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Sample records for accretion column structure

  1. Accretion Column Structure of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

    2006-02-27

    Using Chandra HETG data we present light curves for individual spectral lines of Mg XI and Mg XII for EX Hydrae, an intermediate-polar type cataclysmic variable. The Mg XI light curve, folded on the white dwarf spin period, shows two spikes that are not seen in the Mg XII or broad-band light curves. Occultation of the accretion column by the body of the white dwarf would produce such spikes for an angle between the rotation axis and the accretion columns of {alpha} = 18{sup o} and a height of the Mg XI emission above the white dwarf surface of {approx}< 0.0004 white dwarf radii or {approx}< 4 km. The absence of spikes in the Mg XII and broad-band light curves could then be explained if the bulk of its emission forms at much larger height, > 0.004 white dwarf radii or > 40 km, above the white dwarf surface. The technique described in this letter demonstrates that high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution X-ray spectra can be used to map the temperature and density structure of accretion flows in magnetic cataclysmic variables. The Mg XI and Mg XII light curves are not consistent with the temperature and density structure predicted by the standard Aizu model.

  2. The accretion column of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Costa, D. Joaquim; Luna, Gerardo; Lima, Isabel J.; Silva, Karleyne M. G.; De Araujo, Jose Carlos N.; Coelho, Jaziel

    2016-07-01

    AE Aqr is a magnetic cataclysmic variable, whose white dwarf rotates at the very fast rate of 33 s modulating the flux from high-energies to optical wavelengths. There are many studies of the origin of its emission, which consider emission from a rotating magnetic field or from an accretion column. Recently, MAGIC observations have discarded AE Aqr emission in very high energy gamma-rays discarding non-thermal emission. Furthermore, soft and hard X-ray data from Swift and NuSTAR were fitted using thermal models. Here we present the modelling of AE Aqr X-ray spectra and light curve considering the emission of a magnetic accretion column using the Cyclops code. The model takes into consideration the 3D geometry of the system, allowing to properly represent the white-dwarf auto eclipse, the pre-shock column absorption, and the varying density and temperature of a tall accretion column.

  3. Accretion dynamics of EX Lupi in quiescence. The star, the spot, and the accretion column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Fang, Min; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Kóspál, Ágnes; Henning, Thomas; Ábrahám, Peter; Sipos, Nikoletta

    2015-08-01

    Context. EX Lupi is a young, accreting M0 star and the prototype of EXor variable stars. Its spectrum is very rich in emission lines, including many metallic lines with narrow and broad components. The presence of a close companion has also been proposed, based on radial velocity signatures. Aims: We use the metallic emission lines to study the accretion structures and to test the companion hypothesis. Methods: We analyse 54 spectra obtained during five years of quiescence time. We study the line profile variability and the radial velocity of the narrow and broad metallic emission lines. We use the velocity signatures of different species with various excitation conditions and their time dependency to track the dynamics associated with accretion. Results: We observe periodic velocity variations in the broad and the narrow line components, consistent with rotational modulation. The modulation is stronger for lines with higher excitation potentials (e.g. He II), which are likely produced in a confined area very close to the accretion shock. Conclusions: We propose that the narrow line components are produced in the post-shock region, while the broad components originate in the more extended, pre-shock material in the accretion column. All the emission lines suffer velocity modulation due to the rotation of the star. The broad components are responsible for the line-dependent veiling observed in EX Lupi. We demonstrate that a rotationally modulated line-dependent veiling can explain the radial velocity signature of the photospheric absorption lines, making the close-in companion hypothesis unnecessary. The accretion structure is locked to the star and very stable during the five years of observations. Not all stars with similar spectral types and accretion rates show the same metallic emission lines, which could be related to differences in temperature and density in their accretion structure(s). The contamination of photospheric signatures by accretion

  4. Dynamic effects on cyclotron scattering in pulsar accretion columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    A resonant scattering model for photon reprocessing in a pulsar accretion column is presented. The accretion column is optically thin to Thomson scattering and optically thick to resonant scattering at the cyclotron frequency. Radiation from the neutron star surface propagates freely through the column until the photon energy equals the local cyclotron frequency, at which point the radiation is scattered, much of it back toward the star. The radiation pressure in this regime is insufficient to stop the infall. Some of the scattered radiation heats the stellar surface around the base of the column, which adds a softer component to the spectrum. The partial blocking by the accretion column of X-rays from the surface produces a fan beam emission pattern. X-rays above the surface cyclotron frequency freely escape and are characterized by a pencil beam. Gravitational light bending produces a pencil beam pattern of column-scattered radiation in the antipodal direction, resulting in a strongly angle-dependent cyclotron feature.

  5. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  6. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS UNDERGOING LAYERED ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M. V.; Desch, S. J.

    2011-10-20

    We calculate the temperature structures of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) around T Tauri stars heated by both incident starlight and viscous dissipation. We present a new algorithm for calculating the temperatures in disks in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium, based on Rybicki's method for iteratively calculating the vertical temperature structure within an annulus. At each iteration, the method solves for the temperature at all locations simultaneously, and converges rapidly even at high (>>10{sup 4}) optical depth. The method retains the full frequency dependence of the radiation field. We use this algorithm to study for the first time disks evolving via the magnetorotational instability. Because PPD midplanes are weakly ionized, this instability operates preferentially in their surface layers, and disks will undergo layered accretion. We find that the midplane temperatures T{sub mid} are strongly affected by the column density {Sigma}{sub a} of the active layers, even for fixed mass accretion rate M-dot . Models assuming uniform accretion predict midplane temperatures in the terrestrial planet forming region several x 10{sup 2} K higher than our layered accretion models do. For M-dot < 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and the column densities {Sigma}{sub a} < 10 g cm{sup -2} associated with layered accretion, disk temperatures are indistinguishable from those of a passively heated disk. We find emergent spectra are insensitive to {Sigma}{sub a}, making it difficult to observationally identify disks undergoing layered versus uniform accretion.

  7. Glancing through the accretion column of EXO 2030+375

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrigno, C.; Pjanka, P.; Bozzo, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ducci, L.; Zdziarski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of X-ray instruments is revealing more and more details about the complex magnetic field topology and the geometry of the accretion flows in highly magnetized accretion powered pulsars. We took advantage of the large collecting area and timing capabilities of the EPIC cameras to investigate the accretion geometry onto the magnetized neutron star in the high mass X-ray binary EXO 2030+375 during the rise of one of the source outburst. The X-ray luminosity was 2×10^{36} erg/s and the timing analysis revealed the presence of a narrow dip-like feature in its pulse profile that was never reported before. The width of this feature corresponds to about one hundredth of the neutron star spin period. From the results of the phase-resolved spectral analysis we suggest that this feature can be ascribed to the self-obscuration of the accretion stream passing in front of the observer line of sight. We inferred from Suzaku observation carried out in 2007 that the self-obscuration of the accretion stream might produce a significantly wider feature in the neutron star pulsed profile at higher luminosities (≳2×10^{37} erg/s). The presence of such feature is so far unique among all known high mass X-ray binaries hosting strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  8. Glancing through the accretion column of EXO 2030+375

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrigno, C.; Pjanka, P.; Bozzo, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ducci, L.; Zdziarski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of X-ray instruments is revealing more and more details about the complex magnetic field topology and the geometry of the accretion flows in highly magnetized accretion powered pulsars. We took advantage of the large collecting area and timing capabilities of the EPIC cameras to investigate the accretion geometry onto the magnetized neutron star in the high mass X-ray binary EXO 2030+375 during the rise of one of the source outburst. The X-ray luminosity was 2×10^{36} erg/s and the timing analysis revealed the presence of a narrow dip-like feature in its pulse profile that was never reported before. The width of this feature corresponds to about one hundredth of the neutron star spin period. From the results of the phase-resolved spectral analysis we suggest that this feature can be ascribed to the self-obscuration of the accretion stream passing in front of the observer line of sight. We inferred from Suzaku observation carried out in 2007 that the self-obscuration of the accretion stream might produce a significantly wider feature in the neutron star pulsed profile at higher luminosities (>˜2×10^{37} erg/s). The presence of such feature is so far unique among all known high mass X-ray binaries hosting strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  9. A radiation-hydrodynamics model of accretion columns for ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-09-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M 82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a supercritical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with the density of 10-4 g cm-3 above a neutron star and solve the two-dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, but gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, and thereby a shock is generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as noted by Basko and Sunyaev (1976, MNRAS, 175, 395). The average accretion rate is very high; dot{M}}˜ 10^{2-3} L_E/c2 (with LE being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below LE/(4πr2) at a distance r in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since a large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed LE by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, the observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.

  10. Overview of the physics in the accretion column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael Thomas

    2016-04-01

    This talk discusses the current efforts to model the wide array of physical processes that are important when plasma accretes onto the surface of a highly magnetic neutron star. Broad non-thermal power law X-ray continua are observed that can be modeled by Comptonization of bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and black body contributions. Cyclotron resonance absorption lines are observed, cast against these broad continua, yielding measurements of the magnetic field strengths. Observations show that in some sources the cyclotron line energies can vary with observed luminosity. This observation has lead to significant debate regarding aspects of the cyclotron line formation process. Multiple groups are currently working on modeling the physical processes that affect the behavior of the plasmas, the formation of the X-ray continuum, and the formation of the cyclotron lines. New analysis tools are becoming available to help interpret observations of these systems. In particular, observations by Suzaku and NuSTAR of the X-ray spectra of these binary systems are advancing our searches for the cyclotron lines and our understanding of the physical processes that contribute to the X-ray continuum formation.

  11. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  12. Oscillating water column structural model

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Guild; Bull, Diana L; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Gordon, Margaret Ellen

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  13. Lightweight structural columns. [space erectable trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Lightweight half-lengths of columns for truss structures are described. The columns are adapted for nestable storage and transport to facilitate fabrication of large area truss structures at a remote site and particularly adaptable for space applications.

  14. Accretion disk structure in SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    1987-02-01

    High-resolution coude observations of nonaxisymmetric line emission from the dwarf nova SS Cygni are presented. By subtracting the constant line component, the asymmetric line emission responsible for the observed phase shift between the absorption and emission line radial velocity curves can be isolated. The extra emission is a large fraction of the total line emission and extends to large velocities (of about 1500 km/sec). The phase stability of the emission demands a large-scale structure which is fixed in the frame of the binary. A magnetic origin of the excitation cannot be ruled out but is implausible. A simple explanation is that the accretion stream from the companion star is able to spill over the edge of the disk, introducing emission at noncircular velocities and most likely disturbing the upper layers of the accretion disk.

  15. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Equations for the structure and appearance of supercritical accretion disks and the radiation-driven winds which emanate from them are derived and solved by a steady-state hydrodynamic computer code with a relaxation technique used in stellar structure problems. The present model takes into account the mass of the accreting star, the total accretion rate, a generalization of the disk alpha parameter which accounts for heating by processes in addition to viscosity, and the ratio of the total luminosity to the Eddington luminosity. Solutions indicate that for accretion onto a hard-surfaced star, steady, optically thick winds result for even slightly supercritical accretion, and the object will appear as a supergiant star with a high mass loss rate and a nonblackbody spectrum. Winds from black hole accretion disks are expected to depend on the form of the accretion interior to the critical radius, possibly consisting of no ejection at all, a wind similar to that of a hard-surfaced star, or a column of material ejected from a hole in the accretion disk.

  16. Titan's Cold Accretion and its Internal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2010-10-01

    Recent Cassini radio tracking data has provided a normalized moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al. 2010). Given that the quadrupole field is consistent with hydrostatic equilibrium, a two-layer interior model implies incomplete differentiation with a 700 km water-ice shell and an undifferentiated ice and rock-metal interior. We investigate the accretional history of Titan in connection with its internal structure. Our formation model allows for a size distribution of impactors with upper size cut-off constrained by Hyperion's size and a variable power-law exponent (Mosqueira et al. 2010). The burial of impact energy takes place in a lengthscale of order of the impactor radius, as indicated by numerical simulations (e.g., Pierazzo et al. 1997) applied to our energy regime of interest. Our thermal model includes radiogenic heating due to short and long-lived radionuclides, latent heat of melting, gravitational energy release due to sinking rock, heat of accretion and radiative cooling. We find that melting in the interior takes place well before the satellite reaches its final size. As a result, we expect the formation of an ocean overlying a silicate carapace, which may spend a considerable amount of time in contact with the liquid layer. Such a framework not only facilitates the transport of heat from the interior, but also can help both in leaching Ar40 into the ocean and then releasing into the atmosphere. We consider a range of parameters such as the degree of hydration of the rock component, the fraction of the impact energy that is deposited at the surface of the satellite, and accretion times. But we do not yet consider the effects of small admixtures of contaminants. We argue that models that form Titan in a cold environment may have allowed for the interior to remain cold enough as to preclude complete differentiation.

  17. Multi-dimensional structure of accreting young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, C.; Baraffe, I.; Viallet, M.; Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Constantino, T.; Folini, D.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work is the first attempt to describe the multi-dimensional structure of accreting young stars based on fully compressible time implicit multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. One major motivation is to analyse the validity of accretion treatment used in previous 1D stellar evolution studies. We analyse the effect of accretion on the structure of a realistic stellar model of the young Sun. Our work is inspired by the numerical work of Kley & Lin (1996, ApJ, 461, 933) devoted to the structure of the boundary layer in accretion disks, which provides the outer boundary conditions for our simulations. We analyse the redistribution of accreted material with a range of values of specific entropy relative to the bulk specific entropy of the material in the accreting object's convective envelope. Low specific entropy accreted material characterises the so-called cold accretion process, whereas high specific entropy is relevant to hot accretion. A primary goal is to understand whether and how accreted energy deposited onto a stellar surface is redistributed in the interior. This study focusses on the high accretion rates characteristic of FU Ori systems. We find that the highest entropy cases produce a distinctive behaviour in the mass redistribution, rms velocities, and enthalpy flux in the convective envelope. This change in behaviour is characterised by the formation of a hot layer on the surface of the accreting object, which tends to suppress convection in the envelope. We analyse the long-term effect of such a hot buffer zone on the structure and evolution of the accreting object with 1D stellar evolution calculations. We study the relevance of the assumption of redistribution of accreted energy into the stellar interior used in the literature. We compare results obtained with the latter treatment and those obtained with a more physical accretion boundary condition based on the formation of a hot surface layer suggested by present multi

  18. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. -M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy—gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100–1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  19. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system.

    PubMed

    Cross, J E; Gregori, G; Foster, J M; Graham, P; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Busschaert, C; Charpentier, N; Danson, C N; Doyle, H W; Drake, R P; Fyrth, J; Gumbrell, E T; Koenig, M; Krauland, C; Kuranz, C C; Loupias, B; Michaut, C; Mouchet, M; Patankar, S; Skidmore, J; Spindloe, C; Tubman, E R; Woolsey, N; Yurchak, R; Falize, É

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy-gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  20. Thermal structure of the accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Pflugrath, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The energy associated with the accretion of the earth and the segregation of the core is more than sufficient to melt the entire earth. In order to understand the thermal evolution of the early earth it is necessary to study the relevant heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper the existence of a global magma ocean is postulated and calculations are carried out of the heat flux through it in order to determine its depth. In the solid mantle heat is transferred by the upward migration of magma. This magma supplies the magma ocean. The increase in the mantle liquidus with depth (pressure) is the dominant effect influencing heat transfer through the magma ocean. It is found that a magma ocean with a depth of the order of 20 km would have existed as the earth accreted. It is concluded that the core segregated and an atmosphere was formed during accretion.

  1. Thermal structure of the accreting earth

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, D.L.; Pflugrath, J.C.

    1985-02-15

    The energy associated with the accretion of the earth and the segregation of the core is more than sufficient to melt the entire earth. In order to understand the thermal evolution of the early earth it is necessary to study the relevant heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper we postulate the existence of a global magma ocean and carry out calculations of the heat flux through it in order to determine its depth. In the solid mantle heat is transferred by the upward migration of magma. This magma supplies the magma ocean. The increase in the mantle liquidus with depth (pressure) is the dominant effect influencing heat transfer through the magma ocean. We find that a magma ocean with a depth of the order of 20 km would have existed as the earth accreted. We conclude that the core segregated and an atmosphere was formed during accretion.

  2. Structural properties of impact ices accreted on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural properties of ice accretions formed on aircraft surfaces are studied. The overall objectives are to measure basic structural properties of impact ices and to develop finite element analytical procedures for use in the design of all deicing systems. The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to produce simulated natural ice accretion over a wide range of icing conditions. Two different test apparatus were used to measure each of the three basic mechanical properties: tensile, shear, and peeling. Data was obtained on both adhesive shear strength of impact ices and peeling forces for various icing conditions. The influences of various icing parameters such as tunnel air temperature and velocity, icing cloud drop size, material substrate, surface temperature at ice/material interface, and ice thickness were studied. A finite element analysis of the shear test apparatus was developed in order to gain more insight in the evaluation of the test data. A comparison with other investigators was made. The result shows that the adhesive shear strength of impact ice typically varies between 40 and 50 psi, with peak strength reaching 120 psi and is not dependent on the kind of substrate used, the thickness of accreted ice, and tunnel temperature below 4 C.

  3. Distributed ice accretion sensor for smart aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerardi, J. J.; Hickman, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A distributed ice accretion sensor is presented, based on the concept of smart structures. Ice accretion is determined using spectral techniques to process signals from piezoelectric sensors integral to the airfoil skin. Frequency shifts in the leading edge structural skin modes are correlated to ice thickness. It is suggested that this method may be used to detect ice over large areas with minimal hardware. Results are presented from preliminary tests to measure simulated ice growth.

  4. Accretion tectonics and crustal structure in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coney, P.J.; Jones, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The entire width of the North American Cordillera in Alaska is made up of "suspect terranes". Pre-Late Cretaceous paleogeography is poorly constrained and the ultimate origins of the many fragments which make up the state are unclear. The Prince William and Chugach terranes accreted since Late Cretaceous time and represent the collapse of much of the northeast Pacific Ocean swept into what today is southern Alaska. Greater Wrangellia, a composite terrane now dispersed into fragments scattered from Idaho to southern Alaska, apparently accreted into Alaska in Late Cretaceous time crushing an enormous deep-marine flysch basin on its inboard side. Most of interior eastern Alaska is the Yukon Tanana terrane, a very large entirely fault-bounded metamorphic-plutonic assemblage covering thousands of square kilometers in Canada as well as Alaska. The original stratigraphy and relationship to North America of the Yukon-Tanana terrane are both obscure. A collapsed Mesozoic flysch basin, similar to the one inboard of Wrangellia, lies along the northern margin. Much of Arctic Alaska was apparently a vast expanse of upper Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic deep marine sediments and mafic volcanic and plutonic rocks now scattered widely as large telescoped sheets and Klippen thrust over the Ruby geanticline and the Brooks Range, and probably underlying the Yukon-Koyukuk basin and the Yukon flats. The Brooks Range itself is a stack of north vergent nappes, the telescoping of which began in Early Cretaceous time. Despite compelling evidence for thousands of kilometers of relative displacement between the accreted terranes, and large amounts of telescoping, translation, and rotation since accretion, the resulting new continental crust added to North America in Alaska carries few obvious signatures that allow application of currently popular simple plate tectonic models. Intraplate telescoping and strike-slip translations, delamination at mid-crustal levels, and large-scale lithospheric

  5. Dynamical structure of magnetized dissipative accretion flow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplob; Das, Santabrata

    2016-09-01

    We study the global structure of optically thin, advection dominated, magnetized accretion flow around black holes. We consider the magnetic field to be turbulent in nature and dominated by the toroidal component. With this, we obtain the complete set of accretion solutions for dissipative flows where bremsstrahlung process is regarded as the dominant cooling mechanism. We show that rotating magnetized accretion flow experiences virtual barrier around black hole due to centrifugal repulsion that can trigger the discontinuous transition of the flow variables in the form of shock waves. We examine the properties of the shock waves and find that the dynamics of the post-shock corona (PSC) is controlled by the flow parameters, namely viscosity, cooling rate and strength of the magnetic field, respectively. We separate the effective region of the parameter space for standing shock and observe that shock can form for wide range of flow parameters. We obtain the critical viscosity parameter that allows global accretion solutions including shocks. We estimate the energy dissipation at the PSC from where a part of the accreting matter can deflect as outflows and jets. We compare the maximum energy that could be extracted from the PSC and the observed radio luminosity values for several supermassive black hole sources and the observational implications of our present analysis are discussed.

  6. Dynamical structure of magnetized dissipative accretion flow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplob; Das, Santabrata

    2016-06-01

    We study the global structure of optically thin, advection dominated, magnetized accretion flow around black holes. We consider the magnetic field to be turbulent in nature and dominated by the toroidal component. With this, we obtain the complete set of accretion solutions for dissipative flows where bremsstrahlung process is regarded as the dominant cooling mechanism. We show that rotating magnetized accretion flow experiences virtual barrier around black hole due to centrifugal repulsion that can trigger the discontinuous transition of the flow variables in the form of shock waves. We examine the properties of the shock waves and find that the dynamics of the post-shock corona (PSC) is controlled by the flow parameters, namely viscosity, cooling rate and strength of the magnetic field, respectively. We separate the effective region of the parameter space for standing shock and observe that shock can form for wide range of flow parameters. We obtain the critical viscosity parameter that allows global accretion solutions including shocks. We estimate the energy dissipation at the PSC from where a part of the accreting matter can deflect as outflows and jets. We compare the maximum energy that could be extracted from the PSC and the observed radio luminosity values for several super-massive black hole sources and the observational implications of our present analysis are discussed.

  7. Structure and dynamics of the accretion process and wind in TW Hya

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Berlind, P.; Strader, Jay; Smith, Graeme H.

    2014-07-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy of the classical accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya, covering a decade and spanning the far UV to the near-infrared spectral regions can identify the radiation sources, the atmospheric structure produced by accretion, and properties of the stellar wind. On timescales from days to years, substantial changes occur in emission line profiles and line strengths. Our extensive time-domain spectroscopy suggests that the broad near-IR, optical, and far-uv emission lines, centered on the star, originate in a turbulent post-shock region and can undergo scattering by the overlying stellar wind as well as some absorption from infalling material. Stable absorption features appear in Hα, apparently caused by an accreting column silhouetted in the stellar wind. Inflow of material onto the star is revealed by the near-IR He I 10830 Å line, and its free-fall velocity correlates inversely with the strength of the post-shock emission, consistent with a dipole accretion model. However, the predictions of hydrogen line profiles based on accretion stream models are not well-matched by these observations. Evidence of an accelerating warm to hot stellar wind is shown by the near-IR He I line, and emission profiles of C II, C III, C IV, N V, and O VI. The outflow of material changes substantially in both speed and opacity in the yearly sampling of the near-IR He I line over a decade. Terminal outflow velocities that range from 200 km s{sup –1} to almost 400 km s{sup –1} in He I appear to be directly related to the amount of post-shock emission, giving evidence for an accretion-driven stellar wind. Calculations of the emission from realistic post-shock regions are needed.

  8. ON THE STRUCTURE OF ACCRETION DISKS WITH OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao Chengliang; Wu Xuebing E-mail: wuxb@pku.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    To study the outflows from accretion disks, we solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for accretion disks in spherical coordinates (r{theta}{phi}) to obtain the explicit structure along the {theta}-direction. Using self-similar assumptions in the radial direction, we change the equations to a set of ordinary differential equations about the {theta}-coordinate, which are then solved with symmetrical boundary conditions in the equatorial plane; the velocity field is then obtained. The {alpha} viscosity prescription is applied and an advective factor f is used to simplify the energy equation. The results display thinner, quasi-Keplerian disks for Shakura-Sunyaev disks; thicker, sub-Keplerian disks for advection-dominated accretion flows; and slim disks which are consistent with previous popular analytical models. However, an inflow region and an outflow region always exist, except when the viscosity parameter {alpha} is too large, which supports the results of some recent numerical simulation works. Our results indicate that the outflows should be common in various accretion disks and may be stronger in slim disks, where both advection and radiation pressure are dominant. We also present the structure's dependence on the input parameters and discuss their physical meanings. The caveats of this work and possible improvements for the future are discussed.

  9. Structure and Spectroscopy of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D; Mauche, C

    2005-02-14

    The warped spacetime near black holes is one of the most exotic observable environments in the Universe. X-ray spectra from active galaxies obtained with the current generation of X-ray observatories reveal line emission that is modified by both special relativistic and general relativistic effects. The interpretation is that we are witnessing X-ray irradiated matter orbiting in an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, as it prepares to cross the event horizon. This interpretation, however, is based upon highly schematized models of accretion disk structure. This report describes a project to design a detailed computer model of accretion disk atmospheres, with the goal of elucidating the high radiation density environments associated with mass flows in the curved spacetime near gravitationally collapsed objects. We have evolved the capability to generate realistic theoretical X-ray line spectra of accretion disks, thereby providing the means for a workable exploration of the behavior of matter in the strong-field limit of gravitation.

  10. Pulse Profiles, Accretion Column Dips and a Flare in GX 1+4 During a Faint State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, A. B.; Galloway, D. K.; Greenhill, J. G.; Storey, M. C.; Wilson, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spacecraft observed the X-ray GX 1+4 for it period of 34 hours on July 19/20 1996. The source faded front an intensity of approximately 20 mcrab to a minimum of <= 0.7 mcrab and then partially recovered towards the end of the observation. This extended minimum lasted approximately 40,000 seconds. Phase folded light curves at a barycentric rotation period of 124.36568 +/- 0.00020 seconds show that near the center of the extended minimum the source stopped pulsing in the traditional sense but retained a weak dip feature at the rotation period. Away from the extended minimum the dips are progressively narrower at higher energies and may be interpreted as obscurations or eclipses of the hot spot by the accretion column. The pulse profile changed from leading-edge bright before the extended minimum to trailing-edge bright after it. Data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) show that a torque reversal occurred < 10 days after our observation. Our data indicate that the observed rotation departs from a constant period with a P/P value of approximately -1.5% per year at a 4.5sigma significance. We infer that we may have serendipitously obtained data, with high sensitivity and temporal resolution about the time of an accretion disk spin reversal. We also observed a rapid flare which had some precursor activity close to the center of the extended minimum.

  11. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizano, S.; Tapia, C.; Boehler, Y.; D'Alessio, P.

    2016-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of the magnetized accretion disks that are subject to viscous and resistive heating and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of the magnetized accretion disks that are threaded by the poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation, which was developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low-mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars, as well as two levels of disk magnetization: {λ }{sys}=4 (strongly magnetized disks) and {λ }{sys}=12 (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk, and the T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7% of the viscous heating. In these models, the T Tauri disk has a larger aspect ratio, which is consistent with that inferred from observations. All the disks have spatially extended hot atmospheres where the irradiation flux is absorbed, although most of the mass (˜90%-95%) is in the disk midplane. With the advent of ALMA one expects direct measurements of magnetic fields and their morphology at disk scales. It will then be possible to determine the mass-to-flux ratio of magnetized accretion disks around young stars, an essential parameter for their structure and evolution. Our models contribute to the understanding of the vertical structure and emission of these disks.

  12. Design procedures for fiber composite structural components: Rods, columns and beam columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Step by step procedures are described which are used to design structural components (rods, columns, and beam columns) subjected to steady state mechanical loads and hydrothermal environments. Illustrative examples are presented for structural components designed for static tensile and compressive loads, and fatigue as well as for moisture and temperature effects. Each example is set up as a sample design illustrating the detailed steps that are used to design similar components.

  13. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Carlos; Lizano, Susana

    2016-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of magnetized accretion disks subject to viscous and resistive heating, and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of magnetized accretion disks threaded by a poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars. We consider two levels of disk magnetization, λsys = 4 (strongly magnetized disks), and λsys = 12 (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk. The T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7% of the viscous heating. In these models, the T Tauri disk has a larger aspect ratio, consistent with that inferred from observations. All the disks have spatially extended hot atmospheres where the irradiation flux is absorbed, although most of the mass (~ 90 - 95 %) is in the disk midplane.

  14. Structure of relativistic accretion disk with non-standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khesali, A. R.; Salahshoor, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of stationary, axisymmetric advection-dominated accretion disk (ADAF) around rotating black hole, using non-standard model, was examined. In this model, the transport efficiency of the angular momentum α was dependent on the magnetic Prandtl number α ∝ Pm^{δ } . The full relativistic shear stress recently obtained by a new manner, was used. By considering black hole spin and Prandtl number instantaneously, the structure of ADAFs was changed in inner and outer region of the disk. It was discovered that the accretion flow was denser and hotter in the inner region, due to the black hole spin, and in the outer region, due to the presence of Prandtl parameter. Inasmuch as the rotation of the black hole affected the transport efficiency of angular momentum in parts of the disk very close to the even horizon, then in these regions, the viscosity depended on the rotation of black hole. Also, it was discovered that the effect of the black hole spin on the structure of the disk was related to the presence of Prandtl parameter.

  15. Accretion and Structure in the SW Sextantis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald Wayne

    1998-09-01

    The SW Sextantis stars are cataclysmic variables (CVs) sharing properties that set them apart from other CVs. These include: strong He II λ4686 emission, velocity curves implying asymmetric disk emission, and variable line profiles displaying a transient absorption feature at specific orbital phases. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain these characteristics including (non-disk) circumstellar material, a bipolar disk wind, a white dwarf magnetic field, and coherent accretion stream overflow across the disk, but none has been completely satisfying. I present the results of new photometric and spectroscopic observations of seven SW Sex stars, including Doppler tomogram mapping of emission regions in these systems. These observations, along with recent advances in simulations of accretion disks, suggest a scenario in which the accretion stream undergoes a violent impact with the disk edge. Depending on the mass transfer rate in the stream, the impact site will either cool efficiently (low M) and allow substantial material to flow directly over the disk, or will cool inefficiently (high M) and form a prominent bright spot at the impact site with hot stream material swept 'downstream' along the disk edge. In the former case, non-axisymmetric vertical structure develops in the disk at the terminus of the stream overflow (accounting for absorption seen at φapprox0.5), while in the latter case vertical structure is built up along the disk edge (accounting for absorption at φapprox0.8). The absorption feature phasing in different SW Sex stars implies M decreases as P orb decreases (as expected during CV evolution), but it is not clear whether normal CV evolution can drive changes in M rapidly enough to generate the onset of the SW Sex phenomenon in the narrow range of orbital period they occupy (P orb=3[-]4 hr). I present a gallery of new and archived IUE spectra of the SW Sex stars that display the typically strong UV resonant scattering lines seen in

  16. Zooming in on accretion - I. The structure of halo gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-08-01

    We study the properties of gas in and around 1012 M⊙ haloes at z = 2 using a suite of high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic `zoom' simulations. We quantify the thermal and dynamical structure of these gaseous reservoirs in terms of their mean radial distributions and angular variability along different sightlines. With each halo simulated at three levels of increasing resolution, the highest reaching a baryon mass resolution of ˜10 000 solar masses, we study the interface between filamentary inflow and the quasi-static hot halo atmosphere. We highlight the discrepancy between the spatial resolution available in the halo gas as opposed to within the galaxy itself, and find that stream morphologies become increasingly complex at higher resolution, with large coherent flows revealing density and temperature structure at progressively smaller scales. Moreover, multiple gas components co-exist at the same radius within the halo, making radially averaged analyses misleading. This is particularly true where the hot, quasi-static, high entropy halo atmosphere interacts with cold, rapidly inflowing, low entropy accretion. Haloes at this mass have a well-defined virial shock, associated with a sharp jump in temperature and entropy at ≳ 1.25 rvir. The presence, radius, and radial width of this boundary feature, however, vary not only from halo to halo, but also as a function of angular direction, covering roughly ˜75 per cent of the 4π sphere. We investigate the process of gas virialization as imprinted in the halo structure, and discuss different modes for the accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium.

  17. Zooming in on accretion - I. The structure of halo gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-05-01

    We study the properties of gas in and around 1012 M⊙ haloes at z = 2 using a suite of high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic `zoom' simulations. We quantify the thermal and dynamical structure of these gaseous reservoirs in terms of their mean radial distributions and angular variability along different sightlines. With each halo simulated at three levels of increasing resolution, the highest reaching a baryon mass resolution of ˜10,000 solar masses, we study the interface between filamentary inflow and the quasi-static hot halo atmosphere. We highlight the discrepancy between the spatial resolution available in the halo gas as opposed to within the galaxy itself, and find that stream morphologies become increasingly complex at higher resolution, with large coherent flows revealing density and temperature structure at progressively smaller scales. Moreover, multiple gas components co-exist at the same radius within the halo, making radially averaged analyses misleading. This is particularly true where the hot, quasi-static, high entropy halo atmosphere interacts with cold, rapidly inflowing, low entropy accretion. Haloes at this mass have a well-defined virial shock, associated with a sharp jump in temperature and entropy at ≳ 1.25 rvir. The presence, radius, and radial width of this boundary feature, however, vary not only from halo to halo, but also as a function of angular direction, covering roughly ˜ 75% of the 4π sphere. We investigate the process of gas virialization as imprinted in the halo structure, and discuss different modes for the accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium.

  18. Aperiodic X-ray flux variability of EX Hya and the area of the base of the accretion column at the white dwarf surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semena, A. N.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to determine the characteristic cooling time of the accretion flowmatter near the surface of the magnetic white dwarf in the binary system EX Hya. Most of the X-ray photons in such binary systems are produced in an optically thin hot plasma with a temperature above 10 keV heated when the matter passes through the shock near the white dwarf surface. The total X-ray luminosity is determined by the matter accumulated below the shock in its cooling time. Thus, the X-ray luminosity variability related to the variations in the accretion rate onto the white dwarf surface must be suppressed at frequencies higher than the inverse cooling time. If the optically thin plasma radiation dominates in the rate of energy losses by the heated matter, which is true for white dwarfs with moderately strong magnetic fields, less than 1-10 MG, then the matter cooling time can give an estimate of the matter density in the accretion column. Given the accretion rate and the matter density in the accretion column at the white dwarf surface, the area of the accretion channel can be estimated. We have analyzed all of the currently available observational data for one of the brightest intermediate polars in the X-ray sky, EX Hya, from the RXTE and XMM-Newton observatories. The power spectra of its aperiodic variability have given an upper limit on the cooling time of the hot plasma: <1.5-2 s. For the observed accretion rate, ×1015 g s-1, this corresponds to a matter density below the shock surface ≳1016 cm-3 and an area of the base of the accretion channel no more than <4.6 × 1015 cm2. Using the information about the maximum geometrical size of the accretion channel obtained by analyzing X-ray eclipses in the binary system EX Hya, we have derived an upper limit on the thickness of the flow over the surface of the magnetosphere near the white dwarf surface, ≲3 × 106 cm, and the plasma penetration depth at the magnetospheric boundary, Δ r/r ≲ 6 × 10-3.

  19. The magnetic-field structure in a stationary accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, M. Yu.; Silant'ev, N. A.; Gnedin, Yu. N.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Buliga, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic-field structure in regions of stationary, planar accretion disks around active galactic nuclei where general-relativistic effects can be neglected (from 10 to 200 gravitational radii) is considered. It is assumed that the magnetic field in the outer edges of the disk, which forms in the magnetosphere of the central black hole during the creation of the relativisitic jets, corresponds to the field of a magnetic dipole perpendicular to the plane of the disk. In this case, the azimuthal field component B φ in the disk arises due to the presence of the radial field B ρ and the azimuthal velocity component U φ . The value of the magnetic field at the inner radius of the disk is taken to correspond to the solution of the induction equation in a diffusion approximation. Numerical solutions of the induction equation are given for a number of cases.

  20. Zooming in on accretion - I. The structure of halo gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-08-01

    We study the properties of gas in and around 10^12 solar mass halos at z=2 using a suite of high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic 'zoom' simulations. We quantify the thermal and dynamical structure of these gaseous reservoirs in terms of their mean radial distributions and angular variability along different sightlines. With each halo simulated at three levels of increasing resolution, the highest reaching a baryon mass resolution of ~10,000 solar masses, we study the interaction of filamentary inflow and the quasi-static hot halo atmosphere. We highlight the discrepancy between the spatial resolution available in the halo gas as opposed to within the galaxy itself, and find that stream morphologies become increasingly complex at higher resolution, with large coherent flows revealing density and temperature structure at progressively smaller scales. Moreover, multiple gas components co-exist at the same radius within the halo, making radially averaged analyses misleading. This is particularly true where the hot, quasi-static, high entropy halo atmosphere interacts with cold, rapidly inflowing, low entropy accretion. We investigate the process of gas virialization and identify different regimes for the heating of gas as it accretes from the intergalactic medium. Haloes at this mass have a well-defined virial shock, associated with a sharp jump in temperature and entropy at ~1.25 r_vir. The presence, radius, and radial width of this boundary feature, however, vary not only from halo to halo, but also as a function of angular direction, covering roughly ~85% of the 4pi sphere. Our findings are relevant for the proper interpretation of observations pertaining to the circumgalactic medium, including evidence for large amounts of cold gas surrounding massive haloes at intermediate redshifts.

  1. 8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 242, SHOWING STRUCTURAL COLUMNS AND ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 242, SHOWING STRUCTURAL COLUMNS AND ROOF TRUSSES. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Chlorine Production Cell Building, 405 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 330 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  2. View of first level from north showing interstitial structural columns ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of first level from north showing interstitial structural columns for the Shuttle assemble configuration. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Inner-pipe structure to improve column heterogeneity and peak shape.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Mei, Xiang; Shi, Pengchao; Zhou, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Column heterogeneity plays an important role in peak tailing and asymmetric profiles. We have designed a novel column structure (concentric column structure) that has a concentric inner-pipe nested in a column. This structure was studied by a number calculation method and wider diameter column experiments. The results showed that column heterogeneity and column efficiency were improved by inner-pipe structure. Moreover, the results showed that high-efficiency columns were stronger influenced by inner-pipe structure than low-efficiency columns. The influence of an inner-pipe was related to its size. The optimal inner-pipe diameter was nearly 0.625 times of column diameter. By using inner-pipe structure in this way, it was possible to decrease column heterogeneity and increase column efficiency of a wide-diameter column. PMID:25048455

  4. Structure and Dynamics of the Accretion Process and Wind in TW Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Berlind, P.; Strader, Jay; Smith, Graeme H.

    2014-07-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy of the classical accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya, covering a decade and spanning the far UV to the near-infrared spectral regions can identify the radiation sources, the atmospheric structure produced by accretion, and properties of the stellar wind. On timescales from days to years, substantial changes occur in emission line profiles and line strengths. Our extensive time-domain spectroscopy suggests that the broad near-IR, optical, and far-uv emission lines, centered on the star, originate in a turbulent post-shock region and can undergo scattering by the overlying stellar wind as well as some absorption from infalling material. Stable absorption features appear in Hα, apparently caused by an accreting column silhouetted in the stellar wind. Inflow of material onto the star is revealed by the near-IR He I 10830 Å line, and its free-fall velocity correlates inversely with the strength of the post-shock emission, consistent with a dipole accretion model. However, the predictions of hydrogen line profiles based on accretion stream models are not well-matched by these observations. Evidence of an accelerating warm to hot stellar wind is shown by the near-IR He I line, and emission profiles of C II, C III, C IV, N V, and O VI. The outflow of material changes substantially in both speed and opacity in the yearly sampling of the near-IR He I line over a decade. Terminal outflow velocities that range from 200 km s-1 to almost 400 km s-1 in He I appear to be directly related to the amount of post-shock emission, giving evidence for an accretion-driven stellar wind. Calculations of the emission from realistic post-shock regions are needed. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support

  5. Crystalline structure of accretion disks: Features of a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Giovanni; Benini, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we develop the analysis of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical configuration for an axially symmetric and rotating plasma (embedded in a dipolelike magnetic field), modeling the structure of a thin accretion disk around a compact astrophysical object. Our study investigates the global profile of the disk plasma, in order to fix the conditions for the existence of a crystalline morphology and ring sequence, as outlined by the local analysis pursued in Coppi [Phys. PlasmasPHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.1883667 12, 7302 (2005)] and Coppi and Rousseau [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/500315 641, 458 (2006)]. In the linear regime, when the electromagnetic back-reaction of the plasma is small enough, we show the existence of an oscillating radial behavior for the flux surface function, which very closely resembles the one outlined in the local model, apart from a radial modulation of the amplitude. In the opposite limit, corresponding to a dominant back-reaction in the magnetic structure over the field of central object, we can recognize the existence of a ringlike decomposition of the disk, according to the same modulation of the magnetic flux surface, and a smoother radial decay of the disk density, with respect to the linear case. In this extreme nonlinear regime, the global model seems to predict a configuration very close to that of the local analysis, but here the thermostatic pressure, crucial for the equilibrium setting, is also radially modulated. Among the conditions requested for the validity of such a global model, the confinement of the radial coordinate within a given value sensitive to the disk temperature and to the mass of the central objet, stands; however, this condition corresponds to dealing with a thin disk configuration.

  6. IP Pegasi: Investigation of the accretion disk structure. Searching evidences for spiral shocks in the quiescent accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustroev, V. V.; Borisov, N. V.; Barwig, H.; Bobinger, A.; Mantel, K. H.; Šimić, D.; Wolf, S.

    2002-10-01

    We present the results of spectral investigations of the cataclysmic variable IP Peg in quiescence. Optical spectra obtained on the 6-m telescope at the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia), and on the 3.5-m telescope at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center (Calar Alto, Spain), have been analysed by means of Doppler tomography and Phase Modelling Technique. From this analysis we conclude that the quiescent accretion disk of IP Peg has a complex structure. There are also explicit indications of spiral shocks. The Doppler maps and the variations of the peak separation of the emission lines confirm this interpretation. We have detected that all the emission lines show a rather considerable asymmetry of their wings varying with time. The wing asymmetry shows quasi-periodic modulations with a period much shorter than the orbital one. This indicates the presence of an emission source in the binary rotating asynchronously with the binary system. We also have found that the brightness of the bright spot changes considerably during one orbital period. The spot becomes brightest at an inferior conjunction, whereas it is almost invisible when it is located on the distant half of the accretion disk. Probably, this phenomenon is due to an anisotropic radiation of the bright spot and an eclipse of the bright spot by the outer edge of the accretion disk. Based on observations made at the Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Russia, and at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, Spain.

  7. Clumpy Accretion onto Black Holes. I. Clumpy-advection-dominated Accretion Flow Structure and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Li, Yan-Rong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  8. CLUMPY ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES. I. CLUMPY-ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOW STRUCTURE AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianmin; Cheng Cheng; Li Yanrong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  9. 60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED THE ORIGINAL BRICK SUPPORTS FOR THE SOUTHERNMOST ARCH ON THE BUILDING'S W WALL WHEN THE S SECTION OF THE BUILDING WAS 'OPENED-UP' DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR; LOOKING NW. (Ceronie) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 110, Hagner Road between Schull & Whittemore Roads, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  10. The cortical column: a structure without a function

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jonathan C; Adams, Daniel L

    2005-01-01

    This year, the field of neuroscience celebrates the 50th anniversary of Mountcastle's discovery of the cortical column. In this review, we summarize half a century of research and come to the disappointing realization that the column may have no function. Originally, it was described as a discrete structure, spanning the layers of the somatosensory cortex, which contains cells responsive to only a single modality, such as deep joint receptors or cutaneous receptors. Subsequently, examples of columns have been uncovered in numerous cortical areas, expanding the original concept to embrace a variety of different structures and principles. A ‘column’ now refers to cells in any vertical cluster that share the same tuning for any given receptive field attribute. In striate cortex, for example, cells with the same eye preference are grouped into ocular dominance columns. Unaccountably, ocular dominance columns are present in some species, but not others. In principle, it should be possible to determine their function by searching for species differences in visual performance that correlate with their presence or absence. Unfortunately, this approach has been to no avail; no visual faculty has emerged that appears to require ocular dominance columns. Moreover, recent evidence has shown that the expression of ocular dominance columns can be highly variable among members of the same species, or even in different portions of the visual cortex in the same individual. These observations deal a fatal blow to the idea that ocular dominance columns serve a purpose. More broadly, the term ‘column’ also denotes the periodic termination of anatomical projections within or between cortical areas. In many instances, periodic projections have a consistent relationship with some architectural feature, such as the cytochrome oxidase patches in V1 or the stripes in V2. These tissue compartments appear to divide cells with different receptive field properties into distinct

  11. Active states and structure transformations in accreting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneva, Daniela; Kaygorodov, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Active states in white dwarfs are usually associated with light curve's effects that concern to the bursts, flickering or flare-up occurrences. It is common that a gas-dynamics source exists for each of these processes there. We consider the white dwarf binary stars with accretion disc around the primary. We suggest a flow transformation modeling of the mechanisms that are responsible for ability to cause some flow instability and bring the white dwarfs system to the outburst's development. The processes that cause the accretion rate to sufficiently increase are discussed. Then the transition from a quiescent to an active state is realized. We analyze a quasi-periodic variability in the luminosity of white dwarf binary stars systems. The results are supported with an observational data.

  12. Ice accretion on structures in a marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lozowski, E.P.; Gates, E.M.

    1984-02-01

    A model of the icing of an unheated, non-rotating cylinder has been developed. The model can predict both the shape of the ice accretion and its mass as a function of time, at least for relatively short periods during which deviations from the initial airflow and droplet trajectories are not too significant. These predictions are compared with the results of icing wind tunnel experiments over a range of icing conditions - from cases in which the entire surface is dry (surface temperature below freezing everywhere) to ones in which it is entirely wet (surface temperature equal to 0/sup 0/C everywhere). Techniques for recording and analyzing the surface profile experimentally as a function of time are described and assessed. It is found that the model-predicted accretion profiles are quantitatively quite accurate for dry icing. In wet cases, the profiles are qualitatively right, but the model is unable at present to simulate the details of surface roughness which arise. Nevertheless, the model's mass predictions are found to be quite acceptable, even when the profiles are not.

  13. Vertical Structure of Advection-dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Zeraatgari, Fateme; Abbassi, Shahram

    2015-08-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for optically thin advection-dominated accretion flows by assuming a radially self-similar spherical coordinate system (r,θ ,φ ). The disk is considered to be in steady state and axisymmetric. We define the boundary conditions at the pole and the equator of the disk and, to avoid singularity at the rotation axis, the disk is taken to be symmetric with respect to this axis. Moreover, only the {τ }rφ component of the viscous stress tensor is assumed, and we have set {v}θ =0. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of dynamical quantities of the flow in the vertical direction by finding an analytical solution. As a consequence, we found that the advection parameter, {f}{adv}, varies along the θ direction and reaches its maximum near the rotation axis. Our results also show that, in terms of the no-outflow solution, thermal equilibrium still exists and consequently advection cooling can balance viscous heating.

  14. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  15. Accretion of Gas onto Gap-opening Planets and Circumplanetary Flow Structure in Magnetized Turbulent Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an α-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is αMHD = 10-3, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be \\dot{M}\\approx 2\\times 10^{-6}M_{{J}}\\,yr^{-1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm-2. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent α parameter.

  16. The Crystalline Structure of Ice Formed by Droplet Accretion. II: Annealed Samples and Application.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCappin, C. J.; Macklin, W. C.

    1984-08-01

    The crystal structure of annealed samples of dry growth accreted ice grown on cylinders rotating in an icing tunnel has been determined using the techniques of McCappin and Macklin (Part I). The rate of change of the crystal structure is strongly temperature dependent at annealing temperatures within a few degrees of 0°C and is most rapid at this temperature. In particular, the substructure formed in accretions grown at high ambient temperatures is eliminated within a 20-30 min annealing at 0°C.The changes that occur during annealing may be usefully described by the standard grain growth law. A plot of the mean crystal length against mean average crystal width for data obtained from the etching technique may be used as an indicator of the degree of annealing of an accreted ice sample. It is shown that little quantitative information on the growth conditions of accreted ice can be obtained from measurements of crystal size in fresh samples. However, measurements of mean crystal length and mean average width in samples annealed for 30 min or longer give ambient temperatures accurate to ±5°C. While this accuracy is sufficient for qualitative purposes, it is not sufficient to permit implementation of the quantitative scheme of hailstone analysis proposed by Macklin and others.

  17. Structural efficiency of long lightly loaded truss and isogrid columns for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The general mass characteristics of long lightly loaded columns for space applications are investigated by studying four column concepts. The first is a simple tubular column, the second is a three longeron truss column constructed of tubular members, the third is a three longeron truss column constructed of solid rod members, and the fourth is an open grid work isogrid wall tubular column. Design procedures, which include an initial imperfection in the straightness of the column, are developed for the different concepts and demonstrated numerically. A new set of structural efficiency parameters are developed for lightly loaded columns and are used to show a comparison of the masses of the four column concepts investigated.

  18. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-Disc Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Long, Knox

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to exploit the unique capabilities of FUSE to monitor variations in the wind- formed spectral lines of the luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables(CV) -- RW Sex. (The original proposal contained two additional objects but these were not approved.) These observations were intended to allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we proposed to track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. We planned to use a new Monte Carlo code to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through the CV wind. The analysis therefore was intended to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time.

  19. Three-Layered Atmospheric Structure in Accretion Disks Around Stellar-Mass Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S. N.; Cui, Wei; Chen, Wan; Yao, Yangsen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Xuejun; Wu, Xue-Bing; Xu, Haiguang

    2000-01-01

    Modeling of the x-ray spectra of the Galactic superluminal jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 reveals a three-layered atmospheric structure in the inner region of the inner accretion disks. Above the cold and optically thick disk with a temperature of 0.2 to 0.5 kiloelectron volts, there is a warm layer with a temperature of 1.0 to 1.5 kiloelectron volts and an optical depth around 10. Sometimes there is also a much hotter, optically thin corona above the warm layer, with a temperature of 100 kiloelectron volts or higher and an optical depth around unity. The structural similarity between the accretion disks and the solar atmosphere suggests that similar physical processes may be operating in these different systems.

  20. Gravitational Influences on Magnetic Field Structure in Accretion Disks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The structure of the magnetic fields associated with plasma disks surrounding black holes is identified when the effects of gravitational and Lorentz forces on the dynamics of the disk are comparable. The effects of corrections to the radial gravitational force% ρGM*R(R^2+z^2)^3/2 are explored within the geometry of a thin disk. A significant external magnetic field component is considered, along with an internal component due to the azimuthal current configuration. The relation of the resulting configuration to the field structure when the gravitational force can be neglectedfootnotetextB. Coppi, Phys. Plasmas 12, 057302 (2005)^,footnotetextCoppi, B. and Rousseau, F. Astrophysical Journal, 641: 458-470 (2006) is discussed. The relevant equations for the pseudo-Newtonian potentialfootnotetextPaczy'nski, B. and Wiita, P. J. Astron. Astrophys. 88: 23 (1980) describing the physics near the event horizon of the black hole are also derived and the physical consequences are explored. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the MIT Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

  1. Structural health monitoring approach for detecting ice accretion on bridge cable using the Haar Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Julia; Kiremidjian, Anne; Liao, Yizheng; Georgakis, Christos; Rajagopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    Ice accretion on cables of bridge structures poses serious risk to the structure as well as to vehicular traffic when the ice falls onto the road. Detection of ice formation, quantification of the amount of ice accumulated, and prediction of icefalls will increase the safety and serviceability of the structure. In this paper, an ice accretion detection algorithm is presented based on the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). In the proposed algorithm, the acceleration signals obtained from bridge cables are transformed using wavelet method. The damage sensitive features (DSFs) are defined as a function of the wavelet energy at specific wavelet scales. It is found that as ice accretes on the cables, the mass of cable increases, thus changing the wavelet energies. Hence, the DSFs can be used to track the change of cables mass. To validate the proposed algorithm, we use the data collected from a laboratory experiment conducted at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). In this experiment, a cable was placed in a wind tunnel as ice volume grew progressively. Several accelerometers were installed at various locations along the testing cable to collect vibration signals.

  2. Mechanical end joint system for connecting structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system is presented that eliminates the possibility of free movements between the joint halves during loading or vibration. Both node joint body (NJB) and column end joint body (CEJB) have cylindrical engaging ends. Each of these ends has an integral semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely - the tongue of the NJB mating with the groove of the CEJB and vice versa. The joint system employs a spring loaded internal latch mechanism housed in the CEJB. During mating, this mechanism is pushed away from the NJB and enters the NJB when mating is completed. In order to lock the joint and add a preload across the tongue and groove faces, an operating ring collar is rotated through 45 deg causing an internal mechanism to compress a Belleville washer preload mechanism. This causes an equal and opposite force to be exerted on the latch bolt and the latch plunger. This force presses the two joint halves tightly together. In order to prevent inadvertent disassembly, a secondary lock is also engaged when the joint is closed. Plungers are carried in the operating ring collar. When the joint is closed, the plungers fall into tracks on the CEJB, which allows the joint to be opened only when the operating ring collar and plungers are pushed directly away from the joining end. One application of this invention is the rapid assembly and disassembly of diverse skeletal framework structures which is extremely important in many projects involving the exploration of space.

  3. The Structure of Gas-accreting Protoplanets and the Condition of the Critical Core Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N <= 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  4. Structure of steady state accretion shocks with several cooling functions: Closed integral-form solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Chanmugam, G.; Shaviv, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present, for the first time, a closed integral-form solution to the accretion shock structures for the case where the cooling is due to optically thin bremsstrahlung emission and a series of power-law cooling functions of density and temperature. Our results can provide useful checks on numerical calculations and simple accurate estimates for valuable parameters such as the shock height. For the case where the cooling rate j = (2/3)Arho(exp 2)(P/rho)(exp 1/2)(1 + epsilon (sub s)(P/P(sub s)(exp alpha)(rho(sub s)/rho)(exp beta)), we find that a substantial amount of the accretion energy is released at the base of the accretion shock in the form of bremsstrahlung radiation. This implies that for a cyclotron-dominated shock (qualitatively given by alpha = 2.0, beta = 3.85, and epsilon(sub s) is much greater than 1), bremsstrahlung cooling still plays a crucial role in determining the shock structure. Our results are shown to be consistent with detailed numerical calculations.

  5. THE STRUCTURE OF GAS-ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS AND THE CONDITION OF THE CRITICAL CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N {<=} 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  6. Structure of evolving Accretion Discs and their Implications to the Formation of Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Lega, E.

    2013-10-01

    Two features in a protoplanetary disc can have profound effects on planet formation. The first feature is "pressure bumps", i.e. local maxima in the gas surface density distribution that can arise e.g. at the inner edge of the dead zone. Pressure bumps stop the inward migration of small bodies undergoing gas drag (Brauer et al., 2008), promote the onset of the streaming instability (Johansen and Youdin, 2007), help the accretion of planetary embryos by the pebble-accretion process (Lambrechts and Johansen, 2012) and stop inward type-I migration by the planet-trap mechanism (Masset et al., 2006). The second feature is "scale height bumps", that originate from opacity transitions. The regions of the disc that are shadowed, where H/r decreases with r, allow planetary cores to migrate outwards due to entropy gradient effects (Paardekooper and Mellema (2006), Baruteau and Masset (2008)), until they reach the local minimum of the H/r profile (Bitsch et al. 2013). Thus, it is important to model the existence and the location of these structures in realistic protoplanetary discs. The structure of the disc is dependent on the mass-flux (accretion rate) through the disc, which determines the evolution of the density profile. This mass-flux changes in time, as the whole disc gets accreted onto the central star. We will show using 2D hydrodynamical models how the change of the accretion rate affects the disc structure and how this will change the sweet-spots for saving planetary cores from too rapid inward migration. We will focus here on "scale height bumps" in the disc that will change the alpha-viscosity and consequently the gas surface density (as the mass-flux is constant through the disc). Therefore the formation of pressure bumps is possible, whose prominence and effects on migration will be investigated in detail. This will give important indications of where and when in the disc the cores of giant planets and thus giant planets can form.

  7. Structure and evolution of irradiated accretion disks. I - Static thermal equilibrium structure. II - Dynamical evolution of a thermally unstable torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuchman, Y.; Mineshige, S.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal equilibrum structure and dynamical behavior of externally irradiated accretion disks are investigated. For radiative disks only the surface layer is heated, while for convective disks the heat penetrates deeply into the disk. For sufficiently strong radiation and given irradiation flux F(irr), the disk is completely stabilized against thermal instabilities of the sort invoked to explain dwarf novae. For moderately strong irradiation there is still an unstable branch in the thermal equilibrium curve. In typical soft X-ray transients, the disk is unstable against the dwarf-nova type instability. Fixed F(irr) on accretion disk annuli reduces the amplitude and the quiescent times and increases the outburst duration of the resultant light curves. Varying F(irr) in proportion to the mass accretion rate at the disks's inner edge results in light curves with a plateau in the decay from outbursts. In the case when irradiation is suddenly switched on, a temperature inversion results which leads to the formation of an accretion corona.

  8. Revealing the location and structure of the accretion disk wind in PDS 456

    SciTech Connect

    Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Nardini, E.; Costa, M. T.; Matzeu, G. A.; Braito, V.; O'Brien, P.; Ward, M.; Turner, T. J.; Miller, L.

    2014-03-20

    We present evidence for the rapid variability of the high-velocity iron K-shell absorption in the nearby (z = 0.184) quasar PDS 456. From a recent long Suzaku observation in 2013 (∼1 Ms effective duration), we find that the equivalent width of iron K absorption increases by a factor of ∼5 during the observation, increasing from <105 eV within the first 100 ks of the observation, toward a maximum depth of ∼500 eV near the end. The implied outflow velocity of ∼0.25 c is consistent with that claimed from earlier (2007, 2011) Suzaku observations. The absorption varies on timescales as short as ∼1 week. We show that this variability can be equally well attributed to either (1) an increase in column density, plausibly associated with a clumpy time-variable outflow, or (2) the decreasing ionization of a smooth homogeneous outflow which is in photo-ionization equilibrium with the local photon field. The variability allows a direct measure of absorber location, which is constrained to within r = 200-3500 r {sub g} of the black hole. Even in the most conservative case, the kinetic power of the outflow is ≳ 6% of the Eddington luminosity, with a mass outflow rate in excess of ∼40% of the Eddington accretion rate. The wind momentum rate is directly equivalent to the Eddington momentum rate which suggests that the flow may have been accelerated by continuum scattering during an episode of Eddington-limited accretion.

  9. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound–bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ˜3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free–free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  10. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound–bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ∼3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free–free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  11. VERTICAL STRUCTURE AND CORONAL POWER OF ACCRETION DISKS POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL-INSTABILITY TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  12. Vertical Structure and Coronal Power of Accretion Disks Powered by Magnetorotational-instability Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  13. Oman Ophiolite Structural Constraints Complement Models of Crustal Accretion at the EAST Pacific RISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Jousselin, D.; Boudier, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    This review documents significant similarities between East Pacific Rise (EPR), especially EPR at 9°-10°N and the Oman ophiolites. Both share comparable fast spreading rates, size and their dominant source of information that is mainly geophysical in EPR and structural in Oman. In these respects, they are remarkably complementary. Mantle upwelling zones at the EPR and mantle diapirs in Oman have a similar size and spacing. They punctually introduce basaltic melt and heat in the accreting crust, thus controlling elementary segments structure and activity. A tent-shaped magma chamber fits onto the diapir head, the top of which is a Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ) that stores, modifies, and injects the modified melt into the upper Axial Melt Lens (AML) beneath the lid. This MTZ-AML connection is central in crustal accretion, as documented in Oman. Heat from the diapir is captured above the Moho by the magma chamber and escapes through its walls, into a thin thermal boundary layer that bounds the chamber. Beyond, seawater at lower temperatures feeds smokers on the seafloor.

  14. The Accretion Flow and Boundary Layer Structure in the Dwarf Nova SS Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Armin; Balman, Solen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward; Hertfelder, Marius

    2016-07-01

    We present X-ray analysis of dwarf novae SS Aur (51 ksec) using XMM-Newton Observatory archival data obtained in quiescence for a better understanding of the accretion flow structure. We find X-ray orbital modulations. We report power spectral analysis for EPIC (X-ray) and OM (UV) light curves suggesting high levels of red noise with no significant QPO or periodicities. We simultaneously fitted EPIC pn, MOS1 and MOS2 data using a model for interstellar medium absorption (tbabs) and a multi-temperature plasma emission model (cevmkl) as expected from low accretion rate quiescent dwarf novae. However, the composite model fit yields unacceptable reduced χ ^{2} values due to the existence of soft excess. The soft excess is well modeled using a blackbody model (kT˜˜24 eV) giving a better reduced χ ^{2} value over 3σ significance level. This may indicate the existence of optically thick boundary layer emission. We will discuss the origin of this excess. The best fitting model is a combination of a blackbody, a cevmkl and a power law with an interstellar absorption which yields a reduced χ ^{2} of 1.05. The fit also shows some oxygen and iron over abundances. SS Aur has a maximum thermal plasma temperature of ˜22 keV. The X-ray luminosity in the 0.1 to 50.0 keV energy band is ˜2.0×10 ^{33} ergs ^{-1}. Finally, we discuss these characteristics in the light of standard disk models and accretion flows and geometry in nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables.

  15. Testing SgrA* with the spectrum of its accretion structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Nan; Li, Zilong; Arthur, Jake; Asquith, Rachel; Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-09-01

    SgrA* is the supermassive black hole candidate at the center of the Galaxy and an ideal laboratory to test general relativity. Following previous work by other authors, we use the Polish doughnut model to describe an optically thin and constant angular momentum ion torus in hydrodynamical equilibrium and model the accretion structure around SgrA*. The radiation mechanisms are bremsstrahlung, synchrotron emission, and inverse Compton scattering. We compute the spectrum as seen by a distant observer in Kerr and non-Kerr spacetimes and we study how an accurate measurement can constrain possible deviations form the Kerr solution. As in the case of emission from a thin accretion disk, we find a substantial degeneracy between the determination of the spin and of possible deviations from the Kerr geometry, even when the parameters of the ion torus are fixed. This means that this technique cannot independently test the nature of SgrA* even in the presence of good data and with the systematics under control. However, it might do it in combination with other measurements (black hole shadow, radio pulsar, etc.).

  16. Hybrid accretion disks in active galactic nuclei. I - Structure and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandel, Amri; Liang, Edison P.

    1991-01-01

    A unified treatment is presented of the two distinct states of vertically thin AGN accretion disks: a cool (about 10 to the 6th K) optically thick solution, and a hot (about 10 to the 9th K) optically thin solution. A generalized formalism and a new radiative cooling equation valid in both regimes are introduced. A new luminosity limit is found at which the hot and cool alpha solutions merge into a single solution of intermediate optical depth. Analytic solutions for the disk structure are given, and output spectra are computed numerically. This is used to demonstrate the prospect of fitting AGN broadband spectra containing both the UV bump as well as the hard X-ray and gamma-ray tail, using a single accretion disk model. Such models are found to make definite predictions about the observed spectrum, such as the relation between the hard X-ray spectral index, the UV-to-X-ray luminosity ratio, and a feature of about 1 MeV.

  17. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Materials: Extruded 24S-T Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J.; Roy, J Albert

    1945-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 24S-T aluminum alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of thin-strip columns and local-instability tests of H-, Z-,and channel-section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the' structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  18. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Martials Extruded 0-1HTA Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Niles, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of flat end H-section columns and from local instability tests of H-, Z-, and channel section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  19. Non-LTE modeling of the structure and spectra of hot accretion spots on the surface of young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The results of modeling the structure and spectra of hot accretion spots on the surface of young stars with allowance made for the departures from LTE for hydrogen and helium are presented. The existence of ram pressure of the infalling gas at the outer boundary of the hot spot has been found to lead to Stark broadening of the hydrogen line profiles to ˜1000 km s-1 at the accretion parameters considered. It is shown that allowance for the departures from LTE for carbon and oxygen atoms and ions does not lead to noticeable changes in the structure of the hot spot.

  20. Magnetospheric accretion in EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Peter; Kospal, Agnes; Bouvier, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class of young eruptive stars, in order to understand how the accretion process works in the quiescent system. Here, we request 2.6 hours of telescope time on Spitzer, to carry out a mid-infrared photometric monitoring, which we will supplement with simultaneous ground-based optical and near-infrared data. The multi-wavelength light curves will allow us to reliably separate the effects of fluctuating accretion rate from the rotation of the star. By analyzing the variations of the accretion rate we will determine whether EX Lup accretes through a few stable accretion columns or several short-lived random accretion streams. With this campaign, EX Lup will become one of the T Tauri systems where the accretion process is best understood.

  1. Passive damping concepts for slender columns in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Research into the identification of potential passive damping concepts for use in very slender structural members was continued. The following damping concepts are under investigation: mass-string dampers; bright zinc chain; polyethylene tubing; external viscoelastic tape; brushes for electrostatic and frictional damping; suspended chambers with oil and discs; and hybrid concepts. Each of these concepts are briefly discussed.

  2. Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars - Structure and interchange instability of a model magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, J.; Lea, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    A self-consistent model is analyzed for the spherical infall of weakly magnetized plasma into the magnetosphere of a slowly rotating, strongly magnetized neutron star. It is shown that spherical infall is probably a good approximation for X-ray sources which accrete from a stellar wind. The location of the standoff shock which halts the hypersonic infall is estimated along with the emission from the shocked layer. The location of the equilibrium magnetopause and the structure of the magnetic field within it are calculated; it is found that the magnetic poles are true cusps and that the entry of gas due to equilibrium flow across a cusp is almost certainly dominated by the interchange instability near the magnetic equator. The energy principle is applied to derive necessary conditions for the occurrence of this instability. The results indicate that the strong magnetic-pressure gradient stabilizes the gas unless moderately strong radiative cooling takes place and that the cooled plasma enters the magnetosphere as long filaments capable of moving between field lines. The rate at which the equilibrium magnetopause can 'absorb' mass and momentum is derived, the validity of the approximations employed is discussed, and the likely evolution of the sinking filaments is outlined to show that the spatial distribution of the plasma is determined mainly by the dynamics and thermodynamics of the filaments rather than the magnetic-field structure.

  3. EVA manipulation and assembly of space structure columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T. E.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    Assembly techniques and hardware configurations used in assembly of the basic tetrahedral cell by A7LB pressure-suited subjects in a neutral bouyancy simulator were studied. Eleven subjects participated in assembly procedures which investigated two types of structural members and two configurations of attachment hardware. The assembly was accomplished through extra-vehicular activity (EVA) only, EVA with simulated manned maneuvering unit (MMU), and EVA with simulated MMU and simulated remote manipulator system (RMS). Assembly times as low as 10.20 minutes per tetrahedron were achieved. Task element data, as well as assembly procedures, are included.

  4. Numerical simulation of blast wave interaction with structure columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanchao; Hao, Hong; Li, Zhong-Xian

    2007-08-01

    Buckling of slender structures under compressive loading is a failure of infinitesimal stability due to a confluence of two factors: the energy density non-convexity and the smallness of Korn’s constant. The problem has been well understood only for bodies with simple geometries when the slenderness parameter is well defined. In this paper, we present the first rigorous analysis of buckling for bodies with complex geometry. By limiting our analysis to the “near-flip” instability, we address the universal features of the buckling phenomenon that depend on neither the shape of the domain nor the degree of constitutive nonlinearity of the elastic material.

  5. Structure and Stability of Steady Protostellar Accretion Flows - Part Three - Nonlinear Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluch, M.

    1991-03-01

    Recently, a global, linear stability analysis of the structure of spherically symmetric steady protostellar accretion flows with a shock discontinuity has been made (Balluch 1990b). A detailed non-linear time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics calculation is presented to complement this study. In the `ideal-case' with constant opacity, the shock front around the second, inner core appears unstable with respect to oscillation due to critical cooling, starting at the instant, when a cooling region occurs in the calculation (due to its resolution in the late stages of accretion) and lasting as long as the mass flow rate is larger than M ≥ 2.8 10-6 Msun yr-1. This is in best agreement with the results of the linear analysis. Next, a detailed calculation of the formation of the first, outer core using quasimolecular artificial viscosity length scales, is presented. In about twice the e-folding time of the unstable mode in the linear analysis, a significant growth of a disturbance can be seen. It appears first in the velocity and the radiation flux in the settling zone, accompanied by an oscillation of the radiation flux in the region upstream from the shock up to r = 1014 cm. Some time later, the shock front starts to move. Again, these characteristics are in best concordance with the linear results. In addition, the calculation shows the growth of these oscillations deep in the non-linear regime until the beginning of a rapid expansion of the whole protostellar core. At last, a calculation of the global evolution of this expansion of the first, outer core is presented. It is shown that the expansion is stopped when about twice the core mass is involved. Then another collapse follows, and the whole scenario of formation and expansion of the outer core starts anew. During this evolution, up to 3 shock fronts were present at the same time in the flow. The largest expansion leads to central physical quantities comparable to the initial ones of the interstellar medium. At

  6. Timescales for planetary accretion and the structure of the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1987-01-01

    Models of planetary accretion which assume the mass of condensable matter in the protoplanetary disk was equal to that present in the planets today predict accretion timescales for the outer planets approximately or less than 10 to the 8th years. Such timescales are inconsistent with observations of star forming regions, which suggest that most of the gas in disks around one solar mass is removed in a few x 10 to the 6th years. A unified scenario was outlined for solar system formation consistent with astrophysical constraints. Jupiter's core could have grown by runaway accretion of planetesimals to a mass sufficient to initiate rapid accretion of gas in times of order of 500,000 to 5,000,000 years, provided the surface density of solids in its accretion zone was at least 5 to 10 times greater than that required by minimum mass models of the protoplanetary disk. The inner planets and the asteroids can be accounted for in this picture if the surface density of the solar nebula was relatively uniform out to Jupiter's orbit. The formation of such a protoplanetary disk requires significant transport of mass and angular momentum, and is consistent with viscous accretion disk models of the solar nebula.

  7. Spectrum-luminosity dependence of radiation from the polar emitting regions in accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The recent progress in observational techniques allowed one to probe the evolution of the X-ray spectrum in accreting pulsars (especially, of the cyclotron absorption line - the key spectral feature of accreting magnetized neutron stars) in great detail on various timescales, from pulse-to-pulse variability to secular trends. Particularly interesting are the discovered spectrum-luminosity correlations which are being used to infer the structure and physical characteristics of the pulsar's polar emitting region. I will present the latest developments in the modeling of the emitting structure (accretion column/mound/spot) aimed at explaining the observed spectrum-luminosity dependences.

  8. Computing the origin and evolution of the ribosome from its structure — Uncovering processes of macromolecular accretion benefiting synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Accretion occurs pervasively in nature at widely different timeframes. The process also manifests in the evolution of macromolecules. Here we review recent computational and structural biology studies of evolutionary accretion that make use of the ideographic (historical, retrodictive) and nomothetic (universal, predictive) scientific frameworks. Computational studies uncover explicit timelines of accretion of structural parts in molecular repertoires and molecules. Phylogenetic trees of protein structural domains and proteomes and their molecular functions were built from a genomic census of millions of encoded proteins and associated terminal Gene Ontology terms. Trees reveal a ‘metabolic-first’ origin of proteins, the late development of translation, and a patchwork distribution of proteins in biological networks mediated by molecular recruitment. Similarly, the natural history of ancient RNA molecules inferred from trees of molecular substructures built from a census of molecular features shows patchwork-like accretion patterns. Ideographic analyses of ribosomal history uncover the early appearance of structures supporting mRNA decoding and tRNA translocation, the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and RNA, and a first evolutionary transition that brings ribosomal subunits together into a processive protein biosynthetic complex. Nomothetic structural biology studies of tertiary interactions and ancient insertions in rRNA complement these findings, once concentric layering assumptions are removed. Patterns of coaxial helical stacking reveal a frustrated dynamics of outward and inward ribosomal growth possibly mediated by structural grafting. The early rise of the ribosomal ‘turnstile’ suggests an evolutionary transition in natural biological computation. Results make explicit the need to understand processes of molecular growth and information transfer of macromolecules. PMID:27096056

  9. The evolution of the plasmoidal structure in the pinched column in plasma focus discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kortanek, J.; Zielinska, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a description is provided of the evolution of the dense spherical-like structures—plasmoids—formed in the pinched column of the dense plasma focus at the current of 1 MA at the final phase of implosion of the deuterium plasma sheath and at the phase of evolution of instabilities both at the time of HXR and neutron production. At the stratification of the plasma column, the plasma injected to the dense structures from the axially neighboring regions forms small turbulences which increase first the toroidal structures, and finally generates a non-chaotic current plasmoidal structure with central maximal density. This spontaneous evolution supports the hypothesis of the spheromak-like model of the plasmoid and its sub-millimeter analogy, high-energy spot. These spots, also called nodules formed in the filamentary structure of the current can be a source of the energy capable of accelerating the fast charged particles.

  10. Structural health monitoring of concrete columns subjected to seismic excitations using piezoceramic-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-I.; Wang, J. X.; Song, G.; Gu, H.; Olmi, C.; Mo, Y. L.; Chang, K. C.; Loh, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Structural health monitoring of concrete structures under seismic loads has always attracted a lot of attention in the earthquake engineering community. In this paper, two tests of structural health monitoring of concrete columns using piezoceramic-based sensors are presented. The first test was a shake table test of a reinforced concrete (RC) column. A piezoceramic-based device, called a 'smart aggregate', was pre-embedded and adopted for the structural health monitoring of the concrete column under earthquake excitations. The second test of this study was the in situ health monitoring of RC piers of Niu-Dou Bridge in Taiwan, under seismic loading. RC piers instrumented with the post-embedded piezoceramic-based sensors were tested using reversed cyclic loading. During the shake table test and the in situ reversed cyclic loading test, one sensor was used as an actuator to generate propagating waves, and the other sensors were used to detect the waves. By analyzing the wave response, the existence of cracks can be detected and the severity can be estimated. The experimental results demonstrate the sensitivity and the effectiveness of the piezoceramic-based approach in the structural health monitoring of large-scale concrete structures under earthquake loading.

  11. Timescales for planetary accretion and the structure of the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1987-01-01

    No self-consistent scenario for all stages of planetary accretion which satisfies observational constraints currently exists. An attempt is accordingly made here to resolve the timescale problems and to outline a planet formation scenario consistent with current theories of star formation as well as related models of the protoplanetary disk. For accretion to have proceeded in the manner presently hypothesized, the surface mass density of planetessimals would have had to to be relatively uniform in the Venus-Jupiter region of the protoplanetary disk, consistent with viscous accretion disk models of the solar nebula. The outer regions of the nebula would still have contained enough solid matter to account for the growth of Uranus and Neptune in 5 to 500 million years.

  12. Optical Microlensing and Accretion Disk Structure in the Lensed Quasar SDSS 1520+530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Vigneshwar; Grinaski, Ian; MacLeod, Chelsea; Morgan, Christopher W.; Harris, Hugh C.; Kennington, James

    2015-01-01

    We analyze uncorrelated variability in seven seasons of SDSS r-band monitoring data from the doubly-imaged gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 1520+530 to yield a measurement of the size of the near-UV continuum emission region in this quasar. Photometry in the SBS 1520+530 system is complicated significantly by the proximity of a very bright star whose diffraction spike blends with the the lens, so we employed a mirror-flip subtraction technique to correct for this contamination. We conclude by testing our accretion disk measurement against the Quasar Accretion Disk Size - Black Hole Mass Relation.

  13. Thermonuclear flashes on hydrogen/helium accreting carbon monoxide white dwarfs and structure of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Joseph P.

    We studied H-shell flashes on CO WDs accreting Hydrogen rich matter in regimes where they are believed to be on the border of stable accretion and of having dynamical mass loss. These systems are believed to be progenitors of SNe Ia, however, there is still some question of what range of accretion rates and WD masses allow for growth to the Chandrasekhar mass, if any do at all. Flashes that result in mass loss are also of interest as they enrich the Inter Stellar Medium. Use of an explicit hydro code has allowed for the observation of a new physical effect from wave dissipation. With our high time resolution, energy transport via waves, and detailed EOS, we found that at the onset of the flash, a reduction in the degeneracy pressure due to electron captures, results in a reduction of the total pressure. With a gravitational acceleration on the order of 108 in the shell, a reduction of the total pressure by 1% results in an in fall acceleration of 10 kms2 . With such a strong in fall, compressional heating results in a hotter flash, with results showing temperatures over a billion degrees in all models. These high temperatures had consequences on the nucleosynthesis, as they allowed for rp-breakout during the flash. The effect of a "double" flash was found in one model. This resulted when the flash stalled in the H-shell, resulting in high temperature burning in only a portion of the shell. Once the H was exhausted in the flash region, cooling occurred and there was contraction of the H exhausted region. This contraction caused an in fall of the un-exhausted region which via compressional heating resulted in the flash to occur in the un-exhausted region. Such an effect may happen in any progenitor system in which the flash stalls and compression afterwards is suitable for a re-start of the flash. This effect may be observable with the current generation of instruments. With the high temperatures found in the flashes, rp-breakout nucleosynthesis was found to occur

  14. Probing the Structure of the Accretion Region in a Sample of Magnetic Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogodin, M. A.; Cahuasqui, J. A.; Drake, N. A.; Hubrig, S.; Schöller, M.; Petr-Gotzens, M.; Franco, G. A. P.; Lopes, D. F.; Kozlova, O. V.; Wolff, B.; González, J. F.; Carroll, T. A.; Mysore, S.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a study of the temporal behavior of several diagnostic lines formed in the region of the accretion-disk/star interaction in the three magnetic Herbig Ae stars HD 101412, HD 104237, and HD 190073. More than 100 spectra acquired with the ISAAC, X-shooter, and CRIRES spectrographs installed at the 8-m VLT telescope (ESO, Chile), as well as at other observatories (OHP, Crimean AO) were analyzed. The spectroscopic data were obtained in the He I λ10 830, Paγ, and He I λ5876 lines. We found that the temporal behavior of the diagnostic lines in the spectra of all program stars can be widely explained by a rotational modulation of the line profiles, generated by a local accretion flow. This result is in good agreement with the predictions of the magnetospheric accretion model. For the first time, the rotation period of HD 104237 (Prot = 5.37±0.03 days) as well as the inclination angle (i = 21°±4°) were determined. Additional analysis of the HARPSpol spectra of HD 104237 and HD 190073, taken from the ESO archive, with the use of the SVD method shows that the magnetic field structure of HD 190073 is likely more complex than a simple dipole and contains a circumstellar component. For the first time, the magnetic field of the secondary component of the binary system HD 104237 was also detected ((Bz) = 128±10 G).

  15. Lagrangian coherent structures analysis of gas-liquid flow in a bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Wang, GuoYu; Huang, Biao; Bai, ZeYu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a new identifying method to investigating the gas-liquid two-phase flow behaviors in a bubble column with air injected into water. In the numerical simulations, the standard k- ɛ turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulence phenomenon occurring in the continuous fluid. The Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are applied to analyze the vortex structures in multiphase flow. Reasonable agreements are obtained between the numerical and experimental data. The numerical results show that the evolution of gas-liquid in the column includes initial and periodical developing stages. During the initial stage, the bubble hose is forming and extending along the vertical direction with the vortex structures formed symmetrically. During the periodical developing stage, the bubble hose starts to oscillate periodically, and the vortexes move along the bubble hose to the bottom of column alternately. Compared to the Euler-system-based identification criterion of a vortex, the FTLE field presents the boundary of a vortex without any threshold defined and the LCS represents the divergence extent of infinite neighboring particles. During the initial stage, the interfaces between the forward and backward flows are highlighted by the LCS. As for the periodical developing stage, the LCS curls near the vortex centers, providing a method of analyzing a flow field from a dynamical system perspective.

  16. Theory of wind accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N. I.; Postnov, K. A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2014-01-01

    A review of wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries is presented. We focus attention to different regimes of quasi-spherical accretion onto the neutron star: the supersonic (Bondi) accretion, which takes place when the captured matter cools down rapidly and falls supersonically toward NS magnetospghere, and subsonic (settling) accretion which occurs when plasma remains hot until it meets the magnetospheric boundary. Two regimes of accretion are separated by an X-ray luminosity of about 4 × 1036 erg/s. In the subsonic case, which sets in at low luminosities, a hot quasi-spherical shell must be formed around the magnetosphere, and the actual accretion rate onto NS is determined by ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We calculate the rate of plasma entry the magnetopshere and the angular momentum transfer in the shell due to turbulent viscosity appearing in the convective differentially rotating shell. We also discuss and calculate the structure of the magnetospheric boundary layer where the angular momentum between the rotating magnetosphere and the base of the differentially rotating quasi-spherical shell takes place. We show how observations of equilibrium X-ray pulsars Vela X-1 and GX 301-2 can be used to estimate dimensionless parameters of the subsonic settling accretion theory, and obtain the width of the magnetospheric boundary layer for these pulsars.

  17. Research on seismic behavior and filling effect of a new CFT column-CFT beam frame structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Shima, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    Concrete filled-steel tube (CFT) structure is popularly used in practical structures nowadays. Self-compacting concrete (SCC) was employed to construct a new CFT column-CFT beam frame structure (hereinafter cited as new CFT frame structure) in this research. Three specimens, two CFT column-CFT beam joints and one hollow steel column-I beam joint were tested to investigate seismic behavior of the new CFT frame structure. The experimental results showed that SCC can be successfully compacted into the new CFT frame structure joints in the lab, and the joints provided adequate seismic behavior. In order to further assess filling effect of SCC in the long steel tube, scale column-beam subassembly made of acrylics plate was employed and concrete visual model experiment was done. The results showed that the concrete was able to be successfully cast into the subassembly which indicated that the new CFT frame structure is possible to be constructed in the real building.

  18. Research on seismic behavior and filling effect of a new CFT column-CFT beam frame structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Shima, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Concrete filled-steel tube (CFT) structure is popularly used in practical structures nowadays. Self-compacting concrete (SCC) was employed to construct a new CFT column-CFT beam frame structure (hereinafter cited as new CFT frame structure) in this research. Three specimens, two CFT column-CFT beam joints and one hollow steel column-I beam joint were tested to investigate seismic behavior of the new CFT frame structure. The experimental results showed that SCC can be successfully compacted into the new CFT frame structure joints in the lab, and the joints provided adequate seismic behavior. In order to further assess filling effect of SCC in the long steel tube, scale column-beam subassembly made of acrylics plate was employed and concrete visual model experiment was done. The results showed that the concrete was able to be successfully cast into the subassembly which indicated that the new CFT frame structure is possible to be constructed in the real building.

  19. X-ray Light Curves and Accretion Disk Structure of EX Hydrae

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

    2005-04-12

    We present X-ray light curves for the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Deep Survey photometer. We confirm earlier results on the shape and amplitude of the binary light curve and discuss a new feature: the phase of the minimum in the binary light curve, associated with absorption by the bulge on the accretion disk, increases with wavelength. We discuss several scenarios that could account for this trend and conclude that, most likely, the ionization state of the bulge gas is not constant, but rather decreases with binary phase. We also conclude that photoionization of the bulge by radiation originating from the white dwarf is not the main source of ionization, but that it is heated by shocks originating from the interaction between the in-flowing material from the companion and the accretion disk. The findings in this paper provide a strong test for accretion disk models in close binary systems.

  20. Telescoping columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. T.

    1980-12-01

    An extendable column is described which consists of several axially elongated rigid structural sections nested within one another. Each section includes a number of rotatably attached screws running along its length. The next inner section includes threaded lugs oriented to threadingly engage the screws. The column is extended or retracted upon rotation of the screws. The screws of each section are selectively rotated by a motor and an engagement mechanism.

  1. Discovery of a Three-Layered Atmospheric Structure in Accretion Disks around Stellar-Mass Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Xuejun; Yao, Yangsen; Cui, Wei; Chen, Wan; Wu, Xuebing; Xu, Haiguang

    1999-01-01

    We have carried out systematic modeling of the X-ray spectra of the Galactic superluminal jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40, using our newly developed spectral fitting methods. Our results reveal, for the first time, a three-layered structure of the atmosphere in the inner region of the accretion disks. Above the conanonly known, cold and optically thick disk of a blackbody temperature 0.2-0.5 keV, there is a layer of warm gas with a temperature of 1.0-1.5 keV and an optical depth of around 10. Compton scattering of the underlying disk blackbody photons produces the soft X-ray component we comonly observe. Under certain conditions, there is also a much hotter, optically thin corona above the warm layer, characterized by a temperature of 100 keV or higher and an optical depth of unity or less. The corona produces the hard X-ray component typically seen in these sources. We emphasize that the existence of the warm layer seem to be independent of the presence of the hot corona and, therefore, it is not due to irradiation of the disk by hard X-rays from the corona. Our results suggest a striking structural similarity between the accretion disks and the solar atmosphere, which may provide a new stimulus to study the common underlying physical processes operating in these vastly different systems. We also report the first unambiguous detection of an emission line around 6.4 keV in GRO J1655-40, which may allow further constraining of the accretion disk structure. We acknowledge NASA GSFC and MFC for partial financial support. (copyright) 1999: American Astronomical Society. All rights reverved.

  2. Tailoring the macroporous structure of monolithic silica-based capillary columns with potential for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laschober, Stefan; Sulyok, Michael; Rosenberg, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The present work aims at the optimisation of the synthesis of methyl-silsesquioxane monolithic capillary columns using a sol-gel based protocol. The influence of reaction conditions such as temperature, reaction mixture composition and catalyst concentration has been examined. The morphology of the products was studied by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. Monolithic capillary columns were obtained with a skeleton-like structure with open pores. Pore diameters vary from 0.8 to 15 microm, diameters of the xerogel network vary from 0.4 to 12 microm, respectively. Specific surface areas up to 334 m2/g have been observed, however, many materials did not possess areas above few m2/g which represents the limit of detection of the nitrogen porosimetry measurements. Excellent adhesion to the capillary wall was observed in all cases, and drying was possible at ambient conditions without the formation of cracks. PMID:17241639

  3. Structure of the Upper Crust Exposed at Endeavor Deep: Implications for Crustal Accretion at Ultra-Fast Spreading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popham, C. T.; Pockalny, R. A.; Larson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    Endeavor Deep lies at the tip of the propagating spreading center defining the Juan Fernandez/Nazca plate boundary. This 3 km-deep, amagmatic basin,which rifted into ultra-fast spread 3Myr old Nazca Plate crust, was recently surveyed and sampled with Simrad EM300, DSL-120 and ROV Jason II. Over 140 structural orientations measured from Jason II video of the south rift wall show that flows in extrusive layer 2a strike north-south and dip shallowly to the west, while dikes in intrusive layer 2b strike east-west and dip steeply to the south. Using a general model for crustal accretion in which dikes are emplaced vertically and extrusives horizontally, a rotational history is determined for the 3 Myr old crust exposed in the walls of the deep. Multiple rotations are necessary with two-fold intent, first to return structure to the original off-axis orientation prior to tectonic reorganization; second to account for rotations involved in the process of accretion. Tectonic events are first addressed with a 10-25 degree rotation about a horizontal rift parallel axis to account for flexural uplift. Next a 65-degree rotation applied about a vertical axis to return magnetic lineation 2a to its proposed paleo-off axis orientation. After rotation, intrusive and extrusive populations are strike parallel (N5E). In this orientation, dikes average 65-degree dip away from and extrusives 25-degree dip towards the ridge axis. This generally conforms to observations at Hess deep, Blanco FZ, and ODP hole 801C. The second goal of rotation is to account for off axis adjustments during crustal accretion; a 25-degree rotation about a ridge parallel, horizontal axis returns the average dike inclination to vertical and the extrusive dip to horizontal.

  4. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF STATIONARY ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Lovelace, R. V. E. E-mail: RVL1@cornell.edu

    2012-05-10

    In earlier works we pointed out that the disk's surface layers are non-turbulent and thus highly conducting (or non-diffusive) because the hydrodynamic and/or magnetorotational instabilities are suppressed high in the disk where the magnetic and radiation pressures are larger than the plasma thermal pressure. Here, we calculate the vertical profiles of the stationary accretion flows (with radial and azimuthal components), and the profiles of the large-scale, magnetic field taking into account the turbulent viscosity and diffusivity and the fact that the turbulence vanishes at the surface of the disk. Also, here we require that the radial accretion speed be zero at the disk's surface and we assume that the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is of order unity. Thus, at the disk's surface there are three boundary conditions. As a result, for a fixed dimensionless viscosity {alpha}-value, we find that there is a definite relation between the ratio R of the accretion power going into magnetic disk winds to the viscous power dissipation and the midplane plasma-{beta}, which is the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressure in the disk. For a specific disk model with R of order unity we find that the critical value required for a stationary solution is {beta}{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2.4r/({alpha}h), where h is the disk's half thickness. For weaker magnetic fields, {beta} > {beta}{sub c}, we argue that the poloidal field will advect outward while for {beta} < {beta}{sub c} it will advect inward. Alternatively, if the disk wind is negligible (R<<1), there are stationary solutions with {beta} >> {beta}{sub c}.

  5. Variability in daily pH scales with coral reef accretion and community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, N.; Martz, T.; Brainard, R. E.; Smith, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about natural variability in pH in coastal waters and how resident organisms respond to current nearshore seawater conditions. We used autonomous sensors (SeaFETs) to record temperature and, for the first time, pH with high temporal (hourly observations; 7 months of sampling) resolution on the reef benthos (5-10m depth) at several islands (Kingman, Palmyra and Jarvis) within the newly designated Pacific Remote Island Areas Marine National Monument (PRIMNM) in the northern Line Islands; these islands are uninhabited and lack potentially confounding local impacts (e.g. pollution and overfishing). Recorded benthic pH values were compared with regional means and minimum thresholds based on seasonal amplitude estimated from surrounding open-ocean climatological data, which represent seawater chemistry values in the absence of feedback from the reef. Each SeaFET sensor was co-located with replicate Calcification/Acidification Units (CAUs) designed to quantify species abundances and net community calcification rates so we could determine which, if any, metrics of natural variability in benthic pH and temperature were related to community development and reef accretion rates. The observed range in daily pH encompassed maximums reported from the last century (8.104 in the early evening) to minimums approaching projected levels within the next 100 yrs (7.824 at dawn) for pelagic waters. Net reef calcification rates, measured as calcium carbonate accretion on CAUs, varied within and among islands and were comparable with rates measured from the Pacific and Caribbean using chemistry-based approaches. Benthic species assemblages on the CAUs were differentiated by the presence of calcifying and fleshy taxa (CAP analysis, mean allocation success 80%, δ2 = 0.886, P = <0.001). In general, accretion rates were higher at sites that had a greater number of hours at high pH values each day. Where daily pH failed to exceed climatological seasonal minimum thresholds, net

  6. Structure of the accretion disk in the dwarf nova IP Pegasi

    SciTech Connect

    Goranskii, V.P.; Liutyi, V.M.; Shugarov, S.IU.

    1985-10-01

    Photoelectric U, B, V photometry of eclipses in the close binary system IP Peg, obtained mainly with the 6-m telescope, yields brightness profiles along the edgewise accretion disk. The radiation is dominated by a hot spot whose brightness and location in the disk depend on the state of activity in the binary. In the quiescent phase the disk is surrounded by a dark, extended ring, a small sector of which radiates during postflare declines. These observations support models attributing the outbursts of U Gem stars to intermittent mass ejection by the secondary component. 9 references.

  7. Structure of the accretion disk in the dwarf nova IP Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Lyutyj, V. M.; Shugarov, S. Yu.

    1985-10-01

    The brightness distribution over the edge-on accretion disc is investigated by means of photoelectric UBV observations of eclipses in the close binary system IP Pegasi. The radiation of a hot spot is predominant. The brightness and location of the spot in the disc change depending on the phase of activity. In a quiet state the disc is surrounded by an extended obscure ring, a small sector of which is shining when the star brightness falls down after the outburst. The observations support the model of a strengthening gas flow from the secondary star to explain the cause of outbursts.

  8. High-resolution soft X-ray spectra of Scorpius X-1 - The structure of circumsource accreting material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Seward, F. D.; Chlebowski, T.

    1984-01-01

    Four observations of Scorpius X-1 with the Objective Grating Spectrometer of the Einstein Observatory have provided high-resolution spectra (lambda/Delta lambda = approximately 20-50) in the wavelength range 7-46 A. The spectra reveal the presence of absorption structure due to oxygen, nitrogen, and iron, and variable emission structure associated with ionized iron and nitrogen. The strengths of these features suggest that the N/O abundance ratio in the absorbing and line emitting gas is anomalously high, which might indicate that these spectral components are associated with processed material, probably accreting matter transferred from the surface of an evolved companion. Constraints on the inclination of the system, however, imply that this cool, dense, accreting material must be well out of the plane of the binary system. Possible models for the origin and nature of this circumsource medium are discussed. An extensive discussion of the calibration of the Objective Grating Spectrometer and of the analysis of spectra acquired by that instrument is also provided.

  9. Numerical parameter survey of non-radiative black hole accretion: flow structure and variability of the rotation measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bijia; Pen, Ue-Li; Matzner, Christopher D.; Green, Stephen R.; Liebendörfer, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    We conduct a survey of numerical simulations to probe the structure and appearance of non-radiative black hole accretion flows like the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre. We find a generic set of solutions, and make specific predictions for currently feasible rotation measure (RM) observations, which are accessible to current instruments including the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The slow time variability of the RM is a key quantitative signature of this accretion flow. The time variability of RM can be used to quantitatively measure the nature of the accretion flow, and to differentiate models. Sensitive measurements of RM can be achieved using RM synthesis or using pulsars. Our energy conserving ideal magnetohydrodynamical simulations, which achieve high dynamical range by means of a deformed-mesh algorithm, stretch from several Bondi radii to about one-thousandth of that radius, and continue for tens of Bondi times. Magnetized flows which lack outward convection possess density slopes around -1, almost independent of physical parameters, and are more consistent with observational constraints than are strongly convective flows. We observe no tendency for the flows to become rotationally supported in their centres, or to develop steady outflow. We support these conclusions with formulae which encapsulate our findings in terms of physical and numerical parameters. We discuss the relation of these solutions to other approaches. The main potential uncertainties are the validity of ideal magnetohydrodynamic and the absence of a fully relativistic inner boundary condition. The RM variability predictions are testable with current and future telescopes.

  10. Massive star formation by accretion. I. Disc accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Massive stars likely form by accretion and the evolutionary track of an accreting forming star corresponds to what is called the birthline in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The shape of this birthline is quite sensitive to the evolution of the entropy in the accreting star. Aims: We first study the reasons why some birthlines published in past years present different behaviours for a given accretion rate. We then revisit the question of the accretion rate, which allows us to understand the distribution of the observed pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) stars in the HR diagram. Finally, we identify the conditions needed to obtain a large inflation of the star along its pre-MS evolution that may push the birthline towards the Hayashi line in the upper part of the HR diagram. Methods: We present new pre-MS models including accretion at various rates and for different initial structures of the accreting core. We compare them with previously published equivalent models. From the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram, we deduce the accretion law that best matches the accretion history of most of the intermediate-mass stars. Results: In the numerical computation of the time derivative of the entropy, some treatment leads to an artificial loss of entropy and thus reduces the inflation that the accreting star undergoes along the birthline. In the case of cold disc accretion, the existence of a significant swelling during the accretion phase, which leads to radii ≳ 100 R⊙ and brings the star back to the red part of the HR diagram, depends sensitively on the initial conditions. For an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, only models starting from a core with a significant radiative region evolve back to the red part of the HR diagram. We also obtain that, in order to reproduce the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram with an accretion law deduced from the observed mass outflows in ultra-compact HII regions, the fraction of the

  11. Multi-process herbicide transport in structured soil columns: experiments and model analysis.

    PubMed

    Köhne, J Maximilian; Köhne, Sigrid; Simůnek, Jirka

    2006-05-01

    Model predictions of pesticide transport in structured soils are complicated by multiple processes acting concurrently. In this study, the hydraulic, physical, and chemical nonequilibrium (HNE, PNE, and CNE, respectively) processes governing herbicide transport under variably saturated flow conditions were studied. Bromide (Br-), isoproturon (IPU, 3-(4-isoprpylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) and terbuthylazine (TER, N2-tert-butyl-6-chloro-N4-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) were applied to two soil columns. An aggregated Ap soil column and a macroporous, aggregated Ah soil column were irrigated at a rate of 1 cm h(-1) for 3 h. Two more irrigations at the same rate and duration followed in weekly intervals. Nonlinear (Freundlich) equilibrium and two-site kinetic sorption parameters were determined for IPU and TER using batch experiments. The observed water flow and Br- transport were inversely simulated using mobile-immobile (MIM), dual-permeability (DPM), and combined triple-porosity (DP-MIM) numerical models implemented in HYDRUS-1D, with improving correspondence between empirical data and model results. Using the estimated HNE and PNE parameters together with batch-test derived equilibrium sorption parameters, the preferential breakthrough of the weakly adsorbed IPU in the Ah soil could be reasonably well predicted with the DPM approach, whereas leaching of the strongly adsorbed TER was predicted less well. The transport of IPU and TER through the aggregated Ap soil could be described consistently only when HNE, PNE, and CNE were simultaneously accounted for using the DPM. Inverse parameter estimation suggested that two-site kinetic sorption in inter-aggregate flow paths was reduced as compared to within aggregates, and that large values for the first-order degradation rate were an artifact caused by irreversible sorption. Overall, our results should be helpful to enhance the understanding and modeling of multi-process pesticide transport through structured soils

  12. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ACCRETION DISK IN THE ACCRETION DISK CORONA X-RAY BINARY 4U 1822-371 AT OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Cornell, Mark E.; Hynes, Robert I.; Ashcraft, Teresa A.

    2010-01-20

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy of 4U 1822-371 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We use the new data to construct its UV/optical spectral energy distribution and its orbital light curve in the UV, V, and J bands. We derive an improved ephemeris for the optical eclipses and confirm that the orbital period is changing rapidly, indicating extremely high rates of mass flow in the system, and we show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km s{sup -1}. We show that the disk has a vertically extended, optically thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to approx0.5 of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically thick base of a disk wind, not as the optical counterpart of the ADC. Like previous models of 4U 1822-371, ours needs a tall obscuring wall near the edge of the accretion disk, but we interpret the wall as a layer of cooler material at the base of the disk wind, not as a tall, luminous disk rim.

  13. Crustal structure of accreted terranes in southern Alaska, Chugach Mountains and Copper River Basin, from seismic refraction results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ambos, E.L.; Mooney, W.D.; Christensen, N.I.; Geist, E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic refraction data were collected along a 320-km-long "transect' line in southern Alaska, crossing the Prince William, Chugach, Peninsular, and Wrangellia terranes, and along several shorter lines within individual terranes. Velocity structure in the upper crust (less than 9-km depth) differs among the four terranes. In contrast, layers in the middle crust (9- to 25-km depth) in some case extend across projected terrane boundaries. The top of a gently north dipping sequence of low- and high-velocity layers (5.7-7.8 km/s), more than 10 km thick, extends from near the surface in the southern Chugach terrane to more than 20-km depth beneath the southern Peninsular terrane. This sequence, truncated by the suture between the Prince William and Chugach terranes, is interpreted to be an underplated "terrane' made up of fragments of the Kula plate and its sedimentary overburden that were accreted during subduction in the late Mesozoic and/or early Tertiary, during or between times of accretion of the Prince William and Chugach terranes. -from Authors

  14. Structure of line-emitting accretion disks in active galactic nuclei - Arp 102B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kaiyou; Halpern, Jules P.

    1989-01-01

    The prime objects of the present self-consistent model of a line-emitting accretion disk able to account for the properties observed in a small class of AGNs are Arp 102B and 3C 390.3, whose double-peaked emission lines have been attributed to a Keplerian disk. Improved calculations of the line profile of a relativistic Keplerian disk, generalized to include a variety of emissivity laws as well as local broadening due to electron scattering or turbulence, are noted to fit Arp 102B; analytic and numerical calculations of the solid angle presented by the outer thin disk to an extended isotropic source of illumination demonstrate that the energy budget requirements for line emission from the disk are also satisfied.

  15. The structure of galactic HI in directions of low total column density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, F. J.; Jahoda, K.; Mccammon, D.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed 21 cm study of areas of that have the smallest known amount of HI in the northern sky was performed. These observations were corrected for stray radiation. The region of main interest, around alpha = 10(h)45(m), delta = 57 deg 20', has a minimium N(HI) of 4.5 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm. Spectra taken at 21' resolution over a field 4 x 3 deg in this direction show up to four HI line components. Two, near 0 and -50 km/s, are ubiquitous. There is also a narrow component at -10 km/s attributable to a diffuse cloud covering half of the field, and scattered patches of HI at v -100 km/s. the low and intermediate velocity components have a broad line width and are so smoothly distributed across the region that it is unlikely that they contain significant unresolved angular structure. Eight other low column density directions were also observed. Their spectra typically have several components, but the total column density is always 7 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm and changes smoothly along a 2 deg strip. Half of the directions show narrow lines arising from weak diffuse HI clouds that contain 0.5 to 3.0 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm.

  16. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  17. COMETARY NUCLEI. The shape and structure of cometary nuclei as a result of low-velocity accretion.

    PubMed

    Jutzi, M; Asphaug, E

    2015-06-19

    Cometary nuclei imaged from flyby and rendezvous spacecraft show common evidence of layered structures and bilobed shapes. But how and when these features formed is much debated, with distinct implications for solar system formation, dynamics, and geology. We show that these features could be a direct result of accretionary collisions, based on three-dimensional impact simulations using realistic constitutive properties. We identify two regimes of interest: layer-forming splats and mergers resulting in bilobed shapes. For bodies with low tensile strength, our results can explain key morphologies of cometary nuclei, as well as their low bulk densities. This advances the hypothesis that nuclei formed by collisional coagulation-either out of cometesimals accreting in the early solar system or, alternatively, out of comparable-sized debris clumps paired in the aftermath of major collisions. PMID:26022415

  18. Measurements of the Near-Surface Column Structure of Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-10-01

    Pyroclastic deposits on the Moon are associated with many types of volcanic constructs, including rilles, pits and linear fractures, and small domes. Prior radar data have revealed buried flows and rocks within some pyroclastics deposits (e.g. Aristarchus), while other deposits have radar polarimetry values that suggest very thick mounds of fine (centimeter-or-less sized) material (Campbell et. al., Geology, 36, 135, 2008; Carter et al., JGR, 114, E11004, doi:10.1029/2009JE003406, 2009). Radar can detect buried blocks or buried structures and provide a measure of roughness, while thermal infrared data provides complimentary information on the surface and near-surface rock abundance. The two wavelength ranges are also sensitive to different sized rocks, and the combined data sets provide the best way to make quantitative measurements of the upper structure of pyroclastic deposits. We use imaging radar data from Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mini-RF data, and LRO Diviner rock abundance and regolith temperature maps, to investigate a range of pyroclastic deposits associated with different types of volcanic structures, including Aristarchus, Rima Hyginus, and domes in Mare Tranquillitatis. Thick pyroclastic deposits have low rock abundance in both radar and infrared data, but in many cases (e.g. lunar domes, Aristarchus buried flows), the radar reveals rocks and structures that are not visible in the Diviner data sets. The derived column structure maps will provide an improved estimate of the thickness and degree of regolith mixing of pyroclastic deposits.

  19. Structural characteristics of shallowly buried accretionary prism: Rapidly uplifted Neogene accreted sediments on the Miura-Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The upper Miocene Misaki and Nishizaki formations on the Miura and Boso peninsulas in central Japan preserve the deformation features of an off-scraped accretionary prism. The spatial distribution, geometry, and style of accretion-related deformation with paleotemperature and burial depth estimation are elucidated in this study. The deformation structures and textures are similar to those of modern accretionary prisms. The low maximum paleotemperature (<50°C) and high preserved porosity of the sediments (30-50%) imply a maximum burial depth of less than 1000 m. On the basis of the mode of deformation, this off-scraped body is divided into an imbricate thrust, a thrust unit, and an upper coherent unit in ascending order. The imbricate thrust corresponds to a branch from the basal décollement zone and is subdivided into a brecciated zone, a main gouge zone, and a shear band zone. The thrust unit hosts a concentration of thrust systems that form various orders of duplex structures, while the upper coherent unit is characterized by gravitational instability- and earthquake-induced deformation without thrust faulting. The duplex distribution, shear strain, and fluid migration associated with the off-scraping processes are clearly localized within the imbricate thrust and thrust unit. This accretion-related deformation occurred before lithification of the sediment and under high fluid pressure induced by shear deformation, thickening of the sedimentary sequence, and earthquake-induced liquefaction. These processes are inferred to control the effect on the mode of deformation and the location of thrusting during early deformation of the accretionary prism.

  20. Computer aided diagnosis for osteoporosis based on vertebral column structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Eiji; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Harada, Masafumi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Patients of osteoporosis are comprised of about 11 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems that have gained society. For preventing the osteoporosis, obtaining early detection and treatment are necessary. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving for three dimensional (3D) image analysis, higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. 3D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used for supporting diagnosis of osteoporosis. Simultaneously, this analysis can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. An effective result was provided for the case including an insufficient complicated vertebral body bone fracture by the conventional method.

  1. Evolution of Massive Protostars Via Disk Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-09-01

    Mass accretion onto (proto-)stars at high accretion rates \\dot{M}_* > 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr^{-1} is expected in massive star formation. We study the evolution of massive protostars at such high rates by numerically solving the stellar structure equations. In this paper, we examine the evolution via disk accretion. We consider a limiting case of "cold" disk accretion, whereby most of the stellar photosphere can radiate freely with negligible backwarming from the accretion flow, and the accreting material settles onto the star with the same specific entropy as the photosphere. We compare our results to the calculated evolution via spherically symmetric accretion, the opposite limit, whereby the material accreting onto the star contains the entropy produced in the accretion shock front. We examine how different accretion geometries affect the evolution of massive protostars. For cold disk accretion at 10-3 M sun yr-1, the radius of a protostar is initially small, R *sime a few R sun. After several solar masses have accreted, the protostar begins to bloat up and for M * ~= 10 M sun the stellar radius attains its maximum of 30-400 R sun. The large radius ~100 R sun is also a feature of spherically symmetric accretion at the same accreted mass and accretion rate. Hence, expansion to a large radius is a robust feature of accreting massive protostars. At later times, the protostar eventually begins to contract and reaches the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) for M * ~= 30 M sun, independent of the accretion geometry. For accretion rates exceeding several 10-3 M sun yr-1, the protostar never contracts to the ZAMS. The very large radius of several hundreds R sun results in the low effective temperature and low UV luminosity of the protostar. Such bloated protostars could well explain the existence of bright high-mass protostellar objects, which lack detectable H II regions.

  2. The Structure of the Accretion Disk in the Lensed Quasar SBS 0909+532

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, E.; Muñoz, J. A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Guerras, E.; Acosta-Pulido, J.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.; Arribas, S.; Manchado, A.; Mosquera, A.

    2011-03-01

    We derive the size and temperature profile of the accretion disk of the lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 by measuring the wavelength dependence (chromaticity) of the microlensing magnification produced by the stars in the lens galaxy. After correcting for extinction using the flux ratios of 14 emission lines, we observe a marked change in the B-A flux ratio with wavelength, varying from -0.67 ± 0.05 mag at (rest frame) ~1460 Å to -0.24 ± 0.07 mag at ~6560 Å. For λ >~ 7000 Å both effects, extinction and microlensing, look minimal. Simulations indicate that image B rather than A is strongly microlensed. If we model the change in disk size from 1460 Å to 6560 Å using a Gaussian source (I vprop exp(-R 2/2r 2 s )) with a disk size scaling with wavelength as rs vprop λ p , we find rs = 7+5 -3 light-days at 1460 Å and p = 0.9+0.6 -0.3 for uniform priors on rs and p, and rs = 4+3 -3 light-days and p = 1.0+0.6 -0.4 for a logarithmic prior on rs . The disk temperature profile T vprop R -1/p is consistent with thin disk theory (T vprop R -3/4), given the uncertainties. The estimates of rs are also in agreement with the size inferred from thin disk theory using the estimated black hole mass (M BH ~= 2 × 109 M sun) but not with the smaller size estimated from thin disk theory and the optical flux. We also use the flux ratios of the unmicrolensed emission lines to determine the extinction curve of the dust in the lens galaxy, finding that it is similar to that of the LMC2 Supershell.

  3. Wind accretion: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N. I.; Postnov, K. A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2015-07-01

    A review of wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries is presented. We focus on different regimes of quasi-spherical accretion onto the neutron star (NS): the supersonic (Bondi) accretion, which takes place when the captured matter cools down rapidly and falls supersonically towards the NS magnetosphere, and subsonic (settling) accretion which occurs when plasma remains hot until it meets the magnetospheric boundary. These two regimes of accretion are separated by an X-ray luminosity of about 4 × 1036 erg s-1. In the subsonic case, which sets in at lower luminosities, a hot quasi-spherical shell must form around the magnetosphere, and the actual accretion rate onto NS is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In turn, two regimes of subsonic accretion are possible, depending on plasma cooling mechanism (Compton or radiative) near the magnetopshere. The transition from the high-luminosity with Compton cooling to the lowluminosity (Lx ≲ 3 × 1035 erg s-1) with radiative cooling can be responsible for the onset of the off states repeatedly observed in several low-luminosity slowly accreting pulsars, such as Vela X-1, GX 301-2, and 4U 1907+09. The triggering of the transitionmay be due to a switch in the X-ray beam pattern in response to a change in the optical depth in the accretion column with changing luminosity. We also show that in the settling accretion theory, bright X-ray flares (~1038-1040 erg) observed in supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXT) can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass

  4. Seismic Structure of the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico: Evidence for Heterogenous Accretion and Extension in Proterozoic Time, and Modern Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, B. M.; Levander, A.; Miller, K. C.; Eshete, T.

    2001-12-01

    Southwestern North America is the result of a long and complex geologic history that spans from the Proterozoic time, when assembly of the southwestern part of the continent began, to the present. Geological and geophysical observations suggest that the lithospheric structures produced during the assembly of the continent profoundly influenced subsequent modifications to the southwest. The primary objective of the Continental Dynamics of Rocky Mountains (CDROM) project is to investigate the processes that have produced the present structure of the Rocky Mountains lithosphere and to understand the legacy of the Archean and Proterozoic accretionary boundaries. One of the enigmatic features investigated in CDROM is the Jemez Lineament, an 800 km long alignment of Tertiary volcanic centers that extends across Arizona and northern New Mexico following the southern margin of the Yavapai-Mazatzal Proterozoic terrane boundary. The Jemez lineament was the target of deep seismic reflection and crustal refraction profiling. The reflection profile extends about 150 km parallel to the front of the southern Rocky Mountains and crosses the southern edge of the lineament at high angle near Las Vegas NM. The seismic reflection profile exhibits a striking difference in reflectivity and crustal structure north and south of Las Vegas. To the north the reflection profile images a broad, south dipping, strongly reflecting, ramp structure, traceable to depths of 30-32km. The ramp is overprinted in places by a complex set of bright layered reflections. We interpret the south-dipping ramp as a suture formed during Proterozoic island arc accretion and the bright reflections as Jemez lineament recent intrusives that have ponded at several crustal depths, and are present locally in outcrop. We speculate that the intrusives used the Proterozoic suture as a pathway through the crust to the surface. To the south, the entire middle crust is characterized by a 35 km wide antiform that may have

  5. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. I. Effects of line-of-sight contamination on the column density structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Ossenkopf, V.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Federrath, C.; Tremblin, P.; Girichidis, P.; Bontemps, S.; André, Ph.

    2015-03-01

    Column-density maps of molecular clouds are one of the most important observables in the context of molecular cloud- and star-formation (SF) studies. With the Herschel satellite it is now possible to precisely determine the column density from dust emission, which is the best tracer of the bulk of material in molecular clouds. However, line-of-sight (LOS) contamination from fore- or background clouds can lead to overestimating the dust emission of molecular clouds, in particular for distant clouds. This implies values that are too high for column density and mass, which can potentially lead to an incorrect physical interpretation of the column density probability distribution function (PDF). In this paper, we use observations and simulations to demonstrate how LOS contamination affects the PDF. We apply a first-order approximation (removing a constant level) to the molecular clouds of Auriga and Maddalena (low-mass star-forming), and Carina and NGC 3603 (both high-mass SF regions). In perfect agreement with the simulations, we find that the PDFs become broader, the peak shifts to lower column densities, and the power-law tail of the PDF for higher column densities flattens after correction. All corrected PDFs have a lognormal part for low column densities with a peak at Av ~ 2 mag, a deviation point (DP) from the lognormal at Av(DP) ~ 4-5 mag, and a power-law tail for higher column densities. Assuming an equivalent spherical density distribution ρ ∝ r- α, the slopes of the power-law tails correspond to αPDF = 1.8, 1.75, and 2.5 for Auriga, Carina, and NGC 3603. These numbers agree within the uncertainties with the values of α ≈ 1.5,1.8, and 2.5 determined from the slope γ (with α = 1-γ) obtained from the radial column density profiles (N ∝ rγ). While α ~ 1.5-2 is consistent with a structure dominated by collapse (local free-fall collapse of individual cores and clumps and global collapse), the higher value of α > 2 for NGC 3603 requires a physical

  6. Active Arc-Continent Accretion in Timor-Leste: New Structural Mapping and Quantification of Continental Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Bakker, R.; van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Harris, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The island of Timor represents the active accretion of the Banda volcanic arc to the Australian continental margin. Arc accretion marks the final closure of an ocean basin in the canonic Wilson tectonic cycle, yet the incipient stages as visible now on Timor are still poorly understood. In particular, ocean closure brings continental material into the subduction zone as part of the down-going plate. The positive buoyancy of this subducting continental crust presents a complex problem in crustal dynamics, with possible effects on overall plate motions, migration and/or reversal of the active subduction zone, and the modes of faulting within the upper crust. New mapping in Timor-Leste has provided a detailed view of the structural repetition of Australian continental sedimentary units structurally below overriding Banda Arc material. The central Dili-Same transect begins in the north with the low-grade metamorphic Aileu Formation of Australian affinity, thrust over the time-equivalent more proximal Maubisse Formation to the south. These in turn are thrust over the Australian intra-continental strata, the Triassic Aitutu and the Permian Cribas Formations. The Aitutu and Cribas Formations are deformed in a series of faulted ENE-striking anticlines exposed along the central axis of Timor. The southern end of the transect reveals a 15-km wide piggyback basin of synorogenic marine clays north of another faulted anticline of Aututu and Cribas on the south coast. The eastern Laclo-Barique transect exposes a deeper erosional level, showing three regional NNE-striking thrust faults with approximately 3 km spacing and 50-75 km along-strike extent, each one repeating the Aitutu and Cribas stratigraphy. The strike of Australian-affinity units in the eastern transect is rotated 50-60 degrees to the north compared to the units in the central transect. The Jurassic Wailuli shales and the Bobonaro tectonic mélange act as the upper décollement between this duplex and the Lolotoi

  7. Reconstruction of the Structure of Accretion Disks in Dwarf Novae from the Multi-Band Light Curves of Early Superhumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ohshima, Tomohito; Maehara, Hiroyuki

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new method to reconstruct the structure of accretion disks in dwarf novae using multi-band light curves of early superhumps. Our model assumes that early superhumps are caused by the rotation effect of non-axisymmetrically flaring disks. We have developed a Bayesian model for this reconstruction, in which a smoother disk-structure tends to have a higher prior probability. We analyzed simultaneous optical and near-infrared photometric data of early superhumps of the dwarf nova, V455 And using this technique. The reconstructed disk has two flaring parts in the outermost region of the disk. These parts are responsible for the primary and secondary maxima of the light curves. The height-to-radius ratio is h/r 0.20-0.25 in the outermost region. In addition to the outermost flaring structures, flaring arm-like patterns can be seen in an inner region of the reconstructed disk. The overall profile of the reconstructed disk is reminiscent of the disk structure that is deformed by the tidal effect. However, an inner arm-like pattern, which is responsible for the secondary minimum in the light curve, cannot be reproduced only by the tidal effect. It implies the presence of another mechanism that deforms the disk structure. Alternatively, the temperature distribution of the disk could be non-axisymmetric. We demonstrate that the disk structure with weaker arm-like patterns is optimal in the model including the irradiation effect. However, the strongly irradiated disk gives quite blue colors, which may conflict with the observation. Our results suggest that the amplitude of early superhumps depends mainly on the height of the outermost flaring regions of the disk. We predict that early superhumps can be detected with an amplitude of > 0.02 mag in about 90% of WZ Sge stars.

  8. The Structure of the Circumgalactic Medium of Galaxies: Cool Accretion Inflow Around NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Chelouche, Doron; Jenkins, Edward B.; Tripp, Todd M.; Pettini, Max; York, Donald G.; Frye, Brenda L.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope far-UV spectra of four QSOs whose sightlines pass through the halo of NGC 1097 at impact parameters of ρ = 48–165 kpc. NGC 1097 is a nearby spiral galaxy that has undergone at least two minor merger events, but no apparent major mergers, and is relatively isolated with respect to other nearby bright galaxies. This makes NGC 1097 a good case study for exploring baryons in a paradigmatic bright-galaxy halo. Lyα absorption is detected along all sightlines and Si iii λ1206 is found along the three sightlines with the smallest ρ metal lines of C ii, Si ii, and Si iv are only found with certainty toward the innermost sightline. The kinematics of the absorption lines are best replicated by a model with a disk-like distribution of gas approximately planar to the observed 21 cm H i disk, which is rotating more slowly than the inner disk, and into which gas is infalling from the intergalactic medium. Some part of the absorption toward the innermost sightline may arise either from a small-scale outflow or from tidal debris associated with the minor merger that gives rise to the well known “dog-leg” stellar stream that projects from NGC 1097. When compared to other studies, NGC 1097 appears to be a “typical” absorber, although the large dispersion in absorption line column density and equivalent width in a single halo goes perhaps some way toward explaining the wide range of these values seen in higher-z studies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. Second-order statistics and ‘designer’ waves for violent free-surface motion around multi-column structures

    PubMed Central

    Grice, J. R.; Taylor, P. H.; Taylor, R. Eatock

    2015-01-01

    Extreme wave–structure interactions are investigated using second-order diffraction theory. The statistics of surface elevation around a multi-column structure are collected using Monte Carlo-type simulations for severe sea states. Within the footprint of a realistic four-column structure, we find that the presence of the structure can give rise to extreme crest elevations greater than twice those at the same return period in the incident wave field. Much of this extra elevation is associated with the excitation of second-order near-trapped modes. A ‘designer’ incident wave can be defined at each point around the structure for a given sea state as the average input wave to produce extreme crest elevations at a given return period, and we show that this wave can be simply vertically scaled to estimate the response at other return periods. PMID:25512584

  10. Risk factors associated with structural postural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sedrez, Juliana Adami; da Rosa, Maria Izabel Zaniratti; Noll, Matias; Medeiros, Fernanda da Silva; Candotti, Claudia Tarragô

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between behavioral risk factors, specifically postural habits, with the presence of structural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents. METHODS: 59 students were evaluated through the self-reporting Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument and spinal panoramic radiographic examination. Spine curvatures were classified based on Cobb angles, as normal or altered in the saggital plane and as normal or scoliotic in the frontal plane. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0, based on descriptive statistics and chi-square association test (a=0,05). RESULTS: The prevalence of postural changes was 79.7% (n=47), of which 47.5% (n=28) showed frontal plane changes and 61% (n=36) sagital plane changes. Significant association was found between the presence of thoracic kyphosis and female gender, practice of physical exercises only once or twice a week, sleep time greater than 10 hours, inadequate postures when sitting on a seat and sitting down to write, and how school supplies are carried. Lumbar lordosis was associated with the inadequate way of carrying the school backpack (asymmetric); and scoliosis was associated wuth the practice of competitive sports and sleep time greater than 10 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle may be associated with postural changes. It is important to develop health policies in order to reduce the prevalence of postural changes, by decreasing the associated risk factors. PMID:25623725

  11. Quantitative structure-retention relationship of selected imidazoline derivatives on α1-acid glycoprotein column.

    PubMed

    Filipic, Slavica; Ruzic, Dusan; Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica

    2016-08-01

    The retention behaviour of 22 selected imidazoline drugs and derivatives was investigated on α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) column using Sørensen phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) and 2-propanol as organic modifier. Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationships (QSRR) models were built using extrapolated logkw values as well as isocratic retention factors (logk5, logk8, logk10, logk12, logk15 obtained for 5%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 15%, of 2-propanol in mobile phase, respectively) as dependant variables and calculated physicochemical parameters as independant variables. The established QSRR models were built by stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares regression (PLS). The performance of the stepwise and PLS models was tested by cross-validation and the external test set prediction. The validated QSRR models were compared and the optimal PLS-QSRR model for logkw and each isocratic retention factors (PLS-QSRR(logk5), PLS-QSRR(logk8), PLS-QSRR(logk10), MLR-QSRR(logk12), MLR-QSRR(logk15)) were selected. The QSRR results were further confirmed by Linear Solvation Energy Relationships (LSER). LSER analysis indicated on hydrogen bond basicity, McGowan volume and excess molar refraction as the most significant parameters for all AGP chromatographic retention factors and logkw values of 22 selected imidazoline drugs and derivatives. PMID:26968888

  12. Properties of accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Dove, J.; Staubert, R.; Begelman, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of accretion disk corona in a parameter regime suitable for Galactic black hole candidates are considered and the results of an analysis of these properties using a self-consistent Monte Carlo code are presented. Examples of the coronal temperature structure, the shape and angular dependency of the spectrum and the maximum temperature allowed for each optical depth of the corona are presented. It is shown that the observed spectrum of the Galactic black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 cannot be explained by accreting disk corona models with a slab geometry, where the accretion disk is sandwiched by the comptonizing medium.

  13. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -

    1989-11-24

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. The development of these photon bubbles'' have growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales. The photon bubbles are likely to be a consequence of convective over-stability and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  14. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-11-20

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. We follow the evolution of these photon bubbles for several dynamical timescales. The development of these photon bubbles'' indicates growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales in agreement with a linear stability analysis. The photon bubbles are a consequence of the effect of radiative heat flux on the internal gravity waves in the strongly magnetized atmosphere and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Suitability of multichannel seismic systems for imaging the internal structure of the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Biescas, B.; Carbonell, R.; Danobeitia, J.; Hobbs, R.

    2007-05-01

    Seismic oceanography is slowly becoming a popular tool to investigate the internal structure of the water column. The principle of this technique is that the energy generated by seismic sources is partially reflected at the boundaries between water masses with contrasting physical properties. The reflected wavefield is recorded and processed to create continuous images of these boundaries. Since the pioneer work of Holbrook was published (Holbrook et al., 2003), numerous papers have appeared showing the potential of seismic oceanography to image the ocean's fine structure with unprecedented lateral resolution (10 m), the spatial coincidence of seismic reflectivity and temperature/salinity contrasts, and the correlation between seismic reflections and internal wave spectra. Despite the relatively large amount of recent work, little has been done concerning the existing issues to adapt seismic systems to oceanographic research. In this work we present a set of basic synthetic tests to illustrate the relative significance of different parameters for imaging the oceanic fine structure using seismic methods. The parameters considered include the frequency content and energy of the source wavelet, the ambient noise level, as well as the shooting rate, signal redundancy and fold. We show that powerful (>200 dB re 1 microPa), low-frequency (20-60 Hz) sources such as those commonly used in deep seismic soundings (DSS) are, purposelessly, well-suited to image also the oceans fine structure at all depth ranges. The reason for this is that, on one hand, the acoustic impedance (i.e., reflection coefficients) associated to intra-oceanic boundaries are two orders of magnitude smaller than those associated to geological boundaries (10-3/10-1), so it is crucial to use energetic sources to overcome ambient noise regardless of the target proximity. On the other hand, the limits between water layers, in contrast to the geological ones, do not show abrupt impedance contrasts but rather

  16. The structure of protostellar accretion disks and the origin of bipolar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, Mark; Koenigl, Arieh

    1993-01-01

    Equations are obtained which govern the disk-wind structure and identify the physical parameters relevant to circumstellar disks. The system of equations is analyzed in the thin-disk approximation, and it is shown that the system can be consistently reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations in z. Representative solutions are presented, and it is shown that the apparent paradox discussed by Shu (1991) is resolved when the finite thickness of the disk is taken into account. Implications of the results for the origin of bipolar flows in young stellar objects and possible application to active galactic nuclei are discussed.

  17. Seismic structure and crustal accretion along an intermediate-rate mid-ocean ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert Todd

    Epicenters and magnitudes for 36,523 earthquakes recorded along the Endeavour segment between August 2003 and October 2006 are automatically determined using a local ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) network. The catalog is dominated by two swarm sequences in January and February 2005 in the vicinity of the Endeavour overlapping spreading center, which included earthquakes in West Valley, the northern portion of the Endeavour segment, southwest Endeavour Valley and the Endeavour vent fields. These swarms are attributed to volcanism including a dike intrusion on the northern Endeavour in February 2005 and smaller diking events on the propagating tip of the West Valley segment in both swarms. The dike on the northern Endeavour propagated to the south, which is inconsistent with magma sourced from the axial magma chamber beneath the elevated central portion of the segment. Following the swarms, seismic activity on the Endeavour segment decreased on average to ˜15% of pre-swarm values and almost ceased at the segment ends. I infer that a six-year non-eruptive event that started with a swarm in 1999 and finished with the 2005 swarms ruptured the entire segment and relieved plate-spreading stresses. The inferred coupling between the 1999 and 2005 events, the observation of extensive precursory activity prior to the 2005 swarms, and the interaction between seismically active regions during the swarms is consistent with static triggering with delays influenced by viscoelastic relaxation, hydraulic diffusion and magma withdrawal and replenishment. The isotropic and anisotropic P-wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted travel time data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the ends of the segment. These low velocities are indicative of

  18. The structure of accretion discs around low-mass young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaume, R.

    2003-07-01

    It is nowadays widely accepted that low mass star formation initiated from a molecular cloud undergoes a phase where the central object is surrounded by a disc, in which planets may form later. The study of such a disc mainly aims at the understanding of the evolutionary sequence of star formation and of planet formation. Radiative transfer in this disc is of high importance, for it is heated by viscous dissipation or stellar irradiation for instance. The production and transportation of thermal energy in this disc therefore conditions its chemical and physical properties inside. It has countless consequences in terms of structure. I shall present a study of the discs based on a deep analytical description of the radiative transfer and a delay of the numerical implementation. This method allows a better grasp on processes and physical conditions in these objects. I shall constrain model parameters and establish a new diagnosis combining the spectral energy distribution and the visibilities obtained with optical long-baseline interferometers. The former observable is a well known technique, and the latter new and promising: it provides information at the scale of one astronomical unit for the closest star forming regions. I shall start a generalisation of the analytical studies of the radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres, with two striking discrepancies: viscous heating occurs everywhere in the disc and the surface is illuminated by the star. I apply this formalism in a numerical simulation of a disc heated by viscosity alone. I then develop a simplified version of this transfer in a two-layer disc: the surface is heated by the interior and by the star, and the interior by viscosity and by the surface. This simplification allow to derive a simplified analytical description of the physical conditions in a disc heated by the two processes mentioned above. I shall tackle the interpretation of observations in the end. I shall of the possibilities brought by

  19. Transverse bacterial migration induced by chemotaxis in a packed column with structured physical heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Ford, Roseanne M.

    2009-01-01

    The significance of chemotaxis in directing bacterial migration towards contaminants in natural porous media was investigated under groundwater flow conditions. A laboratory-scale column, with a coarse-grained sand core surrounded by a fine-grained annulus, was used to simulate natural aquifers with strata of different hydraulic conductivities. A chemoattractant source was placed along the central axis of the column to model contaminants trapped in the heterogeneous subsurface. Chemotactic bacterial strains, Escherichia coli HCB1 and Pseudomonas putida F1, introduced into the column by a pulse injection, were found to alter their transport behaviors under the influence of the attractant chemical emanating from the central source. For E. coli HCB1, approximately 18% more of the total population relative to the control without attractant exited the column from the coarse sand layer due to the chemotactic effects of α-methylaspartate under an average fluid velocity of 5.1 m/d. Although P. putida F1 demonstrated no observable changes in migration pathways with the model contaminant acetate under the same flow rate, when the flow rate was reduced to 1.9 m/d, approximately 6~10% of the population relative to the control migrated from the fine sand layer towards attractant into the coarse sand layer. Microbial transport properties were further quantified by a mathematical model to examine the significance of bacterial motility and chemotaxis under different hydrodynamic conditions, which suggested important considerations for strain selection and practical operation of bioremediation schemes. PMID:19731698

  20. He-accreting white dwarfs: accretion regimes and final outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Yungelson, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyse the thermal response of an accreting WD to mass deposition at different timescales. The analysis has been performed for initial WD masses and accretion rates in the range 0.60-1.02 M⊙ and 10-9-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameter space MWD-dot{M}_He leading to formation of red-giant-like structures, steady burning of He, and mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between these regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building up of a He-rich layer via H burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for interpreting He novae is discussed.

  1. To accrete or not accrete, that is the question

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von, Huene R.

    1986-01-01

    Along modern convergent margins tectonic processes span a spectrum from accretion to erosion. The process of accretion is generally recognized because it leaves a geologic record, whereas the process of erosion is generally hypothetical because it produces a geologic hiatus. Major conditions that determine the dominance of accretion or erosion at modern convergent margins are: 1) rate and direction of plate convergence, 2) sediment supply and type in the trench, and 3) topography of the subducting ocean floor. Most change in structure has been ascribed to plate motion, but both erosion and accretion are observed along the same convergence margin. Thus sediment supply and topography are probably of equivalent importance to plate motion because both erosion and accretion are observed under constant conditions of plate convergence. The dominance of accretion or erosion at a margin varies with the thickness of trench sediment. In a sediment flooded trench, the proportions of subducted and accreted sediment are commonly established by the position of a decollement along a weak horizon in the sediment section. Thus, the vertical variation of sediment strength and the distribution of horizontal stress are important factors. Once deformation begins, the original sediment strength is decreased by sediment remolding and where sediment thickens rapidly, increases in pore fluid pressure can be pronounced. In sediment-starved trenches, where the relief of the subducting ocean floor is not smoothed over, the front of the margin must respond to the topography subducted as well as that accreted. The hypothesized erosion by the drag of positive features against the underside of the upper plate (a high stress environment) may alternate with erosion due to the collapse of a margin front into voids such as graben (a low stress environment). ?? 1986 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  2. The growth of planets by pebble accretion in evolving protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Lambrechts, Michiel; Johansen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The formation of planets depends on the underlying protoplanetary disc structure, which in turn influences both the accretion and migration rates of embedded planets. The disc itself evolves on time scales of several Myr, during which both temperature and density profiles change as matter accretes onto the central star. Here we used a detailed model of an evolving disc to determine the growth of planets by pebble accretion and their migration through the disc. Cores that reach their pebble isolation mass accrete gas to finally form giant planets with extensive gas envelopes, while planets that do not reach pebble isolation mass are stranded as ice giants and ice planets containing only minor amounts of gas in their envelopes. Unlike earlier population synthesis models, our model works without any artificial reductions in migration speed and for protoplanetary discs with gas and dust column densities similar to those inferred from observations. We find that in our nominal disc model, the emergence of planetary embryos preferably should occur after approximately 2 Myr in order to not exclusively form gas giants, but also ice giants and smaller planets. The high pebble accretion rates ensure that critical core masses for gas accretion can be reached at all orbital distances. Gas giant planets nevertheless experience significant reduction in semi-major axes by migration. Considering instead planetesimal accretion for planetary growth, we show that formation time scales are too long to compete with the migration time scales and the dissipation time of the protoplanetary disc. All in all, we find that pebble accretion overcomes many of the challenges in the formation of ice and gas giants in evolving protoplanetary discs. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Cyclotron Resonance in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Cyclotron Resonance Absorption/Scattering features provide direct measurement of magnetic field strength in the line forming region. This has enabled the estimation of magnetic field strengths of nearly two dozen neutron stars in accreting high mass binary systems. With improved spectroscopic sensitivity, new X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR, Astrosat and Hitomi are opening the doors to studying detailed features such as the line shape and phase dependence with high significance. Such studies will help understand the nature of matter accumulation in, and outflow from, the magnetically confined accretion column on the neutron star. This talk will describe the results of MHD simulations of the matter flow in such systems, the diagnostics of such flows using cyclotron lines, and comparison with recent observations from NuSTAR and Astrosat.

  4. Tomographic Analysis of Reactive Flow Induced Pore Structure Changes in Column Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Rong; Lindquist, W.Brent; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.

    2009-09-23

    We utilize synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography to capture and quantify snapshots in time of dissolution and secondary precipitation in the microstructure of Hanford sediments exposed to simulated caustic waste in flow-column experiments. The experiment is complicated somewhat as logis- tics dictated that the column spent significant amounts of time in a sealed state (acting as a batch reactor). Changes accompanying a net reduction in porosity of 4% were quantified including: 1) a 25% net decrease in pores resulting from a 38% loss in the number of pores less than < 10-4 MM3 in volume and a 13% increase in the number of pores of larger size; and 2) a 38% decrease in the number of throats. The loss of throats resulted in de- creased coordination number for pores of all sizes and significant reduction in the number of pore pathways.

  5. Structure and evolution of the mantle column beneath the Nakyn kimberlite field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashchepkov, I.; Stegnitsky, Yu; Minin, V.; Tolstov, A.; Vladykin, N.; Rotman, A.; Palessky, S.; Agashev, A.; Khmelnikova, O.; Skvortsova, M.,

    2012-04-01

    Nakyn kimberlites refer to the main stage of kimberlite magmatism in Yakutia (Agashgev et al., 2004) Upper Devonian (UD) kimberlites. Minerals from the concentrates analyzed by EPMA and LAM ICP from Nyurbinskaya, Botuobinskaya pipes and Maiskaya body and placer were compared to determine mantle structure and compositions. Peridotite garnet population of all pies corresponds the lherzolite field to pyroxenitic 15% Cr2O3 (Pokhilenko, Sobolev, 2004), the subcalsic garnets prevail in (8-11; Cr2O3). Peaks of the TiO2 and Na2O correspond to the same Cr2O3 intervals. (Zinchuk et al, 2003). In chromite trend Cr2O3 ( 65-20% ) lognormal decrease with TiO2 enrichment 3.5% in the beginning. In tuffs containing clinopyroxenes from Nyurbinskaya, Botuobinskaya pipes show decrease of Na, Al Ti and Cr rise with Fe as for Mir pie. The Cp in Nurbinskaya tuffs with Ilm are higher in TiO2 Restricted in TiO2 ilmenite trend show rapid decrease of Na2O, MgO content and V2O5 -FeO rise (Fig. 4). The PTFO2 diagrams determined with new variant of the monomineral thermobarometry (Ashchepkov et al., 2010; 2012) reveal a bit different geotherms for Nyurbinskaya pipe 38 to 43 mv/m2 for garnets and Sp estimates and colder for CPx. The refertillization interval markedby Fe rich Cpx and Ilm is 65-30 kbar. For the Botuobinskaya pipe there are 2 branches 40 and 35 mv/m2 and the heating branch at 65 kbars. Mayskaya is showing the colder geotherm but deviations to the hotter part correspondent to the pyroxenites. The Placer in this area show the wider variations of PT conditions and refertillization interval possibly showing possibility of another source of the disintegration which is much rich in the pyroxenites which amount is highly increase with the depth. The comparisons of the PT conditions show that possibly the Mayskaya and Botuobinskaya pipes represent the earlier stages of the developing of mantle columns while Nyurbinskaya the later one but amount of pyroxenites in Nyurbinskaya is less then

  6. Multiproxy reconstruction of tropical Pacific Holocene temperature gradients and water column structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuszewski, J. A.; Oppo, D.; Huang, K.; Dubois, N.; Galy, V.; Mohtadi, M.; Herbert, T.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most prominent mode of tropical Pacific climate variability and has the potential to significantly impact the climate of the Indo-Pacific region and globally1. In the past, the mean state of the Pacific Ocean has, at times, resembled El Niño or La Niña conditions2. Although the dynamical relationships responsible for these changes have been studied through paleoproxy reconstructions and climate modeling, many questions remain. Recent paleoproxy based studies of tropical Pacific hydrology and surface temperature variability have hypothesized that observed climatological changes over the Holocene are directly linked to ENSO and/or mean state variability, complementing studies that dynamically relate centennial scale ENSO variability to mean state changes3-8. These studies have suggested that mid Holocene ENSO variability was low and the mean state was more "La Niña" like3-6. In the late Holocene, paleoproxy data has been interpreted as indicating an increase in ENSO variability with a more moderate mean ocean state3-6. However, alternative explanations could exist. Here, we test the hypothesis that observed climatological changes in the eastern tropical Pacific are related to mean state or ENSO variability during the Holocene. We focus our study on two sets of cores from the equatorial Pacific, with one located in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (BJ803-119 GGC, 117MC, sedimentation rates ~29 cm/kyr) and the other just off the Galapagos in the heart of the Eastern Cold Tongue (KNR195-5 43 GGC, 42MC, sedimentation rates ~20cm/kyr). The western site lies in the region predicted by models to show the greatest variations in temperature and water column structure in response to mean state changes, while the eastern site lies in the area most prone to changes due to ENSO variability7. Together, these sites allow us the best chance to robustly reconstruct ENSO and mean state related changes. We use a multiproxy approach and

  7. Controls on the Geometry of Accretion Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Bell, R. E.; Buck, W. R.; Creyts, T. T.

    2012-12-01

    basal deformation process, the accretion can use up all available water. Field measurements that could match these predictions would be either radar studies or borehole data. High accretion rates from supercooling requires the bed downflow of accretion sites to be wet and warm. The complex basal deformation process with low freezing rates requires mixed strata in a borehole or a complex borehole temperature structure.

  8. Three-dimensional velocity structure of Siletzia and other accreted terranes in the Cascadia forearc of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.

    1999-01-01

    Eocene mafic crust with high seismic velocities underlies much of the Oregon and Washington forearc and acts as a backstop for accretion of marine sedimentary rocks from the obliquely subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Arc-parallel migration of relatively strong blocks of this terrane, known as Siletzia, focuses upper crustal deformation along block boundaries, which are potential sources of earthquakes. In a three-dimensional velocity model of coastal Washington, we have combined surface geology, well data, and travel times from earthquakes and controlled source seismic experiments to resolve the major boundaries of the Siletz terrane with the adjacent accreted sedimentary prism and volcanic arc. In southern Washington and northern Oregon the Siletz terrane appears to be a thick block (???20 km) that extends west of the coastline and makes a high-angle contact with the offshore accreted sedimentary prism. On its east flank the high-velocity Siletz terrane boundary coincides with an en echelon zone of seismicity in the arc. In northern Washington the western edge of Siletzia makes a lower-angled, fault-bound contact with the accretionary prism. In addition, alternating, east-west trending uplifts and downwarps of the Siletz terrane centered on the antiformal Olympic Mountains may reflect focusing of north-south compression in the northern part of the Siletz terrane. This compressional strain may result from northward transport and clockwise rotation of the Siletz terrane into the relatively fixed Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend along the coast.

  9. Performance enhancement on a micro-column structure reformer via thick-film photoresist pre-protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Lai, Shu-Ping; Wang, Hsueh-Sheng; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Huang, Yuh-Jeen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a reformer stack was made by incorporating silicon technology into catalyst preparation. The volumes of an individual micro-channel chip and a whole reformer stack were 0.4 cm3 and 16 cm3, respectively. Different weight ratios (B/C  =  35, 15, 5, and 0 wt%) of binder (a mixture of boehmite, bentonite, and deionized water) and catalyst were mixed to find out the optimal adhesion between the catalyst and silicon substrate. The results from this study show that the percentage of weight loss of the catalyst on the silicon substrate increases as the concentration of inorganic binder decreases. To further increase the exposed surface area of the catalyst deposited on the micro-channels, micro-column structures were integrated into the channels; however, a blockage of the catalysts among the columns during deposition was encountered. To resolve this issue, a method of pre-protecting the micro-channel with thick-film photoresist was utilized for the catalyst deposition, and the performance of the fabricated micro-column reformer was able to reach a 95% methanol conversion rate, 90% hydrogen selectivity, and 1.6  ×  10-5 (mol min-1) hydrogen yield at 225 °C in the partial oxidation of methanol reaction.

  10. Influence of organic waste type and soil structure on the bacterial filtration rates in unsaturated intact soil columns.

    PubMed

    Mosaddeghi, M R; Mahboubi, A A; Zandsalimi, S; Unc, A

    2009-02-01

    Organic wastes are considered to be a source for the potentially pathogenic microorganisms found in surface and sub-surface water resources. Following their release from the organic waste matrix, bacteria often infiltrate into soil and may be transported to significant depths contaminating aquifers. We investigated the influence of soil texture and structure and most importantly the organic waste properties on the transport and filtration coefficients of Escherichia coli and total bacteria in undisturbed soil columns. Intact soil columns (diameter 16 cm and height 25 cm) were collected from two soils: sandy clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) in Hamadan, western Iran. The cores were amended with cow manure, poultry manure and sewage sludge at a rate of 10 Mg ha(-1) (dry basis). The amended soil cores were leached at a steady-state flux of 4.8 cm h(-1) (i.e. 0.12 of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the SCL) to a total volume of up to 4 times the pore volume of the columns. The influent (C(0)) and effluent (C) were sampled at similar time intervals during the experiments and bacterial concentrations were measured by the plate count method. Cumulative numbers of the leached bacteria, filtration coefficient (lambda(f)), and relative adsorption index (S(R)) were calculated. The preferential pathways and stable structure of the SCL facilitated the rapid transport and early appearance of the bacteria in the effluent. The LS filtered more bacteria when compared with the SCL. The effluent contamination of poultry manure-treated columns was greater than the cow manure- and sewage sludge-treated ones. The difference between cow manure and sewage sludge was negligible. The lambda(f) and S(R) values for E. coli and total bacteria were greater in the LS than in the SCL. This indicates a predominant role for the physical pore-obstruction filtration mechanisms as present in the poorly structured LS vs. the retention at adsorptive sites (chemical filtration) more likely in the

  11. Evidence for structure in the H I column density distribution of QSO absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petitjean, P.; Webb, J. K.; Rauch, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Lanzetta, K.

    1993-01-01

    The H I column density distribution function of QSO absorption line systems is investigated using recent data with high spectral resolution, and extensive surveys of the Lyman limit systems and damped Ly-alpha systems. The hypothesis that the differential distribution function is fitted by a single power law is rejected at the 99 percent confidence level. A double power law, with a break at N(H I) = 10 exp 16/sq cm, also provides a poor fit over the range in which the sample is complete. While there are no discontinuities in the observed distribution, there is a clear flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm, compared to lower column densities. These observed features can be understood using models of photoionized clouds which are confined by an external pressure with density profiles governed by gravity. In particular, the flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm can be explained in terms of a transition between metal-poor and metal-rich systems.

  12. A study on semi-active Tuned Liquid Column Dampers (sTLCDs) for structural response reduction under random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, E.; Nagarajaiah, S.; Sun, C.; Basu, B.

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new model for semi-active Tuned Liquid Column Damper (sTLCD) where the sTLCD is connected to the primary structure using an adaptive spring. Short time Fourier transformation (STFT) based control algorithms (feedforward and feedback) are developed to control the stiffness of the spring such that the sTLCD is tuned in real-time when the dominant excitation frequency varies or damage occurs to the primary structure. The effectiveness of the proposed sTLCD and the associated control algorithms is examined numerically under random excitations including stationary and non-stationary excitations. Root Mean Square (RMS) response is computed in three cases: with no TLCD, with a passive Tuned Liquid Column Damper (pTLCD) and with the sTLCD. Results indicate that the developed control algorithms are effective in tuning the frequency of the sTLCD in real-time. As a result, the sTLCD provides more robust reduction than the pTLCD because the pTLCD becomes off-tuned and loses its effectiveness when the properties of the excitations or the primary structure vary.

  13. Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity

    SciTech Connect

    Zobnin, A. V. Usachev, A. D.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The low-pressure (40 and 90 Pa) low-current (4 and 10 mA) direct current discharge in a tube with a sharp change of its radius is studied both numerically and experimentally. A fully self-consistent hybrid numerical model of a two-dimensional non-uniform positive column in neon is developed using a nonlocal approach. The model combines kinetic simulation of the electrons (under two-terms approach) and fluid description of the neon ions and permits to calculate the distribution of all plasma parameters in the direct current discharges in the cameras with cylindrical geometry and radius discontinuity. The simulation results are compared with the measured 585.3 nm neon spectral line absolute intensities and excited 1s{sub 3} metastable neon atom number densities. Non-local electron kinetics in the transition region and formation of standing strata are discussed.

  14. Jets from magnetized accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Ryoji

    When an accretion disk is threaded by large scale poloidal magnetic fields, the injection of magnetic helicity from the accretion disk drives bipolar outflows. We present the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of jet formation from a torus initially threaded by vertical magnetic fields. After the torsional Alfvén waves generated by the injected magnetic twists propagate along the large-scale magnetic field lines, magnetically driven jets emanate from the surface of the torus. Due to the magnetic pinch effect, the jets are collimated along the rotation axis. Since the jet formation process extracts angular momentum from the disk, it enhances the accretion rate of the disk material. Through three-dimensional (3D) global MHD simulations, we confirmed previous 2D results that the magnetically braked surface of the disk accretes like an avalanche. Owing to the growth of non-axisymmetric perturbations, the avalanche flow breaks up into spiral channels. Helical structure also appears inside the jet. When magnetic helicity is injected into closed magnetic loops connecting the central object and the accretion disk, it drives recurrent magnetic reconnection and outflows.

  15. Modeling basic features of biogeochemical structure of water column, bottom boundary layer and benthic boundary layer in changeable redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2013-04-01

    Climate Change affects oxygen depletion and leads to spreading of the bottom areas with hypoxic and anoxic conditions in the coastal areas of the seas and inland waters. This work aimed in estimation of a role of changes of redox conditions in the biogeochemical structure there. We use a 1-dimensional C-N-P-Si-O-S-Mn-Fe vertical transport-reaction model describing the water column, bottom boundary layer and benthic boundary layer with biogeochemical block simulating redox conditions changeability. A biogeochemical block is based on ROLM (RedOx Layer Model), that was constructed to simulate basic features of the water column biogeochemical structure changes in oxic, anoxic and changeable conditions (Yakushev et al., 2007). Organic matter formation and decay, reduction and oxidation of species of nitrogen, sulfur, manganese, iron, and the transformation of phosphorus species are parameterized in the model. ROLM includes a simplified ecological model with phytoplankton, zooplankton, aerobic autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, anaerobic autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. We simulate changes in the parameters distributions and fluxes connected with the vertical displacement of redox interface from the sediments to the water.

  16. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. II. A two-dimensional analytical model for a rotating and accreting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Most stars are born in the gaseous protocluster environment where the gas is reprocessed after the global collapse from the diffuse molecular cloud. The knowledge of this intermediate step gives more accurate constraints on star formation characteristics. Aims: We demonstrate that a virialized globally supported structure, in which star formation happens, is formed out of a collapsing molecular cloud, and we derive a mapping from the parent cloud parameters to the protocluster to predict its properties with a view to confront analytical calculations with observations and simulations. Methods: We decomposed the virial theorem into two dimensions to account for the rotation and the flattened geometry. Equilibrium was found by balancing rotation, turbulence, and self-gravity, while turbulence was maintained through accretion driving and it dissipates in one crossing time. We estimated the angular momentum and the accretion rate of the protocluster from the parent cloud properties. Results: The two-dimensional virial model predicts the size and velocity dispersion given the mass of the protocluster and that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protoclusters lie on a sequence of equilibrium with the trend R ~ M0.5 with limited variations, depending on the evolutionary stage, parent cloud, and parameters that are not well known, such as turbulence driving efficiency by accretion and turbulence anisotropy. The model reproduces observations and simulation results successfully. Conclusions: The properties of protoclusters follow universal relations and they can be derived from that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protocluster is an important primary stage of stellar cluster formation, and should be taken into account when studying star formation. Using simple estimates to infer the peak position of the core mass function (CMF) we find a weak dependence on the cluster mass, suggesting that the physical conditions inside protoclusters may contribute to set a CMF, and by

  17. Period variations in pulsating X-ray sources. I - Accretion flow parameters and neutron star structure from timing observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shaham, J.; Pines, D.

    1978-01-01

    Torque fluctuations which can lead to variations in the periods of pulsating X-ray sources are examined. A description of torque variations in terms of noise processes is developed, and the resulting noise models are applied to observations of several pulsating X-ray sources. It is shown that fluctuations in accretion torque could account for the observed period variations and spindown episodes in Her X-1 and Cen X-3. The values of the torque noise strengths inferred from either a nonresonant response or, in the case of Her X-1, a Tkachenko-mode interpretation of the data are found to be consistent with those expected from processes at the magnetospheric boundary of an accreting neutron star. Ways to distinguish among the various interpretations of the period variations are considered. It is noted that fluctuating mass-flow rates may be responsible for other phenomena observed in compact X-ray sources, such as wobble with zero initial amplitude and binary period variations in close binary systems experiencing mass transfer.

  18. Tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures and upper water column thermal structure during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Andrew; Thunell, Robert C.

    1997-10-01

    Using two cores from the eastern and western Pacific, we have attempted to better quantify tropical ocean temperatures during the last glacial in order to determine how this climatically-important region responds to large scale changes in climate forcing. By analyzing the oxygen isotopes of surface dwelling (G. sacculifer, G. ruber), thermocline dwelling (N. dutertrei, G. menardii, P. obliquiloculata) and sub-thermocline dwelling (G. inflata) planktonic foraminifera, both relative and absolute estimates of the changes in the temperature gradient over this depth interval have been made. Owing to poor carbonate preservation in the Holocene section of both cores, relative temperature estimates suggest only a slight glacial cooling (˜2°C) at these locations, similar to that reported by CLIMAP [1976, 1981]. However, absolute temperature estimates determined from calcite-seawater paleothermometry indicate the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) was ˜3°C cooler during the last glacial maximum (LGM), while the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) was ˜4°C cooler. The upper water column appears to have been less stratified in the EEP, with a steeper thermocline, interpreted as indicating an increase in upwelling during the LGM. The WEP maintained a well developed mixed layer and deep thermocline, similar to today. These results are consistent with a variety of recent tropical temperature estimates for the LGM.

  19. On the dependence of the X-ray continuum variations with luminosity in accreting X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Gornostaev, M. I.; Klochkov, D.; Laplace, E.; Lukin, V. V.; Shakura, N. I.

    2015-09-01

    Using RXTE/ASM archival data, we investigate the behaviour of the spectral hardness ratio as a function of X-ray luminosity in a sample of six transient X-ray pulsars (EXO 2030+375, GX 304-1, 4U 0115+63, V 0332+63, A 0535+26 and MXB 0656-072). In all sources we find that the spectral hardness ratio defined as F5-12 keV/F1.33-3 keV increases with the ASM flux (1.33-12 keV) at low luminosities and then saturates or even slightly decreases above some critical X-ray luminosity falling into the range ˜(3-7) × 1037 erg s-1. Two-dimensional structure of accretion columns in the radiation-diffusion limit is calculated for two possible geometries (filled and hollow cylinder) for mass accretion rates dot{M} ranging from 1017 to 1.2 × 1018 g s-1. The observed spectral behaviour in the transient X-ray pulsars with increasing dot{M} can be reproduced by a Compton-saturated sidewall emission from optically thick magnetized accretion columns with taking into account the emission reflected from the neutron star atmosphere. At dot{M} above some critical value dot{M}_cr˜ (6-8)× 10^{17} g s-1, the height of the column becomes such that the contribution of the reflected component to the total emission starts decreasing, which leads to the saturation and even slight decrease of the spectral hardness. Hollow-cylinder columns have a smaller height than the filled-cylinder ones, and the contribution of the reflected component in the total emission does not virtually change with dot{M} (and hence the hardness of the continuum monotonically increases) up to higher mass accretion rates than dot{M}_cr for the filled columns.

  20. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  1. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  2. Observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilson, Robert B.; Finger, Mark H.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent observations of accreting binary pulsars with the all-sky BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE has detected and studied nearly half of the known accreting pulsar systems. Continuous timing studies over a two-year period have yielded accurate orbital parameters for 9 of these systems, as well as new insights into long-term accretion torque histories.

  3. A nonlinear investigation of corrugation instabilities in magnetic accretion shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Accretion shock waves are present in many important astrophysical systems and have been a focus of research for decades. These investigations provide a large body of understanding as to the nature, characteristics, and evolutionary behaviors of accretion shock waves over a wide range of conditions. However, largely absent are investigations into the properties of accretion shock waves in the presence of strong magnetic fields. In such cases these strong magnetic fields can significantly alter the stability behaviors and evolution of the accretion shock wave through the production and propagation of magnetic waves as well as magnetically constrained advection. With strong magnetic fields likely found in a number of accretion shock systems, such as compact binary and protostellar systems, a better understanding of the behaviors of magnetic accretion shock waves is needed. A new magnetohydrodynamics simulation tool, IMOGEN, was developed to carry out an investigation of instabilities in strong, slow magnetic accretion shocks by modelling their long-term, nonlinear evolution. IMOGEN implements a relaxed, second-order, total variation diminishing, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation laws and incorporates a staggered-grid constrained transport scheme for magnetic advection. Through the simulated evolution of magnetic accretion shocks over a wide range of initial conditions, it has been shown, for sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, that magnetic accretion shocks are generally susceptible to corrugation instabilities, which arise in the presence of perturbations of the initial shock front. As these corrugation instabilities grow, they manifestas magnetic wave propagation in the upstream region of the accretion column, which propagate away from the accretion shock front, and as density columns, or fingers, that grow into the higher density downstream flow, defined and constrained by current loops created during the early evolution of the instability.

  4. Preparation of a concentric layered structure of an electrospun nanofiber column for solid-phase extraction of mass viscous crude extracts.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinli; Yan, Yan; Chang, Hong; Liu, Xiongwei; Kang, Xuejun

    2016-06-01

    The packed nanofiber solid-phase extraction of crude extracts of a mass viscous sample is challenging because the interference and recalcitrant particulates in the sample may attach to the nanofiber and block the column, which leads to insufficient sample extraction. A novel concentric layered nanofiber solid-phase extraction (SPE) column using polystyrene-based electrospun nanofiber as the stationary phase has been employed for the pretreatment of mass viscous crude extracts. The layered column was fabricated by using untouched nanofiber with its natural morphology rather than hand-packing of spoiled fiber to the control packing density of the column. In the novel column, the SPE packed bed was divided into a multi-layer structure to provide uniform radial and axial packing and to part the mobile phase stream by the isolated layer with great superiority in aspects such as lower column pressure and faster elution speed. The feasibility and efficiency of the LFSPE column were then evaluated via determination of rhodamine B (RB) from spiked chili samples. Based on the LFSPE column, a linear spiked calibration curve in the range of 0.02-5 mg/kg was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the method were 0.001 and 0.004 mg/kg, respectively; recoveries at 0.1, 1, and 2 mg/kg (n = 3) were all up to 95 %; and the RSD values of inter-day and intra-day were all below 5 %. This novel LFSPE column overcame heterogeneous packing and exploited the wall effect in subtle ways, and exhibited great superiority by comparison with some existing methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27086018

  5. Interplay between magmatic accretion, spreading asymmetry and detachment faulting at a segment end: Crustal structure south of the Ascension Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Jörg; Dannowski, Anke; Reston, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    A wide-angle seismic section across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge just south of the Ascension transform system reveals laterally varying crustal thickness, and to the east a strongly distorted Moho that appears to result from slip along a large-offset normal fault, termed an oceanic detachment fault. Gravity modelling supports the inferred crustal structure. We investigate the interplay between magmatism, detachment faulting and the changing asymmetry of crustal accretion, and consider several possible scenarios. The one that appears most likely is remarkably simple: an episode of detachment faulting which accommodates all plate divergence and results in the westward migration of the ridge axis, is interspersed with dominantly magmatic and moderately asymmetric (most on the western side) spreading which moves the spreading axis back towards the east. Following the runaway weakening of a normal fault and its development into an oceanic detachment fault, magma both intrudes the footwall to the fault, producing a layer of gabbro (subsequently partially exhumed).

  6. Ignition Column Depths of Helium-rich Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 1728-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misanovic, Zdenka; Galloway, Duncan K.; Cooper, Randall L.

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts observed from the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 by RXTE, Chandra, and INTEGRAL. We compared the variation in burst energy and recurrence times as a function of accretion rate with the predictions of a numerical ignition model including a treatment of the heating and cooling in the crust. We found that the measured burst ignition column depths are significantly below the theoretically predicted values, regardless of the assumed thermal structure of the neutron star (NS) interior. While it is possible that the accretion rate measured by Chandra is underestimated, due to additional persistent spectral components outside the sensitivity band, the required correction factor is typically 3.6 and as high as 6, which is implausible. Furthermore, such underestimation is even more unlikely for RXTE and INTEGRAL, which have much broader bandpasses. Possible explanations for the observed discrepancy include shear-triggered mixing of the accreted helium to larger column depths, resulting in earlier ignition, or the fractional covering of the accreted fuel on the NS surface.

  7. IGNITION COLUMN DEPTHS OF HELIUM-RICH THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 1728-34

    SciTech Connect

    Misanovic, Zdenka; Galloway, Duncan K.; Cooper, Randall L.

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts observed from the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 by RXTE, Chandra, and INTEGRAL. We compared the variation in burst energy and recurrence times as a function of accretion rate with the predictions of a numerical ignition model including a treatment of the heating and cooling in the crust. We found that the measured burst ignition column depths are significantly below the theoretically predicted values, regardless of the assumed thermal structure of the neutron star (NS) interior. While it is possible that the accretion rate measured by Chandra is underestimated, due to additional persistent spectral components outside the sensitivity band, the required correction factor is typically 3.6 and as high as 6, which is implausible. Furthermore, such underestimation is even more unlikely for RXTE and INTEGRAL, which have much broader bandpasses. Possible explanations for the observed discrepancy include shear-triggered mixing of the accreted helium to larger column depths, resulting in earlier ignition, or the fractional covering of the accreted fuel on the NS surface.

  8. Radiative accretion shocks along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields in classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Miceli, M.; Matsakos, T.; Stehlé, C.; Ibgui, L.; de Sa, L.; Chièze, J. P.; Lanz, T.

    2013-11-01

    Context. According to the magnetospheric accretion model, hot spots form on the surface of classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) in regions where accreting disk material impacts the stellar surface at supersonic velocity, generating a shock. Aims: We investigate the dynamics and stability of postshock plasma that streams along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields at the impact region of accretion columns. We study how the magnetic field configuration and strength determine the structure, geometry, and location of the shock-heated plasma. Methods: We model the impact of an accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS by 2D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our model considers the gravity, the radiative cooling, and the magnetic-field-oriented thermal conduction (including the effects of heat flux saturation). We explore different configurations and strengths of the magnetic field. Results: The structure, stability, and location of the shocked plasma strongly depend on the configuration and strength of the magnetic field. In the case of weak magnetic fields (plasma β ≳ 1 in the postshock region), a large component of B may develop perpendicular to the stream at the base of the accretion column, which limits the sinking of the shocked plasma into the chromosphere and perturbs the overstable shock oscillations induced by radiative cooling. An envelope of dense and cold chromospheric material may also develop around the shocked column. For strong magnetic fields (β < 1 in the postshock region close to the chromosphere), the field configuration determines the position of the shock and its stand-off height. If the field is strongly tapered close to the chromosphere, an oblique shock may form well above the stellar surface at the height where the plasma β ≈ 1. In general, we find that a nonuniform magnetic field makes the distribution of emission measure vs. temperature of the postshock plasma at T > 106 K lower than when there is uniform magnetic field

  9. THE CENTRAL ENGINE STRUCTURE OF 3C120: EVIDENCE FOR A RETROGRADE BLACK HOLE OR A REFILLING ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-06-20

    The broad-line radio galaxy 3C120 is a powerful source of both X-ray and radio emission including superluminal jet outflows. We report on our reanalysis of 160 ks of Suzaku data taken in 2006, previously examined by Kataoka et al. Spectral fits to the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer and Hard X-ray Detector/positive intrinsic negative data over a range of 0.7-45 keV reveal a well-defined iron K line complex with a narrow K{alpha} core and relativistically broadened features consistent with emission from the inner regions of the accretion disk. Furthermore, the inner region of the disk appears to be truncated, with an inner radius of r{sub in} = 11.7{sup +3.5}{sub -5.2} r{sub g} . If we assume that fluorescent iron line features terminate at the inner-most stable circular orbit (ISCO), then we measure a black hole spin of a-hat < -0.1 at a 90% confidence level. A rapidly spinning prograde black hole ( a-hat > 0.8) can be ruled out at the 99% confidence level. Alternatively, the disk may be truncated well outside of the ISCO of a rapid prograde hole. The most compelling scenario is the possibility that the inner regions of the disk were destroyed/ejected by catastrophic instabilities just prior to the time these observations were made.

  10. PULSE COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  11. The challenges of manufacturing graphite-epoxy structural columns for space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, R. L.; Friend, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the manufacturing processes developed for large-quantity production of space structure graphite/epoxy composite tubes. The tubes are to be delivered to orbit by the Space Shuttle and assembled by astronaut-assisted assembly machines. The tooling and manufacturing system uses a novel method of dry fiber placement which carefully controls fiber position and orientation and a non-autoclave cure for the epoxy resin. The means of dimensional tolerance control over differential thermal expansion between metal tooling and graphite tubes, resin shrinkage during cure, hot pressurized resins in close tolerance tooling, and tool wear, are examined in detail. A successful pilot production program is also reported.

  12. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    PubMed Central

    Bougouffa, S.; Yang, J. K.; Lee, O. O.; Wang, Y.; Batang, Z.; Al-Suwailem, A.

    2013-01-01

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools. PMID:23542623

  13. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. I. Constant Density Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by solving simultaneously the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Ka line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  14. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. I. CONSTANT DENSITY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R. E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.go

    2010-08-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure, and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by simultaneously solving the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance, and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell processes of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent K{alpha} line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  15. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  16. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  17. Design and implementation of injector/distributor structures for microfabricated non-porous pillar columns for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Sukas, Sertan; Desmet, Gert; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2013-05-10

    A previously proposed foil definition is applied in the design of injector/distributor structures for solid microfabricated column structures for capillary electrochromatography. In addition to a typical bifurcated distributor, an optimized design alternative with two different configurations is experimentally evaluated. Optimized designs yielded a flat profile for the injected sample with a maximum of 3% variation from the mean width, while it went up to 18% for the typical bifurcated distributor. The implemented electrokinetic injection approach enabled controlling the volume of the injected sample accurately without sacrificing the compactness of the device design. The width of the injected sample was directly proportional to the injection time, namely 165 and 218 μm base widths were obtained for 0.6 and 0.8s of feeding, respectively. Reducing the external porosity of the distributor by 85% compared to the typical design, optimized distributors caused a decrease in the mean flow velocity of up to 70%. However, having a flat initial plug shape enabled the separation of a mixture of Coumarin 440, 460, 480 and 540 at 1 mm downstream of the injection point in 80s, while it was even not possible to detect the C440 signal for a typical bifurcated design. PMID:23561733

  18. Optimization of the porous structure and polarity of polymethacrylate-based monolithic capillary columns for the LC-MS separation of enzymatic digests

    PubMed Central

    Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Geiser, Laurent; Svec, Frantisek; Fréchet, Jean M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The porous structure as well as the polarity of methacrylate ester based monolithic stationary phases have been optimized to achieve the separation of various peptide mixtures originating from enzymatic digests. The porous structure, determined by the size of both pores and microglobules, was varied through changes in the composition of porogenic solvents in the polymerization mixture, while the polarity was controlled through the incorporation of butyl, lauryl, or octadecyl methacrylate in the polymer backbone. Both the morphology and the chemistry of the monoliths had a significant effect on the retention and efficiency of the capillary columns. The best resolution of peptidic fragments obtained by digestion of cytochrome c with trypsin in solution was obtained in gradient LC-MS mode using a monolithic capillary column of poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) featuring small pores and small microglobules. Raising the temperature to 60°C enabled separations to be carried out at higher flow rates. Separations carried out at 60°C with a steeper gradient proceeded without loss of performance in half the time required for a comparable separation at room temperature. Our preparation technique affords monolithic columns with excellent column-to-column and run-to-run repeatability of retention times and pressure drops. PMID:17893847

  19. Accretion Disks in Interacting Binaries: Simulations of the Stream-Disk Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, P. J.; Livio, M.

    1996-10-01

    We investigate the impact between the gas stream from the inner Lagrangian point and the accretion disk in interacting binaries using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. We find that a significant fraction of the stream material can ricochet off the disk edge and overflow toward smaller radii and that this generates pronounced nonaxisymmetric structure in the absorption column toward the central object. We discuss the implications of our results for observations and timedependent models of low-mass X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and supersoft X-ray sources.

  20. Disk Accretion and the Stellar Birthline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Cassen, Patrick; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1997-02-01

    We present a simplified analysis of some effects of disk accretion on the early evolution of fully convective, low-mass pre-main-sequence stars. Our analysis builds on the previous seminal work of Stahler, but it differs in that the accretion of material occurs over a small area of the stellar surface, such as through a disk or magnetospheric accretion column, so that most of the stellar photosphere is free to radiate to space. This boundary condition is similar to the limiting case considered by Palla & Stahler for intermediate-mass stars. We argue that for a wide variety of disk mass accretion rates, material will be added to the star with relatively small amounts of thermal energy. Protostellar evolution calculated assuming this ``low-temperature'' limit of accretion generally follows the results of Stahler because of the thermostatic nature of deuterium fusion, which prevents protostars from contracting below a ``birthline'' in the H-R diagram. Our calculated protostellar radii tend to fall below Stahler's at higher masses; the additional energy loss from the stellar photosphere in the case of disk accretion tends to make the protostar contract. The low-temperature disk accretion evolutionary tracks never fall below the deuterium-fusion birthline until the internal deuterium is depleted, but protostellar tracks can lie above the birthline in the H-R diagram if the initial radius of the protostellar core is large enough or if rapid disk accretion (such as might occur during FU Ori outbursts) adds significant amounts of thermal energy to the star. These possibilities cannot be ruled out by either theoretical arguments or observational constraints at present, so that individual protostars might evolve along a multiplicity of birthlines with a modest range of luminosity at a given mass. Our results indicate that there are large uncertainties in assigning ages for the youngest stars from H-R diagram positions, given the uncertainty in birthline positions. Our

  1. Low Accretion Rate Expected From G2 Gas Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracey, Brandon; Morsony, Brian; Workman, Jared

    2015-08-01

    We present high-resolution simulations of the encounter of the G2 gas cloud with Sag A*, focusing on the mass that can be accreted onto the supermassive black hole. Even assuming G2 is a gas cloud of a few time the mass of Earth, we find that very little material should be expected to be accreted. From 5 years before to 5 years after pericenter passage, at most 0.1% of the cloud mass is accreted. The total amount of material accreted by Sag A* increases by at most 20% over this period, and in many cases actually decreases due to the passage of G2. Even over very long timescales, out to 30 years after pericenter passage, only a few 10th's of a percent of the cloud will be accreted, with no significant increase in the overall mass accretion rate of Sag A*.We find that the size of the accretion radius in our simulations has a large effect on the accretion rate, with a smaller accretion radius having a smaller accretion rate. Changing the size of the accretion radius has a larger effect than changing the density profile of the cloud or changing the structure of the background material around Sag A*.

  2. Structure and segmentation of the eastern Gulf of Aden basin and the Sheba ridge from gravity, bathymetric and magnetic anomalies: implications for accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Maia, M.; Gente, P.; Autin, J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Gulf of Aden is a key place for investigating seafloor spreading processes and the evolution in space and time of the margin and ridge segmentation. The rifting of the Gulf that separated Arabia from Somalia started around 35 Ma ago followed by oceanic accretion from at least17.6 Ma. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to study the structure and segmentation of the eastern part of the basin and ridge, which have strong implications for accretion processes. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre, which is dated at least 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly (A5d) identification, seems to be directly related to the structural geometry of the margins. Then, magmatic processes governed the evolution of the segmentation. The segmentation of the oceanic crust evolved, by eastward propagation of the western segment, from three segments (from an5d to an5) to two segments (from an5). At 6 Ma (an3a) a third segment appeared by duplication of the Socotra transform fault, maybe due to a regional kinematics change. The Encens-Sheba oceanic domain is divided in two distinct areas trending NE-SW perpendicular to the Sheba ridge. (1) The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation with two spreading segments 30 to 40 km long, and by a thin crust particularly on the northern and southern ends of its flanks. (2) The Western zone, whose axial segment is more than 120 km long, is characterized by a thick crust and/or a hot mantle and no axial rift valley. This abnormal volcanic activity for a slow spreading ridge is emphasized by bathymetric highs with 5-10 km wide volcanic edifices, and by a negative anomaly of the MBA. These different results support the presence of an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge. The magnetic anomalies and spreading asymmetry reveal that the location of this thermal anomaly might be relatively recent (~ 10 Ma

  3. Spectral formation in accreting X-ray pulsars: bimodal variation of the cyclotron energy with luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, P. A.; Klochkov, D.; Schönherr, G.; Nishimura, O.; Ferrigno, C.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Wolff, M. T.; Wilms, J.; Staubert, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars exhibit significant variability of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) centroid energy on pulse-to-pulse timescales, and also on much longer timescales. Two types of spectral variability are observed. For sources in group 1, the CRSF energy is negatively correlated with the variable source luminosity, and for sources in group 2, the opposite behavior is observed. The physical basis for this bimodal behavior is currently not well understood. Aims: We explore the hypothesis that the accretion dynamics in the group 1 sources is dominated by radiation pressure near the stellar surface, and that Coulomb interactions decelerate the gas to rest in the group 2 sources. Methods: We derive a new expression for the critical luminosity, Lcrit, such that radiation pressure decelerates the matter to rest in sources with X-ray luminosity LX > Lcrit. The formula for Lcrit is based on a simple physical model for the structure of the accretion column in luminous X-ray pulsars that takes into account radiative deceleration, the energy dependence of the cyclotron cross section, the thermodynamics of the accreting gas, the dipole structure of the pulsar magnetosphere, and the diffusive escape of radiation through the column walls. We show that for typical neutron star parameters, Lcrit = 1.5 × 1037 B1216/15 erg s-1, where B12 is the surface magnetic field strength in units of 1012 G. Results: The formula for the critical luminosity is evaluated for five sources, using the maximum value of the CRSF centroid energy to estimate the surface magnetic field strength B12. The results confirm that the group 1 sources are supercritical (LX > Lcrit) and the group 2 sources are subcritical (LX < Lcrit), although the situation is less clear for those highly variable sources that cross over the line LX = Lcrit. We also explain the variation of the CRSF energy with luminosity as a consequence of the variation of the characteristic emission

  4. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  5. A Deep Chandra X-Ray Spectrum of the Accreting Young Star TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Wolk, S.

    2010-02-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of the accreting young star TW Hydrae from a 489 ks observation using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating. The spectrum provides a rich set of diagnostics for electron temperature Te , electron density Ne , hydrogen column density NH , relative elemental abundances, and velocities, and reveals its source in three distinct regions of the stellar atmosphere: the stellar corona, the accretion shock, and a very large extended volume of warm postshock plasma. The presence of Mg XII, Si XIII, and Si XIV emission lines in the spectrum requires coronal structures at ~10 MK. Lower temperature lines (e.g., from O VIII, Ne IX, and Mg XI) formed at 2.5 MK appear more consistent with emission from an accretion shock. He-like Ne IX line ratio diagnostics indicate that Te = 2.50 ± 0.25 MK and Ne = 3.0 ± 0.2 × 1012 cm-3 in the shock. These values agree well with standard magnetic accretion models. However, the Chandra observations significantly diverge from current model predictions for the postshock plasma. This gas is expected to cool radiatively, producing O VII as it flows into an increasingly dense stellar atmosphere. Surprisingly, O VII indicates Ne = 5.7+4.4 -1.2 × 1011 cm-3, 5 times lower than Ne in the accretion shock itself and ~7 times lower than the model prediction. We estimate that the postshock region producing O VII has roughly 300 times larger volume and 30 times more emitting mass than the shock itself. Apparently, the shocked plasma heats the surrounding stellar atmosphere to soft X-ray emitting temperatures and supplies this material to nearby large magnetic structures—which may be closed magnetic loops or open magnetic field leading to mass outflow. Our model explains the soft X-ray excess found in many accreting systems as well as the failure to observe high Ne signatures in some stars. Such accretion-fed coronae may be ubiquitous in the atmospheres of accreting young stars.

  6. BONDI-HOYLE-LYTTLETON ACCRETION ONTO A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Moeckel, Nickolas; Throop, Henry B.

    2009-12-10

    Young stellar systems orbiting in the potential of their birth cluster can accrete from the dense molecular interstellar medium during the period between the star's birth and the dispersal of the cluster's gas. Over this time, which may span several Myr, the amount of material accreted can rival the amount in the initial protoplanetary disk; the potential importance of this 'tail-end' accretion for planet formation was recently highlighted by Throop and Bally. While accretion onto a point mass is successfully modeled by the classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton solutions, the more complicated case of accretion onto a star-disk system defies analytic solution. In this paper, we investigate via direct hydrodynamic simulations the accretion of dense interstellar material onto a star with an associated gaseous protoplanetary disk. We discuss the changes to the structure of the accretion flow caused by the disk, and vice versa. We find that immersion in a dense accretion flow can redistribute disk material such that outer disk migrates inward, increasing the inner disk surface density and reducing the outer radius. The accretion flow also triggers the development of spiral density features, and changes to the disk inclination. The mean accretion rate onto the star remains roughly the same with and without the presence of a disk. We discuss the potential impact of this process on planet formation, including the possibility of triggered gravitational instability, inclination differences between the disk and the star, and the appearance of spiral structure in a gravitationally stable system.

  7. Magnetically Torqued Thin Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluźniak, W.; Rappaport, S.

    2007-12-01

    We compute the properties of a geometrically thin, steady accretion disk surrounding a central rotating, magnetized star. The magnetosphere is assumed to entrain the disk over a wide range of radii. The model is simplified in that we adopt two (alternate) ad hoc, but plausible, expressions for the azimuthal component of the magnetic field as a function of radial distance. We find a solution for the angular velocity profile tending to corotation close to the central star and smoothly matching a Keplerian curve at a radius where the viscous stress vanishes. The value of this ``transition'' radius is nearly the same for both of our adopted B-field models. We then solve analytically for the torques on the central star and for the disk luminosity due to gravity and magnetic torques. When expressed in a dimensionless form, the resulting quantities depend on one parameter alone, the ratio of the transition radius to the corotation radius. For rapid rotators, the accretion disk may be powered mostly by spin-down of the central star. These results are independent of the viscosity prescription in the disk. We also solve for the disk structure for the special case of an optically thick alpha disk. Our results are applicable to a range of astrophysical systems including accreting neutron stars, intermediate polar cataclysmic variables, and T Tauri systems.

  8. Modelling the internal structure of Ceres: Coupling of accretion with compaction by creep and implications for the water-rock differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We model the compaction of a Ceres-like body that accretes from the protoplanetary dust as a porous aggregate. To do this, we use a comprehensive numerical model in which the accretion starts with a km-size seed and the final radius reaches ≈500 km. Our goal is to investigate the interplay of accretion and loss of porosity by hot pressing. We draw conclusions for the evolution of the porosity profile and the present-day porosity distribution on Ceres. In particular, we test the hypothesis that Ceres' low density can be explained by a porous interior instead of by the presence of ice, and whether compaction occurs due to creep or due to dehydration of hydrated minerals. Methods: We extended our thermal evolution model from previous studies to model compaction of an accreting asteroid that is initially porous. We considered two different compositions of Ceres suggested by other workers. The porosity change was calculated according to the thermally activated creep flow. Depending on the composition, parameters relevant for compaction were changed self-consistently with the mineral phases. Results: We find that compaction of initially porous Ceres is dominated by creep and only slightly perturbed by the dehydration. In particular, dehydration alone cannot lead to compaction because creep can occur before the dehydration. Depending on the accretion duration, timing of the compaction varies from between a few million years and more than one billion years. Thereby, late accretion cannot prevent compaction to an average porosity of <2.5%. We provide the evolution as well as the present-day porosity and temperature profiles for Ceres. The temperature allows for the existence of liquid water in the interior of Ceres at a depths of ≥5-33 km. Depending on the composition, either iron melt is produced regardless of the accretion timing or only for an accretion within the first 4 Ma relative to calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions. This argues for a small metallic core.

  9. Bondi accretion in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Valeriya; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Accretion on to central massive black holes in galaxies is often modelled with the Bondi solution. In this paper, we study a generalization of the classical Bondi accretion theory, considering the additional effects of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy, and of electron scattering in the optically thin limit. We provide a general analysis of the bias in the estimates of the Bondi radius and mass accretion rate, when adopting as fiducial values for the density and temperature at infinity the values of these quantities measured at finite distance from the central black hole. We also give general formulae to compute the correction terms of the critical accretion parameter in relevant asymptotic regimes. A full analytical discussion is presented in the case of a Hernquist galaxy, when the problem reduces to the discussion of a cubic equation, therefore, allowing for more than one critical point in the accretion structure. The results are useful for observational works (especially in the case of systems with a low Eddington ratio), as well as for numerical simulations, where accretion rates are usually defined in terms of the gas properties near the black hole.

  10. Bondi accretion in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Valeriya; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Accretion on to central massive black holes in galaxies is often modelled with the Bondi solution. In this paper we study a generalization of the classical Bondi accretion theory, considering the additional effects of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy, and of electron scattering in the optically thin limit. We provide a general analysis of the bias in the estimates of the Bondi radius and mass accretion rate, when adopting as fiducial values for the density and temperature at infinity the values of these quantities measured at finite distance from the central black hole. We also give general formulae to compute the correction terms of the critical accretion parameter in relevant asymptotic regimes. A full analytical discussion is presented in the case of an Hernquist galaxy, when the problem reduces to the discussion of a cubic equation, therefore allowing for more than one critical point in the accretion structure. The results are useful for observational works (especially in the case of systems with a low Eddington ratio), as well as for numerical simulations, where accretion rates are usually defined in terms of the gas properties near the black hole.

  11. Asymmetric Accretion Flows within a Common Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines flows in the immediate vicinity of stars and compact objects dynamically inspiralling within a common envelope (CE). Flow in the vicinity of the embedded object is gravitationally focused, leading to drag and potentially to gas accretion. This process has been studied numerically and analytically in the context of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA). Yet, within a CE, accretion structures may span a large fraction of the envelope radius, and in so doing sweep across a substantial radial gradient of density. We quantify these gradients using detailed stellar evolution models for a range of CE encounters. We provide estimates of typical scales in CE encounters that involve main sequence stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes with giant-branch companions of a wide range of masses. We apply these typical scales to hydrodynamic simulations of three-dimensional HLA with an upstream density gradient. This density gradient breaks the symmetry that defines HLA flow, and imposes an angular momentum barrier to accretion. Material that is focused into the vicinity of the embedded object thus may not be able to accrete. As a result, accretion rates drop dramatically, by one to two orders of magnitude, while drag rates are only mildly affected. We provide fitting formulae to the numerically derived rates of drag and accretion as a function of the density gradient. The reduced ratio of accretion to drag suggests that objects that can efficiently gain mass during CE evolution, such as black holes and neutron stars, may grow less than implied by the HLA formalism.

  12. Effect of polyethylene glycol on pore structure and separation efficiency of silica-based monolithic capillary columns.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Desmet, Gert; Baron, Gino V; Minakuchi, Hiroyoshi; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-04-15

    Monolithic silica materials (first unclad monolith rods, then monolithic capillary columns) were prepared using various amounts of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with different molecular weight (MW). The monolith rods were used to examine the mesoporosity by argon physisorption technique, and the macroporosity by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Subsequently, silica-based monolithic capillary columns with an inner diameter of 100 μm were produced using the same preparation conditions as used for the rods. The results obtained with the monolith rods showed the following important findings: (1) it is feasible to fabricate monolithic silica rods possessing macropore size of 0.5-1.4 μm by tuning the amount of PEGs (independently of the MW), whereas the macropore volume and the mesoporosity remain similar. (2) the smallest macropore size (0.5 μm) rod prepared with PEG having a MW=20,000g/mol provided a narrower macropore size distribution than with PEG with MW=10,000g/mol. The monolithic capillary columns produced with the different PEG type showed similar retention factors for hexylbenzene (k=2.3-2.4) and similar t0-based column permeability (Kv0=2.3-2.4×10(-14)m(2)) in 20:80% (v/v) water:methanol, as expected from the results obtained with the monolith rods. The column prepared with PEG of MW=20,000g/mol gave a plate height of H=4.0 μm for hexylbenzene at an optimal linear velocity of u0=2.6mm/s in 20:80% (v/v) water containing 0.1% formic acid:acetonitrile. To the best of our knowledge, this is the lowest plate height ever recorded for a monolithic column. Comparing the kinetic performance at 30MPa shows that the best monolithic silica column obtained in the present study performs better than the second-generation monolithic silica columns developed up till now in the practically most relevant range of plate numbers (N≤40,000). In this range, the performance is now similar to that of 2.7 μm core-shell particle columns. PMID:26976349

  13. What is the Nature of Accretion in Active Galactic Nuclei?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support theoretical research on the nature of accretion in active galactic nuclei. In the brief time of the award, four papers that appeared in refereed journals were written, as well as two invited reviews in conference proceedings. These papers significantly advanced our understanding of the structure of the most important parts of bright accretion disks around accreting black holes, such as active galactic nuclei.

  14. Research on the Nature of Accretion in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    he purpose of this grant was to support theoretical research on the nature of accretion in active galactic nuclei. In the brief time of the award (one year), four papers that appeared in refereed journals were written, as well as two invited reviews in conference proceedings These papers significantly advanced our understanding of the structure of the most important parts of bright accretion disks around accreting black holes, such as active galactic nuclei.

  15. Accretion, winds and outflows in young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    Young stars and planetary systems form in molecular clouds. After the initial radial infall an accretion disk develops. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTS, F-K type precursors) the accretion disk does not reach down to the central star, but it is truncated near the co-rotation radius by the stellar magnetic field. The inner edge of the disk is ionized by the stellar radiation, so that the accretion stream is funneled along the magnetic field lines. On the stellar surface an accretion shock develops, which is observed over a wide wavelength range as X-ray emission, UV excess, optical veiling and optical and IR emission lines. Some of the accretion tracers, e.g. Hα, can be calibrated to measure the accretion rate. This accretion process is variable on time scales of hours to years due to changing accretion rates, stellar rotation and reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Furthermore, many (if not all) accreting systems also drive strong outflows which are ultimately powered by accretion. However, the exact driving mechanism is still unclear. Several components could contribute to the outflows: slow, wide-angle disk winds, X-winds launched close to the inner disk rim, and thermally driven stellar winds. In any case, the outflows contain material of very different temperatures and speeds. The disk wind is cool and can have a molecular component with just a few tens of km s-1, while the central component of the outflow can reach a few 100 km s-1. In some cases the inner part of the outflow is collimated to a small-angle jet. These jets have an onion-like structure, where the inner components are consecutively hotter and faster. The jets can contain working surfaces, which show up as Herbig-Haro knots. Accretion and outflows in the CTTS phase do not only determine stellar parameters like the rotation rate on the main-sequence, they also can have a profound impact on the environment of young stars. This review concentrates on CTTS in near-by star forming regions where

  16. UV spectral variability in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. 11: The accretion interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report recent IUE high- and low-dispersion observations with the IUE long wavelength camera (LWP) and short wavelength camera (SWP) of the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. We have found a dramatic change in the structure of the Mg II h and k lines (2795.5, 2802.7 A) along with some continuum flux excesses especially at the short end of the SWP camera. LWP high dispersion observations of HR 5999 obtained between 1979 and 1990, at times of comparatively low UV continuum fluxes, exhibit P Cygni type m profiles in the Mg II resonance doublet. In contrast, observations made from September 1990 through March 16-18, 1992, with high W continuum fluxes, present Mg II lines with reverse P Cygni profiles indicative of some active episodic accretion. Accreting gas can also be detected in the additional red wings of the various Fe II and Mn II absorption lines, with velocities up to +300-350 km/s (September 1990). By September 10, 1992 the Mg II profile had returned to the type III P Cygni profile similar to those from earlier spectra. The correlation between the presence of large column densities of accreting gas and the continuum light variations supports suggestions by several authors that HR 5999 is surrounded by an optically thick, viscously heated accretion disk. Detection of accreting gas in the line of sight to HR 5999 permits us to place constraints on our viewing geometry for this system. A discussion is included comparing the spectral and physical similarities between HR 5999 and the more evolved proto-planetary candidate system, beta Pictoris.

  17. Polarized X-rays from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Accreting neutron stars span a wide range in X-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength. Accretion may be wind-fed or disk-fed, and the dominant X-ray flux may originate in the disk or a magnetically confined accretion column. In all such systems X-ray polarization may arise due to Compton or Magneto-Compton scattering, and on some occasions polarization of non-thermal emission from jet-like ejection may also be detectable. Spectral and temporal behaviour of the polarized X-rays would carry information regarding the radiation process, as well as of the matter dynamics - and can assist the detection of effects such as the Lense-Thirring precession. This talk will review our current knowledge of the expected X-ray polarization from accreting neutron stars and explore the prospects of detection with upcoming polarimetry missions.

  18. Probing the Environment of Accreting Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    X-ray binaries are the topic of this thesis. They consist of a compact object -- a black hole or a neutron star -- and an ordinary star, which loses matter to the compact object. The gravitational energy released through this process of mass accretion is largely converted into X-rays. The latter are used in the present work to screen the environment of the compact object. The main focus in the case of a massive star is on its wind, which is not homogeneous, but may display structures in form of temperature and density variations. Since great importance is, in multiple respects, attached to stellar winds in astrophysics, there is large interest in general to understand these structures more thoroughly. In particular for X-ray binaries, whose compact object obtains matter from the wind of its companion star, the state of the wind can decisively influence mass accretion and its related radiation processes. A detailed introduction to the fundamentals of stellar winds, compact objects, accretion and radiation processes in X-ray binaries, as well as to the employed instruments and analysis methods, is given in chapter 1. The focus of this investigation is on Cygnus X-1, a binary system with a black hole and a blue supergiant, which form a persistently very bright X-ray source because of accretion from the stellar wind. It had been known for a long time that this source -- when the black hole is seen through the dense stellar wind -- often displays abrupt absorption events whose origin is suspected to be in clumps in the wind. More detailed physical properties of these clumps and of the wind in general are explored in this work. Observations that were specifically acquired for this study, as well as archival data from different satellite observatories, are analyzed in view of signatures of the wind and its fine structures. These results are presented in chapter 2. In a first part of the analysis, the statistical distribution of the brightness of Cyg X-1, as measured since

  19. Discovery of universal outflow structures above and below the accretion disc plane in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Justin; Schild, Rudolph E.; Leiter, Darryl

    2011-04-01

    59 quasars in the background of the Magellanic Clouds had brightness records monitored by the MACHO project during the years 1992-99. Because the circumpolar fields of these quasars had no seasonal sampling defects, their observation produced data sets well suited to further careful analysis. Following a preliminary report wherein we showed the existence of reverberation in the data for one of the radio-quiet quasars in this group, we now show that similar reverberations have been seen in all of the 55 radio-quiet quasars with adequate data, making possible the determination of the quasar inclination to the observer's line of sight. The reverberation signatures indicate the presence of large-scale elliptical outflow structures similar to that predicted by the Elvis and 'dusty torus' models of quasars, whose characteristic sizes vary within a surprisingly narrow range of scales. More importantly, the observed opening angle relative to the polar axis of the universal elliptical outflow structure present was consistently found to be on the order of 78°.

  20. Buckling testing of composite columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever; Tomblin, John

    1992-11-01

    Euler buckling test results are presented for large composite columns relevant to the mass production of composite structural members by pultrusion. The experimental procedure employed yields highly reproducible and accurate results. All percentage differences between theory and experiment are below 6.2 percent; the theoretically predicted long-column buckling load is accurate even in the case of the most complex composite materials.

  1. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  2. TEM study of defect structure of GaN epitaxial films grown on GaN/Al2O3 substrates with buried column pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbaeva, M. G.; Kremleva, A. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Pechnikov, A. I.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Bougrov, V. E.; Lipsanen, H.; Romanov, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    A TEM study of defect structure of GaN films grown by chloride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) on GaN/Al2O3 substrates was performed. The substrates were fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition overgrowth of templates with buried column pattern. The results of TEM study showed that the character of the defect structure of HVPE-grown films was determined by the configuration of the column pattern in the substrate. By choosing the proper pattern, the reduction in the density of threading dislocations in the films by two orders of magnitude (in respect to the substrate material), down to the value of 107 cm-2, was achieved.

  3. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles island arc: A structural analysis of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Amanda Gail

    2007-12-01

    The Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc is an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. The Leeward Antilles islands (Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire) are located offshore western Venezuela, within the obliquely convergent diffuse plate boundary zone. Outcrop analysis, microthermometry, and 2D marine seismic reflection data provide evidence of three generations of regional deformation since the Late Cretaceous. Outcrop analysis of structural features, including faults, joints, and veins, characterizes the kinematic history of the islands. Fluid inclusion analysis of quartz and calcite veins coupled with apatite fission-track dating provides the island exhumation history. Finally, marine reflection seismic data processing and interpretation of newly acquired data elucidates offshore structures to integrate with our onshore results. The oldest regional deformation, resulting in both ductile (D1) and brittle (F 1) structures, is attributed to displacement partitioning along the arcuate Caribbean plate boundary. Associated crustal thinning initiated island exhumation, at a rate of 0.18 km/my, from a maximum burial depth of 6 km in the Late Cretaceous (˜89 Ma). Coeval with D1/F1 deformation and exhumation, stretching of the island arc resulted in extensive basin rifting that separated the island blocks. At ˜55 Ma, a change in the relative motion of the Caribbean plate altered plate boundary dynamics. Displacement along the right-lateral Caribbean transform fault and Oca - San Sebastian - El Pilar strike-slip fault system created a wrench tectonic regime within the diffuse plate boundary zone. A second generation of brittle structures (F2) developed while the islands were at a maximum burial depth of 2 km during the Paleocene/Eocene. Since ˜45 Ma, continued motion along the strike-slip fault systems and oblique plate convergence resulted in the youngest generation of structural features (F3). Regional

  4. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  5. Structure and dynamics of food webs in the water column on shelf and slope grounds of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, M.; Sweeting, C. J.; Olivar, M. P.; Fernández de Puelles, M. L.; Pasqual, C.; Polunin, N. V. C.; Quetglas, A.

    2014-10-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling is an important process connecting species throughout the water column, particularly, in deep-sea systems where faunal assemblages can be dense if indirectly sustained by production from the above. Through stable isotope analyses, this study explored the sources of production, trophic structure, and bentho-pelagic coupling in two locations with contrasting oceanographic conditions from the western Mediterranean, in the Balearic (BsB) and the Algerian (AsB) sub-basins. The samples of 89 dominant species (23 decapods, 19 cephalopods, 33 fishes, among the other taxa), inhabiting the hyperbenthic and pelagic domains, from the shelf break (250 m), upper slope (650 m), and middle slope (850 m) were analyzed. Results suggested long food webs of approximately four trophic levels (TrLs) that were sustained by planktonic source material in shallower waters and degraded particulate organic matter of planktonic origin in deeper waters. Most of the collected species (70%) occupied intermediate trophic positions between the 3rd and 4th TrLs. The species δ15N and δ13C values exhibited a broad range, consistent with the high diversity that might be attributed to the oligotrophic conditions. As the depth increased, stronger segregation occurred between the trophic groups, and spatial differences were found among consumers of the two locations. Species in the AsB always had consistently higher δ15N values than in the BsB, which could possibly be attributed to the basal δ15N that was present through the food web. Despite the contrasting basin characteristics, a similarly close bentho-pelagic coupling pattern was observed at both locations, except at the deepest ground, especially at the AsB, where the mean δ13C values from the hyperbenthic and pelagic compartments were more distant. This could be related to the higher degree of reworking of organic matter in the AsB. Overall, these findings suggested the need for a depth-stratified approach to analyze

  6. MHD of accretion-disk flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankova, Krasimira

    2015-01-01

    Accretion is one of the most important problems of astrophysics concerning the transfer of matter and the transformation of energy into space. Process represents a falling of the substance on a cosmic object from the surrounding area and is a powerful gravitational mechanism for the production of radiation. Accretion disc effectively converts the mass of the substance by viscous friction and released potential energy transformed into radiation by particle collisions. Accretion onto compact object shows high energy efficiency and temporal variability in a broad class of observational data in all ranges. In the disks of these objects are developed a series instabilities and structures that govern the distribution of the energy. They are expressed in many variety non-stationary phenomena that we observe. That is why we propose generalized model of magnetized accretion disk with advection, which preserves the nonlinearity of the problem. We study interaction of the plasmas flow with the magnetic field, and how this affects the self-organizing disk. The aim of the work is to describe the accretion flow in detail, in his quality of the open astrophysical system, to investigate the evolution and to reveal the mechanisms of the structuring the disk-corona system for to interpret correctly the high energy behavior of such sources.

  7. Planetary migration, accretion, and atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian M.

    mechanisms for stopping this accretion involve either disk dispersal or gap formation. Although mass accretion may eventually be quenched by a global depletion of gas, as in the ease of Uranus and Neptune, such a mechanism is unlikely to have stalled the growth of some known planetary systems which contain relatively low-mass and close-in planets along with more massive and longer period companions. Similarly, the formation of a gap cannot fully explain the decrease in mass accretion. Several groups have shown that, even in the presence of a gap, diffusion allows rapid gas accretion to continue. Here I explore the effect of the growing tidal barrier on the flow within the protoplanetary disk. Using both analytic and numerical approaches I show that accretion rates increases rapidly with the ratio of the protoplanet's Roche to Bondi radii or equivalently to the disk thickness. Mass accretion timescales become comparable to observed disk lifetimes. In regions with loco geometric aspect ratios gas accretion is efficiently quenched with relatively low protoplanetary masses. This mechanism is important for determining the gas- giant planets' mass function, the distribution of their masses within multiple planet systems around solar type stars, and for suppressing the emergence of gas-giants around low mass stars. The final section explores the atmospheric dynamics of short-period gas-giant planets. Ubiquitous among currently observed extrasolar planetary systems these planets receive intense irradiation from their host stars that dominates the energy input into their atmospheres. Characterization of several of these planets through transit observations have revealed information on temperature, structure, and composition. Here we present three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulations of atmospheric circulation on close-in gas giant planets. In contrast to previous Global Climate Models and shallow water algorithms, this method does not assume quasi hydrostatic equilibrium

  8. ON THE NATURE OF THE FIRST TRANSIENT Z SOURCE XTE J1701-462: ITS ACCRETION DISK STRUCTURE, NEUTRON STAR MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH, AND HARD TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G. Q.; Wang, N.; Yan, S. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Qu, J. L. E-mail: dinggq@gmail.com

    2011-08-15

    Using data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, we investigate the spectral evolution along a 'Z' track and a '{nu}' track on the hardness-intensity diagrams of the first transient Z source XTE J1701-462. The spectral analyses suggest that the inner disk radius depends on the mass accretion rate, in agreement with the model prediction, R{sub in}{proportional_to}M-dot{sup 2/7}{sub disk}, for a radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk interacting with the magnetosphere of a neutron star (NS). The changes in the disk mass accretion rate M-dot{sub disk} are responsible for the evolution of the 'Z' or '{nu}' track. Radiation pressure thickens the disk considerably and also produces significant outflows. The NS surface magnetic field strength, derived from the interaction between the magnetosphere and the radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk, is {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 9} G, which is possibly between normal atoll and Z sources. A significant hard tail is detected in the horizontal branches and we discuss several possible origins of the hard tail.

  9. Accretion disks in interacting binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.

    1991-01-01

    Accretion disks have most often been analyzed in cataclysmic variables (CVs); the structure and evolution of accretion disks is defined by angular momentum transfer processes. Detailed atmospheric models indicate that angular momentum transport is efficient, that CV outbursts are regulated by mass transfer variations in the disk, and that they may be initiated either from the inner and outer regions of the disk. Tidal effects on the companion are noted to be capable of inducing a significant departure from Keplerian flow near the outer region of the disk.

  10. Disk-overflow accretion in GK Persei?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellier, Coel; Livio, Mario

    1994-01-01

    We reanalyze the 1983 European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) observations of GK Per during an outburst to investigate the approximately 5000 s quasiperiodic modulation. We find that the spectral behavior is reminiscent of dipping low-mass X-ray binaries and note that the time scale is characteristic of the radius where an accretion stream overflowing the disk would collide back onto the disk. We suggest that structure caused by such disk-overflow accretion was periodically obscuring the white dwarf, producing the modulation.

  11. Doppler tomography of accretion in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeghs, D.

    2004-03-01

    Since its conception, Doppler tomography has matured into a versatile and widely used tool. It exploits the information contained in the highly-structured spectral line-profiles typically observed in mass-transferring binaries. Using inversion techniques akin to medical imaging, it permits the reconstruction of Doppler maps that image the accretion flow on micro-arcsecond scales. I summarise the basic concepts behind the technique and highlight two recent results; the use of donor star emission as a means to system parameter determination, and the real-time movies of the evolving accretion flow in the cataclysmic variable WZ Sge during its 2001 outburst. I conclude with future opportunities in Doppler tomography by exploiting the combination of superior data sets, second generation reconstruction codes and simulated theoretical tomograms to delve deeper into the physics of accretion flows.

  12. Accretion disks in luminous young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, M. T.; de Wit, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    An observational review is provided of the properties of accretion disks around young stars. It concerns the primordial disks of intermediate- and high-mass young stellar objects in embedded and optically revealed phases. The properties were derived from spatially resolved observations and, therefore, predominantly obtained with interferometric means, either in the radio/(sub)millimeter or in the optical/infrared wavelength regions. We make summaries and comparisons of the physical properties, kinematics, and dynamics of these circumstellar structures and delineate trends where possible. Amongst others, we report on a quadratic trend of mass accretion rates with mass from T Tauri stars to the highest mass young stellar objects and on the systematic difference in mass infall and accretion rates.

  13. Accretion of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  14. YSO accretion shocks: magnetic, chromospheric or stochastic flow effects can suppress fluctuations of X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, T.; Chièze, J.-P.; Stehlé, C.; González, M.; Ibgui, L.; de Sá, L.; Lanz, T.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments and numerical simulations of radiative shocks produced by the impact of the accreting gas onto young stars predict quasi-periodic oscillations in the emitted radiation. However, observational data do not show evidence of such periodicity. Aims: We investigate whether physically plausible perturbations in the accretion column or in the chromosphere could disrupt the shock structure influencing the observability of the oscillatory behavior. Methods: We performed local 2D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an accretion shock impacting a chromosphere, taking optically thin radiation losses and thermal conduction into account. We investigated the effects of several perturbation types, such as clumps in the accretion stream or chromospheric fluctuations, and also explored a wide range of plasma-β values. Results: In the case of a weak magnetic field, the post-shock region shows chaotic motion and mixing, smoothing out the perturbations and retaining a global periodic signature. On the other hand, a strong magnetic field confines the plasma in flux tubes, which leads to the formation of fibrils that oscillate independently. Realistic values for the amplitude, length, and time scales of the perturbation are capable of bringing the fibril oscillations out of phase, suppressing the periodicity of the emission. Conclusions: The strength of a locally uniform magnetic field in YSO accretion shocks determines the structure of the post-shock region, namely, whether it will be somewhat homogeneous or if it will split up to form a collection of fibrils. In the second case, the size and shape of the fibrils is found to depend strongly on the plasma-β value but not on the perturbation type. Therefore, the actual value of the protostellar magnetic field is expected to play a critical role in the time dependence of the observable emission.

  15. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  16. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  17. Accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of partial X-ray eclipses from 4U1822-37 have shown that the central X-ray source in this system is diffused by a large Compton-thick accretion disk corona (ADC). Another binary, 4U2129-47, also displays a partial eclipse and contains an ADC. The possible origin of an ADC is discussed and a simple hydrostatic evaporated ADC model is developed which, when applied to 4U1822-37, 4U2129+47 and Cyg X-3, can explain their temporal and spectral properties. The quasi-sinusoidal modulation of all three sources can be reconciled with the partial occultation of the ADC by a bulge at the edge of the accretion disk which is caused by the inflowing material. The height of this bulge is an order of magnitude larger than the hydrostatic disk height and is the result of turbulence in the outer region of the disk. The spectral properties of all three sources can be understood in terms of Compton scattering of the original source spectrum by the ADC. Spectral variations with epoch in Cyg X-3 are probably caused by changes in the optical depth of the corona. A consequence of our model is that any accreting neutron star X-ray source in a semi-detached binary system which is close to its Eddington limit most likely contains an optically thick ADC.

  18. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxaccretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  19. Rapidly Accreting Supergiant Protostars: Embryos of Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yorke, Harold W.

    2012-09-01

    Direct collapse of supermassive stars (SMSs) is a possible pathway for generating supermassive black holes in the early universe. It is expected that an SMS could form via very rapid mass accretion with \\dot{M}_*\\sim 0.1{--}1 \\,M_\\odot \\,yr^{-1} during the gravitational collapse of an atomic-cooling primordial gas cloud. In this paper, we study how stars would evolve under such extreme rapid mass accretion, focusing on the early evolution until the stellar mass reaches 103 M ⊙. To this end, we numerically calculate the detailed interior structure of accreting stars with primordial element abundances. Our results show that for accretion rates higher than 10-2 M ⊙ yr-1, stellar evolution is qualitatively different from that expected at lower rates. While accreting at these high rates, the star always has a radius exceeding 100 R ⊙, which increases monotonically with the stellar mass. The mass-radius relation for stellar masses exceeding ~100 M ⊙ follows the same track with R *vpropM 1/2 * in all cases with accretion rates >~ 10-2 M ⊙ yr-1 at a stellar mass of 103 M ⊙, the radius is ~= 7000 R ⊙ (sime 30 AU). With higher accretion rates, the onset of hydrogen burning is shifted toward higher stellar masses. In particular, for accretion rates exceeding \\dot{M}_*\\gtrsim 0.1 \\,M_\\odot \\,yr^{-1}, there is no significant hydrogen burning even after 103 M ⊙ have accreted onto the protostar. Such "supergiant" protostars have effective temperatures as low as T eff ~= 5000 K throughout their evolution and because they hardly emit ionizing photons, they do not create an H II region or significantly heat their immediate surroundings. Thus, radiative feedback is unable to hinder the growth of rapidly accreting stars to masses in excess of 103 M ⊙ as long as material is accreted at rates \\dot{M}_*\\gtrsim 10^{-2} \\,M_\\odot \\,yr^{-1}.

  20. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  1. Accreting X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes the behavior of matter in environments with extreme magnetic and gravitational fields, explains the instability/stability of accretion disks in certain systems, and discusses how emergent radiation affects accretion flow. Magnetic field measurements are obtained by measuring the lowest cyclotron absorption line energy, observing the cutoff of accretion due to centrifugal inhibition and measuring the spin-up rate at high luminosity.

  2. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  3. Quasar Accretion Disks are Strongly Inhomogeneous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei have been observed to vary stochastically with 10%-20% rms amplitudes over a range of optical wavelengths where the emission arises in an accretion disk. Since the accretion disk is unlikely to vary coherently, local fluctuations may be significantly larger than the global rms variability. We investigate toy models of quasar accretion disks consisting of a number of regions, n, whose temperatures vary independently with an amplitude of σ T in dex. Models with large fluctuations (σ T = 0.35-0.50) in 102-103 independently fluctuating zones for every factor of two in radius can explain the observed discrepancy between thin accretion disk sizes inferred from microlensing events and optical luminosity while matching the observed optical variability. For the same range of σ T , inhomogeneous disk spectra provide excellent fits to the Hubble Space Telescope quasar composite without invoking global Compton scattering atmospheres to explain the high levels of observed UV emission. Simulated microlensing light curves for the Einstein cross from our time-varying toy models are well fit using a time-steady power-law temperature disk and produce magnification light curves that are consistent with current microlensing observations. Deviations due to the inhomogeneous, time-dependent disk structure should occur above the 1% level in the light curves, detectable in future microlensing observations with millimagnitude sensitivity.

  4. Relationship between phytoplankton production and the physical structure of the water column near Cobb Seamount, northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comeau, Luc A.; Vézina, Alain F.; Bourgeois, Myriam; Juniper, S. Kim

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the Cobb Seamount (northeast Pacific) on phytoplankton biomass and primary production. In August 1991, we sampled along six 30 km spokes radiating outward from the summit of Cobb Seamount. Surface chlorophyll a (Chl a) and incident light conditions were relatively uniform over this mesoscale sampling grid, but primary production varied over a ten-fold range. Statistical analyses linked these production variations to a subsurface (>50 m) thermohaline front skirting the flanks of the seamount. The thermal stratification of surface waters (<50 m) also changed across the front, generally increasing toward the seamount. These physical changes in turn were associated with a shallowing and intensification of subsurface Chl a maxima, increases in diatom biovolume, and increases in production to biomass ratios. Although nutrient isolines domed slightly upward over the seamount, this physical feature did not seem to enrich surface waters or stimulate production. It appeared that growth and production rates were enhanced by increased stability of the upper water column that led to an improved subsurface light regime. Possible associations of these physicalbiological interactions with the seamount are discussed.

  5. Accretion in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex Courtney

    2000-10-01

    formation of the nascent Milky Way was not dominated by the late accretion of dwarf galaxies like the ones that currently orbit the Galaxy. However, the assimilation of fragments early in the evolution of the Galaxy is a natural byproduct of hierarchical models of structure formation and can explain many properties of the halo population.

  6. Discovery of an Accretion-Fed Corona in an Accreting Young Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Cranmer, S. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Wolk, S.

    2009-09-01

    A deep (489 ks) Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectrum of the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae shows a new type of coronal structure that is produced by the accretion process. In the standard model for a stellar dipole, the magnetic field truncates the disk and channels the accreting material onto the star. The He-like diagnostic lines of Ne IX provide excellent agreement with the shock conditions predicted by this model, with an electron temperature of 2.5 MK and electron density of 3 × 10^{12} cm^{-3} (see also Kastner et al. 2002). However, the standard model completely fails to predict the post-shock conditions, significantly overpredicting both the density and absorption observed at O VII. Instead the observations require a second ``post-shock'' component with 30 times more mass and 1000 times larger volume than found at the shock itself. We note that in the standard model, the shocked plasma is conveniently located near both closed (coronal) and open (stellar wind) magnetic structures, as the magnetic field connecting the star and disk also separates the open and closed field regions on the stellar surface. The shocked plasma thus can provide the energy to heat not only the post-shock plasma, but also adjacent regions (i.e. an ``accretion-fed corona'') and drive stellar material into surrounding coronal structures. These observations provide new clues to the puzzling soft X-ray excess found in accreting systems, which depends on both the presence of accretion and the level of coronal activity (Guedel and Telleschi 2007). This Large Program with Chandra demonstrates the value of high signal-to-noise, high resolution spectroscopy for understanding the complex interaction of magnetic and accretion processes in late-type star formation.

  7. RADIATIVELY EFFICIENT MAGNETIZED BONDI ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Teyssier, Romain

    2012-01-10

    We have carried out a numerical study of the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the rate of accretion from a uniform, isothermal gas onto a resistive, stationary point mass. Only mass, not magnetic flux, accretes onto the point mass. The simulations for this study avoid complications arising from boundary conditions by keeping the boundaries far from the accreting object. Our simulations leverage adaptive refinement methodology to attain high spatial fidelity close to the accreting object. Our results are particularly relevant to the problem of star formation from a magnetized molecular cloud in which thermal energy is radiated away on timescales much shorter than the dynamical timescale. Contrary to the adiabatic case, our simulations show convergence toward a finite accretion rate in the limit in which the radius of the accreting object vanishes, regardless of magnetic field strength. For very weak magnetic fields, the accretion rate first approaches the Bondi value and then drops by a factor of {approx}2 as magnetic flux builds up near the point mass. For strong magnetic fields, the steady-state accretion rate is reduced by a factor of {approx}0.2 {beta}{sup 1/2} compared to the Bondi value, where {beta} is the ratio of the gas pressure to the magnetic pressure. We give a simple expression for the accretion rate as a function of the magnetic field strength. Approximate analytic results are given in the Appendices for both time-dependent accretion in the limit of weak magnetic fields and steady-state accretion for the case of strong magnetic fields.

  8. Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion from a Planar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion have informed predictions about the evolution of wind-driven accretion systems for over two decades. These simulations frequently exhibit dramatic nonlinear behavior such as the flip-flop instability and the formation of transient accretion disks. During disk accretion, the mass accretion rate is suppressed and angular momentum accretion occurs at quasi-Keplerian rates. These results have been used to interpret neutron star accretion from the equatorially enhanced wind of a Be star in Be/X-ray Binaries. We employ large-scale hydrodynamic simulations to investigate whether the flip-flop instability is possible in three dimensions or is simply a consequence of the restrictions on a 2D flow. We do not observe the flip-flop instability in 3D for any values of the wind scale height or density. Moreover, the angular momentum vector of the accreting gas is typically found to be in the plane of the disk wind rather than perpendicular to it as one might expect based on the results of 2D planar simulations. We measure large-scale asymmetries about the plane of the disk wind that arise due to rotational flow near the accretor. Gas is driven above and below the plane, where it interacts with the bow shock and results in a time-varying shock structure. Winds with scale heights of 0.25 Ra enter locked rotation modes that remain stable for the duration of our computational runs. During this phase, the mass accretion rate is suppressed by up to two orders of magnitude below the analytical prediction and angular momentum accretion occurs at sub-Keplerian values.

  9. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  10. The pulse amplitude variation with QPO frequency in SAX J1808.4-3658: Resonances with the accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Sirin; Alpar, Mehmet Ali; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem

    2016-07-01

    SAX J1808.4-3658 is an accreting millisecond pulsar with a spin period of 401 Hz. The pulsed amplitudes of this source vary with its kHz QPO frequencies (Bult & van der Klis 2015). The pulsed amplitude peaks at certain upper kHz QPO frequencies which we associate with boundary layer modes of the viscous accretion disk (Erkut et al. 2008). We model this as peaks in the energy dissipation rate at the accretion caps due to resonances between the accretion column and the driving modes of the boundary layer.

  11. AGN flickering and chaotic accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Nixon, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Observational arguments suggest that the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei have a characteristic time-scale ˜105 yr. We show that this is the time-scale expected in the chaotic accretion picture of black hole feeding, because of the effect of self-gravity in limiting the mass of any accretion-disc feeding event.

  12. AGN Unification, X-Ray Absorbers and Accretion Disk MHD Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2011-01-01

    We present the 2D photoionization structure of the MHD winds of AGN accretion disks. We focus our attention on a specific subset of winds, those with poloidal currents that lead to density profiles n(r) \\propto 1/r. We employ the code XSTAR to compute the local ionization balance, emissivities and opacity which are then used in the self-consistent transfer of radiation and ionization of a host of ionic species of a large number of elements over then entire poloidal plane. Particular attention is paid to the Absorption Measure Distribution (AMD), namely their hydrogen-equivalent column of these ions per logarithmic 7 interval, dN_H/dlog ? (? = L/n(r)r(sup 2) is the ionization parameter), which provides a measure of the winds' radial density profiles. For the given density profile, AMD is found to be independent of ?, in good agreement with analyses of Chandra and XMM data, suggesting the specific profile as a fundamental AGN property. Furthermore, the ratio of equatorial to polar column densities of these winds is \\simeq 10(exp 4); as such, it is shown they serve as the "torus" necessary for AGN unification with phenomenology consistent with the observations. The same winds are also shown to reproduce the observed columns and velocities of C IV and Fe XXV of SAL QSOs once the proper ionizing spectra and inclination angles are employed.

  13. Morphodynamics of Accreting Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Sherwood, C. R.; Kaminsky, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    Beaches along the Pacific Northwest coast of the US have been shown to have large seasonal variability in shoreline position with several 10's of meters of recession occurring during the winter (high-energy waves) and typically similar scales of beach recovery during the summer (low-energy waves). However, many beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year over decades, resulting in significant shoreline realignment. This historical shoreline advance has been primarily due to the dispersal of sand from the flanks of the ebb-tidal deltas following jetty construction at the entrances to the Columbia River and Grays Harbor. The installation of jetties removed the shallow shoals from the influence of tidal currents, resulting in a shoreface profile that was too shallow for the inherent wave energy. Onshore transport of large quantities of sand occurred over the next several decades, decreasing through time. While much of the original source material is now exhausted, many beaches today are still rapidly accreting on inter-annual time scales. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for this continued accretion. The primary morphodynamic mechanism for sub-aerial beach growth, and shoreline progradation on a seasonal scale, is hypothesized to be the development, onshore migration, and welding of inter-tidal (swash) bars to the upper beach face. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with accreting beaches we have completed two field experiments and are applying computational models that link measured sediment transport to wave and current forcing. Experiments completed in Spring 2001 and Summer 2002 combined process measurements with observations of

  14. Accretion onto neutron stars with the presence of a double layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. C.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is known, from laboratory experiments, that double layers will form in plasmas, usually in the presence of an electric current. It is argued that a double layer may be present in the accretion column of a neutron star in a binary system. It is suggested that the double layer may be the predominant deceleration mechanism for the accreting ions, especially for sources with X-ray luminosities of less than about 10 to the 37th erg/s. Previous models have involved either a collisionless shock or an assumed gradual deceleration of the accreting ions to thermalize the energy of the infalling matter.

  15. Accretion onto neutron stars with the presence of a double layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. C.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    It is known from laboratory experiments that double layers can form in plasmas, usually in the presence of an electric current. It is argued that a double layer may be present in the accretion column of a neutron star in a binary system. It is suggested that the double layer may be the predominant deceleration mechanism for the accreting ions, especially for sources with X-ray luminosities of less than about 10 to the 37th erg/s. Previous models have involved either a collisionless shock or an assumed gradual deceleration of the accreting ions to thermalize the energy of the infalling matter.

  16. Magnetically driven accretion in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-11-01

    We characterize magnetically driven accretion at radii between 1 and 100 au in protoplanetary discs, using a series of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The simulations assume a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disc that is threaded by a net vertical magnetic field of specified strength. Confirming previous results, we find that the Hall effect has only a modest impact on accretion at 30 au, and essentially none at 100 au. At 1-10 au the Hall effect introduces a pronounced bimodality in the accretion process, with vertical magnetic fields aligned to the disc rotation supporting a strong laminar Maxwell stress that is absent if the field is anti-aligned. In the anti-aligned case, we instead find evidence for bursts of turbulent stress at 5-10 au, which we tentatively identify with the non-axisymmetric Hall-shear instability. The presence or absence of these bursts depends upon the details of the adopted chemical model, which suggests that appreciable regions of actual protoplanetary discs might lie close to the borderline between laminar and turbulent behaviour. Given the number of important control parameters that have already been identified in MHD models, quantitative predictions for disc structure in terms of only radius and accretion rate appear to be difficult. Instead, we identify robust qualitative tests of magnetically driven accretion. These include the presence of turbulence in the outer disc, independent of the orientation of the vertical magnetic fields, and a Hall-mediated bimodality in turbulent properties extending from the region of thermal ionization to 10 au.

  17. Microwave ice accretion meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magenheim, Bertram (Inventor); Rocks, James K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system for indicating ice thickness and rate of ice thickness growth on surfaces is disclosed. The region to be monitored for ice accretion is provided with a resonant surface waveguide which is mounted flush, below the surface being monitored. A controlled oscillator provides microwave energy via a feed point at a controllable frequency. A detector is coupled to the surface waveguide and is responsive to electrical energy. A measuring device indicates the frequency deviation of the controlled oscillator from a quiescent frequency. A control means is provided to control the frequency of oscillation of the controlled oscillator. In a first, open-loop embodiment, the control means is a shaft operated by an operator. In a second, closed-loop embodiment, the control means is a processor which effects automatic control.

  18. Accretion disk thermal instability in galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineshige, S.; Shields, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution and spatial propagation of the thermal instability in accretion disks in galactic nuclei are investigated. Integrations of the vertical structure of the disks are described for different alpha prescriptions, and the thermal stability is examined. Global time-dependent calculations of the unstable disks are performed which show that there are two distinct types of behavior according to the assumed prescription for the viscosity parameter: the 'purr' type and the 'roar' type. The roar type is analyzed in some detail.

  19. THE LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF THIN ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Xinwu; Spruit, Hendrik C. E-mail: henk@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-10

    Large-scale magnetic field threading an accretion disk is a key ingredient in the jet formation model. The most attractive scenario for the origin of such a large-scale field is the advection of the field by the gas in the accretion disk from the interstellar medium or a companion star. However, it is realized that outward diffusion of the accreted field is fast compared with the inward accretion velocity in a geometrically thin accretion disk if the value of the Prandtl number P{sub m} is around unity. In this work, we revisit this problem considering the angular momentum of the disk to be removed predominantly by the magnetically driven outflows. The radial velocity of the disk is significantly increased due to the presence of the outflows. Using a simplified model for the vertical disk structure, we find that even moderately weak fields can cause sufficient angular momentum loss via a magnetic wind to balance outward diffusion. There are two equilibrium points, one at low field strengths corresponding to a plasma-beta at the midplane of order several hundred, and one for strong accreted fields, {beta} {approx} 1. We surmise that the first is relevant for the accretion of weak, possibly external, fields through the outer parts of the disk, while the latter one could explain the tendency, observed in full three-dimensional numerical simulations, of strong flux bundles at the centers of disk to stay confined in spite of strong magnetororational instability turbulence surrounding them.

  20. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was observed on September of 2002. Data analysis for both observation has been completed: an investigation of the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure. A study of behavior of the emission features as a function of binary orbit shows modulated behavior in one of the systems. A paper on "High-resolution observations of low-mass X-ray binaries" is near completion. The paper includes observations with the Chandra HETG that are not yet completed.

  1. Post-flare Formation of the Accretion Stream and a dip in Pulse Profiles of LMC X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Aru; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will present results from a pulse profile evolution study of an accreting X-ray pulsar LMC X-4 during and after the large X-ray flares using data from two observatories XMM-Newton and RXTE. During the flares, the pulse profiles was found to have a significant phase offset and also some intensity dependence of the pulse amplitude. Moreover, a phase shift of nearly 180 between the pulse profiles from the persistent emission (just before and after the flares) was found. Investigating the pulse profiles for a long duration after the flares we estimated the time required for the modified accretion column to return to its normal structure and formation of accretion stream that causes dip in the pulse profile of LMC X-4. We will also discuss the results from a pulse phase resolved spectroscopy in narrow phase bins using data from EPIC-PN which confirmed a pulsating nature of the soft spectral component having a pulse shape and phase different form the rest.

  2. TLUSTY: Stellar Atmospheres, Accretion Disks, and Spectroscopic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry

    2011-09-01

    TLUSTY is a user-oriented package written in FORTRAN77 for modeling stellar atmospheres and accretion disks and wide range of spectroscopic diagnostics. In the program's maximum configuration, the user may start from scratch and calculate a model atmosphere of a chosen degree of complexity, and end with a synthetic spectrum in a wavelength region of interest for an arbitrary stellar rotation and an arbitrary instrumental profile. The user may also model the vertical structure of annuli of an accretion disk.

  3. 29 CFR 1926.756 - Beams and columns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beams and columns. 1926.756 Section 1926.756 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.756 Beams and columns. (a.... (c) (1) Double connections at columns and/or at beam webs over a column. When two structural...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.756 - Beams and columns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Beams and columns. 1926.756 Section 1926.756 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.756 Beams and columns. (a.... (c) (1) Double connections at columns and/or at beam webs over a column. When two structural...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.756 - Beams and columns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Beams and columns. 1926.756 Section 1926.756 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.756 Beams and columns. (a.... (c) (1) Double connections at columns and/or at beam webs over a column. When two structural...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.756 - Beams and columns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beams and columns. 1926.756 Section 1926.756 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.756 Beams and columns. (a.... (c) (1) Double connections at columns and/or at beam webs over a column. When two structural...

  7. Structure of the SE Greenland margin from seismic reflection and refraction data: Implications for nascent spreading center subsidence and asymmetric crustal accretion during North Atlantic opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, John R.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Holbrook, W. Steven; Larsen, Hans Christian; Lizarralde, Dan; Korenaga, Jun; Kent, Graham M.; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2003-05-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data from the SE Greenland margin provide a detailed view of a volcanic rifted margin from Archean continental crust to near-to-average oceanic crust over a spatial scale of 400 km. The SIGMA III transect, located ˜600 km south of the Greenland-Iceland Ridge and the presumed track of the Iceland hot spot, shows that the continent-ocean transition is abrupt and only a small amount of crustal thinning occurred prior to final breakup. Initially, 18.3 km thick crust accreted to the margin and the productivity decreased through time until a steady state ridge system was established that produced 8-10 km thick crust. Changes in the morphology of the basaltic extrusives provide evidence for vertical motions of the ridge system, which was close to sea level for at least 1 m.y. of subaerial spreading despite a reduction in productivity from 17 to 13.5 km thick crust over this time interval. This could be explained if a small component of active upwelling associated with thermal buoyancy from a modest thermal anomaly provided dynamic support to the rift system. The thermal anomaly must be exhaustible, consistent with recent suggestions that plume material was emplaced into a preexisting lithospheric thin spot as a thin sheet. Exhaustion of the thin sheet led to rapid subsidence of the spreading system and a change from subaerial, to shallow marine, and finally to deep marine extrusion in ˜2 m.y. is shown by the morphological changes. In addition, comparison to the conjugate Hatton Bank shows a clear asymmetry in the early accretion history of North Atlantic oceanic crust. Nearly double the volume of material was emplaced on the Greenland margin compared to Hatton Bank and may indicate east directed ridge migration during initial opening.

  8. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  9. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  10. Discovery of an Accretion-Fed Corona in an Accreting Young Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Scott J.; Brickhouse, N.; Cranmer, S.; Dupree, A.; Luna, G. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A deep (489 ks) Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectrum of the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae shows a new type of coronal structure that is produced by the accretion process. In the standard model for a stellar dipole, the magnetic field truncates the disk and channels the accreting material onto the star. The He-like diagnostic lines of Ne IX provide excellent agreement with the shock conditions predicted by this model, with an electron temperature of 2.5 MK and electron density of 3 times 1012 cm-3 (see also Kastner et al. 2002). However, the standard model completely fails to predict the post-shock conditions, significantly overpredicting both the density and absorption observed at O VII. Instead the observations require a second "post-shock" component with 30 times more mass and 1000 times larger volume than found at the shock itself. We note that in the standard model, the shocked plasma is conveniently located near both closed (coronal) and open (stellar wind) magnetic structures, as the magnetic field connecting the star and disk also separates the open and closed field regions on the stellar surface. The shocked plasma thus can provide the energy to heat not only the post-shock plasma, but also adjacent regions (i.e. an "accretion-fed corona") and drive stellar material into surrounding coronal structures. These observations provide new clues to the puzzling soft X-ray excess found in accreting systems, which depends on both the presence of accretion and the level of coronal activity (Guedel and Telleschi 2007). This work is partially supported by CXO grant G07-8018X.