy-two patients who underwent ablation procedure were retrospectively revised, performed with (57%) or without (43%) application of NIV (Respironic(®) latex-free total face mask connected to Garbin ventilator-Linde Inc.) during deep sedation (Midazolam 0.01-0.02 mg/kg, fentanyl 2.5-5 μg/kg and propofol: bolus dose 1-1.5 mg/kg, maintenance 2-4 mg/kg/h). In the two groups (NIV vs deep sedation), differences were detected in intraprocedural (pH 7.37 ± 0.05 vs 7.32 ± 0.05, p = 0.001; PaO2 117.10 ± 27.25 vs 148.17 ± 45.29, p = 0.004; PaCO2 43.37 ± 6.91 vs 49.33 ± 7.34, p = 0.002) and in percentage variation with respect to basal values (pH -0.52 ± 0.83 vs -1.44 ± 0.87, p = 0.002; PaCO2 7.21 ± 15.55 vs 34.91 ± 25.76, p = 0.001) of arterial blood gas parameters. Two episodes of respiratory complications, treated with application of NIV, were reported in deep sedation procedure. Endotracheal intubation was not necessary in any case. Adverse events related to electrophysiological procedures and recurrence of atrial fibrillation were recorded, respectively, in 36% and 29% of cases. NIV proved to be feasible in this context and maintained better respiratory homeostasis and better arterial blood gas balance when added to deep sedation. PMID:26937093

  1. The Role for Adjunctive Image in Pre-procedural Assessment and Peri-Procedural Management in Chronic Total Occlusion Recanalisation

    PubMed Central

    Estevez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Ghione, Matteo; Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Agudo, Pilar; Lindsay, Alistair; Mario, Carlo Di

    2014-01-01

    Non invasive coronary angiography with multislice computed tomography has exquisite sensitivity to detect calcium and even the faintest late contrast filling of the distal vessel. Calcium burden and occlusion length are still valuable markers of duration, complexity and success of the recanalisation procedure. The ability to visualise the vessel also in the occluded segment, especially if calcified, can also help the operator to understand where to pierce the proximal cap in stumpless occlusions and to predict unusual courses, especially in very tortuous arteries. Imaging side by side CT images and angiography during the recanalisation procedure is an established practice in many active CTO laboratories and algorithms for co-registration are designed to overcome the challenges of systo-diastolic and respiratory motion. Intravascular ultrasound is used in almost all cases by the experienced Japanese CTO operators but most of the times its main use is a better identification of the diseased segment after predilatation to ensure complete stent cover and appropriate stent expansion, an application similar to other complex non occlusive lesions. The specificity of IVUS during CTO recanalisation is the identification of the vessel path in stumpless occlusions and the guidance of wire reentry especially during reverse Controlled Retrograde Anterograde Tracking. Optical coherence tomography has limitations in the setting of CTO recanalisation because of the need of forceful contrast flushing to clear blood, contraindicated in the presence of anterograde dissections, and the limited penetration. The variability in the use of both non-invasive and invasive imaging during CTO recanalisation is immense, going from more than 90% in Japan to less than 20% in Europe and intermediate penetration in the USA. Probably the explanation is almost only in availability and cost because all countries see a progressive increase of use suggesting that these methods are becoming an

  2. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  3. Delta launch vehicle accident investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    The text of the testimony given by several witnesses during the House hearings on the Delta launch vehicle accident of May 3, 1986 is given. Pre-launch procedures, failure analysis, the possibility of sabotage, and design and testing are among the topics discussed.

  4. 36 CFR 9.46 - Accidents and fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outlined in 36 CFR 2.17, but does not relieve persons from the responsibility of making any other accident... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.46 Accidents and fires. The operator shall...

  5. 36 CFR 9.46 - Accidents and fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... outlined in 36 CFR 2.17, but does not relieve persons from the responsibility of making any other accident... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.46 Accidents and fires. The operator shall...

  6. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  7. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  8. 46 CFR 4.03-1 - Marine casualty or accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine casualty or accident. 4.03-1 Section 4.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-1 Marine casualty or accident. Marine casualty or accident...

  9. Trends in state-level freight accident rates: An enhancement of risk factor development for RADTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.; Kvitek, T.

    1991-01-01

    Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is concerned with understanding and managing risk as it applies to the shipment of spent commercial nuclear reactor fuel. Understanding risk in relation to mode and geography may provide opportunities to minimize radiological and non-radiological risks of transportation. To enhance such an understanding, a set of state-or waterway-specific accident, fatality, and injury rates (expressed as rates per shipment kilometer) by transportation mode and highway administrative class was developed, using publicly-available data bases. Adjustments made to accommodate miscoded or incomplete information in accident data are described, as well as the procedures for estimating state-level flow data. Results indicate that the shipping conditions under which spent fuel is likely to be transported should be less subject to accidents than the average'' shipment within mode. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  11. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures – predictors and management

    PubMed Central

    Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients’ state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His’ bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  12. Current interventional management of male stress urinary incontinence following urological procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Ireneusz; Śledź, Emil; Ciechan, Janusz; Bukowczan, Jakub; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Wiatr, Tomasz; Stangel-Wojcikiewicz, Klaudia; Chłosta, Piotr L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite improvements in surgical techniques and implementation of minimally invasive procedures, male stress urinary incontinence affects a substantial number of patients after prostatic surgery. In response to increasing demand of optimal treatment modality, new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter have recently been introduced. This review summarises the therapeutic surgical options with their outcomes in management of postprostatectomy stress incontinence. Material and methods We performed a literature review by searching the PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases for articles published from January 2000 until April 2015 based on clinical relevance. Results Artificial urinary sphincter is currently considered the “gold standard” treatment of male stress urinary incontinence. Although the new devices in this group have recently been investigated, the AMS 800 remains the only widely used implant. Male slings and adjustable continence devices, achieve the social continence rates up to 60%. Periurethral injections of bulking agents, have limited efficacy of male stress incontinence. Argus sling and ProACT are both associated with substantial explantation rates. Stem cell therapy is a promising option but still requires additional testing. Conclusions The development of new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter is constantly progressing. Although recently introduced minimally invasive treatment options have not yet surpassed the outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter they should continue to be evaluated and compared against the gold standard. PMID:26568879

  13. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures - predictors and management.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients' state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His' bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  14. Management of postaxial polydactyly by "Ksharsutra": A minimally invasive Ayurvedic parasurgical procedure.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amarprakash P

    2013-04-01

    Polydactyly is a most common congenital hand defects in which the hand has one or more extra fingers, commonly seen postaxial, that is, on the small finger side. It is usually treated by surgically removing the extra finger typically, when the child is between 1 and 2 years old. Prognosis after removal of extra digit is good if it occurs in isolation though not devoid of complications like scar formation, stiffness, instability, and late deformity which may need additional reconstructive surgery to recover full function and improve the hand's appearance. I have used "Ksharsutra," an Ayurvedic-medicated thread coated with herbal alkaline drugs having simultaneous cutting and healing property, to remove extra finger in a child, whose parents were not willing to undergo surgery and asked for alternative treatment. "Ksahrsutra ligation" showed excellent result in postaxial polydactyly. The extra finger started necrosing within 24 hours and sloughed out in just 9 days with minimal scar formation. After observing the prognosis, I believe that more cases should be done to establish and promote this unique parasurgical procedure, "Ksharsutra" in the management of polydactyly. PMID:23930044

  15. Management of postaxial polydactyly by “Ksharsutra”: A minimally invasive Ayurvedic parasurgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amarprakash P.

    2013-01-01

    Polydactyly is a most common congenital hand defects in which the hand has one or more extra fingers, commonly seen postaxial, that is, on the small finger side. It is usually treated by surgically removing the extra finger typically, when the child is between 1 and 2 years old. Prognosis after removal of extra digit is good if it occurs in isolation though not devoid of complications like scar formation, stiffness, instability, and late deformity which may need additional reconstructive surgery to recover full function and improve the hand's appearance. I have used “Ksharsutra,” an Ayurvedic-medicated thread coated with herbal alkaline drugs having simultaneous cutting and healing property, to remove extra finger in a child, whose parents were not willing to undergo surgery and asked for alternative treatment. “Ksahrsutra ligation” showed excellent result in postaxial polydactyly. The extra finger started necrosing within 24 hours and sloughed out in just 9 days with minimal scar formation. After observing the prognosis, I believe that more cases should be done to establish and promote this unique parasurgical procedure, “Ksharsutra” in the management of polydactyly. PMID:23930044

  16. MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents

    SciTech Connect

    2007-02-15

    The US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MHSA) recently formed a committee to identify norms and trends in remote control continuous miner crushing accidents. The final report found that these types of accidents commonly happen to experienced miners during routine mining activities, with the majority occurring while moving the miner from one face to another, place changing. Another common aspect of the accidents is that many of the victims are experienced miners who are newly employed at the mine where the accident occurred. Training all employees to stay outside the turning radius of an energized remote control continuous miner, establishing this as a safe operating procedure, and consistently enforcing this practice among miners will reduce these types of accidents. This article was excerpted from the 'Remote Control Continuous Mining Machine Crushing Accident Data Study' published in May 2006. The report may be found from the website: www.msha.gov. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard, Ed.; Puma, Michael, Ed.

    Site visits to a sample of 173 colleges, universities, vocational-technical schools, and other postsecondary institutions--conducted to examine the procedures used to manage federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and campus-based student financial assistance programs--are summarized. This report deals only with the conduct of the…

  18. 45 CFR 309.75 - What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV-D plan? 309.75 Section 309.75 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN...

  19. Underreporting of maritime accidents to vessel accident databases.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Martin; Asbjørnslett, Bjørn Egil; Hole, Lars Petter

    2011-11-01

    Underreporting of maritime accidents is a problem not only for authorities trying to improve maritime safety through legislation, but also to risk management companies and other entities using maritime casualty statistics in risk and accident analysis. This study collected and compared casualty data from 01.01.2005 to 31.12.2009, from IHS Fairplay and the maritime authorities from a set of nations. The data was compared to find common records, and estimation of the true number of occurred accidents was performed using conditional probability given positive dependency between data sources, several variations of the capture-recapture method, calculation of best case scenario assuming perfect reporting, and scaling up a subset of casualty information from a marine insurance statistics database. The estimated upper limit reporting performance for the selected flag states ranged from 14% to 74%, while the corresponding estimated coverage of IHS Fairplay ranges from 4% to 62%. On average the study results document that the number of unreported accidents makes up roughly 50% of all occurred accidents. Even in a best case scenario, only a few flag states come close to perfect reporting (94%). The considerable scope of underreporting uncovered in the study, indicates that users of statistical vessel accident data should assume a certain degree of underreporting, and adjust their analyses accordingly. Whether to use correction factors, a safety margin, or rely on expert judgment, should be decided on a case by case basis. PMID:21819835

  20. 41 CFR 101-39.401 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manager of the GSA IFMS fleet management center issuing the vehicle; (2) The employee's supervisor; and (3... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.401 Reporting of accidents. (a)...

  1. 41 CFR 101-39.401 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manager of the GSA IFMS fleet management center issuing the vehicle; (2) The employee's supervisor; and (3... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.401 Reporting of accidents. (a)...

  2. [The implementation of an independent and differentiated pain management SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) for the interdisciplinary intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Aust, Hansjörg; Wulf, Hinnerk; Vassiliou, Timon

    2013-03-01

    Up to the present day, pain management in the ICU (Intensive Care Units) is a unresolved clinical problem due to patient heterogeneity with complex variation in etiopathology and treatment of the underlying diseases. Therefore, therapeutic strategies in terms of standard operating procedure (SOP) are a necessary to improve the pain management for intensive care patients. Common guidelines for analgosedation are often inadequate to reflect the clinical situation. In particular, for an ICU setting without permanent presence of a physician a missing pain management SOP resulting in delayed pain therapy caused by a therapeutic uncertainty of the nurse staff. In addition to our pre-existing SOP for analgosedation we implemented a pain management SOP for our interdisciplinary, anaesthesiologic ICU. A exploratory survey among the nurse staff was conducted to assess the efficacy of the SOP. The results of the evaluation after a 6 month follow-up indicated a faster onset of pain management and good acceptance by the nursing staff. PMID:23589009

  3. Periprocedural management of patients receiving a vitamin K antagonist or a direct oral anticoagulant requiring an elective procedure or surgery.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, A C; Al-Badri, A; Sherwood, M W; Douketis, J D

    2016-05-01

    The periprocedural management of patients receiving chronic therapy with oral anticoagulants (OACs), including vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin and direct OACs (DOACs), is a common clinical problem. The optimal perioperative management of patients receiving chronic OAC therapy is anchored on four key principles: (i) risk stratification of patient-related and procedure-related risks of thrombosis and bleeding; (ii) the clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event; (iii) discontinuation and reinitiation of OAC therapy on the basis of the pharmacokinetic properties of each agent; and (iv) whether aggressive management such as the use of periprocedural heparin bridging has advantages for the prevention of postoperative thromboembolism at the cost of a possible increase in bleeding risk. Recent data from randomized trials in patients receiving VKAs undergoing pacemaker/defibrillator implantation or using heparin bridging therapy for elective procedures or surgeries can now inform best practice. There are also emerging data on periprocedural outcomes in the DOAC trials for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the evidence for the periprocedural management of patients receiving chronic OAC therapy, focusing on recent randomized trials and large outcome studies, to address three key clinical scenarios: (i) can OAC therapy be safely continued for minor procedures or surgeries; (ii) if therapy with VKAs (especially warfarin) needs to be temporarily interrupted for an elective procedure/surgery, is heparin bridging necessary; and (iii) what is the optimal periprocedural management of the DOACs? In answering these questions, we aim to provide updated clinical guidance for the periprocedural management of patients receiving VKA or DOAC therapy, including the use of heparin bridging. PMID:26988871

  4. Introduction of the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident, Investigation Details, Findings and Crew Survival Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    As the Space Shuttle Program comes to an end, it is important that the lessons learned from the Columbia accident be captured and understood by those who will be developing future aerospace programs and supporting current programs. Aeromedical lessons learned from the Accident were presented at AsMA in 2005. This Panel will update that information, closeout the lessons learned, provide additional information on the accident and provide suggestions for the future. To set the stage, an overview of the accident is required. The Space Shuttle Columbia was returning to Earth with a crew of seven astronauts on 1Feb, 2003. It disintegrated along a track extending from California to Louisiana and observers along part of the track filmed the breakup of Columbia. Debris was recovered from Littlefield, Texas to Fort Polk, Louisiana, along a 567 statute mile track; the largest ever recorded debris field. The Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) concluded its investigation in August 2003, and released their findings in a report published in February 2004. NASA recognized the importance of capturing the lessons learned from the loss of Columbia and her crew and the Space Shuttle Program managers commissioned the Spacecraft Crew Survival Integrated Investigation Team (SCSIIT) to accomplish this. Their task was to perform a comprehensive analysis of the accident, focusing on factors and events affecting crew survival, and to develop recommendations for improving crew survival, including the design features, equipment, training and procedures intended to protect the crew. NASA released the Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Report in December 2008. Key personnel have been assembled to give you an overview of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, the medical response, the medico-legal issues, the SCSIIT findings and recommendations and future NASA flight surgeon spacecraft accident response training. Educational Objectives: Set the stage for the Panel to address the

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

    2000-06-01

    Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  7. Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures: Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Coté, Charles J; Wilson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The safe sedation of children for procedures requires a systematic approach that includes the following: no administration of sedating medication without the safety net of medical/dental supervision, careful presedation evaluation for underlying medical or surgical conditions that would place the child at increased risk from sedating medications, appropriate fasting for elective procedures and a balance between the depth of sedation and risk for those who are unable to fast because of the urgent nature of the procedure, a focused airway examination for large (kissing) tonsils or anatomic airway abnormalities that might increase the potential for airway obstruction, a clear understanding of the medication's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects and drug interactions, appropriate training and skills in airway management to allow rescue of the patient, age- and size-appropriate equipment for airway management and venous access, appropriate medications and reversal agents, sufficient numbers of staff to both carry out the procedure and monitor the patient, appropriate physiologic monitoring during and after the procedure, a properly equipped and staffed recovery area, recovery to the presedation level of consciousness before discharge from medical/dental supervision, and appropriate discharge instructions. This report was developed through a collaborative effort of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry to offer pediatric providers updated information and guidance in delivering safe sedation to children. PMID:27557912

  8. Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures: Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Coté, Charles J; Wilson, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The safe sedation of children for procedures requires a systematic approach that includes the following: no administration of sedating medication without the safety net of medical/dental supervision, careful presedation evaluation for underlying medical or surgical conditions that would place the child at increased risk from sedating medications, appropriate fasting for elective procedures and a balance between the depth of sedation and risk for those who are unable to fast because of the urgent nature of the procedure, a focused airway examination for large (kissing) tonsils or anatomic airway abnormalities that might increase the potential for airway obstruction, a clear understanding of the medication's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects and drug interactions, appropriate training and skills in airway management to allow rescue of the patient, age- and size-appropriate equipment for airway management and venous access, appropriate medications and reversal agents, sufficient numbers of staff to both carry out the procedure and monitor the patient, appropriate physiologic monitoring during and after the procedure, a properly equipped and staffed recovery area, recovery to the presedation level of consciousness before discharge from medical/dental supervision, and appropriate discharge instructions. This report was developed through a collaborative effort of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry to offer pediatric providers updated information and guidance in delivering safe sedation to children. PMID:27354454

  9. Guideline for monitoring and management of pediatric patients during and after sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

    PubMed

    The safe sedation of children for procedures requires a systematic approach that includes the following: no administration of sedating medication without the safety net of medical supervision, careful presedation evaluation for underlying medical or surgical conditions that would place the child at increased risk from sedating medications, appropriate fasting for elective procedures and a balance between depth of sedation and risk for those who are unable to fast because of the urgent nature of the procedure, a focused airway examination for large tonsils or anatomic airway abnormalities that might increase the potential for airway obstruction, a clear understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of the medications used for sedation as well as an appreciation for drug interactions, appropriate training and skills in airway management to allow rescue of the patient, age- and size-appropriate equipment for airway management and venous access, appropriate medications and reversal agents, sufficient numbers of people to both carry out the procedure and monitor the patient, appropriate physiologic monitoring during and after the procedure, a properly equipped and staffed recovery area, recovery to presedation level of consciousness before discharge from medical supervision, and appropriate discharge instructions. PMID:19216414

  10. Guidelines for accident prevention and emergency preparedness

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1993-05-01

    This report reviews recent developments in the guidelines on chemical accident prevention, risk assessment, and management of chemical emergencies, principally in the United States and Europe, and discusses aspects of their application to developing countries. Such guidelines are either in the form of laws or regulations promulgated by governments, or of recommendations from international, professional, or non governmental organizations. In many cases, these guidelines specify lists of materials of concern and methods for evaluating safe usage of these materials and recommend areas of responsibility for different organizations; procedures to be included in planning, evaluation, and response; and appropriate levels of training for different classes of workers. Guidelines frequently address the right of communities to be informed of potential hazards and address ways for them to participate in planning and decision making.

  11. [Error prevention through management of complications in urology: standard operating procedures from commercial aviation as a model].

    PubMed

    Kranz, J; Sommer, K-J; Steffens, J

    2014-05-01

    Patient safety and risk/complication management rank among the current megatrends in modern medicine, which has undoubtedly become more complex. In time-critical, error-prone and difficult situations, which often occur repeatedly in everyday clinical practice, guidelines are inappropriate for acting rapidly and intelligently. With the establishment and consistent use of standard operating procedures like in commercial aviation, a possible strategic approach is available. These medical aids to decision-making - quick reference cards - are short, optimized instructions that enable a standardized procedure in case of medical claims. PMID:24744109

  12. Managing the Fukushima Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident raises a fundamental question: Can science and technology prevent the inevitability of serious accidents, especially those with low probabilities and high consequences? This question reminds us of a longstanding challenge with the trans-sciences, originally addressed by Alvin Weinberg well before the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. This article, revisiting Weinberg's issue, aims at gaining insights from the accident with a special emphasis on the sociotechnical or human behavioral aspects lying behind the accident's causes. In particular, an innovative method for managing the challenge is explored referring to behavioral science approaches to a decision-making process on risk management; such as managing human behavioral risks with information asymmetry, seeking a rational consensus with communicative action, and pursuing procedural rationality through interactions with the outer environment. In short, this article describes the emerging need for Japan to transform its national safety management institutions so that these might be based on interactive communication with parties inside and outside Japan. PMID:24954604

  13. Managing the Fukushima challenge.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident raises a fundamental question: Can science and technology prevent the inevitability of serious accidents, especially those with low probabilities and high consequences? This question reminds us of a longstanding challenge with the trans-sciences, originally addressed by Alvin Weinberg well before the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. This article, revisiting Weinberg's issue, aims at gaining insights from the accident with a special emphasis on the sociotechnical or human behavioral aspects lying behind the accident's causes. In particular, an innovative method for managing the challenge is explored referring to behavioral science approaches to a decision-making process on risk management; such as managing human behavioral risks with information asymmetry, seeking a rational consensus with communicative action, and pursuing procedural rationality through interactions with the outer environment. In short, this article describes the emerging need for Japan to transform its national safety management institutions so that these might be based on interactive communication with parties inside and outside Japan. PMID:24954604

  14. Accidents in family forestry's firewood production.

    PubMed

    Lindroos, Ola; Aspman, Emma Wilhelmson; Lidestav, Gun; Neely, Gregory

    2008-05-01

    Firewood is commonly used around the world, but little is known about the work involved in its production and associated accidents. The objectives were to identify relationships between accidents and time exposure, workers' age and sex, equipment used and work activities in family forestry's firewood production. Data from a postal survey in Northern Sweden were compared to a database of injuries in the same region. Most accidents occurred to 50-69 year old men, who also worked most hours. No significant differences in sex and age were found between expected and recorded accident frequencies when calculated from total work hours; however, when calculated using numbers of active persons significant differences were found for both age and sex. Frequency of accidents per unit worked time was higher for machine involving activities than for other activities. Accidents that occurred when using wedge splitter machines were responsible for most of this overrepresentation. Fingers were the most commonly injured body parts. Mean accident rate for the equipment used was 87 accidents per million work hours, and the rate was highest for wedge splitters (122 accidents per million work hours). Exposure to elevated risks due to violation of safety procedures is discussed, as well as possible preventative measures. PMID:18460354

  15. 14 CFR 420.59 - Launch site accident investigation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... investigation procedures. Accident investigation procedures developed in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.119 and 40 CFR part 68 will satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section to the extent that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site accident investigation...

  16. 14 CFR 420.59 - Launch site accident investigation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... investigation procedures. Accident investigation procedures developed in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.119 and 40 CFR part 68 will satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section to the extent that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site accident investigation...

  17. Use of artificial intelligence in severe accident diagnosis for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zheng; Okrent, D.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    A combination approach of an expert system and neural networks is used to implement a prototype severe accident diagnostic system which would monitor the progression of the severe accident and provide necessary plant status information to assist the plant staff in accident management during the accident. The station blackout accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is used as the study case. The current phase of research focus is on distinguishing different primary system failure modes and following the accident transient before and up to vessel breach.

  18. 40 CFR 68.168 - Five-year accident history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Five-year accident history. 68.168 Section 68.168 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.168 Five-year accident...

  19. 40 CFR 68.168 - Five-year accident history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Five-year accident history. 68.168 Section 68.168 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.168 Five-year accident...

  20. 40 CFR 68.168 - Five-year accident history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Five-year accident history. 68.168 Section 68.168 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.168 Five-year accident...

  1. 36 CFR 9.46 - Accidents and fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... outlined in 36 CFR 2.17, but does not relieve persons from the responsibility of making any other accident... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accidents and fires. 9.46... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.46 Accidents and fires. The operator shall...

  2. 40 CFR 68.168 - Five-year accident history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Five-year accident history. 68.168 Section 68.168 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.168 Five-year accident...

  3. 40 CFR 68.168 - Five-year accident history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Five-year accident history. 68.168 Section 68.168 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.168 Five-year accident...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  5. Procedural sedation: A review of sedative agents, monitoring, and management of complications

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.; Leder, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Given the continued increase in the complexity of invasive and noninvasive procedures, healthcare practitioners are faced with a larger number of patients requiring procedural sedation. Effective sedation and analgesia during procedures not only provides relief of suffering, but also frequently facilitates the successful and timely completion of the procedure. However, any of the agents used for sedation and/or analgesia may result in adverse effects. These adverse effects most often affect upper airway patency, ventilatory function or the cardiovascular system. This manuscript reviews the pharmacology of the most commonly used agents for sedation and outlines their primary effects on respiratory and cardiovascular function. Suggested guidelines for the avoidance of adverse effects through appropriate pre-sedation evaluation, early identification of changes in respiratory and cardiovascular function, and their treatment are outlined. PMID:22144928

  6. Surgical management of unilateral elevator deficiency associated with horizontal deviation using a modified Knapp's procedure.

    PubMed

    Kamlesh; Dadeya, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Both horizontal recti are transpositioned in unilateral elevator deficiency, leaving no alternative to correct any significant ipsilateral horizontal deviation. An effective method to correct vertical and horizontal deviations simultaneously is reported. A modified Knapp's procedure was performed by transposition of the superior half of equally divided (up to 15 mm) medial and lateral recti for vertical deviation and the inferior half after suitable recession or resection for horizontal deviation. This procedure was performed in ten patients who had type II unilateral elevator deficiency with horizontal deviation ranging from 18 to 45 prism diopters (PD). We were able to correct 20 PD of horizontal deviation and 25 PD of vertical deviation with a modified Knapp's procedure without any significant adverse effects after a follow-up of 21 months. A modified Knapp's procedure is recommended for unilateral elevator deficiency associated with horizontal deviation. PMID:12757102

  7. Remote control continuous mining machine crushing accident data study

    SciTech Connect

    2006-05-11

    A committee was formed to identify norms and trends in remote control continuous miner crushing accidents as part of US MSHA's efforts to reduce and eliminate these types of accidents. The committee was tasked with collecting, reviewing, and evaluating remote control accident data to identify significant factors that could possibly contribute to remote control accidents. The report identifies that these types of accidents commonly happen to experienced miners during routine mining activities, with the majority occurring while moving the miner from one face to another (place changing). Another common aspect of the accidents is that many of the victims are newly employed at the mine where the accident occurred. Training all employees to stay outside the turning radius of an energized remote control continuous miner, establishing this as a safe operating procedure, and consistently enforcing this practice among miners will reduce these types of accidents. 10 figs., 5 tabs., 7 apps.

  8. Severe accident simulation at Olkiuoto

    SciTech Connect

    Tirkkonen, H.; Saarenpaeae, T.; Cliff Po, L.C.

    1995-09-01

    A personal computer-based simulator was developed for the Olkiluoto nuclear plant in Finland for training in severe accident management. The generic software PCTRAN was expanded to model the plant-specific features of the ABB Atom designed BWR including its containment over-pressure protection and filtered vent systems. Scenarios including core heat-up, hydrogen generation, core melt and vessel penetration were developed in this work. Radiation leakage paths and dose rate distribution are presented graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an 486 DX2-66, PCTRAN-TVO achieves a speed about 15 times faster than real-time. A convenient and user-friendly graphic interface allows full interactive control. In this paper a review of the component models and verification runs are presented.

  9. 40 CFR 68.75 - Management of change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Management of change. 68.75 Section 68...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.75 Management of change. (a) The... change on safety and health; (3) Modifications to operating procedures; (4) Necessary time period for...

  10. 40 CFR 68.75 - Management of change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management of change. 68.75 Section 68...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.75 Management of change. (a) The... change on safety and health; (3) Modifications to operating procedures; (4) Necessary time period for...

  11. 40 CFR 68.75 - Management of change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of change. 68.75 Section 68...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.75 Management of change. (a) The... change on safety and health; (3) Modifications to operating procedures; (4) Necessary time period for...

  12. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  13. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  14. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  15. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  16. Management of the Schneiderian membrane perforation during the maxillary sinus elevation procedure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Meleo, Deborah; Mangione, Francesca; Corbi, Sergio; Pacifici, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Summary The maxillary sinus elevation is a standard and predictable procedure allowing the realization of dental implant rehabilitation in patients with severe bone atrophy in the lateral-posterior areas of the maxilla. Despite the presence of validated surgical methods and the broad availability of biomaterials, the procedures aimed at increasing the bone volume by lateral antrostomy still entail complications with different degrees of relevance. The prosthetic and surgical outcome is based on a successful coping with these aspects. The perforation of the Schneiderian membrane is one of the most frequent events for which a variety of protocols and approaches have been suggested by different authors. In this work is presented a case study in which a technique to repair the sinus mucosa laceration occurring during a maxillary sinus elevation procedure has been successfully adopted. PMID:22783452

  17. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  18. Use of Continuous Transdermal Alcohol Monitoring during a Contingency Management Procedure to Reduce Excessive Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E.; Cates, Sharon E.; Lake, Sarah L.; Mullen, Jillian; Roache, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on contingency management to treat excessive alcohol use is limited due to feasibility issues with monitoring adherence. This study examined the effectiveness of using transdermal alcohol monitoring as a continuous measure of alcohol use to implement financial contingencies to reduce heavy drinking. Methods Twenty-six male and female drinkers (from 21–39 years old) were recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment sequences. Sequence 1 received 4 weeks of no financial contingency (i.e., $0) drinking followed by 4 weeks each of $25 and then $50 contingency management; Sequence 2 received 4 weeks of $25 contingency management followed by 4 weeks each of no contingency (i.e., $0) and then $50 contingency management. During the $25 and $50 contingency management conditions, participants were paid each week when the Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitor (SCRAM-II™) identified no heavy drinking days. Results Participants in both contingency management conditions had fewer drinking episodes and reduced frequencies of heavy drinking compared to the $0 condition. Participants randomized to Sequence 2 (receiving $25 contingency before the $0 condition) exhibited less frequent drinking and less heavy drinking in the $0 condition compared to participants from Sequence 1. Conclusions Transdermal alcohol monitoring can be used to implement contingency management programs to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:25064019

  19. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  20. Preserving Oral History Interviews on Tape: Curatorial Techniques and Management Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin

    1986-01-01

    This article provides basic step-by-step guidance on how to preserve, restore, and make available for use a taped collection of oral history interviews. Maintains that recorded sound collections may last almost indefinitely if protected by proper housekeeping practices, storage conditions, maintenance procedures, and use policies. (JDH)

  1. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 1: Techniques, Procedures and Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Topics dealing with the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information system for application in energy resources management are discussed. Associated remote sensing and image analysis techniques are also addressed.

  2. 20 CFR 668.860 - What cash management procedures apply to INA grant funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT... regulations which implement the Cash Management Improvement Act, found at 31 CFR part 205, apply by law...

  3. 20 CFR 668.860 - What cash management procedures apply to INA grant funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT... regulations which implement the Cash Management Improvement Act, found at 31 CFR part 205, apply by law...

  4. 20 CFR 668.860 - What cash management procedures apply to INA grant funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT... regulations which implement the Cash Management Improvement Act, found at 31 CFR part 205, apply by law...

  5. Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

  6. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  7. Determining and Managing Fetal Radiation Dose from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. Materials and Methods We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Conclusion Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion. PMID:26576117

  8. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 5. Ethical considerations for dental enhancement procedures.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2010-09-11

    After the demise of the Industrial Age, we currently live in an 'Information Age' fuelled mainly by the Internet, with an ever-increasing medically and dentally literate population. The media has played its role by reporting scientific advances, as well as securitising medical and dental practices. Reality television such as 'Extreme makeovers' has also raised public awareness of body enhancements, with a greater number of people seeking such procedures. To satiate this growing demand, the dental industry has flourished by introducing novel cosmetic products such as bleaching kits, tooth coloured filling materials and a variety of dental ceramics. In addition, one only has to browse through a dental journal to notice innumerable courses and lectures on techniques for providing cosmetic dentistry. The incessant public interest, combined with unrelenting marketing by companies is gradually shifting the balance of dental care from a healing to an enhancement profession. The purpose of this article is to endeavour to answer questions such as, What is aesthetic or cosmetic dentistry? Why do patients seek cosmetic dentistry? Are enhancement procedures a part of dental practice? What, if any, ethical guidelines and constraints apply to elective enhancement procedures? What is the role of the dentist in providing or encouraging this type of 'therapy'? What treatment modalities are available for aesthetic dental treatment? PMID:20829856

  9. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Koji; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Nakashima, Kanami; Orita, Makiko; Yasui, Kiyotaka; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yabe, Hirooki; Maeda, Masaharu; Hayashida, Naomi; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS) of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. Methods We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were “anorexia,” “subjective feelings about health,” “feelings about sleep satisfaction,” and “bereavement caused by the disaster,” confounding variables were “age” and “sex,” and outcome variables were “K6 points.” We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S) to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542) of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. Results A total of 474 residents (87.5%) scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6%) scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old) among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of residents with anorexia and mental illness among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). The amount of residents who scored 44 points or more in the PCL-S among people with K6 score above the cut-off was also considerably higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (79.4 vs 12.9%, p < 0.001). Interestingly, the proportion of residents who scored more than among people with K6 score above the cut-off and the among

  10. Successful Anesthesia Management for 2-Stage Surgical Procedure of a Refractory Tracheogastric Tube Fistula After Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Seiji; Suzuki, Akiko; Miyawaki, Yutaka; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Makita, Koshi

    2016-02-15

    Tracheogastric tube fistulas are rare but fatal complications after esophagectomy. Anesthetic management for a patient with this complication is challenging because air leakage and mechanical ventilation may cause aspiration. We present a case report of the anesthetic management of a patient having 2-stage surgical repair combined with endoscopic mucosal resection for a giant carinal tracheogastric tube fistula. The first stage was separation of the gastric tube above the fistula with spontaneous breathing under local anesthesia and sedation. The second stage was complete separation and reconstruction of the digestive tract under epidural and general anesthesia with spontaneous breathing and pressure support before insertion of a decompression tube. PMID:26862719

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

  12. 76 FR 54288 - Notice of Procedural Changes to the Performance and Registration Information Systems Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... non-motor carrier registrants to obtain registrant-only USDOT Numbers under the PRISM program (76 FR... Registration Information Systems Management (PRISM) Program AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration... Number as part of the PRISM program. In an August 9, 2010, Federal Register notice, the Agency...

  13. 75 FR 47444 - Amendments to the Informal and Other Procedures, Rules of Organization and Program Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Organization and Program Management, and Rules of Practice; Interim Commission Review of Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Inspection Reports and Regulation P AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... Accounting Oversight Board ] (``PCAOB'') inspection reports under Section 104(h) of the Sarbanes- Oxley...

  14. Special Education Management System Project Document. 3. Santa Cruz TBC Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented in chart form with accompanying booklet is the Task Base Composite (TBC), part of the Santa Cruz Special Education Management System Project, which lists 700 staff tasks to aid in the administrative determination of personnel needs, deployment, and program costs. Listed tasks are either "Learner Line" (tasks directly involving or…

  15. An IT Manager's View on E-Mail and Internet Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Mayur S.; Hart, Jeff; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    E-mail is mandatory tool of communications any business to survive in the 21st century. It is imperative that Information technology (IT) managers monitor and make sure that the e-mail systems are used properly. In order to organize a systematic process for proper use of email an administrator must have an input into the development of appropriate…

  16. Health Project Management. A Manual of Procedures for Formulating and Implementing Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, J.; Sapirie, S.

    The manual presents 16 main steps for health project management, from project formulation through termination. The manual defines a health project as a temporary intensive effort to set up and put into operation a new or revised service that will result in the reduction of specific health or health-related problems. (Typical examples include the…

  17. 76 FR 18652 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Federal Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 54790, 54791 (Sept. 9, 2010) (revising the Manual through May... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is...

  18. 77 FR 75567 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 56984, 56984-85 (Sept. 15, 2011) (revising the Manual through May 2011... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  19. 76 FR 56984 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 18652, 18652-53 (April 5, 2011) (revising the Manual through September... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised...

  20. 75 FR 54790 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 6818 (Feb. 11, 2010) (revising the Manual through September 2009... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  1. Managing Classroom Behavior of Head Start Children Using Response Cost and Token Economy Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiano, Jennifer D.; Fortson, Beverly L.; McNeil, Cheryl B.; Humphreys, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of three behavior management techniques used in a Head Start classroom was examined. The three techniques included: (a) techniques currently used by the teacher, (b) response cost, and (c) the Level System (token economy). The current study used an ABACA single subject withdrawal design with follow-up where all conditions were…

  2. A multi-scale modelling procedure to quantify hydrological impacts of upland land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Jackson, B.; Bulygina, N.; Ballard, C.; McIntyre, N.; Marshall, M.; Frogbrook, Z.; Solloway, I.; Reynolds, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent UK floods have focused attention on the effects of agricultural intensification on flood risk. However, quantification of these effects raises important methodological issues. Catchment-scale data have proved inadequate to support analysis of impacts of land management change, due to climate variability, uncertainty in input and output data, spatial heterogeneity in land use and lack of data to quantify historical changes in management practices. Manipulation experiments to quantify the impacts of land management change have necessarily been limited and small scale, and in the UK mainly focused on the lowlands and arable agriculture. There is a need to develop methods to extrapolate from small scale observations to predict catchment-scale response, and to quantify impacts for upland areas. With assistance from a cooperative of Welsh farmers, a multi-scale experimental programme has been established at Pontbren, in mid-Wales, an area of intensive sheep production. The data have been used to support development of a multi-scale modelling methodology to assess impacts of agricultural intensification and the potential for mitigation of flood risk through land use management. Data are available from replicated experimental plots under different land management treatments, from instrumented field and hillslope sites, including tree shelter belts, and from first and second order catchments. Measurements include climate variables, soil water states and hydraulic properties at multiple depths and locations, tree interception, overland flow and drainflow, groundwater levels, and streamflow from multiple locations. Fine resolution physics-based models have been developed to represent soil and runoff processes, conditioned using experimental data. The detailed models are used to calibrate simpler 'meta- models' to represent individual hydrological elements, which are then combined in a semi-distributed catchment-scale model. The methodology is illustrated using field

  3. Single stage bilateral uniportal videothoracoscopic sympathicotomy for hyperhidrosis: can it be managed as an outpatient procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Erşen, Ezel; Kılıç, Burcu; Kara, Hasan Volkan; İşcan, Mehlika; Kaynak, Kamil; Turna, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The videothoracoscopic approach is minimally invasive with benefits that include less postoperative pain and shorter hospital stay. It is also a safe procedure which can be performed on an outpatient basis. Aim To determine whether videothoracoscopic sympathicotomy can be performed safely in most patients as an outpatient procedure. Material and methods Between July 2005 and October 2015, a total of 92 patients underwent bilateral and single port thoracoscopic sympathicotomy in our department on an outpatient basis. The level of sympathicotomy was T2 in 2 (2.2%) patients, T2 to T3 in 31 (33%) patients, T2 to T4 in 46 (50%) patients and T3 to T4 in 12 (13%) patients. Demographic data, length of postoperative stay, substitution index (SI), admission rate (AR) and readmission rate (RR), complications and patient satisfaction were reviewed retrospectively. Results Two (2.2%) patients suffered from chest pain, while 4 (4.3%) patients complained about pain at the port site. Mean discharge time after surgery was 5.1 h (range: 4–6 h), mean duration of hospital stay was 0.15 days (0–3 days) postoperatively and the mean operation time was 43.6 min (15–130 min). In 8 (8.6%) patients, pneumothorax was detected on postoperative chest X-ray, while 5 (5.4%) patients required chest tube drainage. Mild or moderate compensatory sweating developed in 32 (34.7%) patients. No recurrence was observed, and the satisfaction rate was 96.7%. Substitution index and admission rate were 91.3% and 11% respectively, while RR was 0%. Conclusions Bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathicotomy can be performed safely in most patients as an outpatient procedure. PMID:27458488

  4. Ski accidents and legal responsibility: the Spanish case.

    PubMed

    Carus Ribalaygua, Luis

    2010-03-01

    This study classifies and analyzes Spanish court rulings on responsibility for ski accidents(1) occurring within ski resort boundaries, and refers to court cases to propose guidelines aimed at assisting skiers and ski resort managers. Six main trends emerged from the study: (a) Spanish courts resolved lawsuits arising from four clearly identifiable categories of ski accidents. (b) Although lawsuits involving ski accidents were heard in both civil and criminal procedures, civil actions were more extensively brought than criminal ones. (c) The majority of the sentences ending legal proceedings resulted in acquittals, although the cost to defendants in the minority of cases where convictions were made exceeded one million euros in total. (d) No single lawsuit, either civil or criminal, was settled in a Court of First Instance; the vast majority were heard in Provincial Courts and only a small proportion reached the High Court. (e) The defendant was the ski resort operator in the great majority of cases. (f) Court decisions were consistently grounded only on the presence or otherwise of the factors necessary to prove either damages as a result of negligence, according to civil law, or misdemeanor or criminal injuries, in criminal lawsuits. PMID:20159068

  5. Anesthetic issues and perioperative blood pressure management in patients who have cerebrovascular diseases undergoing surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott

    2006-11-01

    Patients who have cerebrovascular disease and vascular insufficiency routinely have neurosurgical and nonneurosurgical procedures. Anesthetic priorities must provide a still bloodless operative field while maintaining cardiovascular stability and renal function. Patients who have symptoms or a history of cerebrovascular disease are at increased risk for stroke, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral anoxia. Type of surgery and cardiovascular status are key concerns when considering neuroprotective strategies. Optimization of current condition is important for a good outcome; risks must be weighed against perceived benefits in protecting neurons. Anesthetic use and physiologic manipulations can reduce neurologic injury and assure safe and effective surgical care when cerebral hypoperfusion is a real and significant risk. PMID:16935193

  6. Last chance therapies and managed care. Pluralism, fair procedures, and legitimacy.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N; Sabin, J E

    1998-01-01

    How can health plans make fair determinations about when "experimental" (and costly) treatments such as high dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation should be covered despite lack of clear clinical consensus about their benefits? Different models for managing "last chance" therapies evolving in some health plans offer promising examples of how issues of fairness and legitimacy in decision-making can be addressed. PMID:9589291

  7. Procedure for determining the distribution ranking index

    SciTech Connect

    Latino, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Distribution Ranking Index (DRI) has been developed as a simple but effective means to indicate the inherent, acute hazards of a material that might be released in a transportation accident. Utilizing existing Dow resources and procedures, it is one of the methods used for prioritization of chemicals in Dow`s distribution related process risk management effort. Seven individual hazard indexes are considered for a material. The values range from 1 to 4 with 4 representing the most severe hazard. The highest value from any hazard index determines the overall DRI. 3 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  8. 41 CFR 102-74.355 - With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.355 With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply? To the maximum extent feasible, Federal agencies must manage facilities in accordance with the accident and...

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.355 - With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.355 With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply? To the maximum extent feasible, Federal agencies must manage facilities in accordance with the accident and...

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.355 - With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.355 With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply? To the maximum extent feasible, Federal agencies must manage facilities in accordance with the accident and...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.355 - With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.355 With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply? To the maximum extent feasible, Federal agencies must manage facilities in accordance with the accident and...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.355 - With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.355 With what accident and fire prevention standards must Federal facilities comply? To the maximum extent feasible, Federal agencies must manage facilities in accordance with the accident and...

  13. Smart Document System (SDS) used in managing DOE order`s with electronic Engineering Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.; Robbins, D.

    1993-12-01

    The Microsoft (MS) Windows product is widely available for PC`s. There exists many thousands of them at Sandia. All of the MS applications in Windows have a Help file. This help file informs the user ``how to`` use and run that application. It is an ``on-line`` manual. The ``Help Compiler`` was obtained from Microsoft. Use of this compiler enables one to insert text in a form the MS ``Help Engine`` recognizes. This means all of the features of the Help file: Hypertext (hot links), browsing, searching, indexing, bookmarks, annotation, are available for your text. This turns a document into a ``Smart Document.`` The use of this Smart Document System (SDS) for Engineering Procedures (EPs) is described.

  14. Current management of aortic arch lesions with hybrid procedures: a tailored approach to a progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Ryan P; Aftab, Muhammad; Roselli, Eric E

    2016-06-01

    In the current era of cardiac and aortic surgery lines between open and endovascular approaches are becoming blurred. Hybrid techniques emerged with the availability of endovascular devices and the idea that combining open operations with a stent graft might provide a treatment option to those patients deemed too high-risk for conventional surgery. As these procedures evolved, it became clear that they still carried significant risk especially for the "inoperable" or "high-risk" patients, but they also offered new options for treating complex pathologies involving multiple segments of the aorta. Hybrid techniques not only provide the potential for less invasive aortic repair, but must be considered as an important complementary treatment option for patients with aortic disease, allowing for a potentially more effective and complete repair. The objective of this article is to review the current options for hybrid arch repair and the indications for choosing the various techniques based on pathologic presentation. PMID:26939046

  15. QA procedures and emissions from nonstandard sources in AQUIS, a PC-based emission inventory and air permit manager

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.E.; Tschanz, J.; Monarch, M.

    1996-05-01

    The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) is a database management system that operates under dBASE IV. It runs on an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) with MS DOS 5.0 or later, 4 megabytes of memory, and 30 megabytes of disk space. AQUIS calculates emissions for both traditional and toxic pollutants and reports emissions in user-defined formats. The system was originally designed for use at 7 facilities of the Air Force Materiel Command, and now more than 50 facilities use it. Within the last two years, the system has been used in support of Title V permit applications at Department of Defense facilities. Growth in the user community, changes and additions to reference emission factor data, and changing regulatory requirements have demanded additions and enhancements to the system. These changes have ranged from adding or updating an emission factor to restructuring databases and adding new capabilities. Quality assurance (QA) procedures have been developed to ensure that emission calculations are correct even when databases are reconfigured and major changes in calculation procedures are implemented. This paper describes these QA and updating procedures. Some user facilities include light industrial operations associated with aircraft maintenance. These facilities have operations such as fiberglass and composite layup and plating operations for which standard emission factors are not available or are inadequate. In addition, generally applied procedures such as material balances may need special treatment to work in an automated environment, for example, in the use of oils and greases and when materials such as polyurethane paints react chemically during application. Some techniques used in these situations are highlighted here. To provide a framework for the main discussions, this paper begins with a description of AQUIS.

  16. Implications of a two-step procedure in surgical management of patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bleu, Géraldine; Merlot, Benjamin; Boulanger, Loïc; Vinatier, Denis; Kerdraon, Olivier; Collinet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) recommendations and French guidelines, pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be systematically performed for women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk. The aim of our study was to evaluate the change of our surgical practices after ESMO recommendations, and to evaluate the rate and morbidity of second surgical procedure in case of understaging after the first surgery. Methods This retrospective single-center study included women with EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk who had surgery between 2006 and 2013. Two periods were defined the times before and after ESMO recommendations. Demographics characteristics, surgical management, operative morbidity, and rate of understaging were compared. The rate of second surgical procedure required for lymph node resection during the second period and its morbidity were also studied. Results Sixty-one and sixty-two patients were operated for EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low-or intermediate-risk before and after ESMO recommendations, respectively. Although immediate pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed more frequently during the first period than the second period (88.5% vs. 19.4%; p<0.001), the rate of postoperative risk-elevating or upstaging were comparable between the two periods (31.1% vs. 27.4%; p=0.71). Among the patients requiring second surgical procedure during the second period (21.0%), 30.8% did not undergo the second surgery due to their comorbidity or old age. For the patients who underwent second surgical procedure, mean operative time of the second procedure was 246.1±117.8 minutes. Third operation was required in 33.3% of them because of postoperative complications. Conclusion Since ESMO recommendations, second surgical procedure for lymph node resection is often required for women with EEC presumed at low- or intermediate-risk. This

  17. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Accident Avoidance Skill Training and Performance Testing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatterick, G. Richard; Barthurst, James R.

    A two-phased study was conducted to determine the feasibility of training drivers to acquire skills needed to avoid critical conflict motor vehicle accidents, and to develop the procedures and materials necessary for such training. Basic data were derived from indepth accident investigations and task analyses of driver behavior. Principal…

  19. Applications of Preference Assessment Procedures in Depression and Agitation Management in Elders with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Leilani; Steers, Mary E.; Elite-Marcandonatou, Alexandra; McLane, Maura; Areán, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Low levels of engagement with leisure activities are commonly seen in older adults with dementia and may lead to decreased social contact, depressed affect, and agitated behaviors. Adults with dementia often have difficulty choosing activities when asked directly about preferences due to cognitive decline, which makes it more difficult to increase their engagement levels. However, simply presenting leisure items without prior knowledge of preferences may be inefficient and may not yield desired results. Long-term care staff need more structured and efficient ways to determine individual preferences and preference assessments (structured choice making opportunities) may offer a solution. Preference assessments have been used to identify effective reinforcers for both individuals with developmental disabilities and older adults with dementia and can provide staff with a brief method for identifying enjoyable activities. This study examined the utility of using stimuli (identified from preference assessments) in behavioral management protocols with 11 elders (mean age = 85.6 years) with dementia in a long-term care setting. Behavioral outcomes of depression and agitation were evaluated at baseline and throughout the intervention. Results indicated positive improvement in behavioral symptoms in 8 of 11 participants. The utility of using preferred items in behavioral management protocols was supported for reducing agitated behaviors but was only partially supported for decreasing depressive symptoms in individuals with dementia. PMID:22593610

  20. Vocal local versus pharmacological treatments for pain management in tubal ligation procedures in rural Kenya: a non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vocal local (VL) is a non-pharmacological pain management technique for gynecological procedures. In Africa, it is usually used in combination with pharmacological analgesics. However, analgesics are associated with side-effects, and can be costly and subject to frequent stock-outs, particularly in remote rural settings. We compared the effectiveness of VL + local anesthesia + analgesics (the standard approach), versus VL + local anesthesia without analgesics, on pain and satisfaction levels for women undergoing tubal ligations in rural Kenya. Methods We conducted a site-randomised non-inferiority trial of 884 women receiving TLs from 40 Marie Stopes mobile outreach sites in Kisii and Machakos Districts. Twenty sites provided VL + local anesthesia + analgesics (control), while 20 offered VL + local anesthesia without additional analgesics (intervention). Pain was measured using a validated 11-point Numeric Rating Scale; satisfaction was measured using 11-point scales. Results A total of 461 women underwent tubal ligations with VL + local anesthesia, while 423 received tubal ligations with VL + local anesthesia + analgesics. The majority were aged ≥30 years (78%), and had >3 children (99%). In a multivariate analysis, pain during the procedure was not significantly different between the two groups. The pain score after the procedure was significantly lower in the intervention group versus the control group (by 0.40 points; p = 0.041). Satisfaction scores were equally high in both groups; 96% would recommend the procedure to a friend. Conclusion VL + local anesthesia is as effective as VL + local anesthesia + analgesics for pain management during tubal ligation in rural Kenya. Avoiding analgesics is associated with numerous benefits including cost savings and fewer issues related to the maintenance, procurement and monitoring of restricted opioid drugs, particularly in remote low-resource settings

  1. Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners (Second Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatelatos,Michael; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Apostolakis, George; Everline, Chester; Guarro, Sergio; Mathias, Donovan; Mosleh, Ali; Paulos, Todd; Riha, David; Smith, Curtis; Vesely, William; Youngblood, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a comprehensive, structured, and logical analysis method aimed at identifying and assessing risks in complex technological systems for the purpose of cost-effectively improving their safety and performance. NASA's objective is to better understand and effectively manage risk, and thus more effectively ensure mission and programmatic success, and to achieve and maintain high safety standards at NASA. NASA intends to use risk assessment in its programs and projects to support optimal management decision making for the improvement of safety and program performance. In addition to using quantitative/probabilistic risk assessment to improve safety and enhance the safety decision process, NASA has incorporated quantitative risk assessment into its system safety assessment process, which until now has relied primarily on a qualitative representation of risk. Also, NASA has recently adopted the Risk-Informed Decision Making (RIDM) process [1-1] as a valuable addition to supplement existing deterministic and experience-based engineering methods and tools. Over the years, NASA has been a leader in most of the technologies it has employed in its programs. One would think that PRA should be no exception. In fact, it would be natural for NASA to be a leader in PRA because, as a technology pioneer, NASA uses risk assessment and management implicitly or explicitly on a daily basis. NASA has probabilistic safety requirements (thresholds and goals) for crew transportation system missions to the International Space Station (ISS) [1-2]. NASA intends to have probabilistic requirements for any new human spaceflight transportation system acquisition. Methods to perform risk and reliability assessment in the early 1960s originated in U.S. aerospace and missile programs. Fault tree analysis (FTA) is an example. It would have been a reasonable extrapolation to expect that NASA would also become the world leader in the application of PRA. That was

  2. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  3. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  4. The relationship between tail biting in pigs, docking procedure and other management practices.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E J; Jones, T A; Guise, H J; Penny, R H; Hoste, S

    2001-01-01

    The tail length (docked, tipped or undocked) and tail status (bitten or unbitten) of 27,870 pigs from 450 units was recorded at six UK abattoirs. A farm survey of the final finishing stage was used to investigate the relationship between management practice and tail biting. This showed that docking was the most important factor influencing the probability of being not bitten, with 2.4% of docked and 8.5% of long-tailed pigs being tail-bitten. The following factors reduced the probability of long-tailed pigs being tail-bitten; light straw provision, use of natural ventilation or artificially controlled natural ventilation (ACNV), mixed sex grouping, meal or liquid feeding, and use of double or multi-space feeders. Docked and long-tailed pigs provided with light straw and natural ventilation/ACNV had levels of tail biting of 1.2% and 4.3% respectively; 3.9% of docked pigs with artificial ventilation and no straw were tail-bitten. Long-tailed pigs fed via double or multi-space feeders also had 3.9% of tails bitten. PMID:11145831

  5. Development and testing of LANDSAT-assisted procedures for cost-effective forest management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Sanders, P. A.; Thomson, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The capability of LANDSAT data to make certain forest management activities on the Clearwater National Forest in Idaho more efficient and/or more effective was examined. One task was designed to evaluate the utility of single-date categorized LANDSAT data as a source of land cover information for use in assessing elk habitat quality. LANDSAT data was used to categorize conifer forest on the basis of the percentage crown closure. This information was used to evaluate elk habitat quality on the basis of the ratio of cover to forage. A preliminary conclusion is that categorized LANDSAT data can be helpful for assessing current elk habitat quality if the relationships between crown closure and hiding cover can be adequately defined. Another task was designed to evaluate the utility of merged two-date LANDSAT data for updating the existing (1972) Clearwater Forest land cover information. LANDSAT data from 1972 and 1981 were merged, and change images were created. These products indicated where major changes were taking place. These areas could then be examined on aerial photography or in the field to further characterize the nature and magnitude of the change. The 1972 land cover information could be subsequently altered in these changed areas, whereas areas with no change would not have to be re-examined.

  6. Surgical management of oral submucous fibrosis in an edentulous patient: A procedural challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D.; Tatu, Rohit J.; Shenoy, Nithin A.; Sharma, Vaibhav S.

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) offers a formidable challenge due to restricted mouth opening. Physiotherapy via interocclusal force application is the mainstay for surgical treatment. Herein, we report a case of a man with OSMF requiring construction of dentures. The main objective was to deliver intra-operative and post operative inter occlusal forces without fracturing the mandible and thus providing rehabilitation to the patient prosthetically. An edentulous male patient reported with grade IVA OSMF to our department to improve his mouth opening for denture construction. The patient was managed successfully using surgical sectioning of the fibrous bands. Inter occlusal force application for mouth opening during the operation and post operative physiotherapy were facilitated using custom-made occlusal splints. Satisfactory mouth opening was achieved, with good healing and no event of infection or fracture. Here, we propose an easy method to achieve adequate mouth opening in an edentulous patient of OSMF, with atrophic ridges; without the chances of fracture of either jaw. PMID:22442590

  7. Aircraft Configuration and Flight Crew Compliance with Procedures While Conducting Flight Deck Based Interval Management (FIM) Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Rick; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Flight deck based Interval Management (FIM) applications using ADS-B are being developed to improve both the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). FIM is expected to improve the safety and efficiency of the NAS by giving pilots the technology and procedures to precisely achieve an interval behind the preceding aircraft by a specific point. Concurrently but independently, Optimized Profile Descents (OPD) are being developed to help reduce fuel consumption and noise, however, the range of speeds available when flying an OPD results in a decrease in the delivery precision of aircraft to the runway. This requires the addition of a spacing buffer between aircraft, reducing system throughput. FIM addresses this problem by providing pilots with speed guidance to achieve a precise interval behind another aircraft, even while flying optimized descents. The Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPiDR) human-in-the-loop experiment employed 24 commercial pilots to explore the use of FIM equipment to conduct spacing operations behind two aircraft arriving to parallel runways, while flying an OPD during high-density operations. This paper describes the impact of variations in pilot operations; in particular configuring the aircraft, their compliance with FIM operating procedures, and their response to changes of the FIM speed. An example of the displayed FIM speeds used incorrectly by a pilot is also discussed. Finally, this paper examines the relationship between achieving airline operational goals for individual aircraft and the need for ATC to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater precision. The results show that aircraft can fly an OPD and conduct FIM operations to dependent parallel runways, enabling operational goals to be achieved efficiently while maintaining system throughput.

  8. Instrumentation availability during severe accidents for a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment

    SciTech Connect

    Arcieri, W.C.; Hanson, D.J. )

    1992-02-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program, the availability of instruments to supply accident management information during a broad range of severe accidents is evaluated for a Boiling Water Reactor with a Mark I containment. Results from this evaluation include: (1) the identification of plant conditions that would impact instrument performance and information needs during severe accidents; (2) the definition of envelopes of parameters that would be important in assessing the performance of plant instrumentation for a broad range of severe accident sequences; and (3) assessment of the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents.

  9. Standard operating procedure for air quality stationary source management at Air Force installations in the Air Force Materiel Command

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.M.; Ryckman, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    To sustain compliance and avoid future enforcement actions associated with air quality stationary sources and to provide installation commanders with a certification process for Title V permitting, and Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Stationary Source Management has been developed. The SOP consists of two major sections: Stationary Source Planning and Administration, and Stationary Source Operations These two main sections are further subdivided into twelve subsections which delineate requirements (e.g. maintaining inventories, applying for and maintaining permits, keeping records, reporting and certifying compliance) and assign ownership of processes and responsibilities (e.g. appointing a manager/alternate for each identified stationary air source). In addition, the SOP suggests training that should be provided from operator to commander levels to ensure that all personnel involved with a stationary air source are aware of their responsibilities. Implementation of the SOP should provide for the essential control necessary for installation commanders to eliminate stationary air source non-compliance and to certify compliance in accordance with the Title V Operating Permit requirements. This paper will discuss: the background and purpose for the SOPs content, the twelve subsections of the SOP, the success of implementation at various installations, the relevance or the recommended training, the success of negotiating with various labor unions for SOP implementation and the success of the SOP in reference to its intended purpose.

  10. Airline accident response.

    PubMed

    Bettes, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines government regulations affecting accident response and offers guidelines for airline contingency plans in the face of major air disasters, such as those encountered on September 11, 2001. The author also touches upon the role of the corporate medical department in accident investigation and victim identification. PMID:11872433

  11. Civil aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Haines, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This talk reviews some historic aircraft accidents and some more recent. It reflects on the division of accident causes, considering mechanical failures and aircrew failures, and on aircrew training. Investigation results may lead to improved aircraft design, and to appropriate crew training. PMID:24057309

  12. Anatomy of an Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The findings of industrial safety engineers in the areas of accident causation and prevention are wholly applicable to adventure programs. Adventure education instructors can use safety engineering concepts to assess the risk in a particular activity, understand factors that cause accidents, and intervene to minimize injuries and damages if…

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.360 - What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.360 Section 102-74.360 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.360 - What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.360 Section 102-74.360 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant...

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.360 - What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.360 Section 102-74.360 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.360 - What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.360 Section 102-74.360 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.360 - What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.360 Section 102-74.360 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant...

  18. Human-Centered Technologies and Procedures for Future Air Traffic Management: A Preliminary Overview of 1996 Studies and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Philip; McCoy, Elaine; Denning, Rebecca; Woods, David; Sarter, Nadine; Dekker, Sidney; Billings, Charles

    1996-01-01

    In this project, we have been exploring the use of a general methodology to predict the impact of future Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts and technologies. In applying this methodology, our emphasis has been on the importance of modeling coordination and cooperation among the multiple agents within this system, and on understanding how the interactions among these agents will be influenced as new roles, responsibilities, procedures and technologies are introduced. To accomplish this, we have been collecting data on performance under the current air traffic management system, trying to identify critical problem areas and looking for exemplars suggestive of general approaches for solving such problems. Based on the results of these field studies, we have developed a set of scenarios centered around potential future system designs, and have conducted studies using these scenarios involving a total 40 controllers, dispatchers, pilots and traffic managers. The purpose of this report is to provide NASA with an early summary of the major recommendations that have resulted from our research under the AATT Program thus far. Recommendations 1-3 deal with general approaches that our findings suggest should be incorporated in future AATT Program activities, while Recommendations 4-11 identify some specific topics and technologies that merit research and development activities. Detailed technical reports containing supporting data, as well as the results of our still ongoing analyses, will be provided at a later date. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. Section 1 briefly describes the general design philosophy supported by our empirical studies. Section 2 presents the research methods we have used for identifying requirements for future system designs and for evaluating alternative design solutions. Section 3 discusses preliminary results from an initial set of investigations that we have conducted using these research methods. Section 4 then provides an

  19. “Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report”

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios P.; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. Presentation of cases A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Discussion Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Conclusion Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. PMID:26318135

  20. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned.

  1. Accident analysis for US fast burst reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Paternoster, R.; Flanders, M.; Kazi, H.

    1994-09-01

    In the US fast burst reactor (FBR) community there has been increasing emphasis and scrutiny on safety analysis and understanding of possible accident scenarios. This paper summarizes recent work in these areas that is going on at the different US FBR sites. At this time, all of the FBR facilities have or in the process of updating and refining their accident analyses. This effort is driven by two objectives: to obtain a more realistic scenario for emergency response procedures and contingency plans, and to determine compliance with changing regulatory standards.

  2. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  3. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  4. Procedural pain management in Italy: learning from a nationwide survery involving centers of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Po', Chiara; Benini, Franca; Sainati, Laura; Farina, Maria Immacolata; Cesaro, Simone; Agosto, Caterina

    2011-01-01

    Procedural pain is an important aspect of care in pediatrics, and particularly in pediatric oncology where children often consider this to be the most painful experience during their illness. Best recommended practice to control procedural pain includes both sedative-analgesic administration and non-pharmacological treatments, practiced in an adequate and pleasant setting by skilled staff. A nationwide survey has been conducted among the Italian Centers of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology to register operators' awareness on procedural pain, state of the art procedural pain management, operators' opinions about pain control in their center, and possible barriers impeding sedation-analgesia administration. Based on indications in the literature, we discuss the results of the survey to highlight critical issues and suggest future directions for improvement. Future objectives will be to overcome differences depending on size, improve operators' beliefs about the complexity of pain experience, and promote a global approach to procedural pain. PMID:22355519

  5. Successful Management of Two Cases of Placenta Accreta and a Literature Review: Use of the B-Lynch Suture and Bilateral Uterine Artery Ligation Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Maliheh; Ghavami, Behnaz; Saraeian, Samaneh; Sheibani, Samaneh; Abbasian Azar, Fatemeh; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Placenta accreta is an increasingly common complication of pregnancy that can result in massive hemorrhage. Case Presentation We describe two cases of placenta accreta, with successful conservative management in a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran. In both cases, two procedures were performed: compression suture (B-Lynch) and a perfusion-decreasing procedure (bilateral uterine artery ligation). We also present the results of a narrative literature review. Conclusions The double B-Lynch and uterine arterial ligation procedure in cases of abnormal placentation might be strongly considered in fertility preservation, coagulopathy, coexisting medical disease, blood access shortage, low surgical experience, distant local hospitals, and no help. PMID:27354921

  6. 46 CFR 122.208 - Accidents to machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accidents to machinery. 122.208 Section 122.208 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Voyage Records § 122.208 Accidents to machinery. The owner, managing operator, or master shall...

  7. 46 CFR 122.208 - Accidents to machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accidents to machinery. 122.208 Section 122.208 Shipping... Voyage Records § 122.208 Accidents to machinery. The owner, managing operator, or master shall report damage to a boiler, unfired pressure vessel, or machinery that renders further use of the item...

  8. 46 CFR 185.208 - Accidents to machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accidents to machinery. 185.208 Section 185.208 Shipping...) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.208 Accidents to machinery. The owner, managing operator, or master shall report damage to a boiler, unfired pressure vessel, or machinery that...

  9. Comparison of childhood thyroid cancer prevalence among 3 areas based on external radiation dose after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: The Fukushima health management survey.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hideto; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohtsuru, Akira; Midorikawa, Sanae; Suzuki, Satoru; Fukushima, Toshihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sakai, Akira; Yamashita, Shunichi; Tanigawa, Koichi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Abe, Masafumi; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake led to a subsequent nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. In its wake, we sought to examine the association between external radiation dose and thyroid cancer in Fukushima Prefecture. We applied a cross-sectional study design with 300,476 participants aged 18 years and younger who underwent thyroid examinations between October 2011 and June 2015. Areas within Fukushima Prefecture were divided into three groups based on individual external doses (≥1% of 5 mSv, <99% of 1 mSv/y, and the other). The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals of thyroid cancer for all areas, with the lowest dose area as reference, were calculated using logistic regression models adjusted for age and sex. Furthermore, the ORs of thyroid cancer for individual external doses of 1 mSv or more and 2 mSv or more, with the external dose less than 1 mSv as reference, were calculated. Prevalence of thyroid cancer for the location groups were 48/100,000 for the highest dose area, 36/100,000 for the middle dose area, and 41/100,000 for the lowest dose area. Compared with the lowest dose area, age-, and sex-adjusted ORs (95% confidence intervals) for the highest-dose and middle-dose areas were 1.49 (0.36-6.23) and 1.00 (0.67-1.50), respectively. The duration between accident and thyroid examination was not associated with thyroid cancer prevalence. There were no significant associations between individual external doses and prevalence of thyroid cancer. External radiation dose was not associated with thyroid cancer prevalence among Fukushima children within the first 4 years after the nuclear accident. PMID:27583855

  10. Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report. Volume Five

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehmann, H. W.; Barry, J. L.; Deal, D. W.; Hallock, J. N.; Hess, K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volume V of the Report contains appendices that were not cited in VolumeI. These consist of documents produced by NASA and other organizations, which were provided to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board in support of its inquiry into the February 1, 2003 destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia The contents include:. Appendix G.1 Requirements and Procedures for Certification of Flight Readiness; Appendix G.2 Appendix R, Space Shuttle Program Contingency Action Plan; Appendix G.3 CAIB Charter, with Revisions; Appendix G.4 Group 1 Matrix Brief on Maintenance, Material, and Management; Appendix G.5 Vehicle Data Mapping(VDM) Team Final Report, Jun 13, 2003; Appendix G.6 SRB Working Group Presentation to CAIB; Appendix G. 7 Starfire Team Final Report, Jun 3, 2003; Appendix G.8 Using the Data and Observations from Flight STS-107, Executive Summary; Appendix G.9 Contracts, Incentives, and Safety/Technical Excellence; Appendix G.10 Detailed Summaries: Rogers Commission Report, ASAP Report, SIAT Report; Appendix G.11 Foam Application and Production Chart; Appendix G.12 Crew Survivability Report; and Appendix G.12 Aero/Aerothermal/ Thermal/Structures Team FinalReport, August 6, 2003.

  11. Anthropotechnological analysis of industrial accidents in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, M. C.; de Almeida, I. M.; Monteau, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Brazilian Ministry of Labour has been attempting to modify the norms used to analyse industrial accidents in the country. For this purpose, in 1994 it tried to make compulsory use of the causal tree approach to accident analysis, an approach developed in France during the 1970s, without having previously determined whether it is suitable for use under the industrial safety conditions that prevail in most Brazilian firms. In addition, opposition from Brazilian employers has blocked the proposed changes to the norms. The present study employed anthropotechnology to analyse experimental application of the causal tree method to work-related accidents in industrial firms in the region of Botucatu, São Paulo. Three work-related accidents were examined in three industrial firms representative of local, national and multinational companies. On the basis of the accidents analysed in this study, the rationale for the use of the causal tree method in Brazil can be summarized for each type of firm as follows: the method is redundant if there is a predominance of the type of risk whose elimination or neutralization requires adoption of conventional industrial safety measures (firm representative of local enterprises); the method is worth while if the company's specific technical risks have already largely been eliminated (firm representative of national enterprises); and the method is particularly appropriate if the firm has a good safety record and the causes of accidents are primarily related to industrial organization and management (multinational enterprise). PMID:10680249

  12. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. PMID:20618386

  13. Sleep related vehicle accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Horne, J. A.; Reyner, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the incidence, time of day, and driver morbidity associated with vehicle accidents where the most likely cause was the driver falling asleep at the wheel. DESIGN--Two surveys were undertaken, in southwest England and the midlands, by using police databases or on the spot interviews. SUBJECTS--Drivers involved in 679 sleep related vehicle accidents. RESULTS--Of all vehicle accidents to which the police were summoned, sleep related vehicle accidents comprised 16% on major roads in southwest England, and over 20% on midland motorways. During the 24 hour period there were three major peaks: at around 0200, 0600, and 1600. About half these drivers were men under 30 years; few such accidents involved women. CONCLUSIONS--Sleep related vehicle accidents are largely dependent on the time of day and account for a considerable proportion of vehicle accidents, especially those on motorways and other monotonous roads. As there are no norms for the United Kingdom on road use by age and sex for time of day with which to compare these data, we cannot determine what the hourly exposure v risk factors are for these subgroups. The findings are in close agreement with those from other countries. PMID:7888930

  14. Medical and related aspects of the Goiania accident: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A.R.; Hunt, J.G.; Valverde, N.J.; Brandao-Mello, C.E.; Farina, R. )

    1991-01-01

    On 13 September 1987, a radiation accident occurred in the city of Goiania in Central Brazil. Approximately 250 people were exposed to a 137Cs source from an abandoned radiotherapy unit. At least 14 patients showed some degree of bone marrow depression, and eight developed the classical signs and symptoms of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Twenty-eight people presented local radiation injuries ranging from first to third degree, and 104 individuals showed evidence of internal contamination. This paper describes the circumstances of the event, the first-aid measures taken, the criteria adopted for triage of the exposed population, and the radiation protection procedures used during the clinical management of the irradiated individuals.

  15. Development of Database for Accident Analysis in Indian Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Debi Prasad; Guru Raghavendra Reddy, K.

    2015-08-01

    Mining is a hazardous industry and high accident rates associated with underground mining is a cause of deep concern. Technological developments notwithstanding, rate of fatal accidents and reportable incidents have not shown corresponding levels of decline. This paper argues that adoption of appropriate safety standards by both mine management and the government may result in appreciable reduction in accident frequency. This can be achieved by using the technology in improving the working conditions, sensitising workers and managers about causes and prevention of accidents. Inputs required for a detailed analysis of an accident include information on location, time, type, cost of accident, victim, nature of injury, personal and environmental factors etc. Such information can be generated from data available in the standard coded accident report form. This paper presents a web based application for accident analysis in Indian mines during 2001-2013. An accident database (SafeStat) prototype based on Intranet of the TCP/IP agreement, as developed by the authors, is also discussed.

  16. Quality function deployment applied to local traffic accident reduction.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S Y

    1999-11-01

    One of the major tasks of police stations is the management of local road traffic accidents. Proper prevention policy which reflects the local accident characteristics could immensely help individual police stations in decreasing various severity levels of road traffic accidents. In order to relate accident variation to local driving environmental characteristics, we use both cluster analysis and Poisson regression. The fitted result at the level of each cluster for each type of accident severity is utilized as an input to quality function deployment. Quality function deployment (QFD) has been applied to customer satisfaction in various industrial quality improvement settings, where several types of customer requirements are related to various control factors. We show how QFD enables one to set priorities on various road accident control policies to which each police station has to pay particular attention. PMID:10487350

  17. [Role of the practitioner after accidents related to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Vrousos, C; Kolodié, H; Gallin-Martel, C; Pons, H

    1995-03-15

    Accidents due to ionizing radiations can be nuclear accidents, concerning a large part of the population, or radiological accidents which may, at higher doses, irradiate a limited number of persons. In case of nuclear accident, radioactive rejections lead to an irradiation and/or a contamination, and induce the "préfet" to take public health measures. According to the dose possibly received by the population, measures can be the continuation of normal life, confinement, distribution of stable iodine, restriction of certain food consummation, evacuation being the ultimate measure. General practitioner will be an important actor in the information of the populations. When a radiological accident occurs, the management will depend on the type of accident and the dose emitted. This treatment of medico-surgical emergency is an absolute priority, if traumatic lesions are associated, on nuclear risk, especially when prognosis for life is involved. Lesions associated to radiolesions worsen the prognosis. PMID:7754325

  18. Mobile equipment accidents in surface coal mines. Information circular/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Aldinger, J.A.; Kenney, J.M.; Keran, C.M.

    1995-11-01

    This U.S. Bureau of Mines report present an analysis of surface coal mining accidents involving mobile equipment for the years 1989 through 1991. Mobile equipment is defined as haulage trucks, front-end loaders, bulldozers, scrapers, and road graders. These five pieces of mining equipment accounted for 20 pct of all surface coal mine accidents and 41 pct of the fatalities. The general discussion of these accidents covers the accident causes, the primary activity of the accident victims, and other contributing factors. A more detailed analysis of accidents associated with each piece of mobile equipment is also provided. This report will provide mine managers and mine safety personnel with a better understanding of the hazards associated with mobile mining equipment.

  19. OA01.28. Management of post - axial polydactyly by ksharsutra - A minimally invasive Ayurvedic para surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amarprakash

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Polydactyly is a most common congenital hand defect in which the hand has one or more extra fingers, commonly seen post axial i.e. on the small finger side, affecting about one out of every 1,000 babies. It is usually treated by surgically removing the extra finger typically, when the child is between 1 and 2 years old. Prognosis after removal of extra digit is good, though not devoid of complications like scar formation, instability and late deformity which may need additional reconstructive surgery to recover full function and improve the hand's appearance. The evidence of polydactyly is linked with superstitions related with divine phenomenon. Due to the myth and fear of complications, parents hesitate or are reluctant to opt for surgery. Method: In this study, Ksharsutra, an Ayurvedic medicated thread coated with herbal alkaline drugs having simultaneous cutting and healing property was used by free ligation technique to remove extra finger in a child, whose parents were not willing to undergo surgery. This was an observational single case design without controlled group. Result: After Ksharsutra ligation, the extra finger started necrosing within 24 hours. The finger turned bluish to black in next 3 days with minimal pain at the site of ligation and finally sloughed out in just nine days with minimal scar formation. Conclusion: Ksahrsutra Ligation showed excellent result in postaxial polydactyly. The results are encouraging enough to warrant more studies to establish and promote this unique para surgical procedure i.e. Ksharsutra in the management of postaxial Polydactyly.

  20. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  1. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  2. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Housing. Module I-B-6: Maintenance Procedures for Surfaces and Appliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennings, Patricia

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on maintenance procedures for surfaces and appliances is the sixth in a set of six modules on consumer education related to housing. (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see…

  3. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Technical Report No. 1: Sample Design, Student Survey Yield and Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Ellis, Richard

    Part of a study of program management procedures in the campus-based and Basic Educational Opportunity Grant programs reports on the design of the site visit component of the study and the results of the student survey, both in terms of the yield obtained and the quality of the data. Chapter 2 describes the design of sampling methodology employed…

  4. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Housing. Module I-B-3: Procedures for Selecting Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennings, Patricia

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on procedures for selecting housing is the third in a set of six modules on consumer education related to housing. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see CE 019…

  5. Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

  6. FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) database consist of three relational tables, containing data on automobile accidents on public U.S. roads that resulted in the death of one or more people within 30 days of the accident. Truck and trailer accidents are also included.

  7. Utilization of accident databases and fuzzy sets to estimate frequency of HazMat transport accidents.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanhua; Keren, Nir; Mannan, M Sam

    2009-08-15

    Risk assessment and management of transportation of hazardous materials (HazMat) require the estimation of accident frequency. This paper presents a methodology to estimate hazardous materials transportation accident frequency by utilizing publicly available databases and expert knowledge. The estimation process addresses route-dependent and route-independent variables. Negative binomial regression is applied to an analysis of the Department of Public Safety (DPS) accident database to derive basic accident frequency as a function of route-dependent variables, while the effects of route-independent variables are modeled by fuzzy logic. The integrated methodology provides the basis for an overall transportation risk analysis, which can be used later to develop a decision support system. PMID:19250750

  8. The Tokaimura Nuclear Accident: A Tragedy of Human Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses nuclear power and the consequences of a nuclear accident. Covers issues ranging from chemical process safety to risk management of chemical industries to the ethical responsibilities of the chemical engineer. (Author/ASK)

  9. Striking a balance between professionalism and strict adherence to procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Leckner, J.M. ); Ghertman, F.

    1991-11-01

    It is frequently a delicate matter to strike the correct balance between reliance on the professionalism of an operating staff and the enforcement of strict procedures. At French nuclear facilities, the initial approach was to use procedures to ensure that instructions were strictly adhered to. A review of incident and accident procedures resulted in restructuring documents to organize operator action. As to general operating procedures in which more initiative is left to those involved the format of the documents and the way that they are arranged has scarcely changed since they were first issued. The trend has been to try to make the documents comprehensive, resulting in a considerable increase in their size and making it increasingly difficult to use them. As the nature of the documents has been the origin of numerous accidents (failure to comply with the documents, erroneous action, and operating incidents), the authors decided to review the form and content of the operating documents to determine what should be covered by rules and what should be left to the operator in terms of responsibility and freedom of action. It is in this perspective, at the request of Golfech power plant and with the participation of the operating department engineers and technicians, that the authors have tried to restructure radioactive release effluent management procedures.

  10. 41 CFR 102-80.80 - With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply? 102-80.80 Section 102-80.80 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-80.80 With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?...

  11. 41 CFR 102-80.80 - With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply? 102-80.80 Section 102-80.80 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-80.80 With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?...

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.80 - With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply? 102-80.80 Section 102-80.80 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention § 102-80.80 With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?...

  13. 14 CFR 420.59 - Launch site accident investigation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... investigation procedures. Accident investigation procedures developed in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.119 and 40 CFR part 68 will satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section to the extent that.... 420.59 Section 420.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL...

  14. [Psychogenesis of accidents].

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, E; Nencini, R; Nicolosi, N

    1988-01-01

    After having carried out a historical review of industrial psychology with specific attention to the evolution of the concept of causality in accidents, the Authors formulate their work hypothesis from that research which take into highest consideration the executives' attitudes in the genesis of the accidents. As dogmatism appears to be one of the most negative of executives' attitudes, the Authors administered Rockeach's Scale to 130 intermediate executives from 6 industries in Latium and observed the frequency index for accidents and the morbidity index (absenteeism) of the 2149 workhand. The Authors assumed that to high degree of dogmatism on the executives' side should correspond o a higher level of accidents and absenteeism among the staff. The data processing revealed that, due to the type of machinery employed, three of the industries examined should be considered as High Risk Industrie (HRI), while the remaining three could be considered as Low Risk Industries (LRI): in fact, due to the different working conditions, a significant lower number of accidents occurred in last the three. A statistically significant correlation between the executives' dogmatism and the number of accidents among their workhand in the HRI has been noticed, while this has not been observed in the LRI. This confirms, as had already been pointed out by Gemelli in 1944, that some "objective conditions" are requested so that the accident may actually take place. On the other hand the morbidity index has not shown any difference related to the different kind of industries (HRI, LRI): in both cases statistically significant correlations were obtained between the executives' dogmatism and the staff's absenteeism. absenteeism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3154344

  15. Drudgery, accidents and injuries in Indian agriculture.

    PubMed

    Nag, Pranab Kumar; Nag, Anjali

    2004-04-01

    The Indian farming employs 225 million workforce to cover 140 million hectares of total cultivated land. In spite of rapid farm mechanization (e.g., 149 million farm machinery), the vast resource-poor family farming has primary dependence on traditional methods (e.g., 520 million hand tools and 37 million animal-drawn implements are in operation). The work drudgery, the traumatic accidents and injuries are the major concerns to examine options for ergonomics intervention and betterment of work in crop production activities. This review summarizes human energy expenditure in crop production activities, to assess the job severity, tools and machinery, and formulate the basis to reorganize work and work methods. While the farm mechanization is more in the northern India, the accidents were more in the villages in southern India. On average of the four regions, the tractor incidents (overturning, falling from the tractor, etc.) were highest (27.7%), followed by thresher (14.6%), sprayer/duster (12.2%), sugarcane crusher (8.1%) and chaff cutter (7.8%) accidents. Most of the fatal accidents resulted from the powered machinery, with the annual fatality rate estimated as 22 per 100,000 farmers. The hand tools related injuries (8% of the total accidents) were non-fatal in nature. In spite of the enactment of legislation, the shortcomings in production and monitoring of the machinery in field use may be responsible for the high rate of accidents (e.g., 42 thresher accidents/1,000 mechanical threshers/year in southern India). Due to the lack of technical capability of the local artisans, adhering to safety and design standards is impractical to the implements fabricated in the rural areas. The analysis emphasizes that the effective safety and health management may be possible through legislative enabling of the local infra-structure, such as block development authority and primary health services, to permeate occupational health and safe work practices in the farming sector

  16. 40 CFR 68.69 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.69 Operating procedures. (a) The... control of hazardous chemical inventory levels; and, (v) Any special or unique hazards. (4) Safety...

  17. 40 CFR 68.69 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.69 Operating procedures. (a) The... control of hazardous chemical inventory levels; and, (v) Any special or unique hazards. (4) Safety...

  18. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medical Interventions for the Management of Procedure-Related Pain, Anxiety, and Distress in Pediatric Oncology: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Wendy; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This integrative review aims to identify evidence in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyINFO, and COCHRANE) regarding the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medical interventions, either alone or as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy, in alleviating procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in children and adolescents with cancer. A total of 32 articles met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that mind–body interventions, including hypnosis, distraction, and imagery, may be effective, alone or as adjuncts to pharmacological interventions, in managing procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology. PMID:21035021

  19. Road Traffic Accident Analysis of Ajmer City Using Remote Sensing and GIS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, P.; Tripathi, S.; Palria, S.

    2014-12-01

    With advancement in technology, new and sophisticated models of vehicle are available and their numbers are increasing day by day. A traffic accident has multi-facet characteristics associated with it. In India 93% of crashes occur due to Human induced factor (wholly or partly). For proper traffic accident analysis use of GIS technology has become an inevitable tool. The traditional accident database is a summary spreadsheet format using codes and mileposts to denote location, type and severity of accidents. Geo-referenced accident database is location-referenced. It incorporates a GIS graphical interface with the accident information to allow for query searches on various accident attributes. Ajmer city, headquarter of Ajmer district, Rajasthan has been selected as the study area. According to Police records, 1531 accidents occur during 2009-2013. Maximum accident occurs in 2009 and the maximum death in 2013. Cars, jeeps, auto, pickup and tempo are mostly responsible for accidents and that the occurrence of accidents is mostly concentrated between 4PM to 10PM. GIS has proved to be a good tool for analyzing multifaceted nature of accidents. While road safety is a critical issue, yet it is handled in an adhoc manner. This Study is a demonstration of application of GIS for developing an efficient database on road accidents taking Ajmer City as a study. If such type of database is developed for other cities, a proper analysis of accidents can be undertaken and suitable management strategies for traffic regulation can be successfully proposed.

  20. Modelling road accidents: An approach using structural time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junus, Noor Wahida Md; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the trend of road accidents in Malaysia for the years 2001 until 2012 was modelled using a structural time series approach. The structural time series model was identified using a stepwise method, and the residuals for each model were tested. The best-fitted model was chosen based on the smallest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and prediction error variance. In order to check the quality of the model, a data validation procedure was performed by predicting the monthly number of road accidents for the year 2012. Results indicate that the best specification of the structural time series model to represent road accidents is the local level with a seasonal model.

  1. Reduction of police vehicle accidents through mechaniically aided supervision

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Lynn D.; Schnelle, John F.; Kirchner, Robert; Carr, Adam F.; Domash, Michele; Risley, Todd R.

    1980-01-01

    Tachograph recorders were installed in 224 vehicles of a metropolitan police department to monitor vehicle operation in an attempt to reduce the rate of accidents. Police sergeants reviewed each tachograph chart and provided feedback to officers regarding their driving performance. Reliability checks and additional feedback procedures were implemented so that upper level supervisors monitored and controlled the performance of field sergeants. The tachograph intervention and components of the feedback system nearly eliminated personal injury accidents and sharply reduced accidents caused by officer negligence. A cost-benefit analysis revealed that the savings in vehicle repair and injury claims outweighed the equipment and operating costs. PMID:16795634

  2. Injuries are not accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us. PMID:25386040

  3. Accidents in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Keddy, J. Arthur

    1964-01-01

    The causes of injury to 17,141 children brought to the emergency department of a large pediatric hospital in one year were studied. The leading causes of injury were: falls, 5682; cuts or piercings, 1902; poisonings, 1597; and transportation accidents, 1368. Included in these are 587 falls on or down stairs, 401 cuts due to glass, 630 poisonings from household or workshop substances, 510 poisonings from salicylate tablets, and 449 accidents involving bicycles or tricycles. Other findings included 333 injuries to fingers or hands in doors, usually car doors; 122 instances of pulled arms; 384 ingestions and 53 inhalations of foreign bodies; 60 alleged sexual assaults, 58 chemical burns, 127 wringer injuries, and four attempted suicides. A rewarding opportunity in accident prevention exists for hospitals that undertake to compile and distribute pertinent source data. PMID:14201260

  4. Pain management in the neonatal piglet during routine management procedures. Part 2: Grading the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piglets reared in swine production in the US undergo painful procedures that include castration, tail docking, teeth clipping, and identification with ear notching or tagging. These procedures are usually performed without pain mitigation. The objective of this project was to develop recommendations...

  5. Learning from the Piper Alpha accident: A postmortem analysis of technical and organizational factors

    SciTech Connect

    Pate-Cornell, M.E. )

    1993-04-01

    The accident that occurred on board the offshore platform Piper Alpha in July 1988 killed 167 people and cost billions of dollars in property damage. It was caused by a massive fire, which was not the result of an unpredictable act of God' but of an accumulation of errors and questionable decisions. Most of them were rooted in the organization, its structure, procedures, and culture. This paper analyzes the accident scenario using the risk analysis framework, determines which human decision and actions influenced the occurrence of the basic events, and then identifies the organizational roots of these decisions and actions. These organizational factors are generalizable to other industries and engineering systems. They include flaws in the design guidelines and design practices (e.g., tight physical couplings or insufficient redundancies), misguided priorities in the management of the tradeoff between productivity and safety, mistakes in the management of the personnel on board, and errors of judgement in the process by which financial pressures are applied on the production sector (i.e., the oil companies' definition of profit centers) resulting in deficiencies in inspection and maintenance operations. This analytical approach allows identification of risk management measures that go beyond the purely technical (e.g., add redundancies to a safety system) and also include improvements of management practices. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A catastrophe-theory model for simulating behavioral accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral accidents are a particular type of accident. They are caused by inappropriate individual behaviors and faulty reactions. Catastrophe theory is a means for mathematically modeling the dynamic processes that underlie behavioral accidents. Based on a comprehensive data base of mining accidents, a computerized catastrophe model has been developed by the Bureau of Mines. This model systematically links individual psychological, group behavioral, and mine environmental variables with other accident causing factors. It answers several longstanding questions about why some normally safe behaving persons may spontaneously engage in unsafe acts that have high risks of serious injury. Field tests with the model indicate that it has three imnportant uses: it can be used as a effective training aid for increasing employee safety consciousness; it can be used as a management laboratory for testing decision alternatives and policies; and it can be used to help design the most effective work teams.

  7. Physics in Accident Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brake, Mary L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes physics formulas which can be used by law enforcement officials to determine the possible velocity of vehicles involved in traffic accidents. These include, among others, the slide to stop-level road, slide to stop-sloping roadway, and slide to stop-two different surfaces formulas. (JN)

  8. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Edition: A Collection of Papers on NASA Procedures and Guidance 7120.5A. Volume 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    A key aspect of NASA's new Strategic Management System is improving the way we plan, approve, execute and evaluate our programs and projects. To this end, NASA has developed the NASA Program and Project Management processes and Requirements-NASA Procedures and Guidelines (NPG) 7120.5A, which formally documents the "Provide Aerospace Products and Capabilities" crosscutting process, and defines the processes and requirements that are responsive to the Program/Project Management-NPD 7120.4A. The Program/Project Management-NPD 7120.4A, issued November 14, 1996, provides the policy for managing programs and projects in a new way that is aligned with the new NASA environment. An Agencywide team has spent thousands of hours developing the NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements-NPG 7120.5A. We have created significant flexibility, authority and discretion for the program and project managers to exercise and carry out their duties, and have delegated the responsibility and the accountability for their programs and projects.

  9. Management and presentation of grouped procedures: has the IHE integration profile cracked the toughest radiology workflow nut?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Charles R.; Channin, David S.; Avrin, David E.; Lindop, Christopher

    2001-08-01

    In a simple, typical radiology workflow process, an order generates a single procedure, which in turn generates a single data set, from which, one radiology report is generated. There are, however, occasions when a single order consists of more than one procedure each with a separate report, yet the procedures are accomplished by one physical acquisition of data. The prototypical example of this is the request for computed tomographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen and pelvis. The study is accomplished, with modern day scanners, by a single helical acquisition, yet there are typically three codable and billable procedures involved, and these may be reported independently either for administrative or academic reasons. This grouping of procedures remained up to now a challenge to automate across integrated modalities, PACS and RIS. This paper discusses a number of other practical cases where this situation occurs and reviews the capabilities of the Presentation of Grouped Procedures IHE Integration Profile in solving this problem. The DICOM services used are evaluated as well as the strengths and weaknesses of this IHE Integration Profile. The implementation experience gained on both a CT and an MR for the IHE Demonstration at RSNA 2000 and HIMSS 2001 is also reviewed. In conclusion, the resulting clinical and operational benefits are discussed.

  10. Presidential commission investigating Challenger accident at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Views of the Presidential commission investigating the Challenger accident at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Two JSC Officials chat prior to a meeting with members of the Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, while one of the commissioners studies his notes. Left to right in the foreground are Richard H. Kohrs, Deputy Manager of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) program office; JSC Deputy Director Robert C. Goetz and Joseph F. Sutter (28749); Two JSC Officials and two members of the Commission meet in the Executive Conference Room of JSC's Project Management Building. Left to right are Goetz; Kohrs; Sutter and Dr. Arthur B.C. Walker Jr. (28750); More meeting between NASA and the commission. Left to right are Goetz; Kohrs; Walker and Robert W. Rummel and Joseph F. Sutter (28751).

  11. 48 CFR 45.202 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... offeror's property management plans, methods, practices, or procedures for accounting for property are... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 45.202 Evaluation procedures. (a) The contracting officer shall consider any potentially unfair competitive advantage that may result from...

  12. New oral anticoagulants: a practical guide on prescription, laboratory testing and peri-procedural/bleeding management. Australasian Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Tran, H; Joseph, J; Young, L; McRae, S; Curnow, J; Nandurkar, H; Wood, P; McLintock, C

    2014-06-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are becoming available as alternatives to warfarin to prevent systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism. An in-depth understanding of their pharmacology is invaluable for appropriate prescription and optimal management of patients receiving these drugs should unexpected complications (such as bleeding) occur, or the patient requires urgent surgery. The Australasian Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis has set out to inform physicians on the use of the different NOAC based on current available evidence focusing on: (i) selection of the most suitable patient groups to receive NOAC, (ii) laboratory measurements of NOAC in appropriate circumstances and (iii) management of patients taking NOAC in the perioperative period, and strategies to manage bleeding complications or 'reverse' the anticoagulant effects for urgent invasive procedures. PMID:24946813

  13. Initial Investigations of Controller Tools and Procedures for Schedule-Based Arrival Operations with Mixed Flight-Deck Interval Management Equipage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Cabrall, Christopher; Kupfer, Michael; Omar, Faisal G.; Prevot, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    NASA?s Air Traffic Management Demonstration-1 (ATD-1) is a multi-year effort to demonstrate high-throughput, fuel-efficient arrivals at a major U.S. airport using NASA-developed scheduling automation, controller decision-support tools, and ADS-B-enabled Flight-Deck Interval Management (FIM) avionics. First-year accomplishments include the development of a concept of operations for managing scheduled arrivals flying Optimized Profile Descents with equipped aircraft conducting FIM operations, and the integration of laboratory prototypes of the core ATD-1 technologies. Following each integration phase, a human-in-the-loop simulation was conducted to evaluate and refine controller tools, procedures, and clearance phraseology. From a ground-side perspective, the results indicate the concept is viable and the operations are safe and acceptable. Additional training is required for smooth operations that yield notable benefits, particularly in the areas of FIM operations and clearance phraseology.

  14. Applying STAMP in Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy; Daouk, Mirna; Dulac, Nicolas; Marais, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Accident models play a critical role in accident investigation and analysis. Most traditional models are based on an underlying chain of events. These models, however, have serious limitations when used for complex, socio-technical systems. Previously, Leveson proposed a new accident model (STAMP) based on system theory. In STAMP, the basic concept is not an event but a constraint. This paper shows how STAMP can be applied to accident analysis using three different views or models of the accident process and proposes a notation for describing this process.

  15. [Equestrian accidents in children].

    PubMed

    Giebel, G; Braun, K; Mittelmeier, W

    1993-11-01

    In a retrospective study we reviewed 262 horse riding related injuries in children younger than 16 which were treated between 1975 and 1989 at the Section of Traumatology in the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Homburg/Saar. In 155 of these accidents, detailed information was gained via a questionnaire. The typical patient profile was that of young female equestrians with little experience and little weekly riding practice, without practicing falling-exercises and warming up often using different horses. At the time of the accident only 59% were wearing a head protection. Most accidents happened in the summer months in the afternoon during leisure riding on a large familiar horse in the riding hall. Apart from the typical accidents like falling of the horse (64.9%) and falling with the horse (5.7%) accidents in handling the horse were of special significance: Kick by horse's hoof (11.8%), being stepped by horse (3.8%), horsebite (7.3%) and injuries of horse's bridle had their own pattern of injuries. Injuries of the distal parts of the upper extremity are preeminent in falling of the horse, whilst in falling with the horse head injuries and shoulder injuries are preeminent. Remarkably often injuries of kick by horse's hoof were causing sometimes even dangerous head injuries (41.6%). Overall in horse riding related injuries in childhood superficial soft tissue injuries (48.6%) and fractures (30.6%) were predominant. Fractures of the clavicle which are well known as a riding injury proved to be typical for a fall with the horse, whilst a fractured vertebra was only seen once amongst the 262 children treated. The severity of the injuries was lower than expected: In 85.1% of all the injuries only one body region was injured, 90.1% could be assigned to an injury severity score (ISS) of 1-3. Ponyriders had less severe injuries than riders of large horses. One fatal accident happened in handling a horse, in these situations preventive measures are often

  16. Applicability of NASA contract quality management and failure mode effect analysis procedures to the USGS Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M. K.; Little, D. G.; Hoard, E. G.; Taylor, A. C.; Campbell, R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach that might be used for determining the applicability of NASA management techniques to benefit almost any type of down-to-earth enterprise is presented. A study was made to determine the following: (1) the practicality of adopting NASA contractual quality management techniques to the U.S. Geological Survey Outer Continental Shelf lease management function; (2) the applicability of failure mode effects analysis to the drilling, production, and delivery systems in use offshore; (3) the impact on industrial offshore operations and onshore management operations required to apply recommended NASA techniques; and (4) the probable changes required in laws or regulations in order to implement recommendations. Several management activities that have been applied to space programs are identified, and their institution for improved management of offshore and onshore oil and gas operations is recommended.

  17. [Principles of intervertebral disc assessment in private accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Dittrich, V; Röser, K

    2015-09-01

    Due to the spread of intervertebral disc degeneration, insurance companies and experts are regularly confronted with related assessments of insured persons under their private accident insurance. These claims pose a particular challenge for experts, since, in addition to the clinical assessment of the facts, extensive knowledge of general accident insurance conditions, case law and current study findings is required. Each case can only be properly assessed through simultaneous consideration of both the medical and legal facts. These guidelines serve as the basis for experts and claims.managers with respect to the appropriate individual factual assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration in private accident insurance. PMID:26548005

  18. Application of Electronic Business in Safe Accident Prevention and Control on Coalface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guozhi; Tang, Jianquan; Yao, Chunhui; Yang, Lei

    In this paper, by analyzing the coal mine safety accident of present stage, the author has come to a conclusion that the safe accidents on coalface accounting for a lot of coal mine safety accident, and has brought forward the cause leading to this phenomenon. Then, through the discussion about "Overlying Strata Movement Law", this author has suggested that Electronic Business can be used for the coal mine to prevent and control safe accident on coalface, and has given out the operating pattern of Electronic Business innovatively. This conclusions are most instructive to Chinese coal mine in managing safe accident on coalface and innovative for application of Electronic Business in coal mine safety.

  19. Recommendations for Injury Prevention in Transport Aviation Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grierson, Anita E.; Jones, Lisa E.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, a national objective was established to reduce the rate of fatal accidents in aviation. To assist in determining the best methods for improving aircraft crash survivability, a combined approach was used involving database research and the examination of case studies of transport aviation accidents. The results of the study include recommendations for maintaining occupiable space, enhancing occupant restraint, managing energy transferred to the occupant, improving egress, and increasing post-crash survival.

  20. Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

    2010-03-01

    An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

  1. Accident prediction models for roads with minor junctions.

    PubMed

    Mountain, L; Fawaz, B; Jarrett, D

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method for predicting expected accidents on main roads with minor junctions where traffic counts on the minor approaches are not available. The study was based on data for some 3800 km of highway in the U.K. including more than 5000 minor junctions. The highways consisted of both single and dual-carriageway roads in urban and rural areas. Generalized linear modelling was used to develop regression estimates of expected accidents for six highway categories and an empirical Bayes procedure was used to improve these estimates by combining them with accident counts. Accidents on highway sections were shown to be a non-linear function of exposure and minor junction frequency. For the purposes of estimating expected accidents, while the regression model estimates were shown to be preferable to accident counts, the best results were obtained using the empirical Bayes method. The latter was the only method that produced unbiased estimates of expected accidents for high-risk sites. PMID:9006638

  2. On the use of drift bottle and seabed drifter data in coastal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, C. S.; Norcross, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The use of drift bottle and seabed drifter information for use in coastal management is discussed. The drift bottle/seabed drifter portion of VIMS project MACONS (Mid Atlantic Continental Shelf) is described as an example of how a comprehensive survey using drift bottles and seabed drifters provides data useful for coastal management. The data from MACONS are analyzed to answer specific questions of interest to several different coastal managers: a manager siting a deep oil port, one siting a sewage outfall, a manager responsible for setting up emergency beach protection procedures before an accident occurs, and a manager responsible for the environmental quality of a particular small section of coastline.

  3. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Cover-Copy-Compare and Variations of This Self-Management Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Laurice M.; Konrad, Moira; Cates, Gary; Vajcner, Terra; Eveleigh, Elisha; Fishley, Katelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Studies that examined copy-cover-compare (CCC) and variations of this procedure were reviewed and analyzed. This review revealed a substantial number of studies that validated the use of CCC across spelling and math skills and across students with and without disabilities. A meta-analysis of findings indicated that CCC and variations of this…

  4. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  5. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  6. Accident Flying Squad

    PubMed Central

    Snook, Roger

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the organization, evaluation, and costing of an independently financed and operated accident flying squad. 132 accidents involving 302 casualties were attended, six deaths were prevented, medical treatment contributed to the survival of a further four, and the condition or comfort of many other casualties was improved. The calls in which survival was influenced were evenly distributed throughout the three-and-a-half-year survey and seven of the 10 so aided were over 16 and under 30 years of age, all 10 being in the working age group. The time taken to provide the service was not excessive and the expense when compared with the overall saving was very small. The scheme was seen to be equally suitable for basing on hospital or general practice or both, and working as an integrated team with the ambulance service. The use of specialized transport was found to be unnecessary. Other benefits of the scheme included use of the experience of attending accidents to ensure relevant and realistic training for emergency service personnel, and an appreciation of the effect of ambulance design on the patient. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:5069642

  7. Hand injury in the accident and emergency service.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D J; Smith, M E; Angarita, G

    1985-01-01

    The management of hand injuries forms an important part of the hospital accident and emergency service, and early recognition and informed management are essential for a favourable outcome (Frazier et al., 1978). In Edinburgh a routine system of hand management is well established and includes the training of casualty officers. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the hand service in the Accident and Emergency Department, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, a prospective study was undertaken to compare the outcome of treatment of hand injury by a routine system with treatment over a similar period by more experienced registrars in hand surgery training posts (Hand Fellows). PMID:4052212

  8. The use of flight test techniques in aircraft accident investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, E. K.; Bach, R. E., Jr.; Wingrove, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Wind shear is a serious safety hazard to commercial aviation. Low level wind shear (downburst) was the cause of the takeoff accident in New Orleans, July 9, 1982, and the landing accident in Dallas, Aug. 2, 1985. Shear layer instability is a common cause of clear air turbulence (CAT) at cruising altitudes. A number of encounters with severe CAT, in which passengers were injured, have recently occurred (Hannibal, MO, April 1981; Morton, WY, July 1982; etc.). Improved accident investigation techniques can lead to a better understanding of the nature of the wind environment associated with downbursts and CAT and to better detection and avoidance procedures. For the past several years, NASA-Ames has worked closely with the National Transportation Safety Board in the investigation of wind related accidents.

  9. Analysis of Occupational Accident Fatalities and Injuries Among Male Group in Iran Between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Seyed Shamseddin; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Sepehri, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because of occupational accidents, permanent disabilities and deaths occur and economic and workday losses emerge. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the factors responsible for occupational accidents occurred in Iran. Patients and Methods: The current study analyzed 1464 occupational accidents recorded by the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs’ offices in Iran during 2008 - 2012. At first, general understanding of accidents was obtained using descriptive statistics. Afterwards, the chi-square test and Cramer’s V statistic (Vc) were used to determine the association between factors influencing the type of injury as occupational accident outcomes. Results: There was no significant association between marital status and time of day with the type of injury. However, activity sector, cause of accident, victim’s education, age of victim and victim’s experience were significantly associated with the type of injury. Conclusions: Successful accident prevention relies largely on knowledge about the causes of accidents. In any accident control activity, particularly in occupational accidents, correctly identifying high-risk groups and factors influencing accidents is the key to successful interventions. Results of this study can cause to increase accident awareness and enable workplace’s management to select and prioritize problem areas and safety system weakness in workplaces. PMID:26568848

  10. Perioperative management of a patient undergoing a novel mini-invasive percutaneous transcatheter left ventricular reconstruction procedure.

    PubMed

    Zaouter, Cedrick; Cornolle, Claire; Labrousse, Louis; Ouattara, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Survivors of myocardial infarction might have residual damage and higher risks of developing heart failure. This increasing complication encompasses up to 45% of all infarcts. As anesthesiologists we will have to perform anesthesia more frequently in patients with such challenging medical history schedule to undergo mini-invasive surgical procedures. We present the case of a 51-year-old man with severe heart failure post-myocardial infarction with multiple sclerosis undergoing a novel percutaneous transcatheter ventricular reconstruction via a left mini-thoracotomy. To guide the surgeon during the intervention we used a real-time 3D echocardiography, enlightening the fact that guidance is crucial for that kind of procedure. To lower postoperative pain and the inflammatory response we have administered successfully intravenous lidocaine, indicating that it is possible to avoid regional anesthesia in patients with multiple sclerosis scheduled for mini-invasive left ventricular reconstruction requiring a mini-thoracotomy. PMID:27290977

  11. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  12. On the design of flight-deck procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1994-01-01

    In complex human-machine systems, operations, training, and standardization depend on a elaborate set of procedures which are specified and mandated by the operational management of the organization. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots, to ensure a logical, efficient, safe, and predictable means of carrying out the mission objectives. In this report the authors examine the issue of procedure use and design from a broad viewpoint. The authors recommend a process which we call 'The Four P's:' philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. We believe that if an organization commits to this process, it can create a set of procedures that are more internally consistent, less confusing, better respected by the flight crews, and that will lead to greater conformity. The 'Four-P' model, and the guidelines for procedural development in appendix 1, resulted from cockpit observations, extensive interviews with airline management and pilots, interviews and discussion at one major airframe manufacturer, and an examination of accident and incident reports. Although this report is based on airline operations, we believe that the principles may be applicable to other complex, high-risk systems, such as nuclear power production, manufacturing process control, space flight, and military operations.

  13. 46 CFR 4.05-20 - Report of accident to aid to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Report of accident to aid to navigation. 4.05-20 Section 4.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC... accident to aid to navigation. Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under...

  14. 46 CFR 4.05-20 - Report of accident to aid to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Report of accident to aid to navigation. 4.05-20 Section 4.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC... accident to aid to navigation. Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under...

  15. 46 CFR 4.05-20 - Report of accident to aid to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Report of accident to aid to navigation. 4.05-20 Section 4.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC... accident to aid to navigation. Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under...

  16. 46 CFR 4.05-20 - Report of accident to aid to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Report of accident to aid to navigation. 4.05-20 Section 4.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC... accident to aid to navigation. Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under...

  17. 46 CFR 4.05-20 - Report of accident to aid to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Report of accident to aid to navigation. 4.05-20 Section 4.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC... accident to aid to navigation. Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under...

  18. 49 CFR 831.13 - Flow and dissemination of accident or incident information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow and dissemination of accident or incident information. 831.13 Section 831.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD ACCIDENT/INCIDENT INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES § 831.13 Flow...

  19. Managing Malignant Colorectal Obstruction with Self-Expanding Stents. A Closer Look at Bowel Perforations and Failed Procedures.

    PubMed

    Gleditsch, D; Søreide, O K; Nesbakken, A

    2016-09-01

    Stent treatment of large bowel obstruction is still controversial. There are concerns regarding complications, particularly bowel perforation, as well as long-term outcome in curable patients. Through a 10-year retrospective study, we have evaluated efficacy, complications, delay in surgical interventions and stent patency in cases of palliative treatment. We treated 183 patients, 85 as bridge to surgery and 98 as definitive, palliative treatment. At presentation, 58 % of patients had advanced local or metastatic disease. Seventeen patients required more than one stent insertion. The total number of procedures was 213. We recorded technical and clinical success or failure, complications, necessity of restenting or surgical intervention, mortality and stent patency in the palliation group. Stenting was clinically successful in 89 % of the bridge to surgery group and 86 % of the palliative group. Complications occurred in 7 %, including 12 perforations. Six patients suffered an early perforation, of which two died. Half of the six late perforations were silent. Procedure related mortality was 1 %. The clinical success rate was high in both the palliative and bridge to surgery setting. The complication rate was low, and the sum of early and late perforations was 5.6 %. Procedure related mortality was low. PMID:27342437

  20. Policy and procedures for the management and archival storage of data collected for hydrologic investigations, U.S. Geological Survey, Indiana District

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Cohen, David A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the policy and procedures used by the Indiana District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, to manage and store data collected during hydrologic investigations. It is the policy of the Indiana District that data collected to meet the objectives of projects for hydrologic investigations be documented, organized, and archieved in a manner that (1) facilitates retrieval, evaluation, and use by other District personnel, and (2) enables verifi- cation of data contained in all reports and computer data bases.

  1. [Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and Tokaimura criticality accident].

    PubMed

    Takada, Jun

    2012-03-01

    It is clear from inspection of historical incidents that the scale of disasters in a nuclear power plant accident is quite low level overwhelmingly compared with a nuclear explosion in nuclear war. Two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed by nuclear blast with about 20 kt TNT equivalent and then approximately 100,000 people have died respectively. On the other hand, the number of acute death is 30 in the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. In this chapter, we review health hazards and doses in two historical nuclear incidents of Chernobyl and Tokaimura criticality accident and then understand the feature of the radiation accident in peaceful utilization of nuclear power. PMID:22514916

  2. 40 CFR 68.69 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating procedures. 68.69 Section 68.69 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.69 Operating procedures. (a) The owner or operator shall develop...

  3. Prone split-leg position to manage encrusted ureteral stents in a single-stage procedure in women: Step-by-step surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Torricelli, Fábio César Miranda; Mazzucchi, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel; Monga, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The management of encrusted ureteral stents is costly, time consuming and may be risky for the patient and challenging for the urologist. Treatment modalities for encrusted stents include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, cystolithopaxy, rigid or flexible ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, open surgery, and a combination of those methods. In this study we describe the management of severe forgotten encrusted ureteral stents in 3 female patients using a prone split-leg position. This position allows us to effectively treat any site and degree of stent encrustation in a single-session approach with the patient in the same position during the whole procedure. All patients were rendered stent and stone free. No complications occurred. PMID:26279723

  4. Prone split-leg position to manage encrusted ureteral stents in a single-stage procedure in women: Step-by-step surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Torricelli, Fábio César Miranda; Mazzucchi, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel; Monga, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The management of encrusted ureteral stents is costly, time consuming and may be risky for the patient and challenging for the urologist. Treatment modalities for encrusted stents include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, cystolithopaxy, rigid or flexible ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, open surgery, and a combination of those methods. In this study we describe the management of severe forgotten encrusted ureteral stents in 3 female patients using a prone split-leg position. This position allows us to effectively treat any site and degree of stent encrustation in a single-session approach with the patient in the same position during the whole procedure. All patients were rendered stent and stone free. No complications occurred. PMID:26279723

  5. Early dose assessment following severe radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Goans, R.E.; Holloway, E.C.

    1996-06-01

    Prompt and aggressive treatment of victims to high level whole-body gamma exposure has been shown to improve their likelihood of survival. However, in such cases, both the magnitude of the accident and the dosimetry profile(s) of the victim(s) are often not known in detail for days to weeks. Medical intervention could therefore be delayed after a major accident because of uncertainties in the initial dose estimate. A simple dose-prediction algorithm based on lymphocyte kinetics as documented in prior radiation accidents is presented here. This algorithm provides an estimate of marrow dose within the first 12-18 h following an acute whole-body gamma exposure. Early lymphocyte depletion curves post-accident follow a single exponential, L(t) = L{sub o}e{sup -k(D)t}, where L{sub o} is the pre- accident lymphocyte count and k(D) is a rate constant, dependent on the average dose, D. Within the first 12-18 h post-accident, K(D) may be calculated utilizing serial lymphocyte counts. Data from the REAC/TS Accident Registry were used to develop a dose prediction algorithm from 43 gamma exposure cases where both lymphocyte kinetics and dose reconstruction were felt to be reasonably reliable. The relationship D(K) is shown to follow a logistic dose response curve of the form D = a/[1 + (K/b){sup c}] in the range 0 {le} D {le} 15 Gy. The fitting parameters (mean {+-} SD) are found to be a = 21.5 {+-} 5.8 Gy, b = 1.75 {+-} 0.99 d{sup -1}, and c = -0.98 {+-} 0.14, respectively. The coefficient of determination r{sup 2} for the fit is 0.90 with an F-value of 174.7. Dose estimated in this manner is intended to serve only as a first approximation to guide initial medical-management. The treatment regimen may then be modified as needed after more exact dosimetry has become available.

  6. Teachers' Use of Classroom Management Procedures in the United States and Greece: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin-Little, K. Angeleque; Little, Steven G.; Laniti, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    A survey was conducted of teachers' classroom management practices in the United States and Greece. The United States sample consisted of 149 teachers in Arizona, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The Greek sample consisted of 97 teachers in Athens and the surrounding area. The survey asked questions regarding teachers' use of…

  7. Procedures and best management practices for genetically engineered traits in USDA/ARS germplasm and breeding lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two decades have passed since the commercialization in the U. S. of crops with genetically engineered (GE) traits. Today more than 80% of corn, soybean, canola, sugar beet and cotton acreage in the United States is planted to transgenic cultivars, but concerns exist regarding how best to manage the ...

  8. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R A; Mahaffey, J A; Carr, F Jr

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

  9. Crew Communication as a Factor in Aviation Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. A.; Linde, C.; Murphy, M.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of air transport accidents caused by problems in crew communication and coordination was investigated. Communication patterns which are most effective in specific situations were determined. Methods to assess the effectiveness of crew communication patterns were developed. The results lead to the development of new methods training crews in effective communication and provide guidelines for the design of aviation procedures and equipment.

  10. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  11. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Poore, III, Willis P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.450 - How must we report accident and incident data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How must we report accident and incident data? 102-33.450 Section 102-33.450 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.445 - What accident and incident data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What accident and incident data must we report? 102-33.445 Section 102-33.445 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.445 - What accident and incident data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What accident and incident data must we report? 102-33.445 Section 102-33.445 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.450 - How must we report accident and incident data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How must we report accident and incident data? 102-33.450 Section 102-33.450 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT...

  16. Rear-end accident victims. Importance of understanding the accident.

    PubMed Central

    Sehmer, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Family physicians regularly treat victims of rear-end vehicle accidents. This article describes how taking a detailed history of the accident and understanding the significance of the physical events is helpful in understanding and anticipating patients' morbidity and clinical course. Eight questions to ask patients are suggested to help physicians understand the severity of injury. PMID:8495140

  17. Reactor Accident Consequence Code

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-02

    MACCS1.5 performs probabilistic calculations of potential off site consequences of the atmospheric releases of radioactive material in reactor accidents. The principal phenomena considered in MACCS are atmospheric transport, environmental contamination, emergency response, long term mitigative actions based on dose projection, dose accumulation by a number of pathways including food and water ingestion, early and latent health effects, and economic costs. MACCS can be used for a variety of applications including probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, sensitivity studies to gain a better understanding of the parameters important to PRA, and cost benefit analysis. The time scale after the accident is divided into three phases: emergency, intermediate, and long term. The region surrounding the reactor is divided into a polar-coordinate grid, with the reactor located at the center, for the calculations. Two preprocessors, MAXGC and DOSFAC, are included. MAXGC generates the maximum allowable ground concentrations based on protective action guide (PAG) dose levels. DOSFAC generates the dose conversion data used by MACCS.

  18. Reactor Accident Consequence Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-11-02

    MACCS1.5 performs probabilistic calculations of potential off site consequences of the atmospheric releases of radioactive material in reactor accidents. The principal phenomena considered in MACCS are atmospheric transport, environmental contamination, emergency response, long term mitigative actions based on dose projection, dose accumulation by a number of pathways including food and water ingestion, early and latent health effects, and economic costs. MACCS can be used for a variety of applications including probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) ofmore » nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, sensitivity studies to gain a better understanding of the parameters important to PRA, and cost benefit analysis. The time scale after the accident is divided into three phases: emergency, intermediate, and long term. The region surrounding the reactor is divided into a polar-coordinate grid, with the reactor located at the center, for the calculations. Two preprocessors, MAXGC and DOSFAC, are included. MAXGC generates the maximum allowable ground concentrations based on protective action guide (PAG) dose levels. DOSFAC generates the dose conversion data used by MACCS.« less

  19. MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree) based risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1990-02-01

    Risk Management is the optimization of safety programs. This requires a formal systems approach to hazards identification, risk quantification, and resource allocation/risk acceptance as opposed to case-by-case decisions. The Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) has gained wide acceptance as a comprehensive formal systems approach covering all aspects of risk management. It (MORT) is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing safety system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal ''universal'' management program for optimizing occupational safety.

  20. Factors Associated with Infant Feeding Methods after the Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Fukushima: Data from the Pregnancy and Birth Survey for the Fiscal Year 2011 Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kayoko; Goto, Aya; Ota, Misao; Yasumura, Seiji; Abe, Masafumi; Fujimori, Keiya

    2016-08-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of and factors associated with infant feeding methods after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident using data from the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods We conducted an anonymous self-administered questionnaire survey of 16,001 women who gave birth around the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake and registered their pregnancies at Fukushima Prefecture municipal offices between August 1, 2010 and July 31, 2011. The responses of 8366 women were analyzed. Chi square tests and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to compare various factors between women who had formula-fed their children because of concern regarding radioactive contamination or other reasons and those who had breastfed exclusively. Results The percentage of women who had breastfed exclusively was 30.9 %. The percentage of women who had both breastfed and formula-fed or formula-fed exclusively was 69.1 %, of which 20.3 % formula-fed because of concern regarding radioactive contamination of breast milk. The use of formula feeding because of concern about radioactive contamination was significantly higher in women who had resided within the evacuation area and those whose regular antenatal care had been interrupted. The use of formula feeding for other reasons was significantly higher in women who had resided within the evacuation area and lower for those who had willingly switched to another medical institution. Conclusions for Practice Our results suggest the importance of providing breastfeeding support to women who are forced to evacuate or whose antenatal care is interrupted after a disaster. PMID:27028325

  1. Randomised controlled trial and cost consequences study comparing initial physiotherapy assessment and management with routine practice for selected patients in an accident and emergency department of an acute hospital

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, B; Shepstone, L; Poland, F; Mugford, M; Finlayson, B; Clemence, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Health is reviewing the effectiveness of accident and emergency (A&E) departments. This study aimed to compare health and economic effects of physiotherapy initial assessment and management with routine practice in an A&E department. Methods: Randomised controlled trial and cost and consequences study. Patients presenting at A&E were eligible if suspected at triage to have soft tissue injury without fracture. The efficacy end point was "days to return to usual activities". Secondary end points included patient satisfaction with their care and further health outcomes and cost data. Results: 766 of 844 (915) patients were randomised. The median days before return to usual activities (available for 73% of those randomised) was greater in the physiotherapist group (41 days compared with 28.5 days; hazard ratio 0.85 p = 0.071). The physiotherapy group expressed greater satisfaction with their A&E care (on a scale of 1 to 5, median was 4.2 compared with 4.0, p<0.001), were more likely to be given advice and reassurance, and more likely to be provided with aids and appliances. Costs were the same between the two arms. Conclusion: There is evidence that physiotherapy leads to a prolonged time before patients return to usual activities. This study shows no clear danger from physiotherapy intervention and long term outcomes may be different but given these findings, a best estimate is that introducing physiotherapist assessment will increase costs to the health service and society. Routine care should continue be provided unless there is some reason why it is not feasible to do so and an alternative must be found. PMID:15662054

  2. Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: lesson to be learned.

    PubMed

    Ya-anant, Nanthavan; Tiyapun, Kanokrat; Saiyut, Kittiphong

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive materials in Thailand have been used in medicine, research and industry for more than 50 y. Several radiological accident and incidents happened in the past 10 y. A serious one was the radiological accident that occurred in Samut Prakan, Thailand in 2000. The serious radiological accident occurred when the (60)Co head was partially dismantled, taken from that storage to sell as scrap metal. Three victims died and 10 people received high dose from the source. The lesson learned from the radiological accident in Samut Prakan was to improve in many subjects, such as efficiency in Ministerial Regulations and Atomic Energy Act, emergency response and etc. In addition to the serious accident, there are also some small incidents that occurred, such as detection of contaminated scrap metals from the re-cycling of scrap metals from steel factories. Therefore, the radiation protection infrastructure was established after the accident. Laws and regulations of radiation safety and the relevant regulatory procedures must be revised. PMID:21561942

  3. Statistical analysis of sudden chemical leakage accidents reported in China between 2006 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Ping, Hua; Ma, Zhi-Hong; Pan, Li-Gang

    2014-04-01

    According to the data from authoritative sources, 1,400 sudden leakage accidents occurred in China during 2006 to 2011 were investigated, in which, 666 accidents were used for statistical characteristic abstracted with no or little damage. The research results were as follows: (1) Time fluctuation: the yearly number of sudden leakage accidents is shown to be decreasing from 2006 to 2010, and a slightly increase in 2011. Sudden leakage accidents occur mainly in summer, and more than half of the accidents occur from May to September. (2) Regional distribution: the accidents are highly concentrated in the coastal area, in which accidents result from small and medium-sized enterprises more easily than that of the larger ones. (3) Pollutants: hazardous chemicals are up to 95 % of sudden leakage accidents. (4) Steps: transportation represents almost half of the accidents, followed by production, usage, storage, and discard. (5) Pollution and casualties: it is easy to cause environmental pollution and casualties. (6) Causes: more than half of the cases were caused by human factor, followed by management reason, and equipment failure. However, sudden chemical leakage may also be caused by high temperature, rain, wet road, and terrain. (7) The results of principal component analysis: five factors are extracted by the principal component analysis, including pollution, casualties, regional distribution, steps, and month. According to the analysis of the accident, the characteristics, causes, and damages of the sudden leakage accident will be investigated. Therefore, advices for prevention and rescue should be acquired. PMID:24407779

  4. Mineral resource management of the Outer Continental Shelf : leasing procedures, evaluation of resources, and supervision of production operations on leased lands of the Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Maurice V.; John, C.B.; Kelly, R.F.; LaPointe, A.E.; Meurer, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An important function of the Geological Survey is the evaluation and management of the mineral resources of the Outer Continental Shelf, particularly with respect to oil and gas, salt, and sulfur. Production of oil and gas from the Outer Continental Shelf of the United States has increased substantially over the past 20 years and represents an increasing percentage of total United States production. As discovery of major onshore production of oil and gas has become more difficult, the search has moved into the surrounding waters where submerged sedimentary formations are conducive to the accumulation of oil and gas. Increased energy demands of recent years have accelerated the pace of offshore operations with a corresponding improvement in technology as exploration and development have proceeded farther from shore and into deeper water. While improved technology and enforcement of more stringent regulations have made offshore operations safer, it is unrealistic to believe that completely accident-free operations can ever be achieved. Only slightly more than six percent of the world's continental terrace is adjacent to the United States, but less than one percent has been explored for oil and gas. Since the lead time for the development of offshore oil and gas resources can be as much as a decade, they do not provide an immediate energy supply but should be viewed in the light of a near-term source with a potential of becoming a medium-range source of supply pending the development of alternative energy sources. Revenues from the Outer Continental Shelf are deposited to the general fund of the United States Treasury. A major portion of these funds is allocated to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the largest Federal grant-in-aid program of assistance to States, counties, and cities for the acquisition and development of public parks, open space, and recreation lands and water.

  5. Incidental finding of tracheal bronchus complicating the anesthetic management of a left video-assisted thoracoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shvetank; Banks, Mark A.; Dalela, Sanjeev; Bates, William B.; Castresana, Manuel R.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the large airways are uncommon, but may occasionally pose significant difficulties for anesthesiologists. The tracheal bronchus is an anatomical variant in which an accessory bronchus originates directly from the trachea rather than distal to the carina, as a takeoff from the right mainstem bronchus. Anesthesiologists should be aware of this uncommon anomaly, its different variants, and its management in order to successfully establish one lung ventilation (OLV) for surgical isolation. In this article, we report the challenges encountered in establishing OLV in a patient with a previously undiagnosed aberrant right upper lobe bronchus arising directly from the trachea. PMID:27006553

  6. German aircraft accident statistics, 1930

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, Ludwig

    1932-01-01

    The investigation of all serious accidents, involving technical defects in the airplane or engine, is undertaken by the D.V.L. in conjunction with the imperial traffic minister and other interested parties. All accidents not clearly explained in the reports are subsequently cleared up.

  7. Weather types and traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Klaić, Z B

    2001-06-01

    Traffic accident data for the Zagreb area for the 1981-1982 period were analyzed to investigate possible relationships between the daily number of accidents and the weather conditions that occurred for the 5 consecutive days, starting two days before the particular day. In the statistical analysis of low accident days weather type classification developed by Poje was used. For the high accident days a detailed analyses of surface and radiosonde data were performed in order to identify possible front passages. A test for independence by contingency table confirmed that conditional probability of the day with small number of accidents is the highest, provided that one day after it "N" or "NW" weather types occur, while it is the smallest for "N1" and "Bc" types. For the remaining 4 days of the examined periods dependence was not statistically confirmed. However, northern ("N", "NE" and "NW") and anticyclonic ("Vc", "V4", "V3", "V2" and "mv") weather types predominated during 5-days intervals related to the days with small number of accidents. On the contrary, the weather types with cyclonic characteristics ("N1", "N2", "N3", "Bc", "Dol1" and "Dol"), that are generally accompanied by fronts, were the rarest. For 85% days with large number of accidents, which had not been caused by objective circumstances (such as poor visibility, damaged or slippery road etc.), at least one front passage was recorded during the 3-days period, starting one day before the day with large number of accidents. PMID:11787547

  8. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  9. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An accident...) Explosion or fire not intentionally set by the operator. (b) Release of 5 gallons (19 liters) or more...

  10. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An accident...) Explosion or fire not intentionally set by the operator. (b) Release of 5 gallons (19 liters) or more...

  11. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An accident...) Explosion or fire not intentionally set by the operator. (b) Release of 5 gallons (19 liters) or more...

  12. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E.

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  13. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. PMID:20817399

  14. Assessing the compatibility of the management of standardized procedures with the complexity of a sociotechnical system: case study of a control room in an oil refinery.

    PubMed

    Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu; Gonzalez, Santiago Sosa

    2013-09-01

    Although the need for the management of complex socio-technical systems (STS) to be compatible with the nature of those systems is widely recognized, there are few guidelines on how to determine the actual extent of this compatibility. The purpose of this study is to assess how compatible the management of standardized procedures (SPs) is with the nature of a complex STS. To this end, a case study was made of a control room in an oil refinery, involving the following stages: (a) delimitation of the investigated STS; (b) description of the STS according to a set of characteristics of complex STS; (c) application of two types of questionnaires to thirty workers - one of them to assess their perceptions about the applicability of seven principles of SPs management in complex STS and the other to determine their perceptions about the actual use of these principles; and (d) a feedback meeting with workers to discuss the results of the assessment. The assessment is discussed in terms of its limitations, usefulness and ease of use of the data collection and analysis tools. PMID:23465943

  15. Columbia Accident Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board gathers for a second day for its third public hearing, held in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The CAIB was set up to examine STS-107 and analyze exploratory tests. Navy Admiral Harold W. 'Hal' Gehman Jr. was designated as the Chairman of the Board. From left to right in this photo sit Board Members Steven B. Wallace, Scott Hubbard, Dr. John Logsdon, Rear Admiral Stephen Turcotte, Hal Gehman, General Duane Deal, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, and Maj. General Kenneth W. Hess. Not shown are Maj. General John Barry, Dr. James N. Hallock, Roger Tetrault, Dr. Sheila Widnall, and Dr. Sally Ride. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

  16. [The radiation accident].

    PubMed

    Stögmann, W

    1988-08-26

    The reactor accident of Chernobyl in April 1986 has shown us all the dangers which are inherent ever in the peaceful use of atomic energy. The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation are dependent on biological effectiveness, on dose, on duration of exposure and on the age of the exposed person (the younger the graver). Acute ionizing radiation of the whole body leads to radiation disease or radiation syndrome of different stages of severity according to dosage. If the patient survives other consequences of ionizing radiation may arise: non-stochastic effects such as cataracts, keloid formation, fibrosis of the lungs and infertility) and stochastic effects (oncogenesis and mutagenesis). The sensitivity to ionizing radiation is especially high in childhood because of the high velocity of cell metabolism and cell growth, the large body-surface area and because their repair mechanism following radiation damage is not yet. PMID:3188527

  17. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  18. Educational Accounting Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidwell, Sam B.

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews the functions, procedures, and reports with which school business officials must be familiar in order to interpret and make decisions regarding the school district's financial position. Among the accounting functions discussed are financial management, internal auditing, annual…

  19. Risk and safety management in infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART): from the doctor's office to the ART procedure.

    PubMed

    de Ziegler, Dominique; Gambone, Joseph C; Meldrum, David R; Chapron, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Risk and safety management (RSM) is receiving increasing attention in medicine, with the goals of reducing medical error and increasing quality of care. The principles and tools of RSM can and should be applied to assisted reproductive technology (ART), a field that has already made significant progress in reducing the undesirable and sometimes dangerous consequences of treatment. ART is a prime area of medicine to contribute and help to lead the application of RSM and patient safety because it has been ahead of many other fields of medicine in standardizing treatment, certifying and auditing practitioners, and reporting standardized outcomes, and because treatments are applied to otherwise healthy individuals where exposure to risk may be less acceptable. PMID:24200109

  20. Early dose assessment following severe radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Goans, R.E.; Holloway, E.C.; Berger, M.E.; Ricks, R.C.

    1997-04-01

    Early treatment of victims of high level acute whole-body x-ray or gamma exposure has been shown to improve their likelihood of survival. However, in such cases, both the magnitude of the exposure and the dosimetry profile(s) of the victim(s) are often not known in detail for days to weeks. A simple dose-prediction algorithm based on lymphocyte kinetics as documented in prior radiation accidents is presented here. This algorithm provides an estimate of dose within the first 8 h following an acute whole-body exposure. Early lymphocyte depletion kinetics after a severe radiation accident follow a single exponential, L(t) = L{sub o}e{sup -k(D)t}, where k(D) is a rate constant, dependent primarily on the average dose, D. Within the first 8 h post-accident, K(D) may be calculated utilizing serial lymphocyte counts. Data from the REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry were used to develop a dose-prediction algorithm from 43 gamma exposure cases where both lymphocyte kinetics and dose reconstruction were felt to be reasonably reliable. The inverse relationship D(K) may be molded by a simple two parameter curve of the form D = a/(1 + b/K) in the range 0 {le} D {le} 15 Gy, with fitting parameters (mean {+-} SD): a = 13.6 {+-} 1.7 Gy, and b = 1.0 {+-} 0.20 d{sup -1}. Dose estimated in this manner is intended to serve only as a first approximation to guide initial medical management. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A methodology for the quantitative risk assessment of major accidents triggered by seismic events.

    PubMed

    Antonioni, Giacomo; Spadoni, Gigliola; Cozzani, Valerio

    2007-08-17

    A procedure for the quantitative risk assessment of accidents triggered by seismic events in industrial facilities was developed. The starting point of the procedure was the use of available historical data to assess the expected frequencies and the severity of seismic events. Available equipment-dependant failure probability models (vulnerability or fragility curves) were used to assess the damage probability of equipment items due to a seismic event. An analytic procedure was subsequently developed to identify, evaluate the credibility and finally assess the expected consequences of all the possible scenarios that may follow the seismic events. The procedure was implemented in a GIS-based software tool in order to manage the high number of event sequences that are likely to be generated in large industrial facilities. The developed methodology requires a limited amount of additional data with respect to those used in a conventional QRA, and yields with a limited effort a preliminary quantitative assessment of the contribution of the scenarios triggered by earthquakes to the individual and societal risk indexes. The application of the methodology to several case-studies evidenced that the scenarios initiated by seismic events may have a relevant influence on industrial risk, both raising the overall expected frequency of single scenarios and causing specific severe scenarios simultaneously involving several plant units. PMID:17276591

  2. Corporate cost of occupational accidents: an activity-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Rikhardsson, Pall M; Impgaard, Martin

    2004-03-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents for a company with 3.600 employees was estimated to approximately US$ 682.000. The paper includes an introduction regarding accident cost analysis in companies, a presentation of the SACA project methodology and the SACA method itself, a short overview of some of the results of the SACA project and a conclusion. Further information about the project is available at http://www.asb.dk/saca. PMID:14642872

  3. Prohibiting or 'managing' conflict of interest? A review of policies and procedures in three European drug regulation agencies.

    PubMed

    Lexchin, Joel; O'Donovan, Orla

    2010-03-01

    In light of debates about the relationship between interests and scientific expert judgments, and the potential for declarations of conflict of interest (COI) to minimize corporate bias, we reviewed the approach to COI in 3 European drug regulatory bodies. These bodies were the Irish Medicines Board, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in the United Kingdom and the European Medicines Agency in the European Union. Official statements about COI laws and codes of practice in the 3 contexts suggest that COIs are prohibited. In practice, the approaches to COI in the 3 drug regulatory agencies presuppose and promote the ideas that COIs cannot and need not be eliminated as the risk of bias can be managed. Because the evidence about if and how COI affects micro-level decision-making in drug regulatory authorities is neither complete nor comprehensive, we advocate a precautionary principle model. Under this model COI would be prohibited on the grounds that it might influence the outcome of regulatory decisions. PMID:19782458

  4. [Hidden statistics of traffic accidents].

    PubMed

    Nordentoft, E L; Larsen, C F; Jørgensen, H R

    1989-10-23

    Only 19% of the 3,071 injured persons who were treated in the casualty department of Odense Hospital following traffic accidents in 1987 could be found again in the police registers of traffic accidents from the same region. All of the registrations from the police registers from the central region could be found again in the casualty department. In 1971, the corresponding coverage was 36%. The degree of coverage is particularly low for single bicycle accidents, other bicycle accidents, other single accidents and the hours immediately after midnight. Considerable disagreement exists concerning registration of the use of safety belts and crash helmets. In Odense, the municipal road authorities utilize the localization of the accidents reported by the casualty department. The decrease in the degree of coverage is due mainly to an increasing proportion of bicycle accidents. Where casualties require admission to hospital, the coverage is approximately 75%. This has remained unchanged throughout the years and it is therefore suggested that this proportion should be employed as indicator of the effect of the majority of prophylactic measures. In addition, proposals are made for simplification of the police registration forms. PMID:2588362

  5. High-dose-rate Intracavitary Radiotherapy in the Management of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 and Carcinoma In Situ Presenting With Poor Histologic Factors After Undergoing Excisional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Young Tae; Cho, Nam Hoon; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of high-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (HDR-ICR) in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN 3) and carcinoma in situ (CIS) presenting with poor histologic factors for predicting residual disease after undergoing diagnostic excisional procedures. Methods and Materials: This study was a retrospective analysis of 166 patients with CIN 3 (n=15) and CIS (n=151) between October 1986 and December 2005. They were diagnosed by conization (n=158) and punch biopsy (n=8). Pathologic analysis showed 135 cases of endocervical gland involvement (81.4%), 74 cases of positive resection margins (44.5%), and 52 cases of malignant cells on endocervical curettage (31.3%). All patients were treated with HDR-ICR using Co{sup 60} or Ir{sup 192} at a cancer center. The dose was prescribed at point A located 2 cm superior to the external os and 2 cm lateral to the axis of the tandem for intact uterus. Results: Median age was 61 years (range, 29-77). The median total dose of HDR-ICR was 30 Gy/6 fractions (range, 30-52). At follow-up (median, 152 months), 2 patients developed recurrent diseases: 1 CIN 2 and 1 invasive carcinoma. One hundred and forty patients survived and 26 patients died, owing to nonmalignant intercurrent disease. Rectal bleeding occurred in one patient; however, this symptom subsided with conservative management. Conclusions: Our data showed HDR-ICR is an effective modality for CIN 3 and CIS patients presenting with poor histologic factors after excisional procedures. HDR-ICR should be considered as a definitive treatment in CIN 3 and CIS patients with possible residual disease after undergoing excisional procedures.

  6. A review of criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, W R; Smith, D R

    1989-03-01

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Forty-one accidental power transients are reviewed. In each case where available, enough detail is given to help visualize the physical situation, the cause or causes of the accident, the history and characteristics of the transient, the energy release, and the consequences, if any, to personnel and property. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this study, except that some information on the major accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 is provided in the Appendix. 67 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. 43 CFR 3601.62 - Cancellation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL MATERIALS DISPOSAL Mineral Materials Disposal; General Provisions Contract and Permit Cancellation § 3601.62 Cancellation procedure....

  8. 43 CFR 3601.62 - Cancellation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL MATERIALS DISPOSAL Mineral Materials Disposal; General Provisions Contract and Permit Cancellation § 3601.62 Cancellation procedure....

  9. 43 CFR 3601.62 - Cancellation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL MATERIALS DISPOSAL Mineral Materials Disposal; General Provisions Contract and Permit Cancellation § 3601.62 Cancellation procedure....

  10. Development of fission-products transport model in severe-accident scenarios for Scdap/Relap5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honaiser, Eduardo Henrique Rangel

    The understanding and estimation of the release of fission products during a severe accident became one of the priorities of the nuclear community after 1980, with the events of the Three-mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2), in 1979, and Chernobyl accidents, in 1986. Since this time, theoretical developments and experiments have shown that the primary circuit systems of light water reactors (LWR) have the potential to attenuate the release of fission products, a fact that had been neglected before. An advanced tool, compatible with nuclear thermal-hydraulics integral codes, is developed to predict the retention and physical evolution of the fission products in the primary circuit of LWRs, without considering the chemistry effects. The tool embodies the state-of-the-art models for the involved phenomena as well as develops new models. The capabilities acquired after the implementation of this tool in the Scdap/Relap5 code can be used to increase the accuracy of probability safety assessment (PSA) level 2, enhance the reactor accident management procedures and design new emergency safety features.

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.445 - What accident and incident data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What accident and incident data must we report? 102-33.445 Section 102-33.445 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL...

  12. [Prevention of bicycle accidents].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Barthel, P; Bönninger, J; Bürkle, H; Hagemeister, C; Hannawald, L; Huhn, R; Kühn, M; Liers, H; Maier, R; Otte, D; Prokop, G; Seeck, A; Sturm, J; Unger, T

    2015-04-01

    For a very precise analysis of all injured bicyclists in Germany it would be important to have definitions for "severely injured", "seriously injured" and "critically injured". By this, e.g., two-thirds of surgically treated bicyclists who are not registered by the police could become available for a general analysis. Elderly bicyclists (> 60 years) are a minority (10 %) but represent a majority (50 %) of all fatalities. They profit most by wearing a helmet and would be less injured by using special bicycle bags, switching on their hearing aids and following all traffic rules. E-bikes are used more and more (145 % more in 2012 vs. 2011) with 600,000 at the end of 2011 and are increasingly involved in accidents but still have a lack of legislation. So even for pedelecs 45 with 500 W and a possible speed of 45 km/h there is still no legislative demand for the use of a protecting helmet. 96 % of all injured cyclists in Germany had more than 0.5 ‰ alcohol in their blood, 86 % more than 1.1 ‰ and 59 % more than 1.7 ‰. Fatalities are seen in 24.2 % of cases without any collision partner. Therefore the ADFC calls for a limit of 1.1 ‰. Some virtual studies conclude that integrated sensors in bicycle helmets which would interact with sensors in cars could prevent collisions or reduce the severity of injury by stopping the cars automatically. Integrated sensors in cars with opening angles of 180° enable about 93 % of all bicyclists to be detected leading to a high rate of injury avoidance and/or mitigation. Hanging lamps reduce with 35 % significantly bicycle accidents for children, traffic education for children and special trainings for elderly bicyclists are also recommended as prevention tools. As long as helmet use for bicyclists in Germany rates only 9 % on average and legislative orders for using a helmet will not be in force in the near future, coming up campaigns seem to be necessary to be promoted by the Deutscher

  13. Aspects Concerning The Rules And The Investigation Of Traffic Accidents As Work Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnu, Lucian Ioan

    2015-07-01

    When Romania joined the European Union, it was imposed that the Romanian legislation in the field of the security and health at work be in line with the European one. The concept of health as it is defined by the International Body of Health, refers to a good physical, mental and social condition. The improvement of the activity of preventing the traffic accidents as work accidents must have as basis the correct and accurate evaluation of risks of getting injured. The goal of the activity of prevention and protection is to ensure the best working conditions, the prevention of accidents and occupational diseases and the adjustment to the scientific and technological progress. In the road transport sector, as in any other sector, it is very important to pay attention to working conditions to ensure a workforce motivated and well qualified. Some features make it a more difficult sector risk management than other sectors. However, if one takes into account how it works in practice this sector and the characteristics of drivers and how they work routinely, risks, dangers and threats can be managed efficiently and with great success.

  14. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  15. Columbia Accident Probe Widens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board has identified about a dozen shuttle program safety concerns it will address in its final report, in addition to foam shedding from the Lockheed Martin external tank-believed by many board members to be the direct cause for the loss of Columbia and her crew. As new evidence narrows the location of Columbia's left-wing breach to a lower corner of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) Panel 8 and its adjoining T-seal, the board is broadening its penetration of other shuttle safety issues. As the board works in Houston, United Space Alliance technicians here at Kennedy last week sent the first six of 22 RCC panels from the orbiter Atlantis left wing to Vought Aircraft Industries Inc. in Dallas for extensive testing to assess their integrity. The move is a key step toward both returning the shuttle to flight with Atlantis and obtaining more data on RCC panels subjected to fewer flights, and less exposure to the weather, than the older panels used on Columbia.

  16. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    This report on a method of analysis of aircraft accidents has been prepared by a special committee on the nomenclature, subdivision, and classification of aircraft accidents organized by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in response to a request dated February 18, 1928, from the Air Coordination Committee consisting of the Assistant Secretaries for Aeronautics in the Departments of War, Navy, and Commerce. The work was undertaken in recognition of the difficulty of drawing correct conclusions from efforts to analyze and compare reports of aircraft accidents prepared by different organizations using different classifications and definitions. The air coordination committee's request was made "in order that practices used may henceforth conform to a standard and be universally comparable." the purpose of the special committee therefore was to prepare a basis for the classification and comparison of aircraft accidents, both civil and military. (author)

  17. The 1991 Department of the Army Service Response Force exercise: Procedural Guide SRFX-91

    SciTech Connect

    Madore, M.A.; Thomson, R.S.; Haffenden, R.A.; Baldwin, T.E.; Meleski, S.A.

    1991-09-01

    This procedural guide was written to assist the US Army in planning for a chemical emergency exercise at Tooele Army Depot in Utah. The roles of various members of the emergency response community are described for various accident scenarios, and the relationships between the various responders are identified. For the June 1991 exercise at Tooele, the emergency response community includes the command structure at Tooele Army Depot; the US Army Service Response Force and other Department of Defense agencies; emergency response personnel from Tooele, Salt Lake, and Utah counties and municipal governments; the Utah Comprehensive Emergency Management Agency and other state agencies; and various federal agencies.

  18. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  20. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 must, as soon...

  1. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  2. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  3. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  4. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  5. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 shall as soon...

  6. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  7. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  8. Accidental knowledge: Using accidents and other project failures to inform research in systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, Diane C.

    Projects experience cost overruns, late deliveries, quality issues, cancellation, and accidents despite the best efforts of the systems engineering community. There is relatively little research on why systems engineering failures in general happen, but a substantial body of work on accident causation. Here, we investigate whether systems failures in general exhibit the same patterns of causation as accidents. We conducted a review of existing accident models to develop a model that could be applied to all types of project failures. Our model helped us to classify where the factors occur during the system development/system operation phases and which entity was involved in each factor. We analyzed 58 failure case studies. The failure cases span non-accidents, accidents, and dual failures. The sources for each subset had varying depth and scope of investigation. We developed a coding method to compare the factors between failure cases that broke each factor down into an "actor-action-object" structure. We further generalized the actions from the "actor-action-object" strings into control flaws so that we could analyze the failure cases at a high level. We analyzed the control flaws, actions, and actors for each failure case and compared the results for accidents and non-accidents. Of our results that we could not attribute to study biases, we found similarities and differences between project failure causation. We also identified which control flaws, actions, and actors were the most prevalent in the different types of project failures. Of all the actions, "failure to consider factor in system development" contributed most to non-accidents, while "failure to consider step in risk management" contributed the most to accidents. Of all the actors, "company management" contributed the most to non-accidents and accidents.

  9. Spine Immobilizer for Accident Victims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Lampson, K.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed conformal bladder filled with tiny spheres called "microballoons," enables spine of accident victim to be rapidly immobilized and restrained and permit victim to be safely removed from accident scene in extremely short time after help arrives. Microballoons expand to form rigid mass when pressure within bladder is less than ambient. Bladder strapped to victim is also strapped to rescue chair. Void between bladder and chair is filled with cloth wedges.

  10. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  11. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation. PMID:26444172

  12. Severe accidents due to windsurfing in the Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Kalogeromitros, A; Tsangaris, H; Bilalis, D; Karabinis, A

    2002-06-01

    Windsurfing is a popular sport and has recently become an Olympic event. As an open-air water activity that requires the participant to be in perfect physical condition, windsurfers may be prone to accidents when certain basic rules or procedures are violated. The current study monitored severe injuries due to windsurfing over a period of 12 months in the Aegean Sea in Greece. Our study revealed 22 cases of severe accidents due to windsurfing, with a wide range of injuries including head injuries, spinal cord injuries, and severe fractures of the extremities. Prolonged hospitalization, severe disability and two deaths occurred as consequences of these accidents. The study examined the characteristics of these patients and the possible risk factors and conditions associated with the accidents. We also focused on the most common types of injuries and reviewed the mechanisms that may provoke them. Water sports and particularly windsurfing represent a major challenge for the emergency medical system, especially in the Aegean Sea. Hundreds of islands, kilometres of isolated coasts, millions of tourists, an extended summer period and rapidly changing weather create conditions that constantly test the efficacy of the emergency services. The development of an appropriate infrastructure and maximum control of the risk factors causing these accidents could reduce the morbidity and mortality that, unfortunately but rather predictably, accompany this popular summer activity. PMID:12131638

  13. PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2011-10-28

    This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

  14. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  15. 3W approach to the investigation, analysis, and prevention of human-error aircraft accidents.

    PubMed

    Ricketson, D S; Brown, W R; Graham, K N

    1980-09-01

    Human error is the largest cause of U.S. Army aircraft accidents. An approach to this problem is presented which is based on a model of the human-error accident. This 3W approach identifies what task error (TE) caused or contributed to the accident, what inadequacy (I) in the aviation system caused or allowed the TE to occur, and what remedial measure (R) is required to correct the I. There were 82 human-error accidents analyzed to identify TEIR information. Statistically important is were identified which could be remedied based on accident costs. Then, potentially cost-effective remedial actions were ranked on a cost-benefit totem pole. The totem pole was given to the aviation system manager as a management tool to assist in determining priorities for corrective actions. PMID:7417175

  16. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  17. Stakeholder involvement facilitates decision making for UK nuclear accident recovery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C; Burt, R; Nisbet, A F

    2005-01-01

    The importance of major stakeholders participating in the formulation of strategies for maintaining food safety and agricultural production following a nuclear accident has been successfully demonstrated by the UK 'Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group' (AFCWG). The organisation, membership and terms of reference of the group are described. Details are given of the achievements of the AFCWG and its sub-groups, which include agreeing management options that would be included in a recovery handbook for decision-makers in the UK and tackling the disposal of large volumes of contaminated milk, potentially resulting from a nuclear accident. PMID:15921830

  18. Office of Inspector General report on inspection of selected issues regarding the Department of Energy accident investigation program

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    One method used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to promote worker safety is through the Department`s accident investigation program. The objectives of the program are, among other things, to enhance safety and health of employees, to prevent the recurrence of accidents, and to reduce accident fatality rates and promote a downward trend in the number and severity of accidents. The Assistant Secretary, Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH), through the EH Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, is responsible for implementation of the Department`s accident investigation program. As part of the inspection, the authors reviewed an April 1997 EH accident investigation report regarding an accident involving a Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) welder, who suffered fatal burns when his clothing caught fire while he was using a cutting torch at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. They also reviewed reports of other accident investigations conducted by EH and DOE field organizations. Based on the review of these reports, the authors identified issues concerning the adequacy of the examination and reporting by accident investigation boards of specific management systems and organizations as a possible accident root cause. The inspection also identified issues concerning worker safety that they determined required immediate management attention, such as whether occurrences were being reported in the appropriate management systems and whether prompt consideration was being given to implementing revisions of national standards when the revisions increased worker safety.

  19. Analysis of Two Electrocution Accidents in Greece that Occurred due to Unexpected Re-energization of Power Lines

    PubMed Central

    Baka, Aikaterini D.; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigation and analysis of accidents are critical elements of safety management. The over-riding purpose of an organization in carrying out an accident investigation is to prevent similar accidents, as well as seek a general improvement in the management of health and safety. Hundreds of workers have suffered injuries while installing, maintaining, or servicing machinery and equipment due to sudden re-energization of power lines. This study presents and analyzes two electrical accidents (1 fatal injury and 1 serious injury) that occurred because the power supply was reconnected inadvertently or by mistake. PMID:25379331

  20. Analysis of Two Electrocution Accidents in Greece that Occurred due to Unexpected Re-energization of Power Lines.

    PubMed

    Baka, Aikaterini D; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K

    2014-09-01

    Investigation and analysis of accidents are critical elements of safety management. The over-riding purpose of an organization in carrying out an accident investigation is to prevent similar accidents, as well as seek a general improvement in the management of health and safety. Hundreds of workers have suffered injuries while installing, maintaining, or servicing machinery and equipment due to sudden re-energization of power lines. This study presents and analyzes two electrical accidents (1 fatal injury and 1 serious injury) that occurred because the power supply was reconnected inadvertently or by mistake. PMID:25379331