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Sample records for accuracy fuel flowmeter

  1. High accuracy fuel flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    All three flowmeter concepts (vortex, dual turbine, and angular momentum) were subjected to experimental and analytical investigation to determine the potential portotype performance. The three concepts were subjected to a comprehensive rating. Eight parameters of performance were evaluated on a zero-to-ten scale, weighted, and summed. The relative ratings of the vortex, dual turbine, and angular momentum flowmeters are 0.71, 1.00, and 0.95, respectively. The dual turbine flowmeter concept was selected as the primary candidate and the angular momentum flowmeter as the secondary candidate for prototype development and evaluation.

  2. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  3. High accuracy fuel flowmeter. Phase 2C and 3: The mass flowrate calibration of high accuracy fuel flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, D. William

    1992-01-01

    A facility for the precise calibration of mass fuel flowmeters and turbine flowmeters located at AMETEK Aerospace Products Inc., Wilmington, Massachusetts is described. This facility is referred to as the Test and Calibration System (TACS). It is believed to be the most accurate test facility available for the calibration of jet engine fuel density measurement. The product of the volumetric flow rate measurement and the density measurement, results in a true mass flow rate determination. A dual-turbine flowmeter was designed during this program. The dual-turbine flowmeter was calibrated on the TACS to show the characteristics of this type of flowmeter. An angular momentum flowmeter was also calibrated on the TACS to demonstrate the accuracy of a true mass flowmeter having a 'state-of-the-art' design accuracy.

  4. High accuracy fuel flowmeter. Phase 2C and 3: The mass flowrate calibration of high accuracy fuel flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, D. William

    1992-02-01

    A facility for the precise calibration of mass fuel flowmeters and turbine flowmeters located at AMETEK Aerospace Products Inc., Wilmington, Massachusetts is described. This facility is referred to as the Test and Calibration System (TACS). It is believed to be the most accurate test facility available for the calibration of jet engine fuel density measurement. The product of the volumetric flow rate measurement and the density measurement, results in a true mass flow rate determination. A dual-turbine flowmeter was designed during this program. The dual-turbine flowmeter was calibrated on the TACS to show the characteristics of this type of flowmeter. An angular momentum flowmeter was also calibrated on the TACS to demonstrate the accuracy of a true mass flowmeter having a 'state-of-the-art' design accuracy.

  5. The NASA High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter (HAFF) Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobart, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    The high accuracy fuel flowmeter development program is described. A flightworthy meter that measures mass flowrate of aircraft fuels to within + or - 0.25% of reading over a 50:1 range of flow is developed. A study of measurement techniques to achieve this goal yielded three candidates: (1) a dual turbine flowmeter with density and viscosity compensation; (2) an angular momentum flowmeter with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud; and (3) a vortex precission flowmeter with density and viscosity compensation. An experimental study of each technique was completed and the first two candidates were selected for prototype development.

  6. Unsteady Phenomena During Operation of the SSME Fuel Flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Bogdan

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a part of the analysis carried in support of the SSME Fuel Flowmeter redesign, addressing a particular phenomenon known as "shifting" of the flowmeter constant value. It consists of a sudden change in the flowmeter indication, which occurs simultaneously with the onset of an oscillatory variation of the rotor speed. The change in the flowmeter indications does not correspond to a real change in the volumetric flow through the device. Several causes have been investigated in detail, in the past, without conclusive evidence towards a cause of this phenomenon. The present analysis addresses the flow physics through the flowmeter by assembling results from 3-D CFD calculations, airfoil CD/CL performance curves and mass moment of inertia characteristics of the rotor into a synergistic calculation which simulates the unsteady regime of the flowmeter operation. The results show that the 4-bladed rotor interacts with the periodic flow pattern created behind the flow straightener upstream in a manner that generates a steady, periodic fluctuation in the rotor's speed. The amplitude of this fluctuation is significantly smaller than the 0.5% of mean speed threshold which constitutes a flight operational limit. When manufacturing variations occur, however, the fluctuations are amplified and can generate a significant apparent change in the flowmeter indication. Two types of possible fabrication variations.which can occur even for parts fabricated within the accepted tolerances for the blade airfoil.are presented, together with their effect on the flowmeter operation.

  7. Accuracy of flowmeters measuring horizontal groundwater flow in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Ursic, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Borehole flowmeters that measure horizontal flow velocity and direction of groundwater flow are being increasingly applied to a wide variety of environmental problems. This study was carried out to evaluate the measurement accuracy of several types of flowmeters in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator. Flowmeter response to hydraulic gradient, aquifer properties, and well-screen construction was measured during 2003 and 2005 at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The flowmeters tested included a commercially available heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler flowmeter, a scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter, and a fluid-conductivity logging system. Results of the study indicated that at least one flowmeter was capable of measuring borehole flow velocity and direction in most simulated conditions. The mean error in direction measurements ranged from 15.1 degrees to 23.5 degrees and the directional accuracy of all tested flowmeters improved with increasing hydraulic gradient. The range of Darcy velocities examined in this study ranged 4.3 to 155 ft/d. For many plots comparing the simulated and measured Darcy velocity, the squared correlation coefficient (r2) exceeded 0.92. The accuracy of velocity measurements varied with well construction and velocity magnitude. The use of horizontal flowmeters in environmental studies appears promising but applications may require more than one type of flowmeter to span the range of conditions encountered in the field. Interpreting flowmeter data from field settings may be complicated by geologic heterogeneity, preferential flow, vertical flow, constricted screen openings, and nonoptimal screen orientation.

  8. FLOWMETER

    DOEpatents

    November, G.S.; Schute, F.

    1962-02-20

    A fluid flowmeter is designed in which a standing pressure wave is established. The amplitude of this standing wave is a function of the fluid flow rate so that pressure sensing devices may be used to indicate fluid flow and variations thereof. (AEC)

  9. Rotor Re-Design for the SSME Fuel Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Bogdan

    1999-01-01

    The present report describes the process of redesigning a new rotor for the SSME Fuel Flowmeter. The new design addresses the specific requirement of a lower rotor speed which would allow the SSME operation at 1 15% rated power level without reaching a blade excitation by the wakes behind the hexagonal flow straightener upstream at frequencies close to the blade natural frequency. A series of calculations combining fleet flowmeters test data, airfoil fluid dynamics and CFD simulations of flow patterns behind the flowmeter's hexagonal straightener has led to a blade twist design alpha = alpha (radius) targeting a kf constant of 0.8256. The kf constant relates the fuel volume flow to the flowmeter rotor speed, for this particular value 17685 GPM at 3650 RPM. Based on this angle distribution, two actual blade designs were developed. A first design using the same blade airfoil as the original design targeted the new kf value only. A second design using a variable blade chord length and airfoil relative thickness targeted simultaneously the new kf value and an optimum blade design destined to provide smooth and stable operation and a significant increase in the blade natural frequency associated with the first bending mode, such that a comfortable margin could be obtained at 115% RPL. The second design is a result of a concurrent engineering process, during which several iterations were made in order to achieve a targeted blade natural frequency associated with the first bending mode of 1300 Hz. Water flow tests preliminary results indicate a kf value of 0.8179 for the f-irst design, which is within 1% of the target value. The second design rotor shows a natural frequency associated with the first bending mode of 1308 Hz, and a water-flow calibration constant of kf 0.8169.

  10. Comparison of Coriolis and turbine-type flowmeters for fuel measurement in gas turbine testing

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, J.D.; Grabe, W.

    1995-01-01

    The Machinery and Engine Technology (MET) Program of the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) has established a program for the evaluation of sensors to measure gas turbine engine performance accurately. The precise measurement of fuel flow is an essential part of steady-state gas turbine performance assessment. The MET Laboratory has critically examined two types of fuel flowmeters, Coriolis and turbine. The two flowmeter types are different in that the Coriolis flowmeter measures mass flow directly, while the turbine flowmeter measures volumetric flow, which must be converted to mass flow for conventional performance analysis. The direct measurement of mass flow, using a Coriolis flowmeter, has many advantages in field testing of gas turbines, because it reduces the risk of errors resulting from the conversion process. Turbine flowmeters, on the other hand, have been regarded as an industry standard because they are compact, rugged, reliable, and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes the project objectives, the experimental installation, and the results of the comparison of the Coriolis and turbine-type flowmeters in steady-state performance testing. Discussed are variations between the two types of flowmeters due to fuel characteristics, fuel handling equipment, acoustic and vibration interference, and installation effects. Also included in this paper are estimations of measurement uncertainties for both types of flowmeter. Results indicate that the agreement between Coriolis and turbine-type flowmeters is good over the entire steady-state operating range of a typical gas turbine engine. In some cases the repeatability of the Coriolis flowmeter is better than the manufacturer`s specification. Even a significant variation in fuel density (10 percent), and viscosity (300 percent) did not appear to compromise the ability of the Coriolis flowmeter to match the performance of the turbine flowmeter.

  11. The Effect of Acoustic Disturbances on the Operation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Fuel Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Bogdan; Szabo, Roland; Dorney, Dan; Zoladz, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) uses a turbine fuel flowmeter (FFM) in its Low Pressure Fuel Duct (LPFD) to measure liquid hydrogen flowrates during engine operation. The flowmeter is required to provide accurate and robust measurements of flow rates ranging from 10000 to 18000 GPM in an environment contaminated by duct vibration and duct internal acoustic disturbances. Errors exceeding 0.5% can have a significant impact on engine operation and mission completion. The accuracy of each sensor is monitored during hot-fire engine tests on the ground. Flow meters which do not meet requirements are not flown. Among other parameters, the device is screened for a specific behavior in which a small shift in the flow rate reading is registered during a period in which the actual fuel flow as measured by a facility meter does not change. Such behavior has been observed over the years for specific builds of the FFM and must be avoided or limited in magnitude in flight. Various analyses of the recorded data have been made prior to this report in an effort to understand the cause of the phenomenon; however, no conclusive cause for the shift in the instrument behavior has been found. The present report proposes an explanation of the phenomenon based on interactions between acoustic pressure disturbances in the duct and the wakes produced by the FFM flow straightener. Physical insight into the effects of acoustic plane wave disturbances was obtained using a simple analytical model. Based on that model, a series of three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the MSFC PHANTOM turbomachinery code. The code was customized to allow the FFM rotor speed to change at every time step according to the instantaneous fluid forces on the rotor, that, in turn, are affected by acoustic plane pressure waves propagating through the device. The results of the simulations show the variation in the rotation rate of the flowmeter

  12. A Mathematical Model of the Thermo-Anemometric Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Korobiichuk, Igor; Bezvesilna, Olena; Ilchenko, Andriі; Shadura, Valentina; Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-anemometric flowmeter design and the principles of its work are presented in the article. A mathematical model of the temperature field in a stream of biofuel is proposed. This model allows one to determine the fuel consumption with high accuracy. Numerical modeling of the heater heat balance in the fuel flow of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter is conducted and the results are analyzed. Methods for increasing the measurement speed and accuracy of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter are proposed. PMID:26378535

  13. A Mathematical Model of the Thermo-Anemometric Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Korobiichuk, Igor; Bezvesilna, Olena; Ilchenko, Andriі; Shadura, Valentina; Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-anemometric flowmeter design and the principles of its work are presented in the article. A mathematical model of the temperature field in a stream of biofuel is proposed. This model allows one to determine the fuel consumption with high accuracy. Numerical modeling of the heater heat balance in the fuel flow of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter is conducted and the results are analyzed. Methods for increasing the measurement speed and accuracy of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter are proposed. PMID:26378535

  14. Self-Calibrating Respiratory-Flowmeter Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Orr, Joseph A.

    1990-01-01

    Dual flowmeters ensure accuracy over full range of human respiratory flow rates. System for measurement of respiratory flow employs two flowmeters; one compensates for deficiencies of other. Combination yields easily calibrated system accurate over wide range of gas flow.

  15. Use of small turbine-type flowmeters to measure flow in large pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minkin, H. L.; Hobart, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of mass flow in large pipes using small turbine-type flowmeters is discussed. Experiments for determining accuracy of flowmeter and applicability to various types of flow measurement are reported. Illustration of turbine flowmeter and calibration curve are included.

  16. Aeroacoustic flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The flowmeter is based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of sound wavelength. Plane sound waves are generated aeroacoustically by a non-protruding ring cavity energized either directly by the flow or by a subsidiary flow of the same medium. The frequency of the aeroacoustic source varies with temperature and therefore the temperature can be obtained. In the case of steam flow, temperature can be measured independently and therefore from the measured frequency (or speed of sound), the quality of wet steam can be measured. The flowmeter is linear in velocity and no calibrations are required.

  17. Flowmeters and reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemp, J.

    1988-11-01

    A general method is given for developing the basic theory of any kind of 'interrogating field' flowmeter. These include electromagnetic flowmeters, transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters, and Coriolis mass flowmeters. The general expression for the weight vector for the Coriolis mass flowmeter is derived and calculated in one configuration.

  18. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid. 4 figs.

  19. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1981-06-10

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid.

  20. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1983-01-01

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid (10) containing entrained particles (12) is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly (31) on the raster area of a low-light level television camera (20). The particles (12) are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers (32) surrounding the rod optic lens assembly (31). Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen (40). The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid (10).

  1. Automatic flowmeter calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating the accuracy of a flowmeter is described. The system includes a calculator capable of performing mathematical functions responsive to receiving data signals and function command signals. A prover cylinder is provided for measuring the temperature, pressure, and time required for accumulating a predetermined volume of fluid. Along with these signals, signals representing the temperature and pressure of the fluid going into the meter are fed to a plurality of data registers. Under control of a progress controller, the data registers are read out and the information is fed through a data select circuit to the calculator. Command signals are also produced by a function select circuit and are fed to the calculator set indicating the desired function to be performed. The reading is then compared with the reading produced by the flowmeter.

  2. Nonintrusive Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental work performed in the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype nonintrusive gaging system for use in monitoring the consumption of earth-storable fuels and oxidants in either a one-g or a zero-g environment are explained. The design specifications were those applicable to the reaction control system and to the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) fuel and oxidant on the space shuttle while in orbit. The major requirement was for the measurement of flow pulses with sufficient accuracy to provide a continuous knowledge of the fuel and oxidant remaining in the OMS system to within 1% or better. An ultrasonic frequency chirp technique was used having a high inherent rejection for signals traversing stray paths, and for random noise generated by the flowing liquid. A detailed analysis of the frequency chirp approach for two modes of operation (period and phase changes), including an error analysis are reported.

  3. Modern ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, V. M.; Truman, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The current status of ultrasonic flowmeters were reviewed on the basis of materials published in the Soviet Union and elsewhere. The following advantages of ultrasonic flowmeters over earlier instruments are cited. A comparative analysis is made of the design methods employed in ultrasonic flowmeters. The evolution of ultrasonic flowmetering is traced from the first generation and trends in their development are analyzed.

  4. Support of gas flowmeter upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    A project history review, literature review, and vendor search were conducted to identify a flowmeter that would improve the accuracy of gaseous flow measurements in the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Calibration Laboratory and the Hydrogen High Flow Facility. Both facilities currently use sonic flow nozzles to measure flowrates. The flow nozzle pressure drops combined with corresponding pressure and temperature measurements have been estimated to produce uncertainties in flowrate measurements of 2 to 5 percent. This study investigated the state of flowmeter technology to make recommendations that would reduce those uncertainties. Most flowmeters measure velocity and volume, therefore mass flow measurement must be calculated based on additional pressures and temperature measurement which contribute to the error. The two exceptions are thermal dispersion meters and Coriolis mass flowmeters. The thermal dispersion meters are accurate to 1 to 5 percent. The Coriolis meters are significantly more accurate, at least for liquids. For gases, there is evidence they may be accurate to within 0.5 percent or better of the flowrate, but there may be limitations due to inappropriate velocity, pressure, Mach number and vibration disturbances. In this report, a comparison of flowmeters is presented. Candidate Coriolis meters and a methodology to qualify the meter with tests both at WSTF and Southwest Research Institute are recommended and outlined.

  5. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  6. Space Shuttle Hypergol Load Determination Using Nonintrusive Ultrasonic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph; Kelley, Andrew; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle preflight hypergol oxidizer and fuel loading were monitored using a nonintrusive flow measurement system (NFMS) during preflight operation. A pair of 4-megahertz ultrasonic transducers measured the flow rate using a transit-time flow measurement technique. Using wireless cellular phone technology, flow-rate data was monitored and recorded. Excellent correlation was observed between the flow profiles measured using the proposed nonintrusive ultrasonic flowmeters (UFM's) and those made from conventional intrusive turbine meters (TFM). Based on the preliminary tests, it is concluded that the nonintrusive method of flow measurement has the same or higher accuracy, is simpler, and costs less than the existing TFM. Benefits of UFM's include a highly flexible, cost-effective, reliable, hazard free, and streamlined hypergol operation. Redundant installation of ultrasonic flowmeters was recommended for a few more launches prior to the replacement of the existing TFM.

  7. STS-51 pad abort. OV103-engine 2033 (ME-2) fuel flowmeter sensor open circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The STS-51 initial launch attempt of Discovery (OV-103) was terminated on KSC launch pad 39B on 12 Aug. 1993 at 9:12 AM E.S.T. due to a sensor redundancy failure in the liquid hydrogen system of ME-2 (Engine 2033). The event description and time line are summarized. Propellant loading was initiated on 12 Aug. 1993 at 12:00 AM EST. All space shuttle main engine (SSME) chill parameters and Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) were nominal. At engine start plus 1.34 seconds a Failure Identification (FID) was posted against Engine 2033 for exceeding the 1800 spin intra-channel (A1-A2) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel qualification limit. The engine was shut down at 1.50 seconds followed by Engines 2032 and 2030. All shut down sequences were nominal and the mission was safely aborted. SSME Avionics hardware and software performed nominally during the incident. A review of vehicle data table (VDT) data and controller software logic revealed no failure indications other than the single FID 111-101, Fuel Flowrate Intra-Channel Test Channel A disqualification. Software logic was executed according to requirements and there was no anomalous controller software operation. Immediately following the abort, a Rocketdyne/NASA failure investigation team was assembled. The team successfully isolated the failure cause to an open circuit in a Fuel Flowrate Sensor. This type of failure has occurred eight previous times in ground testing. The sensor had performed acceptably on three previous flights of the engine and SSME flight history shows 684 combined fuel flow rate sensor channel flights without failure. The disqualification of an Engine 2 (SSME No. 2033) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel was a result of an instrumentation failure and not engine performance. All other engine operations were nominal. This disqualification resulted in an engine shutdown and safe sequential shutdown of all three engines prior to ignition of the solid boosters.

  8. STS-51 pad abort. OV103-engine 2033 (ME-2) fuel flowmeter sensor open circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 initial launch attempt of Discovery (OV-103) was terminated on KSC launch pad 39B on 12 Aug. 1993 at 9:12 AM E.S.T. due to a sensor redundancy failure in the liquid hydrogen system of ME-2 (Engine 2033). The event description and time line are summarized. Propellant loading was initiated on 12 Aug. 1993 at 12:00 AM EST. All space shuttle main engine (SSME) chill parameters and Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) were nominal. At engine start plus 1.34 seconds a Failure Identification (FID) was posted against Engine 2033 for exceeding the 1800 spin intra-channel (A1-A2) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel qualification limit. The engine was shut down at 1.50 seconds followed by Engines 2032 and 2030. All shut down sequences were nominal and the mission was safely aborted. SSME Avionics hardware and software performed nominally during the incident. A review of vehicle data table (VDT) data and controller software logic revealed no failure indications other than the single FID 111-101, Fuel Flowrate Intra-Channel Test Channel A disqualification. Software logic was executed according to requirements and there was no anomalous controller software operation. Immediately following the abort, a Rocketdyne/NASA failure investigation team was assembled. The team successfully isolated the failure cause to an open circuit in a Fuel Flowrate Sensor. This type of failure has occurred eight previous times in ground testing. The sensor had performed acceptably on three previous flights of the engine and SSME flight history shows 684 combined fuel flow rate sensor channel flights without failure. The disqualification of an Engine 2 (SSME No. 2033) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel was a result of an instrumentation failure and not engine performance. All other engine operations were nominal. This disqualification resulted in an engine shutdown and safe sequential shutdown of all three engines prior to ignition of the solid boosters.

  9. Application of CFD to Explain Anomalous Stall Behavior of the SSME Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascoli, E.; Clever, W.; Hadid, A.; Lynch, E. D.; Stewart, M.; Lee, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Fuel Flowmeter is located in the duct between the low and high pressure fuel turbopumps. In the flowmeter the rotation rate of a 4-blade rotor positioned downstream of two flow straighteners is employed to measure the engine fuel flow rate and thereby control the engine mixture ratio via the engine controller. Hence, inaccurate operation of the flowmeter could have serious consequences for SSME engine operation and performance, forcing, for example, tanking of extra fuel to allow for inaccurate flowmeter measurement. Since the current flight flowmeter configuration was incorporated into the SSME in the early eighties, some anomalies in flowmeter behavior have been observed. The initial flowmeter incorporated an "egg crate" design for the two flow straighteners which turn the duct flow to make it more uniform and parallel after it has come out of the 90 degree bend just upstream of the flowmeter.

  10. Proving Coriolis flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, C.

    1995-12-01

    Coriolis meters provide significant advantages for custody transfer measurement of fluids. The most obvious feature is the Coriolis meter`s ability to provide a direct mass flow measurement. This makes Coriolis meters ideally suited to measuring products which are commonly accounted for on a mass basis, such as LPG, NGL, ethylene, liquid CO{sub 2}. Using a single Coriolis meter simplifies the metering system by replacing a volumetric flowmeter, densitometer, and flow computer, with a single measurement device. Another unique feature of Coriolis meters is their ability to measure fluid density independently of mass flow rate. The density measurement is determined in the same manner as any vibrating tube densitometer. By measuring both the mass flow rate ({center_dot}m) and density ({rho}), the Coriolis meter can provide a volumetric flow measurement (q) by performing the following calculation: q = {center_dot}m / {rho}. Coriolis meters have no rotating parts such as bearings or gears, that wear with time. This reduces maintenance costs. Since solids can flow through the meters without damage, strainers are generally unnecessary. Also, gas or vapor in the process fluid which can damage turbine meters due to overspin, will not harm Coriolis meters. The measurement accuracy of Coriolis meters, {+-}0.15%, is suitable for custody transfer measurement. The meters are capable of measuring flow bi-directionally. This is particularly advantageous for loading rack and cavern storage applications. Flowmeters which are used for custody transfer measurement, generally require some means to prove meter accuracy. The principles of operation of Coriolis meters are fundamentally different than those of turbine or positive displacement meters. In order to properly prove these meters it is important to understand some basics about the meters operation and output signals.

  11. A study for developing an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermans, M.; Bregman, R.

    1984-06-01

    The system parameters for low cost ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters for medical applications were investigated. A flowmeter was built. A phase locked loop is used to find the correct Doppler shift. Laboratory and field tests prove the success of the development, although very often insufficient reflectors exist in the liquids. The accuracy is + or - 5%; the reproducibility is + or - 0.5%.

  12. Comparison Test and its Evaluation of Flowmeters for Heat Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae-Man; Choi, Yong-Moon; Yoon, Byung-Ro

    2010-06-01

    This study selected a total of 24 heat flowmeters consisting of three types: impeller, electromagnetic and ultrasonic, 8 meters each. The diameter was 0.05 m (9 meters), 0.08 m (9 meters), and 0.15 m (6 meters). In accordance with the OIML R 75 testing method accuracy, installation position, external environment, and durability were tested, and the flowmeter property field test was conducted in the field where of heat supply from winter to summer in order to select the type of heat flowmeter best suited for the circumstances in Korea. According to the test result, all 3 types of flowmeters met the OIML Recommendation, but the result of the field test showed that the electromagnetic flowmeters displayed a deviation at the low flow rate during summer. The impeller flowmeters showed accuracy suggested by the OIML Recommendation, but the ultrasonic flowmeter, a next-generation flowmeter, which is strong against contamination, low in maintenance-rate, and high in accuracy as it has no moving part, was found to be the best choice.

  13. Turbine flowmeters and their applications at the Naval Air Propulsion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberndorfer, R. E.

    1980-04-01

    At the Naval Air Propulsion Center, it has a specific requirement to make accurate mass flow measurements on the fuel flow of a gas turbine engine to determine the performance characteristics. The problem of acquiring mass flow from the inherent volumetric flow data of a turbine flowmeter is discussed. The development of a universal curve from calibration data is discussed. The unique curve fits for flowmeter, viscosity and specific gravity and their use during on-line data acquisition is described. The accuracy of the final mass flow data and its dependence on the errors associated with viscosity, specific gravity, temperature and frequency measurement is discussed. Some techniques used at NAPC to reduce these errors are described.

  14. Sidetone generator flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, R.J.

    1983-11-03

    A flowmeter is provided which uses the sidetones generated in a cavity formed in the wall of a flowpipe or the like in response to fluid flowing past the cavity to provide a measure of the flow velocity of that fluid. The dimensions of the cavity are such as to provide a dominant vibratory frequency which is sensed by a pressure sensor. The flowmeter is adapted for use for a range of frequencies in which the Strouhal number is constant and under these conditions the vibratory frequency is directly related to the flow rate. The tone generator cavity and pressure transducer form a unit which is connected in-line in the flowpipe.

  15. Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, D. C.; Glicksman, L. R.; Peterson, C. R.

    1984-09-01

    Consolidated Edison of New York City has expressed the need for a new gasmeter for accurately monitoring large diameter interdistrict gas transmission lines for loss due to theft or leakage. A research effort aimed at developing a new flowmeter for Con Edison is described. The new flowmeter uses ultrasonic flowmetering technology in a novel way to meet Con Edison's four major design specifications: the flowmeter should be accurate to 0.5 percent of totalized flow over one year, it should be much simpler to install than a conventional flowmeter, essentially meaning that excavation be limited to that necessary to expose the upper surface of a buried main; its installation must not require service shutdown; and, the flowmeter should not require zero-flow calibration once installed in the gas main.

  16. Flowmeter evaluation for on-orbit operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Various flowmetering concepts were flow tested to characterize the relative capabilities and limitations for on-orbit fluid-transfer operations. Performance results and basic operating principles of each flowmetering concept tested are summarized, and basic considerations required to select the best flowmeter(s) for fluid system application are discussed. Concepts tested were clamp-on ultrasonic, area averaging ultrasonic, offset ultrasonic, coriolis mass, vortex shedding, universal venturi tube, turbine, bearingless turbine, turbine/turbine differential-pressure hybrid, dragbody, and dragbody/turbine hybrid flowmeters. Fluid system flowmeter selection considerations discussed are flowmeter performance, fluid operating conditions, systems operating environments, flowmeter packaging, flowmeter maintenance, and flowmeter technology. No one flowmetering concept tested was shown to be best for all on-orbit fluid systems.

  17. Flowmeter evaluation for on-orbit operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1988-08-01

    Various flowmetering concepts were flow tested to characterize the relative capabilities and limitations for on-orbit fluid-transfer operations. Performance results and basic operating principles of each flowmetering concept tested are summarized, and basic considerations required to select the best flowmeter(s) for fluid system application are discussed. Concepts tested were clamp-on ultrasonic, area averaging ultrasonic, offset ultrasonic, coriolis mass, vortex shedding, universal venturi tube, turbine, bearingless turbine, turbine/turbine differential-pressure hybrid, dragbody, and dragbody/turbine hybrid flowmeters. Fluid system flowmeter selection considerations discussed are flowmeter performance, fluid operating conditions, systems operating environments, flowmeter packaging, flowmeter maintenance, and flowmeter technology. No one flowmetering concept tested was shown to be best for all on-orbit fluid systems.

  18. Concentration measurement systems with stable solutions for binary gas mixtures using two flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Chongho; Kawashima, Kenji; Kagawa, Toshiharu

    2011-06-01

    The previously proposed gas concentration measurement system (Yamazaki et al 2007 Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 2762-8) shows a considerable error for some combinations of gases. The error increases when the system of equations determining mole fractions becomes a mathematically ill-conditioned system. Because the parameters of the equations reflect the material properties of the gases, the current paper considers flowmeters whose flow rate indication does not involve any gas property. This paper firstly illustrates the ill condition for the combination of venturi meter and laminar flowmeters. The paper then discusses the simultaneous measurement of flow rate and mole fractions by flowmeter combinations: an ultrasonic flowmeter and a venturi meter, an ultrasonic flowmeter and a laminar flowmeter. Experiments are conducted for a mixture of argon and air. When a venturi meter and a laminar flowmeter are used, the equations to evaluate the gas mixture ratio become an ill-conditioned system, and hence the evaluated mixture ratio shows a considerable error. On the other hand, the combination of an ultrasonic flowmeter and a laminar flowmeter detects the gas mixture ratio with proper accuracy.

  19. Measurement of transitional flow in pipes using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Gang, Liu; Guang-Sheng, Du; Zhu-Feng, Shao; Qian-Ran, He; Chun-Li, Zhou

    2014-10-01

    The accuracy of an ultrasonic flowmeter depends on the ratio k of average profile velocity of pipe and average velocity of an ultrasonic propagation path. But there is no appropriate method of calculating k for transition flow. In this paper, the velocity field of the transition flow in a pipe is measured by particle image velocimetry. On this basis, the k of U-shaped and V-shaped ultrasonic flowmeter is obtained when Reynolds number is between 2000 and 20 000. It is shown that the k is constant when the Reynolds number is in the range of 2000-2400 and 5400-20 000, and the k decreases with the increasing of Re when the Reynolds number is 2400-5400. The results of study can be used to improve the measurement accuracy of ultrasonic flowmeters when flow is transition flow and can provide help for the study of pipe flow.

  20. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  1. Soap film gas flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lalin, H.S.; Bermudez, J.E.; Fleming, W.T.

    1987-09-08

    A soap film gas flowmeter is described comprising: a flow tube having a hollow body with opposite open ends through which a soap film is propelled and a first closed chamber housing a soap solution. It also includes means for supporting the flow tube in a substantially vertical position with the open bottom end of the flow tube disposed in the first chamber above the soap solution; a second closed chamber into which the open top end of the flow tube extends and gas inlet means for introducing gas into the first chamber at a flow rate to be measured using the flowmeters. A gas exit means is included for discharging the gas introduced into the first chamber through the second chamber. Plus there are means for generating a single soap bubble from the soap solution substantially at the bottom end of the flow tube and a relatively large opening in the flowtube for providing an open passageway for inlet gas to pass through the flowtube when the bottom open end of the flowtube is covered by the soap solution.

  2. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  3. Experimental study of a vortex-shedding flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thinh, Ngo D.; Howard, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype of a vortex-shedding flowmeter with no moving parts is investigated for the loading of hypergolic fuels into the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Eliminating moving parts is intended to reduce the need for servicing the meter, and the vortex shedder is compared to the turbine flowmeter presently in use. A flow test loop is designed and employed to conduct experimental investigations in which the output characteristics are examined. The relationship between vortex frequency and flow rate is almost linear, as is the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and the Reynolds and Strouhal numbers. The results are consistent with calculations and suggest that the flowmeter is a possible replacement for measuring the loading of hypergols into the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  4. Ultrasonic flowmeters: half-century progress report, 1955-2005.

    PubMed

    Lynnworth, L C; Liu, Yi

    2006-12-22

    Ultrasonic flowmeters are one of the fastest-growing technologies within the general field of instruments for process monitoring, measurement and control. Today, acoustic/ultrasonic flowmeters utilize clamp-on and wetted transducers, single and multiple paths, paths on and off the diameter, passive and active principles, contrapropagating transmission, reflection (Doppler), tag correlation, vortex shedding, liquid level sensing of open channel flow or flow in partially-full conduits, and other interactions. Ultrasonic flowmeters are applicable to liquids, gases, and multiphase mixtures, but not without limits. However, no single technology, nor one type of interaction within a technology, can be best for all fluids, occasions and situations. Users who select a particular type of ultrasonic flowmeter over one based on a competing (nonultrasonic) technology often do so for one (or more) of the following reasons: ultrasonic equipment provides a useful measurement whether the fluid is single-phase or not single-phase; equipment is easy to use; flow regime can be laminar, transitional or turbulent; transducers are totally external (no penetration of the pressure boundary); transducers, if not clamp-on, are minimally invasive; no excess pressure drop; when certain conditions are met, accuracy can be better than 0.5%; fast (ms) response; reliable despite temperature extremes; reasonable purchase price, installation, operating and maintenance costs. Sometimes mass flowrate is obtainable. Energy flowrate might be achieved for natural gas and biogas in the near future. How did ultrasonic flowmeters advance in the past fifty years to support such claims? This paper tries to answer this question by looking at ultrasonic flowmeter inventions and publications since 1955, to see how four key problems were solved. PMID:16782156

  5. Ultrasonic flowmeters that are insensitive to suspended solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averett, William J.

    1990-10-01

    The results of an investigation of the performance of state of the art and standard porable ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters that do not require particles or bubbles in the fluid to make an accurate measurement are described. Both the standard and new state of the art flowmeters measured flow within their claimed accuracy in tap water without any particles of bubbles added. All testing was performed at the U.S. EPA Test and Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio. All testing conformed to Scientific Apparatus Makers Association (SAMA) standards. The test results from both flowmeters are presented so that an easy comparison may be made and that the improvement in performance can be determined. The velocity range of all testing was from 0-21.58 ft/second. The state of the art ultrasonic flowmeter was superior in measuring lower values of flow and performed about the same as the control flow meter over the upper range of the velocities tested. However, these advancements in ultrasonic technology do not abrogate the normal loss of accuracy above 16.25 ft/second in tap water. The loss seems to be a function of Reynolds number.

  6. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  7. High sensitivity vortex shedding flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes an apparatus for measuring fluid flows. It comprises: a flowmeter body including a flow passage; a vortex generator of an elongated cylindrical shape disposed across a cross section of the flow passage, wherein at lest one extremity of the vortex generator is secured to the flowmeter body; a transducer contained in a container vessel secured to the flowmeter body, wherein the transducer is pressed onto a thin wall of the container vessel; and a flexible coupling connecting the thin wall of the container vessel to a deflective portion of the vortex generating, wherein the flexible coupling enhances relative deflection between the vortex generator and the container vessel. Wherein fluctuating fluid dynamic forces resulting from vortices shed from the vortex generator and experienced by vortex generator generate fluctuating electrical signals from the transducer as a measure of fluid flow through the flow passage.

  8. Permanent-magnet flowmeter having improved output-terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, C.; Myers, H.J.

    1981-10-26

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  9. Permanent magnet flowmeter having improved output terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, Charles; Myers, Harry J.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  10. A novel time varying signal processing method for Coriolis mass flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting-Ao; Tu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2014-06-01

    The precision of frequency tracking method and phase difference calculation method affects the measurement precision of Coriolis Mass Flowmeter directly. To improve the accuracy of the mass flowrate, a novel signal processing method for Coriolis Mass Flowmeter is proposed for this time varying signal, which is comprised of a modified adaptive lattice notch filter and a revised sliding recursive discrete-time Fourier transform algorithm. The method cannot only track the change of frequency continuously, but also ensure the calculation accuracy when measuring phase difference. The computational load of the proposed method is small with higher accuracy. Simulation and experiment results show that the proposed method is effective. PMID:24985861

  11. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  12. Accuracy of trace element determinations in alternate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the techniques used at Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in trace metals analysis is presented, including the results of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry of blank levels and recovery experiments for several metals. The design of an Interlaboratory Study conducted by LeRC is presented. Several factors were investigated, including: laboratory, analytical technique, fuel type, concentration, and ashing additive. Conclusions drawn from the statistical analysis will help direct research efforts toward those areas most responsible for the poor interlaboratory analytical results.

  13. Flowmeter determines mix ratio for viscous adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.

    1967-01-01

    Flowmeter determines mix ratio for continuous flow mixing machine used to produce an adhesive from a high viscosity resin and aliphatic amine hardener pumped through separate lines to a rotary blender. The flowmeter uses strain gages in the two flow paths and monitors their outputs with appropriate instrumentation.

  14. Note: Ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on optimized time-of-flight algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Tang, Z. A.

    2011-04-01

    A new digital signal processor based single path ultrasonic gas flowmeter is designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. To achieve high accuracy measurements, an optimized ultrasound driven method of incorporation of the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation of the transmit-receive technique is used to stimulate the transmitter. Based on the regularities among the received envelope zero-crossings, different received signal's signal-to-noise ratio situations are discriminated and optional time-of-flight algorithms are applied to take flow rate calculations. Experimental results from the dry calibration indicate that the designed flowmeter prototype can meet the zero-flow verification test requirements of the American Gas Association Report No. 9. Furthermore, the results derived from the flow calibration prove that the proposed flowmeter prototype can measure flow rate accurately in the practical experiments, and the nominal accuracies after FWME adjustment are lower than 0.8% throughout the calibration range.

  15. Note: ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on optimized time-of-flight algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Tang, Z A

    2011-04-01

    A new digital signal processor based single path ultrasonic gas flowmeter is designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. To achieve high accuracy measurements, an optimized ultrasound driven method of incorporation of the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation of the transmit-receive technique is used to stimulate the transmitter. Based on the regularities among the received envelope zero-crossings, different received signal's signal-to-noise ratio situations are discriminated and optional time-of-flight algorithms are applied to take flow rate calculations. Experimental results from the dry calibration indicate that the designed flowmeter prototype can meet the zero-flow verification test requirements of the American Gas Association Report No. 9. Furthermore, the results derived from the flow calibration prove that the proposed flowmeter prototype can measure flow rate accurately in the practical experiments, and the nominal accuracies after FWME adjustment are lower than 0.8% throughout the calibration range. PMID:21529053

  16. A High-Pressure Bi-Directional Cycloid Rotor Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Ding, Fan; Ding, Chuan; Man, Zaipeng

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of various liquids and gases is critical in industrial automation. Rotary positive displacement meters (rotary PD meters) are highly accurate flowmeters that are widely employed in engineering applications, especially in custody transfer operations and hydraulic control systems. This paper presents a high pressure rotary PD meter containing a pair of internal cycloid rotors. It has the advantages of concise structure, low pressure loss, high accuracy and low noise. The curve of the internal rotor is designed as an equidistant curtate epicycloid curve with the external rotor curve as its conjugate. The calculation method used to determine the displacement of the cycloid rotor flowmeter is discussed. A prototype was fabricated, and experiments were performed to confirm measurements over a flow range of 1–100 L/min with relative errors of less than ±0.5%. The pressure loss through the flowmeter was about 3 bar at a flow rate of 100 L/min. PMID:25196162

  17. Acoustic flowmeters: Their applications in hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzsche, Ulf

    Flowmeter installations for viscous and high hydrostatic pressure media are developed. Their usability is considered for characteristic measuring tasks in the field of oil hydraulics. The properties of flow sensors are evaluated by system analysis. Acoustic measuring systems are preferred. Two ultrasonic flowmeters are realized. Simulation models, installation with piezoceramic material parameters, and sound visualization support these developments. A computer aided hydraulic test stand is developed in order to detect the measuring characteristics of this system. Flowmeter applications are shown using the identification of the static and dynamic parameters of an electrohydraulic pilot valve.

  18. The design of optical fiber vortex flowmeter's probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Wang, Yutian; Ni, Yang; Li, Jianxia

    2009-07-01

    The vortex flowmeter works in a poor environment, therefore the stability and accuracy of the online testing system have become the core question for getting high accuracy. The optical probe is the main part of the system which produces and obtains the vortex signal. This paper designs the vortex shedder according to the hydromechanics principle, and it is proposed to be ringlike structures, also gives the test results which prove the effectiveness of the shedder on vortex decomposition. A liquid flow online testing system is designed according to the vortex signal characteristics, and the optical fiber is chosen as the sense organ. Then it designed the probe's parameters and the necessary important circuits of the system to further increase its accuracy. It also assembles the sensor system which is designed to insure the rationality, reliability, stability of the structure. Finally it proposed the methods on the coefficient revision and the liquid condition parameter compensation to get higher accuracy.

  19. Theoretical and experimental investigations of flow pulsation effects in Coriolis mass flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svete, A.; Kutin, J.; Bobovnik, G.; Bajsić, I.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of flow pulsations on the dynamic behavior of Coriolis flowmeters is very important for their further development. In order to determine the phase difference between the vibrational signals, which represents the basic measurement effect of Coriolis flowmeters, there are many methods that include the proper filtering of all the signal components, except those with frequencies close to the drive frequency. Therefore, an understanding of the phenomenon of exciting the meter at its first natural frequency is very important. The results of a simple, linear, two-degree-of-freedom, lumped-parameter, dynamic model of a flowmeter show that the flow pulsations can degrade the accuracy of such a flowmeter as a result of indirect excitations of the measuring tube at the first natural frequency through the second-order perturbations by means of the Coriolis forces induced in pulsating flow conditions. In order to experimentally investigate these flow pulsation effects, a prototype of a straight-tube Coriolis mass flowmeter was developed to enable the processing of the response signals logged directly from the flow tube's sensors with the dual quadrature demodulation method, and therefore to provide the information available within the phase-difference data. The experimental results show that the flow pulsations upset the meter at its first natural frequency indirectly, as well as directly at the frequency of the pulsations due to the geometric imperfections of the measuring tube.

  20. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  1. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  2. Design of a Geothermal Downhole Magnetic Flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, Dave A.; Normann, Randy A.

    2015-06-15

    This paper covers the development of a 300°C geothermal solid-state magnetic flowmeter (or magmeter) to support in situ monitoring of future EGS (enhanced geothermal system) production wells. Existing flowmeters are simple mechanical spinner sensors. These mechanical sensors fail within as little as 10 hrs, while a solid-state magmeter has the potential for months/years of operation. The design and testing of a magnetic flow sensor for use with existing high-temperature electronics is presented.

  3. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  4. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter. (a) Identification. A gas calibration flowmeter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  20. Smart ultrasonic flowmeter used for the operation support of water resource management in the agricultural areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmostafa, Ziani; Mustapha, Bennouna; Boissier, Raymond

    2008-10-01

    Ultrasonic sensors transmit acoustic waves and receive them later. This is done by ultrasonic transducers, which transform an ultrasonic wave into an electrical signal and vice versa. Often, it is possible to use the same transducer for both transmitting and receiving. The most important parts of any ultrasonic sensor are the transducers. The spectral and spatial radiation characteristics of these components are the prime determinants of sensor performance. Such transducers must have a robust design, stable radiation pattern (high directivity) and good receiving sensitivity. Intelligent ultrasonic sensors have the possibility to extract the information about the variables to be measured, carried by the ultrasonic signals efficiently and with accuracy. To achieve this performance, the signals are processed by dedicated hardware (accurate electronic measuring devices). Ultrasound has the property, that its velocity is strongly affected by the flow velocity of the fluids in which it propagates. The ultrasonic flowmeters have gained a lot of attention over the past few years; they have several advantages over the differential pressure flowmeter, turbine meters, coriolis meters and vortex meters. They are widely used to measure the flow of liquids, first, they are either less intrusive (wetted flowmeter) or non-intrusive (clamp-on flowmeter), depending on the model. Also, they don't have moving parts that are subject to wear over time, and with minimum obstruction of the flow. Ultrasonic flowmeter are not limited to clean liquids (Transit time flowmeter), a special type of ultrasonic flowmeter can also accurately measure the flow of slurries and liquids with many impurities (Doppler flowmeter). This part of paper describes the intelligent ultrasonic sensor. The conception or the realization of intelligent ultrasonic sensor requires the synthesis of several technologies, a knowledge in the fields of sensor, digital ultrasonic signal processing, distributed system and

  1. Variable density flowmeter for loading road tankers using process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloughry, Richard; Young, Matthew; Pickup, Elaine; Barratt, Lawrence

    2001-02-01

    Montell Carrington Limited produces polyethylene and polypropylene nibs, which are sold in bulk form to companies who use them to make products for the consumer market. The nibs are stored in 30 storage bunkers, each with a capacity of 500 tonnes. The external distribution of nibs is achieved using 40 tonne road tankers that are filled from each of the bunkers using gravity feed. Work has been undertaken at the Manchester Metropolitan University, in collaboration with Montell, to develop a Variable Density Flowmeter using Process Tomography that will enable the mass flow of nibs to be measured with an accuracy of +/-2% and hence control the loading of the road tankers. The flowmeter (260mm diameter) was situated between the bunker discharge outlet valve and the tanker. Measurement of the density distribution across the pipe, using Process Tomography, enabled the mass flow into the road tankers to be determined. The Montell Process Tomography (MPT) system was a PC based system incorporating Texas Instruments C40 parallel processors and a 12 electrode capacitance measuring system with a driven axial shield. The capacitance detector was an AC bridge detection circuit working at 100kHz, a demodulator and a back projection algorithm were used to obtain the process images.

  2. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  3. Thermal flowmeter modification for the addition of a packer and pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, B.F.

    1994-06-01

    Measuring water movement in boreholes has achieved greater hydrogeologic importance in recent years. Most flowmeters can measure flows greater then 180 cm/min, with some specialized spinner flowmeters with stall velocities as low as 14 cm/min. However, in many cases the injection or removal of water from a well may not be acceptable. For example, groundwater contamination may prohibit ground-surface discharge of borehole fluids, borehole stability may be of concern in uncased boreholes, and cost may limit the use of a pump. Two geophysical logging tools have been developed to measure slow water velocities in boreholes: the thermal-pulse flowmeter (TFM), and the electromagnetic flowmeter. The TFM was used in this study. Measurement accuracy was increased by nearly one order of magnitude by outfitting the thermal-pulse flowmeter (TFM) with an inflatable packer. To accurately measure slow water velocities in boreholes greater than 15 cm diameter, it is necessary to divert borehole fluids through the TFM by inflating a packer. During calibration it was noted that the TFM`s accuracy decreased as the borehole diameter increased. With the packer inflated, the TFM has a useful flow measurement range of 0.08 to 15 l/min (with flow velocities of 0.24 {+-} 0.012 cm/min to 45.7 {+-} 0.61 cm/min, respectively, in 20-cm-diameter pipe), compared to 0.8 to 57 l/min for a packerless TFM. A computer interface was added to the TFM to provide a real-time graphical display of the differential voltage output from the TFM, a running mean and standard deviation of the pulse-response time, and mean flow rate and velocity based on calibration curve fits.

  4. BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS: FIELD APPLICATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews application of borehole flowmeters in granular and fractured rocks. asic data obtained in the field are the ambient flow log and the pumping-induced flow log. hese basic logs may then be used to calculate other quantities of interest. he paper describes the app...

  5. BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS: FIELD APPLICATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews application of borehole flowmeters in granular and fractured rocks. Basic data obtained in the field are the ambient flow log and the pumping-induced flow log. These basic logs may then be used to calculate other quantities of interest. The paper describes the ...

  6. PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF THE MANNING MODEL S-4000 PORTABLE WASTEWATER SAMPLER AND THE MODEL F-3000 DIPPER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance of the Manning model S-4000 wastewater sampler and the model F-3000 flowmeter was investigated. The S-4000 wastewater sampler was tested at temperatures of 2, 20, and 35C to determine accuracy and precision of the timer and sample volumes. The multiplexer function of ...

  7. An automated secondary standard for calibrating liquid flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobart, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    A secondary working standard of flow calibration has been developed to be used in place of a primary weight-time standard, and which can thereby effect a 75 percent reduction in calibration time while maintaining acceptable accuracies. The secondary standard uses six previously calibrated turbine-type flowmeters built into two manifold systems containing automatically switched flow valves. The pair of systems is capable of covering the flow range of 0.0004 to 19 l/s (0.007 to 300 gpm) with the uncertainty in volume flow rate not exceeding + or - 0.25 percent over the range of 0.06 to 19 l/s and not exceeding + or - 0.5 percent over the range 0.0004 to 0.06 1/s. Data reduction and plotting of results are by computer.

  8. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter for hypergolics/all media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinh, Ngo

    1990-09-01

    A family of vortex shedding flowmeters for flow measurement of hypergols that requires a long term operation without removal from system lines was further developed. A family of vortex shedding flowmeters without moving parts was designed. The test loop to evaluate the meters for the Freon flow, which simulates the hypergolic fluids, was modified and reconstructed. Preliminary results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of an 1/2 inch flowmeter as a function of the flow rate.

  9. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter for hypergolics/all media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thinh, Ngo

    1990-01-01

    A family of vortex shedding flowmeters for flow measurement of hypergols that requires a long term operation without removal from system lines was further developed. A family of vortex shedding flowmeters without moving parts was designed. The test loop to evaluate the meters for the Freon flow, which simulates the hypergolic fluids, was modified and reconstructed. Preliminary results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of an 1/2 inch flowmeter as a function of the flow rate.

  10. Optical fiber magneto-optic sensor in the turbine mass flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbo; Gong, Jianmin; Li, Yanhe; Liao, Yanbiao; Liao, Mao

    2000-08-01

    The optical fiber flow sensors for automatic measurement in oil industry are considered excellent sensing components owing to the advantages of the immunity to electromagnetic interference and intrinsic safety telemetry. But there are not many commercially fiber optic flow sensors because of the high cost and immature measuring technology. Based on the advanced technology of optical fiber magneto-optic sensor and the matured technology of turbine flow sensor, a new kind of optical fiber mass flowmeter is studied to meet a fast growing demand for measuring flow in mass units instead of volumetric units. It not only keeps on the advantages of the turbine flowmeter, such as high accuracy, large measuring range, but also reduces the effect of electromagnetic noise from the environment, improves the response characteristics in the low frequency. In this paper, the basic principles of the optical fiber mass flowmeter is presented. The design of the optical fiber magneto-optic sensor is studied in detail and the effective method for signal processing is also discussed. Experimental results show that the optical fiber magneto-optic sensor can respond to high frequency of up to 1 KHz and the measurement accuracy of rotational velocity is about 0.1%.

  11. Modelling of the Coriolis mass flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, G.; Hemp, J.

    1989-08-01

    The Coriolis mass flowmeter is modelled by using the theory of vibrating beams. Tube deformations for the fundamental mode and for the next two modes of natural (out-of-plane) vibration are worked out for a U-tube configuration. Predictions of the relative phase of the vibration at two points are compared with measurements carried out on the "Micro Motion" industrial meter in water and kerosene flow rigs.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Guide Wave Flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Harumichi; Lebedev, Maxim; Akedo, Jun

    2007-07-01

    Cylindrical pipes are widely used in industries such as nuclear power plants and micro total analysis systems (μTAS). Measuring the flow rate of fluid in such pipes is critical. Ultrasonic flowmeters are noncontact, nondestructive, and easy-to-use devices, and are therefore widely used. However, typical bulk-wave-based ultrasonic flowmeters cannot be used for pipes narrower than the wavelength of bulk waves. For such pipes, we are currently developing a “guide wave flowmeter” that uses guide waves instead of bulk waves. Previously, we theoretically and experimentally investigated a pipe filled with quiescent fluid for all modes [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 4573]. In this study, we expanded our theoretical investigation to a cylindrical pipe containing flowing fluid, and then compared the results with experimental results. Both the theoretical and experimental results revealed that the flow rate can be determined by measuring the sound velocity (propagation time) of guide waves. This is the operating principle of our guide wave flowmeter.

  13. Theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemp, J.

    1982-09-01

    A theory of transit time ultrasonic flowmeters for clean fluids is developed from the equations of fluid mechanics applied simultaneously to the fluid and the sound vibrations. These equations are linearized (weak sound) and use is made of the electroacoustic reciprocity theorem to give a relation between the voltages and currents at the transducer terminals and the fluid velocity. The technique of "reciprocal operation" of a transit time ultrasonic flowmeter is described and the way this technique eliminates zero drift is explained. The theory can be applied to meters with broad sound beams (which provide a better average over velocity profiles) or meters in which the wavelength of sound is not necessarily small compared with the duct diameter. Small modificaition of the sound field (due to flow) is assumed and the resulting phase (or amplitude) shift of the received signal is expressed as an integral throughout the fluid of the dot product of the fluid velocity and a weight vector defined in terms of the sound fields in the stationary fluid. Simple flowmeter designs which approach the ideal of complete immunity to velocity distribution are described.

  14. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  15. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  16. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter....

  17. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter....

  18. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter....

  19. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter....

  20. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  1. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  2. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  3. FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

  4. The influence of wellbore inflow on electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements.

    PubMed

    Clemo, Tom; Barrash, Warren; Reboulet, Edward C; Johnson, Timothy C; Leven, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a combined field, laboratory, and numerical study of electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements acquired without the use of a packer or skirt to block bypass flow around the flowmeter. The most significant finding is that inflow through the wellbore screen changes the ratio of flow through the flowmeter to wellbore flow. Experiments reveal up to a factor of two differences in this ratio for conditions with and without inflow through the wellbore screen. Standard practice is to assume the ratio is constant. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the effect of inflow on the flowmeter. The model is formulated using momentum conservation within the borehole and around the flowmeter. The model is embedded in the MODFLOW-2000 ground water flow code. PMID:19341370

  5. Application of a vortex shedding flowmeter to the wide range measurement of high temperature gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-01-01

    A single flowmeter was required for helium gas measurement in a Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor loss of coolant simulator. Volumetric flow accuracy of +-1.0% of reading was required over the Reynolds Number range 6 x 10/sup 3/ to 1 x 10/sup 6/ at flowing pressures from 0.2 to 9 MPa (29 to 1305 psia) at 350/sup 0/C (660/sup 0/F) flowing temperature. Because of its inherent accuracy and rangeability, a vortex shedding flowmeter was selected and specially modified to provide for a remoted thermal sensor. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between signal attenuation and sensor remoting geometry, as well as the relationship between gas flow parameters and remoted thermal sensor signal for both compressed air and helium gas. Based upon the results of these experiments, the sensor remoting geometry was optimized for this application. The resultant volumetric flow rangeability was 155:1. The associated temperature increase at the sensor position was 9/sup 0/C above ambient (25/sup 0/F) at a flowing temperature of 350/sup 0/C. The volumetric flow accuracy was measured over the entire 155:1 flow range at parametric values of flowing density. A volumetric flow accuracy of +- % of reading was demonstrated.

  6. A New Approach to Laminar Flowmeters

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Fernando Lopez; Diaz, Alvaro Deibe; Lema, Marcos Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Santiago Vazquez

    2010-01-01

    After studying the performance and characteristics of actual laminar flowmeters a new disposition for this type of sensors is proposed in such a way that the measurement errors introduced by the intrinsic nature of the device can be minimized. The preliminary study shows that the developing entry region introduces non-linearity effects in all these devices. These effects bring about not only errors, but also a change in the slope of the linear calibration respect of the Poiseuille relation. After a subsequent analysis on how these non-linearity errors can be reduced, a new disposition of this type of flowmeters is introduced. This device makes used of flow elements having pressure taps at three locations along its length and connected to three isolated chambers. In this way, the static pressure can be measured at three locations and contributed to by the pressure taps at the level of each chamber. Thus the linearization error is reduced with an additional advantage of producing a reduced pressure drop. PMID:22163486

  7. Ultrasonic flowmeters: temperature gradients and transducer geometry effects.

    PubMed

    Willatzen, M

    2003-03-01

    Ultrasonic flowmeter performance is addressed for the case of cylindrically shaped flowmeters employing two reciprocal ultrasonic transducers A and B so as to measure time-of-flight differences between signals transmitted from transducer A towards B followed by an equivalent signal transmitted from transducer B towards A. In the case where a liquid flows through the flowmeter's measuring section ("spoolpiece"), the arrival times of the two signals differ by an amount related to the flow passing between the two transducers. Firstly, a detailed study of flow measurement errors with mean flow in the laminar flow regime is carried out as a function of the mode index and the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio in the case where no temperature gradients are present in the flowmeter sensor. It is shown that all modes except the fundamental mode overestimate the mean flow by a factor of 33.33% while excitation of the fundamental mode solely give error-free measurements. The immediate consequences are that the flowmeter error decreases as the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio approaches 1 from 0 reflecting the fact that the excitation level of the fundamental mode increases from almost 0 to 1 as this ratio approaches 1 from 0. Secondly, the effect on flowmeter performance due to flow-induced temperature gradients is examined. It is shown that the presence of temperature gradients leads to flowmeter errors at the higher-flow values even in the case where the fundamental mode is the only mode excited. It is also deduced that flowmeter errors in general depend on the distance between transducers A and B whether temperature gradients exist or not. This conclusion is not reflected in the usual definition of flowmeter errors given by the so-called mode-dependent deviation of measurement introduced in earlier works. PMID:12565074

  8. Series Supply of Cryogenic Venturi Flowmeters for the ITER Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, J.; Poncet, J. M.; Ercolani, E.; Clayton, N.; Journeaux, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the ITER project, the CEA-SBT has been contracted to supply 277 venturi tube flowmeters to measure the distribution of helium in the superconducting magnets of the ITER tokamak. Six sizes of venturi tube have been designed so as to span a measurable helium flowrate range from 0.1 g/s to 400g/s. They operate, in nominal conditions, either at 4K or at 300K, and in a nuclear and magnetic environment. Due to the cryogenic conditions and the large number of venturi tubes to be supplied, an individual calibration of each venturi tube would be too expensive and time consuming. Studies have been performed to produce a design which will offer high repeatability in manufacture, reduce the geometrical uncertainties and improve the final helium flowrate measurement accuracy. On the instrumentation side, technologies for differential and absolute pressure transducers able to operate in applied magnetic fields need to be identified and validated. The complete helium mass flow measurement chain will be qualified in four test benches: - A helium loop at room temperature to insure the qualification of a statistically relevant number of venturi tubes operating at 300K.- A supercritical helium loop for the qualification of venturi tubes operating at cryogenic temperature (a modification to the HELIOS test bench). - A dedicated vacuum vessel to check the helium leak tightness of all the venturi tubes. - A magnetic test bench to qualify different technologies of pressure transducer in applied magnetic fields up to 100mT.

  9. Calibration of sonic flowmeters for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, D. F.; Salsman, G. G.; Hodges, C. E.

    1980-12-01

    Scientists at the Naval Coastal Systems Center (NCSC) at Panama City, Florida, have used a commercially available acoustic flowmeter to monitor critical flow conditions during an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) funded study of the effects of biofouling on the efficiency of a prototype heat transfer system. Flowmeters of this type are particularly useful in applications requiring unimpeded flow; i.e., no sensor projecting into the moving fluid. Unfortunately, sonic flowmeters are somewhat difficult to calibrate and may be subject to drift. A method of calibration devised by NCSC may thus be of some interest to other users. It is the purpose of this report to document the special procedures used by test personnel to calibrate the flowmeters. Briefly, the calibration consisted of pumping sea water through the flowmeter into a tank suspended beneath a special load cell which provided an output voltage proportional to the weight of water in the tank. A programmable desktop calculator system was used to monitor changes in voltage as a function of time and convert these changes into flow rates for direct comparison with values read from the sonic flowmeter's digital display. Calibration checks were made at metered flows of 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 gallons per minute (gpm). It was found that computed flows were essentially linear but differed from metered values by as much as 9.0 percent.

  10. Sensitivity of Flux Accuracy to Setup of Fossil Fuel and Biogenic CO2 Inverse System in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Deng, A.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Turnbull, J. C.; Davis, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to utilize a variety of measurements and a high resolution inversion system to estimate the spatial distribution and the temporal variation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the city of Indianapolis. We separated biogenic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes and tested the sensitivity of inverse flux estimates to inverse system configurations by performing Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The a priori CO2 emissions from Hestia were aggregated to 1 km resolution to represent emissions from the Indianapolis metropolitan area and its surroundings. With the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), the physical relations between concentrations at the tower locations and emissions at the surface were simulated at 1 km spatial resolution, hourly. Within a Bayesian synthesis inversion framework, we tested the effect of multiple parameters on our ability to infer fossil fuel CO2 fluxes: the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes in the optimization procedure, the use of fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements, the impact of reduced transport errors, the sensitivity to observation density, and the spatio-temporal properties of prior errors. The results indicate that the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes obviously weakens the ability to invert for the fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban environment, but having relatively accurate fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements can effectively compensate the interference from the biogenic flux component. Reduced transport error and more intensive measurement networks are two possible approaches to retrieve the spatial pattern of the fluxes and decrease the bias in inferred whole-city fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The accuracy of posterior fluxes is very sensitive to the spatial correlation length in the prior flux errors which, if they exist, can enhance significantly our ability to recover the known fluxes

  11. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, Stanley B.; Raue, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having ls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. The magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180.degree. apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  12. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-08-18

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having walls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. Two magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180/sup 0/ apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  13. Research of the high performance low temperature vortex street flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhen-peng; Geng, Wei-guo

    2007-07-01

    Flow measurement is the key method for R&D and operation monitoring of liquid rocket engine. Therefore, it is important to measure flux of low temperature liquid propellants for the liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen or the liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket engine. Presently in China, the level meter and the turbine flowmeter are usually used in the experimentation of the liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket engine. The level meter can only scale average flux and the precision of the turbine flowmeter (the measuring wild point is 1.5%) can not be ensured due to the reason which there is not devices of low temperature real-time demarcation in China. Therefore, it is required to research the high performance low temperature flow measurement equipment and the vortex street flowmeter is selected because of its advantages. In the paper, some key techniques of low temperature vortex street flowmeter are researched from the design aspect. Firstly, the basic theoretical research of vortex street flowmeter includes signal detection method, shape of vortex producer and effects of dimension of vertex producer to vortex quality. Secondly, low temperature vortex street flowmeter adopts the method of piezoelectric components stress mode. As for the weakness of phase-change, lattice change and fragility for many piezoelectric materials in low temperature, it can not be fulfilled piezoelectric signal and mechanism performance under this condition. Some piezoelectric materials which can be used in low temperature are illustrated in the paper by lots of research in order for the farther research. The article places emphasis upon low temperature trait of piezoelectric materials, and the structure designs of signal detector and calculation of stress, electric charge quantity and heat transfer.

  14. An ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring dynamic liquid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpini, T. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel oscillating pipe system was developed to provide dynamic calibration wherein small sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 0.5 to 10% of the steady-state flow were added to the steady-state flow by oscillating the flowmeter relative to the fixed pipes in the flow system. Excellent agreement was obtained between the dynamic velocities derived from an accelerometer mounted on the oscillating pipe system and those sensed by the flowmeter at frequencies of 7, 19, and 30 Hz. Also described were the signal processing techniques used to retrieve the small sinusoidal signals which were obscured by the fluid turbulence.

  15. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, J. C.; Eghbali, D. A.; Flitton, V. E.; Anderson, D. G.

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m(exp 3)/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40 percent. Both flowmeter types accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results.

  16. Modelling of flow in pipes and ultrasonic flowmeter bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Richard; Cibera, Vaclav; Syka, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    The contribution gives a summary of the flow modelling in flow parts of ultrasonic flowmeters using CFD system ANSYS/FLUENT. The article describes the basic techniques used to create CFD models of flow parts flow and selected results of the flow fields. The first part of the article summarizes the results of velocity profiles in smooth pipes for various turbulent models and used relations. The second part describes selected results of the numerical modelling of flow in the flow parts of the ultrasonic flowmeters and their partially comparison with experimental results.

  17. Improved strain-wire flowmeter has fast response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. C.; Dunbar, W. R.

    1965-01-01

    Strain-sensitive resistance wires in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement form the sensing element of a flowmeter. The change in resistance of the wires is measured as a function of stream velocity. Thus the electrical output is a measure of both rapidly varying and steady fluid-flow rates.

  18. ULTRASONIC FLOWMETERS THAT ARE INSENSITIVE TO SUSPENDED SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the results of an investigation of the performance of state-of-the-art and standard portable ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters that do not require particles or bubbles in the fluid to make an accurate measurement. oth the standard and new state-of-the-art flowme...

  19. Vortex shedding fluid flowmeter using optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, J. H.; Pitt, C. W.

    1981-03-01

    An optical fibre flowmeter is described which uses a single fibre mounted transversely to the fluid flow within the pipe. The fibre is vibrated by the natural phenomenon of vortex shedding, causing phase modulation of the optical carrier within. The modulation is detected at the fibre exit by the fibredyne technique, and the flow rate determined from the vibration frequency.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to understand the origin of contaminant plumes and infer their future migration, one requires a knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution. n many aquifers, the borehole flowmeter offers the most direct technique available for developing a log of hydraulic ...

  1. A thermal peripheral blood flowmeter with contact force compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jai Kyoung; Youn, Sechan; Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a thermal peripheral blood flowmeter where a force sensor is integrated to compensate the blood flow measurement. Since blood flow is highly sensitive to the contact force between the sensor and skin, previous blood flowmeters needed to be fixed on the skin with a constant contact force. We integrate a force sensor with a thermal blood flowmeter to measure both blood flow and contact force simultaneously for force-compensated blood flow measurement. The blood flowmeter presented here is composed of a resistance temperature detector and a piezoresistive force sensor and was fabricated by surface and bulk micromachining techniques. In the experimental measurement, the blood flow linearly decreased with the contact force at the rate of 31.7% N-1. By using the measured compensation coefficient, the device showed a constant blood flow with the maximum difference of 6.4% over the contact force variation of 1-3 N, and otherwise showed the maximum difference of 75.0%. The present device is suitable for applications with portable biomedical instrumentation or air-conditioning systems for the estimation of human thermoregulation status.

  2. Performance of turbine-type flowmeters in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Tests using commercially available flowmeters provide information on the constancy in water of the calibration factor /pulses per unit volume/, on the maximum deviation of the factor from its mean value, and on the probability of predicting the calibration factor of a meter in liquid hydrogen at full scale.

  3. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  4. Development of a wide range vortex shedding flowmeter for high-temperature helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S. P.; Ennis, R. M., Jr.; Herndon, P. G.

    1981-07-01

    A single flowmeter capable of meeting all the core flow test loop (CFTL) requirements was developed in order to provide significant economic and performance advantages in the operation of the loop. The development, conceptual design, and final design of a modified vortex shedding flowmeter are described. The results of extensive flow calibration of the flowmeter at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station are presented. The report closes with recommendations for application of the VSFM to the CFTL and for future development work.

  5. Time-resolved flowmetering of gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow by ultrasound pulse Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi; Tasaka, Yuji; Takeda, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound pulse Doppler method is applied for componential volumetric flow rate measurement in multiphase pipe flow consisted of gas and liquid phases. The flowmetering is realized with integration of measured velocity profile over the cross section of the pipe within liquid phase. Spatio-temporal position of interface is detected also with the same ultrasound pulse, which further gives cross sectional void fraction. A series of experimental demonstration was shown by applying this principle of measurement to air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal tube of 40 mm in diameter, of which void fraction ranges from 0 to 90% at superficial velocity from 0 to 15 m/s. The measurement accuracy is verified with a volumetric type flowmeter. We also analyze the accuracy of area integration of liquid velocity distribution for many different patterns of ultrasound measurement lines assigned on the cross section of the tube. The present method is also identified to be pulsation sensor of flow rate that fluctuates with complex gas-liquid interface behavior.

  6. Flowmetering of drainage wells in Kuwait City, Kuwait

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Senay, Y.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Szekely, F.

    2000-01-01

    A heat-pulse flowmeter was used in six drainage wells in Kuwait City for flow profiling under both ambient and pumping conditions. The data collected were used in: (a) estimating the cross-flow among the screened intervals under ambient conditions; (b) estimating the relative transmissivity adjacent to the individual screen zones; and (c) determination of the hydraulic heads at the far boundaries of the large-scale aquifer zones. These inferences were cross-checked against known hydrogeology of the aquifer-aquitard system in the study area, and the calibration results of numerical flow modeling. The major conclusions derived from the flow measurements were: (a) the presence of natural downward cross-flow under ambient condition supported the hypothesis that the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer in the study area was divided into a series of permeable units (aquifers), separated by confining or semi-confining beds (aquitards); (b) the head differences between the different screened zones, derived through modeling of the flowmeter data of the wells, provided additional confirmation for the division of the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer into compartments in the study area; (c) flowmeter data indicated that the second and third aquifers were contributing most of the water to the well bores, compared with the uppermost (first) and the lowermost (fourth) aquifers; and (d) inflow to the wells during pumping was associated with discrete sub-intervals in the screened zones, controlled by local aquifer heterogeneity, and possibly clogging of screens and gravel pack.

  7. A vortex-shedding flowmeter based on IPMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pasquale, Giovanna; Graziani, Salvatore; Pollicino, Antonino; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are electroactive polymers that can be used both as sensors and actuators. They have been demonstrated for many potential applications, in wet and underwater environments. Applications in fields such as biomimetics, robotics, and aerospace, just to mention a few, have been proposed. In this paper, the sensing nature of IPMCs is used to develop a flowmeter based on the vortex shedding phenomenon. The system is described, and a model is proposed and verified. A setup has been realized, and data have been acquired for many working conditions. The performance of the sensing system has been investigated by using acquired experimental data. Water flux velocities in the range [0.38, 2.83] m s-1 have been investigated. This working range is comparable with ranges claimed for established technologies. Results show the suitability of the proposed system to work as a flowmeter. The proposed transducer is suitable for envisaged post-silicon applications, where the use of IPMCs gives the opportunity to realize a new generating polymeric flowmeter. This has potential applications in fields where properties of IPMCs such as low cost, usability, and disposability are relevant.

  8. Time delay estimation in the ultrasonic flowmeter in the oil well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Lin, Weijun; Zhang, Chengyu; Shen, Zhihui; Zhang, Hailan

    2010-01-01

    A new prototype of ultrasonic flowmeter used in the oil well is presented. The flowmeter depends on the time delay between the propagating times of the downstream and upstream ultrasonic pulses. The ultrasonic passageway is slanted to prevent the disadvantage introduced by the high viscosity of the oil. Two method of time delay estimation: threshold and cross-correlation are both studied and realized.

  9. Practical experience of using thermal-mass flowmeters at the registration associated (free) petroleum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlyyyakhmatov, M. G.; Kashapov, N. F.; Khayritonov, Kh A.; Lazarev, D. K.; Lazarev, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    The results of field tests of thermal-mass flowmeter TurboFlow TFG-S in comparison with ultrasonic flowmeter Dymetic-1223K at existing oil and gas extraction object are given in the article. Measured medium - associated (free) petroleum gas.

  10. Comparison of velocity-log data collected using impeller and electromagnetic flowmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhouse, M.W.; Izbicki, J.A.; Smith, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have used flowmeters in environments that are within the expectations of their published ranges. Electromagnetic flowmeters have a published range from 0.1 to 79.0 m/min, and impeller flowmeters have a published range from 1.2 to 61.0 m/min. Velocity-log data collected in five long-screened production wells in the Pleasant Valley area of southern California showed that (1) electromagnetic flowmeter results were comparable within ??2% to results obtained using an impeller flowmeter for comparable depths; (2) the measured velocities from the electromagnetic flowmeter were up to 36% greater than the published maximum range; and (3) both data sets, collected without the use of centralizers or flow diverters, produced comparable and interpretable results. Although either method is acceptable for measuring wellbore velocities and the distribution of flow, the electromagnetic flowmeter enables collection of data over a now greater range of flows. In addition, changes in fluid temperature and fluid resistivity, collected as part of the electromagnetic flowmeter log, are useful in the identification of flow and hydrogeologic interpretation.

  11. Vortex shedding flowmeter with fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, D. J.; Skuratovsky, E.

    Vortex shedding flow meters have proved over the last decade to be suitable for a wide variety of applications. They provide good accuracy, reliable flow measurement in a wide range of flow rates, and low pressure drop. Past performance was limited to operating pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 600 and process temperatures below 400 C. This paper presents a new design of vortex shedding flow meter with a fiber optic sensor capable of operating at pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 2500 and temperatures from -200 to 600 C. This device opens new horizons for vortex shedding flow meters in flow measurements and process control applications.

  12. Data Oscillation Resolution of Propellant Flowmeter Used in FASTRAC Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, J.; Koelbl, M.; Martin, M. A.; Nesman, T.; Hicks, G. D.; Kennedy, Jim W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stennis Space Centers' horizontal test facility, Marshall Space Flight Centers' propulsion test article and the X-34 flight vehicle are designed with V-cone flowmeters for measurement of both RP-1 and LOX flow-rates for Fastrac engine testing. Delta pressure transducer data from these flowmeters are used to calibrate the RP-1 and LOX mixture ratio in the Fastrac engine. Data from the V-Cone flowmeter delta pressure transducers have excessive oscillation. The delta pressure oscillations have caused flowrate data fluctuations that interfered with making the accurate readings necessary to calibrate the RP-1 and LOX mixture ratio required for Fastrac engine operation. The objective of this report is to document the flowmeter data oscillation problem and the method used to obtain more reliable flowmeter data.

  13. A heat-pulse flowmeter for measuring minimal discharge rates in boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has tested a borehole-configured heat-pulse flowmeter which has good low-velocity flow-measuring sensitivity. The flowmeter was tested in the laboratory in 51-, 102-, and 152-millimeter-diameter columns using water velocities ranging from 0.35 to 250 millimeters per second. The heat-pulse flowmeter also was tested in a 15-meter-deep granite test pit with controlled water flow, and in a 58-meter-deep borehole in sedimentary materials. The flowmeter's capability to detect and measure naturally occurring, low-velocity, thermally induced convection currents in boreholes was demonstrated. Further improvements to the heat-pulse-flowmeter system are needed to increase its reliability and improve its response through four-conductor logging cable.

  14. Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

  15. An evaluation of free- and fixed-vane flowmeters with curved- and flat-bladed Savonius rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Antony; Desa, Ehrlich

    1994-04-01

    Speed and direction performances of flowmeters, designed by the authors for in-house use, employing an Aanderaa-type curved-bladed Savonius rotor and a free vane and an Aanderaa-type flat-bladed Savonius rotor and a fixed vane, are discussed. It has been observed that accuracy, linearity, and tilt response of a meter using the Aanderaa curved-bladed rotor is superior to those of a meter using the Aanderaa flat-bladed rotor. Analysis showed that the azimuth response of a flowmeter is affected by the presence of support rods surrounding its rotor. The change in azimuth response arises from flow pattern modifications in the vicinity of the rotor, imposed by the changes in the horizontal angle of the support rods of the rotor relative to the flow streamlines. While the use of two support rods may be suitable for a fixed-vane system, it is undesirable for a free-vane system where the meter's orientation with respect to the flow direction is not defined. Flow direction calibration results indicated that a fixed-vane system exhibits superior direction performance compared to a free-vane system. The comparatively poor direction performance of the free-vane system stems from the poor coupling to the 'vane-follower' magnet from the external vane.

  16. Evaluation of several ultrasonic flowmeter transducers in cryogenic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moughon, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen piezoelectric ultrasonic flowmeter transducers were laboratory tested to determine their suitability and long range reliability for use by the National Transonic Facility (NTF) to measure the flow rate of 450 Kg/sec of liquid nitrogen (LN2). Tests included thermally cycling each transducer 50 to 150 times over a temperature range of 295 K (ambient) to 77 K (LN2). The transducers were submerged in liquid nitrogen for 1 to 4 hours and the signal strength and quality noted. Results disclose that the current state-of-the-art ultrasonic flow transducers are very reliable and will meet the stringent requirements of the NTF.

  17. Low power electromagnetic flowmeter providing accurate zero set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A low power, small size electromagnetic flowmeter system is described which produces a zero output signal for zero flow. The system comprises an air core type electromagnetic flow transducer, a field current supply circuit for the transducer coils and a pre-amplifier and demodulation circuit connected to the output of the transducer. To prevent spurious signals at zero flow, separate, isolated power supplies are provided for the two circuits. The demodulator includes a pair of synchronous rectifiers which are controlled by signals from the field current supply circuit. Pulse transformer connected in front of the synchronous rectifiers provide isolation between the two circuits.

  18. Evaluation of several ultrasonic flowmeter transducers in cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moughon, W. C.

    1981-04-01

    Eighteen piezoelectric ultrasonic flowmeter transducers were laboratory tested to determine their suitability and long range reliability for use by the National Transonic Facility (NTF) to measure the flow rate of 450 Kg/sec of liquid nitrogen (LN2). Tests included thermally cycling each transducer 50 to 150 times over a temperature range of 295 K (ambient) to 77 K (LN2). The transducers were submerged in liquid nitrogen for 1 to 4 hours and the signal strength and quality noted. Results disclose that the current state-of-the-art ultrasonic flow transducers are very reliable and will meet the stringent requirements of the NTF.

  19. RAPID COMMUNICATION Time-resolved measurements with a vortex flowmeter in a pulsating turbulent flow using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurantzon, F.; Örlü, R.; Segalini, A.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Vortex flowmeters are commonly employed in technical applications and are obtainable in a variety of commercially available types. However their robustness and accuracy can easily be impaired by environmental conditions, such as inflow disturbances and/or pulsating conditions. Various post-processing techniques of the vortex signal have been used, but all of these methods are so far targeted on obtaining an improved estimate of the time-averaged bulk velocity. Here, on the other hand, we propose, based on wavelet analysis, a straightforward way to utilize the signal from a vortex shedder to extract the time-resolved and thereby the phase-averaged velocity under pulsatile flow conditions. The method was verified with hot-wire and laser Doppler velocimetry measurements.

  20. Measuring intake flows in hydroelectric plants with an acoustic scintillation flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Acoustic Scintillation Flowmeter (ASFM) offers some unique advantages for measuring intake flows in hydroelectric plants. The method is non-intrusive, resulting in a minimum of flow interference and is well-suited to use in low-head dams and other applications where intake tunnels are short or have awkward geometries. Deployment in intake gate slots is straightforward, allowing data to be collected quickly and easily, with a minimum of plant down-time. An example of such flow measurements is shown. Interest in assessing the capability of the ASFM to make the highly-accurate measurements suitable for system efficiency evaluations led to our performing a series of tow-tank tests. Over a range of speeds from 0.5 to 5.0 m/sec, the mean deviation between the towing speed and the ASFM measurements was less than 0.5%. Measurements at an instrumented dam site are planned as the next stage in the accuracy assessment.

  1. Calibration and testing of selected portable flowmeters for use on large irrigation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luckey, Richard R.; Heimes, Frederick J.; Gaggiani, Neville G.

    1980-01-01

    Existing methods for measuring discharge of irrigation systems in the High Plains region are not suitable to provide the pumpage data required by the High Plains Regional Aquifer System Analysis. Three portable flowmeters which might be suitable for obtaining fast and accurate discharge measurements on large irrigation systems were tested. A propeller type gaged-pipe meter, a Doppler meter, and a transient-time meter were tested under both laboratory and field conditions during 1979. The gated-pipe meter was found to be difficult to use and sensitive to particulate matter in the fluid. The Doppler meter, while easy to use, would not function on steel pipe 6 inches or larger in diameter, or on aluminum pipe larger than 8 inches in diameter. The transient-time meter was more difficult to use than the other two meters; however, this instrument provided a high degree of accuracy and reliability under a variety of conditions. Of the three meters tested, only the transient-time meter was found to be suitable for providing reliable discharge measurements on the variety of irrigation system used in the High Plains region. (USGS)

  2. Carotid blood flow measured by an ultrasonic volume flowmeter in carotid stenosis and patients with dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, S; Folstein, M F

    1985-01-01

    The volume flowmeter is a simple, noninvasive Doppler ultrasound technique that provides accurate measurement of carotid artery diameter and flow. The device provides a useful laboratory test that can aid significantly in diagnosis of carotid stenosis and dementia. PMID:2935592

  3. Active ultrasonic cross-correlation flowmeters for mixed-phase pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Raptis, A. C.

    Two ultrasonic flowmeters which employ the active cross-correlation technique and use a simple clamp-on transducer arrangement are discussed. The flowmeter for solid/liquid flows was tested over a wide range of coal concentration in water and oil. The measured velocity based on the peak position of the cross-correlation function is consistently higher by about 15% than the average velocity measured by flow diversion. The origin of the difference results mainly from the flow velocity profiles and the transit-time probability distribution. The flowmeter that can measure particle velocity in a solid/gas flow requires acoustic decoupling arrangement between two sensing stations. The measured velocity is mainly associated with the particles near the wall. Performance of both flowmeters is presented.

  4. Vortex shedding flowmeters for liquids at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vortex shedding flowmeter designs for flow measurements in liquid oxygen ducts on the space shuttle main engines have been tested in a high head water flow test facility. The results have shown that a vortex shedding element or vane spanning the duct can give a linear response to an average flow velocity of 46 m/s (150 ft/s) in a 1 1/2 inch nominal (41 mm actual) diameter duct while a vane partially spanning the duct can give a linear response to velocities exceeding 55 m/s (180 ft/s). The maximum pressure drops across the flow sensing elements extrapolate to less than 0.7 MPa (100 psi) at 56 m/s (184 ft/s) for liquid oxygen. The test results indicate that the vanes probably cannot be scaled up with pipe size, at least not linearly.

  5. IDENTIFYING HYDRAULICALLY CONDUCTIVE FRACTURES WITH A SLOW-VELOCITY BOREHOLE FLOWMETER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Alfred E.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey used a recently developed heat-pulse flowmeter to measure very slow borehole axial water velocities in granitic rock at a site near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. The flowmeter was used with other geophysical measurements to locate and identify hydraulically conducting fractures contributing to the very slow vertical water flow in the two boreholes selected for study. The heat-pulse flowmeter has a flow-measuring range in water of 0. 06-6m/min, and can resolve velocity differences as slow as 0. 01 m/min. This is an order of magnitude slower than the stall speed of spinner flowmeters. The flowmeter is 1. 16 m long and 44 mm in diameter. It was calibrated in columns of 76 and 152 mm diameter, to correspond to the boreholes studied. The heat-pulse flowmeter system is evaluated, and problems peculiar to the measurement of very slow axial water velocities in boreholes are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-07-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K{sub eff}) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K{sub eff} on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  7. A Design of Experiments (DOE) approach to optimise temperature measurement accuracy in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barari, F.; Morgan, R.; Barnard, P.

    2014-11-01

    In SOFC, accurately measuring the hot-gas temperature is challenging due to low gas velocity, high wall temperature, complex flow geometries and relatively small pipe diameter. Improper use of low cost thermometry system such as standard Type K thermocouples (TC) may introduce large measurement error. The error could have a negative effect on the thermal management of the SOFC systems and consequential reduction in efficiency. In order to study the factors affecting the accuracy of the temperature measurement system, a mathematical model of a TC inside a pipe was defined and numerically solved. The model calculated the difference between the actual and the measured gas temperature inside the pipe. A statistical Design of Experiment (DOE) approach was applied to the modelling data to compute the interaction effect between variables and investigate the significance of each variable on the measurement errors. In this study a full factorial DOE design with six variables (wall temperature, gas temperature, TC length, TC diameter and TC emissivity) at two levels was carried out. Four different scenarios, two sets of TC length (6 - 10.5 mm and 17 - 22 mm) and two different sets of temperature range (550 - 650 °C and 750 - 850 °C), were proposed. DOE analysis was done for each scenario and results were compared to identify key parameters affecting the accuracy of a particular temperature reading.

  8. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results. PMID:25417730

  9. Testing and Comparative Evaluation of Space Shuttle Main Engine Flowmeter Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hissam, Andy; Leberman, Mike; McLeroy, Rick

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of testing of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) flowmeter bearings and cage material. These tests were con&cM over a several month period in 2004 at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The test program's primary objective was to compare the performance of bearings using the existing cage material and bearings using a proposed replacement cage material. In order to meet the test objectives for this program, a flowmeter test rig was designed and fabricated to measure both breakaway and running torque for a flowmeter assembly. Other test parameters,,such as motor current and shaft speed, were also recorded and provide a means of comparing bearing performance. The flowmeter and bearings were tested in liquid hydrogen to simulate the flowmeter's operating environment as closely as possible. Based on the results from this testing, the bearings with the existing cage material are equivalent to the bearings with the proposed replacement cage material. No major differences exist between the old and new cage materials. Therefore, the new cage material is a suitable replacement for the existing cage material.

  10. Realization of a multipath ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on transit-time technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Weihua; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    A microcomputer-based ultrasonic gas flowmeter with transit-time method is presented. Modules of the flowmeter are designed systematically, including the acoustic path arrangement, ultrasound emission and reception module, transit-time measurement module, the software and so on. Four 200 kHz transducers forming two acoustic paths are used to send and receive ultrasound simultaneously. The synchronization of the transducers can eliminate the influence caused by the inherent switch time in simple chord flowmeter. The distribution of the acoustic paths on the mechanical apparatus follows the Tailored integration, which could reduce the inherent error by 2-3% compared with the Gaussian integration commonly used in the ultrasonic flowmeter now. This work also develops timing modules to determine the flight time of the acoustic signal. The timing mechanism is different from the traditional method. The timing circuit here adopts high capability chip TDC-GP2, with the typical resolution of 50 ps. The software of Labview is used to receive data from the circuit and calculate the gas flow value. Finally, the two paths flowmeter has been calibrated and validated on the test facilities for air flow in Shaanxi Institute of Measurement & Testing. PMID:23809902

  11. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Testing in R-Area

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.

    2000-10-12

    Six constant-rate, multiple-well aquifer tests were recently conducted in R-area to provide site-specific in situ hydraulic parameters for assessing groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB) plume migration and RRSB remedial alternatives. The pumping tests were performed in the Upper Three Runs and Gordon aquifers between December 1999 and February 2000. The tests provide reliable estimates of horizontal conductivity averaged over aquifer thickness, and a relatively large horizontal zone of influence. To complement these results, Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter (EBF) testing was subsequently performed to determine the vertical variation of horizontal conductivity for RPC-2PR, RPC-3PW, RPT-2PW, RPT-3PW, RPT-4PW and RPT-30PZ. The EBF data generally indicate significant aquifer heterogeneity over the tested screen intervals (Figures 14, 16-18, 20, 22, 24, 26 and 27-31). The vertical variation of groundwater flow in or out of the well screen under ambient conditions was also measured (Figures 13, 15, 19, 21, 23 and 25). These data have implications for contaminant monitoring.

  12. Liquid and gas flowmeters based on the waveguide properties of pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmakov, I.A.

    1995-08-01

    A fundamentally new type of flowmeter based on the waveguide properties of pipelines is discussed and the influence of the flow of the fluid on the critical frequencies is considered. Waveguides have a set of critical frequencies. Waves with frequencies below the critical values do not propagate, i.e., the waveguides are {open_quotes}blocked{close_quotes} to such waves. This circumstance, along with the possibility of kinematic {open_quotes}unblocking{close_quotes} of pipeline-waveguides, forms the basis for a new flowmeter. This article discusses the essence and operating principle of a new flowmeter, based on the waveguide properties of the measuring segment of the pipeline, where the fluid moving in it is probed with acoustic signals. Waves of a different kind can be used, however, because the {open_quotes}unblocking{close_quotes} of the pipeline-waveguide is kinematic.

  13. Three-dimensional geostatistical inversion of flowmeter and pumping test data.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Englert, Andreas; Cirpka, Olaf A; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-01-01

    We jointly invert field data of flowmeter and multiple pumping tests in fully screened wells to estimate hydraulic conductivity using a geostatistical method. We use the steady-state drawdowns of pumping tests and the discharge profiles of flowmeter tests as our data in the inference. The discharge profiles need not be converted to absolute hydraulic conductivities. Consequently, we do not need measurements of depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity at well locations. The flowmeter profiles contain information about relative vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity, while drawdown measurements of pumping tests provide information about horizontal fluctuation of the depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity. We apply the method to data obtained at the Krauthausen test site of the Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. The resulting estimate of our joint three-dimensional (3D) geostatistical inversion shows an improved 3D structure in comparison to the inversion of pumping test data only. PMID:18266734

  14. Calibration of an ultrasonic flowmeter and investigation of its behavior under given mounting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkhof, H. G.; Hajek, W.

    1985-01-01

    An ultrasonic flowmeter equipped with three movable detectors was calibrated on a water meter test stand and tested under mounting conditions similar to the definitive mounting in the primary cooling circuit of an experimental nuclear reactor. Measuring errors are found to be 0.5%. However, deviations 20% are found when the flowmeter is mounted behind parts distorting the velocity profile in tube, especially by angular momentum. These errors are significantly reduced by the introduction of a flow rectifier which has to be calibrated together with the flowmeter. The magnitude of the deviations between the three measured signals and the magnitude of the measuring signal deviations at constant flow are shown to be influenced by flow perturbations. The measuring signal differences can therefore only be determined during commissioning in the primary cooling circuit.

  15. An additional uncertainty of the throughput generated by the constant pressure gas flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peksa, L.; Gronych, T.; Řepa, P.; Wild, J.; Tesař, J.; Pražák, D.; Krajíček, Z.; Vičar, M.

    2008-03-01

    The lower range limit of constant pressure gas flowmeters is about 10-8 Pa×m3/s. Detrimental gas throughputs caused by leaks and gassing from surfaces prevent from its decrease. Even if the flowmeter is entirely vacuum tight the throughput caused by the outgassing from surfaces can be sufficiently reduced only by pumping at elevated temperature. It can be performed with the flowmeters using directly driven bellows or diaphragm bellows in the volume displacers. Despite it, the lower range limit can hardly be decreased more than several ten times with up to now known designs. An additional uncertainty caused by the difference in pressure at the initial and final instant of measurement will increase at generating small throughputs to the extent that it will kill the measurement.

  16. Permeability profiles in granular aquifers using flowmeters in direct-push wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paradis, D.; Lefebvre, R.; Morin, R.H.; Gloaguen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical hydrogeological models should ideally be based on the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K), a property rarely defined on the basis of sufficient data due to the lack of efficient characterization methods. Electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements during pumping in uncased wells can effectively provide a continuous vertical distribution of K in consolidated rocks. However, relatively few studies have used the flowmeter in screened wells penetrating unconsolidated aquifers, and tests conducted in gravel-packed wells have shown that flowmeter data may yield misleading results. This paper describes the practical application of flowmeter profiles in direct-push wells to measure K and delineate hydrofacies in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers having low-to-moderate K (10-6 to 10-4 m/s). The effect of direct-push well installation on K measurements in unconsolidated deposits is first assessed based on the previous work indicating that such installations minimize disturbance to the aquifer fabric. The installation and development of long-screen wells are then used in a case study validating K profiles from flowmeter tests at high-resolution intervals (15 cm) with K profiles derived from multilevel slug tests between packers at identical intervals. For 119 intervals tested in five different wells, the difference in log K values obtained from the two methods is consistently below 10%. Finally, a graphical approach to the interpretation of flowmeter profiles is proposed to delineate intervals corresponding to distinct hydrofacies, thus providing a method whereby both the scale and magnitude of K contrasts in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers may be represented. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  17. SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers. [for Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A.; Wilcox, R. A.; Spivak, A. L.; Daney, D. E.; Woodhouse, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    A venturi flowmeter has been designed and constructed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment. The calibration results obtained from the SHOOT venturi demonstrate the ability of the flowmeter to meet the requirements of the SHOOT experiment. Flow rates as low as 20 cu dm/h and as high as 800 cu dm/h have been measured. Performances of the SHOOT differential and absolute pressure transducers, which have undergone calibration and vibration tests, are also included. Throughout the tests, the responses of the transducers remained linear and repeatable to within + or - 1 percent of the full scales of the transducers.

  18. A new technique for measuring gas conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters was developed. It was applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for hydrocarbon gases. The values of conversion factors for two common hydrocarbons measured using this technique are in good agreement with the empirical values cited by the manufacturer. Similar agreements can be expected for all other hydrocarbons. The technique is based on Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion product gases with that in normal air. It is simple, quick and relatively safe--particularly for toxic/poisonous hydrocarbons.

  19. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented. PMID:25136496

  20. Using flowmeter pulse tests to define hydraulic connections in the subsurface: A fractured shale example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2002-01-01

    Cross-borehole flowmeter pulse tests define subsurface connections between discrete fractures using short stress periods to monitor the propagation of the pulse through the flow system. This technique is an improvement over other cross-borehole techniques because measurements can be made in open boreholes without packers or previous identification of water-producing intervals. The method is based on the concept of monitoring the propagation of pulses rather than steady flow through the fracture network. In this method, a hydraulic stress is applied to a borehole connected to a single, permeable fracture, and the distribution of flow induced by that stress monitored in adjacent boreholes. The transient flow responses are compared to type curves computed for several different types of fracture connections. The shape of the transient flow response indicates the type of fracture connection, and the fit of the data to the type curve yields an estimate of its transmissivity and storage coefficient. The flowmeter pulse test technique was applied in fractured shale at a volatile-organic contaminant plume in Watervliet, New York. Flowmeter and other geophysical logs were used to identify permeable fractures in eight boreholes in and near the contaminant plume using single-borehole flow measurements. Flowmeter cross-hole pulse tests were used to identify connections between fractures detected in the boreholes. The results indicated a permeable fracture network connecting many of the individual boreholes, and demonstrated the presence of an ambient upward hydraulic-head gradient throughout the site.

  1. Practical experience of using ultrasound flowmeters at the measurement associated petroleum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlyyyakhmatov, M. G.; Kashapov, N. F.; Khayritonov, Kh A.; Lazarev, D. K.; Lazarev, V. K.

    2015-06-01

    The results of field tests of several ultrasound flowmeters at existing oil and gas extraction objects are given in the paper. Measured medium - associated petroleum gas. This work aims to create a unified system for measuring the amount and parameters of APG in order to reduce operating costs.

  2. An electronic Doppler signal generator for assessing continuous-wave ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, R. H.; Dixon, P.

    1986-03-01

    The design and performance of the electric Doppler signal generator are described. The features of the CW ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter, which operates in the 2-10 MHz range, that are relevant to the design of the generator are examined. Methods for evaluating the bandwidth, dynamic range, directional separation, and linearity of the zero-crossing detector are discussed. The use of a polyphase network as a phase shifter to generate a single sideband (SSB) signal is analyzed. The SSB generation is performed at a frequency of 100 kHz and the advantages of generation at this frequency are stated. The selection of proper SSB signals for the system is investigated. The performance of the Doppler signal generator is evaluated with a frequency analyzer; sideband rejection ratios and phase error in the quadrature oscillator are calculated. The Doppler generator was applied to a CW flowmeter and output signal levels were measured. The test reveals that the Doppler signal generator's performance exceeds the flowmeter requirements; rejection of the unwanted sideband exceeds 40 dB for Doppler frequencies up to 10 kHz, which is the minimum upper frequency for 10 MHz flowmeters.

  3. No-flow alarm disabled in respironics EverFlo oxygen concentrators equipped with optional low-flow flowmeter.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Respironics EverFlo oxygen concentrators can be equipped with an optional internal low-flow flowmeter, but when this flowmeter is in place, the unit will not alarm for no-flow conditions. Facilities should consider using an oxygen concentrator other than the EverFlo for pediatric patients, who may be harmed by a loss of supplemental oxygen. Facilities that choose to continue using the EverFlo with the low-flow flowmeter should ensure that pediatric patients are appropriately monitored, such as with a pulse oximeter. PMID:23444572

  4. Characterization of Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Using Heat-pulse Flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsai-Ping; Lin, Ming-Hsuan; Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous thinking on how to dispose radioactive wastes safely is essential to mankind and living environment. The concepts of multiple barriers and deep geologic disposal remain the preferred option to retard the radionuclide migration in most countries. However, the investigation of preferential groundwater flow path in a fractured rock is a challenge to the characterization of potential disposal site. Heat-pulse flowmeter is a developing logging tool for measuring the vertical flow velocity in a borehole under a constant pumping or injection rate and provides a promising direct measurement method for determining the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity of formation. As heat-pulse flowmeter is a potential technique to measure low-velocity borehole flow, we adopted it to test the feasibility of detecting permeable fractures. Besides, a new magnetic tracer made by nano-iron particles is developed to identify the possible flow path precisely and to verify the permeable section detected by the heat-pulse flowmeter. The magnetic tracer was received by a magnet array and can also be detected by a sensor of electric conductivity. The test site is located in the Heshe of Taiwan. Eight wells were established in a fractured sandy siltstone for characterizing the fracture network. The test wells are 25 to 45 m depth and opened ranging from 15 to 45 m. Prior to the heat-pulse flowmeter measurement, we also performed surface geological investigation, pumping test, geophysical logging, and salt tracer test. Field measurements using heat-pulse flowmeter were then conducted at a constant pumping rate. The measurement interval is 50 to 100 cm in depth but improved to 25 cm near the relatively permeable zone. Based on the results of heat-pulse flowmeter, several permeable sections were identified. The magnetic tracer tests were then conducted to verify the potential preferential flow pathway between adjacent wells. Test results indicated that water flow in borehole is

  5. Development, Calibration and Deployment of an Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Cross-Hole Hydrogeologic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovacek, A. E.; Fisher, A. T.; Kirkwood, W.; Wheat, C. G.; Maughan, T.; Gomes, K.

    2011-12-01

    We developed an autonomous electromagnetic flowmeter as part of a cross-hole hydrogeologic experiment using subseafloor borehole observatories (CORKs) that penetrate into the volcanic ocean crust. The cylindrical flowmeter is adapted from a conventional industrial tool and hardened for use at water depths up to 6000 m. In addition, the electronics were modified with a new power controller, and a data logger and communication board was added to enable data storage and long-term, autonomous use for up to eight years. The flowmeter generates a magnetic field and measures a voltage gradient that is created across the orifice as water moves through it. This kind of tool is ideally suited for use in the deep sea, particularly for measuring hydrothermal fluids emanating from the ocean crust, because it requires no moving parts, places no obstructions along the flow path, gives total flow volume as well as instantaneous flow rate, and is highly accurate across a large dynamic range, including bi-directional flow. This flowmeter was deployed on a CORK wellhead using an adapter and ring clamp system located above a 4-inch ball valve. The ball valve can be opened to permit flow (from an overpressured formation) out of the CORK and into the overlying ocean. A polyvinyl chloride "chimney" positioned vertically above the flowmeter is instrumented with autonomous temperature loggers to permit an additional estimate of fluid flow rates with time, based on heat loss during fluid ascent, and to facilitate fluid sampling. Calibration of the new flowmeter was completed in two stages: tank testing using a pump at flow rates of 0.5 to 1.2 L/s, and by lowering the flowmeter on a wireline at sea at rates equivalent to 0.5 to 5.2 L/s. A cross plot of apparent and reference flow rates obtained during calibration indicates a highly linear instrument response. Comparison of instantaneous (once per minute) and integrated (total flow) data collected during calibration indicates good agreement

  6. An investigation of the accuracy of empirical aircraft design for the development of an unmanned aerial vehicle intended for liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Christopher Scott

    A study was conducted to assess the accuracy of empirical techniques used for the calculation of flight performance for unmanned aerial vehicles. This was achieved by quantifying the error between a mathematical model developed with these techniques and experimental test data taken using an unmanned aircraft. The vehicle utilized for this study was developed at Washington State University for the purpose of flying using power derived from hydrogen stored as a cryogenic liquid. The vehicle has a mass of 32.8 kg loaded and performed a total of 14 flights under battery power for 3.58 total flight hours. Over these flights, the design proved it is capable of sustaining level flight from the power available from a PEM fuel cell propulsion system. The empirical techniques used by the model are explicitly outlined within. These yield several performance metrics that are compared to measurements taken during flight testing. Calculations of required thrust for steady flight over all airspeeds and rates of climb modeled are found to have a mean percent error of 3.2%+/-7.0% and a mean absolute percent error of 34.6%+/-5.1%. Comparison of the calculated and measured takeoff distance are made and the calculated thrust required to perform a level turn at a given rate is compared to flight test data. A section of a test flight is analyzed, over which the vehicle proves it can sustain level flight under 875 watts of electrical power. The aircraft's design is presented including the wing and tail, propulsion system, and build technique. The software and equipment used for the collection and analysis of flight data are given. Documentation and validation is provided of a unique test rig for the characterization of propeller performance using a car. The aircraft remains operational to assist with research of alternative energy propulsion systems and novel fuel storage techniques. The results from the comparison of the mathematical model and flight test data can be utilized to assist

  7. Multiphase flowmeter successfully measures three-phase flow at extremely high gas-volume fractions -- Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.B.; Borling, D.C.; Powers, B.S.; Shehata, K.; Halvorsen, M.

    1998-02-01

    A multiphase flowmeter (MPFM) installed in offshore Egypt has accurately measured three-phase flow in extremely gassy flow conditions. The meter is completely nonintrusive, with no moving parts, requires no flow mixing before measurement, and has no bypass loop to remove gas before multiphase measurement. Flow regimes observed during the field test of this meter ranged from severe slugging to annular flow caused by the dynamics of gas-lift gas in the production stream. Average gas-volume fraction ranged from 93 to 98% during tests conducted on seven wells. The meter was installed in the Gulf of Suez on a well protector platform in the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co. (Gupco) October field, and was placed in series with a test separator located on a nearby production platform. Wells were individually tested with flow conditions ranging from 1,300 to 4,700 B/D fluid, 2.4 to 3.9 MMscf/D of gas, and water cuts from 1 to 52%. The meter is capable of measuring water cuts up to 100%. Production was routed through both the MPFM and the test separator simultaneously as wells flowed with the assistance of gas-lift gas. The MPFM measured gas and liquid rates to within {+-} 10% of test-separator reference measurement flow rates, and accomplished this at gas-volume fractions from 93 to 96%. At higher gas-volume fractions up to 98%, accuracy deteriorated but the meter continued to provide repeatable results.

  8. Metrological analysis of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for cryogenic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, P.; Girone, M.; Liccardo, A.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.

    2015-12-01

    The metrological performance of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for monitoring helium under cryogenic conditions is assessed. At this aim, an uncertainty model of the transducer, mainly based on a valve model, exploiting finite-element approach, and a virtual flowmeter model, based on the Sereg-Schlumberger method, are presented. The models are validated experimentally on a case study for helium monitoring in cryogenic systems at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The impact of uncertainty sources on the transducer metrological performance is assessed by a sensitivity analysis, based on statistical experiment design and analysis of variance. In this way, the uncertainty sources most influencing metrological performance of the transducer are singled out over the input range as a whole, at varying operating and setting conditions. This analysis turns out to be important for CERN cryogenics operation because the metrological design of the transducer is validated, and its components and working conditions with critical specifications for future improvements are identified.

  9. Metrological analysis of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for cryogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, P.; Girone, M.; Liccardo, A.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.

    2015-12-15

    The metrological performance of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for monitoring helium under cryogenic conditions is assessed. At this aim, an uncertainty model of the transducer, mainly based on a valve model, exploiting finite-element approach, and a virtual flowmeter model, based on the Sereg-Schlumberger method, are presented. The models are validated experimentally on a case study for helium monitoring in cryogenic systems at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The impact of uncertainty sources on the transducer metrological performance is assessed by a sensitivity analysis, based on statistical experiment design and analysis of variance. In this way, the uncertainty sources most influencing metrological performance of the transducer are singled out over the input range as a whole, at varying operating and setting conditions. This analysis turns out to be important for CERN cryogenics operation because the metrological design of the transducer is validated, and its components and working conditions with critical specifications for future improvements are identified.

  10. Analysis of the feedback system in a nonintrusive dynamic flowmeter for measuring Pogo oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Equations were developed which describe the closed loop feedback system operation of a proposed ultrasonic, dynamic, nonintrusive flowmeter whose design is based on a constant phase, voltage controlled frequency feedback concept. These equations are based on linear feedback system theory. The time constant of a low pass filter is taken into account. The equations show that the larger the open loop gain, the smaller the error due to fluctuations in the speed of sound and the smaller the effective time constant.

  11. Application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data for improved production well construction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gossell, M.A.; Nishikawa, T.; Hanson, R.T.; Izbicki, J.A.; Tabidian, M.A.; Bertine, K.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water production wells commonly are designed to maximize well yield and, therefore, may be screened over several water-bearing zones. These water-bearing zones usually are identified, and their hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality are inferred, on the basis of indirect data such as geologic and geophysical logs. Production well designs based on these data may result in wells that are drilled deeper than necessary and are screened through zones having low permeability or poor-quality ground water. In this study, we examined the application of flowmeter logging and depth-dependent water quality samples for the improved design of production wells in a complex hydrogeologic setting. As a demonstration of these techniques, a flowmeter log and depth-dependent water quality data were collected from a long-screened production well within a multilayered coastal aquifer system in the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California. Results showed that the well yields most of its water from four zones that constitute 58% of the screened interval. The importance of these zones to well yield was not readily discernible from indirect geologic or geophysical data. The flowmeter logs and downhole water quality data also show that small quantities of poor-quality water could degrade the overall quality of water from the well. The data obtained from one well can be applied to other proposed wells in the same hydrologic basin. The application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data to well design can reduce installation costs and improve the quantity and quality of water produced from wells in complex multiple-aquifer systems.

  12. Coriolis Mass-Flowmeter for aerostatic gas amount determination in zero pressure stratosperic balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The CNES ballooning community regularly operates zero pressure balloons in many countries around the world (recently in France, Sweden, Canada and soon, Australia in 2017). An important operational flight parameter is the aerostatic gas mass injected into the balloon (currently helium and hydrogen in the study). Besides the lifting force, it determines mainly the ascent rate from which the adiabatic expansion depends directly. A too high ascent velocity in very cold air temperature profiles could result in a gas temperature drop which if too great, might induce brittleness of the envelope. A precise gas mass determination is therefore critical for performance as well as for mission safety. The various gas supply tanks in various countries all have different characteristics with possible uncertainties with regard to their volumes. This makes the currently used gas mass determination method based on supply tank pressure measurements unreliable. This method also relies on tank temperature, another source of inaccuracy in the gas amount determination. CNES has therefore prospected for alternative methods to reduce inaccuracies and perhaps also ease the operational procedures during balloon inflation. Coriolis mass-flowmeters which have reached industrial maturity, offer the great advantage over other flowmeters to be able to directly measure the mass of the transferred fluid, and not deducing it from other parameters as other types of flowmeters would do. An industrial contractor has been therefore assigned to integrate this solution into the CNES operational setup. This new system is to be tested in February 2016. The presentation will briefly explain the Coriolis flowmeter's principle and display the February 2016 performance tests' results. The expected incidence on zero pressure balloons' trajectories will also be discussed based on simulations ran on a balloon flight simulator software.

  13. Microfluidic flowmeter based on micro "hot-wire" sandwiched Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yan, Guofeng; Zhang, Liang; He, Sailing

    2015-04-01

    We present a compact microfluidic flowmeter based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The FPI was composed by a pair of fiber Bragg grating reflectors and a micro Co(2+)-doped optical fiber cavity, acting as a "hot-wire" sensor. Microfluidic channels made from commercial silica capillaries were integrated with the FPIs on a chip to realize flow-rate sensing system. By utilizing a tunable pump laser with wavelength of 1480 nm, the proposed flowmeter was experimentally demonstrated. The flow rate of the liquid sample is determined by the induced resonance wavelength shift of the FPI. The effect of the pump power, microfluidic channel scale and temperature on the performance of our flowmeter was investigated. The dynamic response was also measured under different flow-rate conditions. The experimental results achieve a sensitivity of 70 pm/(μL/s), a dynamic range up to 1.1 μL/s and response time in the level of seconds, with a spatial resolution ~200 μm. Such good performance renders the sensor a promising supplementary component in microfluidic biochemical sensing system. Furthermore, simulation modal was built up to analyze the heat distribution of the "hot-wire" cavity and optimize the FPI structure as well. PMID:25968776

  14. A coupled finite-element, boundary-integral method for simulating ultrasonic flowmeters.

    PubMed

    Bezdĕk, Michal; Landes, Hermann; Rieder, Alfred; Lerch, Reinhard

    2007-03-01

    Today's most popular technology of ultrasonic flow measurement is based on the transit-time principle. In this paper, a numerical simulation technique applicable to the analysis of transit-time flowmeters is presented. A flowmeter represents a large simulation problem that also requires computation of acoustic fields in moving media. For this purpose, a novel boundary integral method, the Helmholtz integral-ray tracing method (HIRM), is derived and validated. HIRM is applicable to acoustic radiation problems in arbitrary mean flows at low Mach numbers and significantly reduces the memory demands in comparison with the finite-element method (FEM). It relies on an approximate free-space Green's function which makes use of the ray tracing technique. For simulation of practical acoustic devices, a hybrid simulation scheme consisting of FEM and HIRM is proposed. The coupling of FEM and HIRM is facilitated by means of absorbing boundaries in combination with a new, reflection-free, acoustic-source formulation. Using the coupled FEM-HIRM scheme, a full three-dimensional (3-D) simulation of a complete transit-time flowmeter is performed for the first time. The obtained simulation results are in good agreement with measurements both at zero flow and under flow conditions. PMID:17375833

  15. Combined use of flowmeter and time-drawdown data to estimate hydraulic conductivities in layered aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Nishikawa, T.

    1996-01-01

    The vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in layered aquifer systems commonly is needed for model simulations of ground-water flow and transport. In previous studies, time-drawdown data or flowmeter data were used individually, but not in combination, to estimate hydraulic conductivity. In this study, flowmeter data and time-drawdown data collected from a long-screened production well and nearby monitoring wells are combined to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a complex multilayer coastal aquifer system. Flowmeter measurements recorded as a function of depth delineate nonuniform inflow to the wellbore, and this information is used to better discretize the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity using analytical and numerical methods. The time-drawdown data complement the flowmeter data by giving insight into the hydraulic response of aquitards when flow rates within the wellbore are below the detection limit of the flowmeter. The combination of these field data allows for the testing of alternative conceptual models of radial flow to the wellbore.

  16. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise. PMID:26445047

  17. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise. PMID:26445047

  18. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  19. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration. PMID:27587148

  20. Theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabin, Jozef

    1987-07-01

    A geometric approach is used to analyze the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of flow velocities that are high but yet much smaller than the ultrasound velocity. The approach is based on the calculation of the transit time difference between the ultrasonic waves that are reflected from a moving particle at its various positions. Beam divergence is taken into account, and each path of the ultrasonic wave propagation is approximated by two rectilinear components. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shift is influenced not only by the suspended particle velocity, but also by the mean flow velocity of the fluid. This influence is of second order in the flow velocity.

  1. Pressure drop and temperature rise in He II flow in round tubes, Venturi flowmeters and valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walstrom, P. L.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure drops in highly turbulent He II flow were measured in round tubes, valves, and Venturi flowmeters. Results are in good agreement with single-phase flow correlations for classical fluids. The temperature rise in flow in a round tube was measured, and found to agree well with predictions for isenthalpic expansion. Cavitation was observed in the venturis under conditions of low back pressure and high flow rate. Metastable superheating of the helium at the venturi throat was observed before the helium made a transition to saturation pressure.

  2. Integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter designed to enable wafer-level packaging.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshinori; Goma, Masaki; Onoe, Atsushi; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2010-08-01

    The authors propose a new sensor structure for an integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter that consists of two silicon cavities with a PD and laser diode inside each cavity. A silicon lid formed with a converging microlens completes the package. This structure, which was achieved using micromachining techniques, features reduced optical power loss in the sensor, resulting in its small size and significantly low power consumption. Measurements using a model tissue blood flow system confirmed that the new sensor had high linearity and a wide dynamic range for measuring tissue blood flow. PMID:20199932

  3. The combined use of heat-pulse flowmeter logging and packer testing for transmissive fracture recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Po-Jui; Chou, Po-Yi; Hsu, Shih-Meng

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an improved borehole prospecting methodology based on a combination of techniques in the hydrogeological characterization of fractured rock aquifers. The approach is demonstrated by on-site tests carried out in the Hoshe Experimental Forest site and the Tailuge National Park, Taiwan. Borehole televiewer logs are used to obtain fracture location and distribution along boreholes. The heat-pulse flow meter log is used to measure vertical velocity flow profiles which can be analyzed to estimate fracture transmissivity and to indicate hydraulic connectivity between fractures. Double-packer hydraulic tests are performed to determine the rock mass transmissivity. The computer program FLASH is used to analyze the data from the flowmeter logs. The FLASH program is confirmed as a useful tool which quantitatively predicts the fracture transmissivity in comparison to the hydraulic properties obtained from packer tests. The location of conductive fractures and their transmissivity is identified, after which the preferential flow paths through the fracture network are precisely delineated from a cross-borehole test. The results provide robust confirmation of the use of combined flowmeter and packer methods in the characterization of fractured-rock aquifers, particularly in reference to the investigation of groundwater resource and contaminant transport dynamics.

  4. A novel, microscope based, non invasive Laser Doppler flowmeter for choroidal blood flow assessment

    PubMed Central

    Strohmaier, C; Werkmeister, RM; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Schroedl, F; Brandtner, H; Radner, W; Schmetterer, L; Kiel, JW; Grabnerand, G; Reitsamer, HA

    2015-01-01

    Impaired ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous ocular diseases like glaucoma or AMD. The purpose of the present study was to introduce and validate a novel, microscope based, non invasive laser Doppler flowmeter (NILDF) for measurement of blood flow in the choroid. The custom made NI-LDF was compared with a commercial fiber optic based laser Doppler flowmeter (Perimed PF4000). Linearity and stability of the NI-LDF were assessed in a silastic tubing model (i.d. 0.3 mm) at different flow rates (range 0.4 – 3 ml/h). In a rabbit model continuous choroidal blood flow measurements were performed with both instruments simultaneously. During blood flow measurements ocular perfusion pressure was changed by manipulations of intraocular pressure via intravitreal saline infusions. The NILDF measurement correlated linearly to intraluminal flow rates in the perfused tubing model (r = 0.99, p<0.05) and remained stable during a 1 hour measurement at a constant flow rate. Rabbit choroidal blood flow measured by the PF4000 and the NI-LDF linearly correlated with each other over the entire measurement range (r = 0.99, y = x* 1,01 – 12,35 P.U., p < 0,001). In conclusion, the NI-LDF provides valid, semi quantitative measurements of capillary blood flow in comparison to an established LDF instrument and is suitable for measurements at the posterior pole of the eye. PMID:21443871

  5. Metrological analysis of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for cryogenic helium.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Girone, M; Liccardo, A; Pezzetti, M; Piccinelli, F

    2015-12-01

    The metrological performance of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for monitoring helium under cryogenic conditions is assessed. At this aim, an uncertainty model of the transducer, mainly based on a valve model, exploiting finite-element approach, and a virtual flowmeter model, based on the Sereg-Schlumberger method, are presented. The models are validated experimentally on a case study for helium monitoring in cryogenic systems at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The impact of uncertainty sources on the transducer metrological performance is assessed by a sensitivity analysis, based on statistical experiment design and analysis of variance. In this way, the uncertainty sources most influencing metrological performance of the transducer are singled out over the input range as a whole, at varying operating and setting conditions. This analysis turns out to be important for CERN cryogenics operation because the metrological design of the transducer is validated, and its components and working conditions with critical specifications for future improvements are identified. PMID:26724060

  6. Gas compression in lungs decreases peak expiratory flow depending on resistance of peak flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Pedersen, T F; Miller, M R

    1997-11-01

    It has recently been shown (O. F. Pedersen T. R. Rasmussen, O. Omland, T. Sigsgaard, P. H. Quanjer. and M. R. Miller. Eur. Respir. J. 9: 828-833, 1996) that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak flowmeter decreases peak expiratory flow (PEF) by approximately 8% compared with PEF measured by a pneumotachograph. To explore the reason for this, 10 healthy men (mean age 43 yr, range 33-58 yr) were examined in a body plethysmograph with facilities to measure mouth flow vs. expired volume as well as the change in thoracic gas volume (Vb) and alveolar pressure (PA). The subjects performed forced vital capacity maneuvers through orifices of different sizes and also a mini-Wright peak flowmeter. PEF with the meter and other added resistances were achieved when flow reached the perimeter of the flow-Vb curves. The mini-Wright PEF meter decreased PEF from 11.4 +/- 1.5 to 10.3 +/- 1.4 (SD) l/s (P < 0.001), PA increased from 6.7 +/- 1.9 to 9.3 +/- 2.7 kPa (P < 0.001), an increase equal to the pressure drop across the meter, and caused Vb at PEF to decrease by 0.24 +/- 0.09 liter (P < 0.001). We conclude that PEF obtained with an added resistance like a mini-Wright PEF meter is a wave-speed-determined maximal flow, but the added resistance causes gas compression because of increased PA at PEF. Therefore, Vb at PEF and, accordingly, PEF decrease. PMID:9375314

  7. Note: Anti-strong-disturbance signal processing method of vortex flowmeter with two sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke-Jun; Luo, Qing-Lin; Fang, Ming; Wang, Gang; Liu, San-Shan; Kang, Yi-Bo; Shi, Lei

    2011-09-01

    Some digital signal processing methods have been used to deal with the output signal of vortex flowmeter for extracting the flow rate frequency from the noisy output of vortex flow rate sensor and achieving the measurement of small flow rate. In applications, however, the power of noise is larger than that of flow rate sometimes. These strong disturbances are caused by pipe vibration mostly. Under this condition the previous digital signal processing methods will be unavailable. Therefore, an anti-strong-disturbance solution is studied for the vortex flowmeter with two sensors in this Note. In this solution, two piezoelectric sensors are installed in the vortex probe. One is called the flow rate sensor for measuring both the flow rate and vibration noise, and the other is called the vibration sensor for detecting the vibration noise and sensing the flow rate signal weakly at the same time. An anti-strong-disturbance signal processing method combining the frequency-domain substation algorithm with the frequency-variance calculation algorithm is proposed to identify the flow rate frequency. When the peak number of amplitude spectrum of the flow rate sensor is different from that of the vibration sensor, the frequency-domain subtraction algorithm will be adopted; when the peak number of amplitude spectrum of the flow rate sensor is the same as that of the vibration sensor, the frequency-variance calculation algorithm will be employed. The whole algorithm is implemented in real time by an ultralow power micro control unit (MCU) to meet requirements of process instrumentation. The experimental results show that this method can obtain the flow rate frequency correctly even if the power of the pipe vibration noise is larger than that of the vortex flow rate signal.

  8. A propagation time difference evaluation for a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for low-pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroshi; Sawayama, Toshiyuki; Nagamune, Kouki

    2016-07-01

    We have been studying the development of a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring the gas flow rate, especially at low-pressure gas such as atmospheric pressure. In this study, we evaluated the propagation time difference of ultrasonic wave for measuring the airflow at atmospheric pressure. We placed a pair of ultrasonic transducers outside a pipe and generated ultrasonic waves aslant to the flow direction. We observed the propagation time difference of the ultrasonic wave as a function of the gas flow velocity, and found that the difference was proportional to the gas flow. Therefore, it was shown that we were able to measure the atmospheric pressure gas flow rate with a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter. Moreover, we evaluated the dependency of ultrasonic wave intensity on gas pressure.

  9. 40 CFR 86.338-79 - Exhaust measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust measurement accuracy. 86.338... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.338-79 Exhaust measurement accuracy. (a) The analyzers must be operated between 15 percent and...

  10. Research on the optical fiber gas flowmeters based on intermodal interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Hu, Hai-feng; Bi, Dan-juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a self-heating type optical fiber flowmeter with high sensitivity was proposed. The core-offset fiber structures were employed to couple a part of signal light into the fiber cladding layer, and the other part of light still propagated in the core layer. The intermodal interference between the two parts of light happened when the cladding modes were coupled back into core layer. Meanwhile, the high power laser was also introduced into fiber to heat the silver film coated on the surface of the cladding layer. When the cool gas flow passed, the temperature of the sensor probe decreased due to the heat transfer process. Because of the thermo-optic effect in the fiber, interference spectrum could be shifted when the temperature was changed. The experimental results showed the resolution of the proposed sensor was 2×10-2 m/s in the region of 0-8 m/s. The highest sensitivity could achieve 1537 pm/(m/s).

  11. Final report on EURAMET project No. 1046: Intercomparison of water flow standards using electromagnetic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Jan; Lojek, Libor

    2013-01-01

    The Euramet comparison No. 1046 is a supplementary comparison of European national water flow laboratories. The comparison started in May 2008 and the measurements were finished in June 2009. Eleven laboratories took part in the comparison—namely: Austria (BEV), Bosnia and Herzegovina (IMBH), Czech Republic (CMI - pilot laboratory), France (CETIAT), Greece (EIM), Hungary (MKEH), Lithuania (VMT/LEI), Republic of Macedonia (BoM), Norway (Justervesenet), Slovakia (SMU) and Switzerland (METAS). Two electromagnetic flow-meters were used as transfer standards. Laboratories' results were compared in a range of flow-rates between 1 m3/h and 10 m3/h with water at a temperature near to 20 °C. The data were evaluated according to standard methods. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Numerical Simulation of Transit-Time Ultrasonic Flowmeters by a Direct Approach.

    PubMed

    Luca, Adrian; Marchiano, Regis; Chassaing, Jean-Camille

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a computational code for the numerical simulation of wave propagation through domains with a complex geometry consisting in both solids and moving fluids. The emphasis is on the numerical simulation of ultrasonic flowmeters (UFMs) by modeling the wave propagation in solids with the equations of linear elasticity (ELE) and in fluids with the linearized Euler equations (LEEs). This approach requires high performance computing because of the high number of degrees of freedom and the long propagation distances. Therefore, the numerical method should be chosen with care. In order to minimize the numerical dissipation which may occur in this kind of configuration, the numerical method employed here is the nodal discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. Also, this method is well suited for parallel computing. To speed up the code, almost all the computational stages have been implemented to run on graphical processing unit (GPU) by using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming model from NVIDIA. This approach has been validated and then used for the two-dimensional simulation of gas UFMs. The large contrast of acoustic impedance characteristic to gas UFMs makes their simulation a real challenge. PMID:27019484

  13. Beam-forming techniques with applications to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. C.

    The near-field and array approaches to beam forming appear to be the most practical and useful methods for providing uniform illumination of the cross section of blood vessels. Through the near-field approach, the required beam patterns are produced in the near field of pulsed transducers and, as a result, it is most suitable for peripheral applications. Field patterns of pulsed transducers are defined and are investigated by theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental characterization to verify the validity and indicate the limitations of this approach. Transducers are designed and fabricated, based on these results, and are employed in the preliminary flowmeter system evaluation. The use of transducer arrays is the only viable approach to deepbody measurements and flexible beamwidth adjustment. A theory, founded on the finite Fourier-Bessel and Dini series expansions, is developed to synthesize circularly symmetrical beam patterns by means of concentric annular arrays. Its application to the generation of variable-width uniform beams results in a canonical design procedure. A prototype transducer array suitable for transcutaneous cardiac-output estimation was developed.

  14. Development of a curb-valve flowmeter for gas theft detection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, K.F.; Glicksman, L.R.; Peterson, C.R.

    1984-09-01

    Today, according to numerous gas utilities, significant revenues are being lost via theft of service, losses ultimately passed on to the businesses honest customers. A method to detect such thievery developed was the design of a secondary flowmetering device. Located outside a suspected concern, and placed within the small confines of a modified valve or pipe structure, its function is to act as a cross reference for the existing positive-displacement meter. The concept chosen was the phenomena of vortex shedding, a fluid oscillatory instability which is used extensively as a measuring technique in the process control industry. Feasibility studies were carried out using a flat, non-moving bluff-shedding element and a piezo-electric bimorph ceramic cantilevered behind it. Both elements were situated within a curb valve based prototype design having a test section inner diameter of one inch. As predicted, experiments demonstrate a repeatable, linear relationship between frequency of oscillation and volume flow for flow rates between 200 and 1000 CFH.

  15. Schlieren laser Doppler flowmeter for the human optical nerve head with the flicker stimuli.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Martial H; Truffer, Frederic; Evequoz, Hugo; Khayi, Hafid; Mottet, Benjamin; Chiquet, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    We describe a device to measure blood perfusion for the human optic nerve head (ONH) based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with a flicker stimuli of the fovea region. This device is self-aligned for LDF measurements and includes near-infrared pupil observation, green illumination, and observation of the ONH. The optical system of the flowmeter is based on a Schlieren arrangement which collects only photons that encounter multiple scattering and are back-scattered out of the illumination point. LDF measurements are based on heterodyne detection of Doppler shifted back-scattered light. We also describe an automated analysis of the LDF signals which rejects artifacts and false signals such as blinks. By using a Doppler simulator consisting of a lens and a rotating diffusing wheel, we demonstrate that velocity and flow vary linearly with the speed of the wheel. A cohort of 12 healthy subjects demonstrated that flicker stimulation induces an increase of 17.8% of blood flow in the ONH. PMID:24296999

  16. Development of Coriolis mass flowmeter with digital drive and signal processing technology.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Li; Xu, Ke-Jun; Fang, Min; Liu, Cui; Xiong, Wen-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Coriolis mass flowmeter (CMF) often suffers from two-phase flowrate which may cause flowtube stalling. To solve this problem, a digital drive method and a digital signal processing method of CMF is studied and implemented in this paper. A positive-negative step signal is used to initiate the flowtube oscillation without knowing the natural frequency of the flowtube. A digital zero-crossing detection method based on Lagrange interpolation is adopted to calculate the frequency and phase difference of the sensor output signals in order to synthesize the digital drive signal. The digital drive approach is implemented by a multiplying digital to analog converter (MDAC) and a direct digital synthesizer (DDS). A digital Coriolis mass flow transmitter is developed with a digital signal processor (DSP) to control the digital drive, and realize the signal processing. Water flow calibrations and gas-liquid two-phase flowrate experiments are conducted to examine the performance of the transmitter. The experimental results show that the transmitter shortens the start-up time and can maintain the oscillation of flowtube in two-phase flowrate condition. PMID:23721742

  17. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, John M.; Lindner, Gordon M.; Rowe, John C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  18. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  19. Relative accuracy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  20. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  1. Integrated microfluidic flowmeter based on a micro-FBG inscribed in Co²⁺-doped optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengyong; Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Zhang, A Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-10-15

    A novel microfluidic flowmeter integrated with microfiber Bragg grating (µFBG) is presented. Two glass capillaries and a short length of high-light-absorption Co²⁺-doped optical fiber were stacked inside a larger outer capillary tube. The stack was then drawn into a tapered device. Two microchannels with the diameter of ~50  μm were formed inside the capillaries for flowing of microfluidics. An FBG was inscribed in the tapered Co²⁺-doped fiber with waist diameter of ~70  μm, and acts as a flow-rate sensor. A pump laser with wavelength of 1480 nm was utilized to locally heat the µFBG, rendering the µFBG as miniature "hot-wire" flowmeter. The flow rate of the liquid in the microchannels is determined by the induced wavelength shift of the µFBG. The experimental results achieve a minimum detectable change of ~16  nL/s in flow rate, which is very promising in the use as part of biochips. PMID:25361108

  2. Comparison of intraoperative completion flowmeter versus duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gabor A; Calligaro, Keith D; Kolakowski, Steven; Doerr, Kevin J; McAffee-Bennett, Sandy; Muller, Kathy; Dougherty, Matthew J

    Intraoperative completion studies of the internal carotid artery following carotid endarterectomy are recommended to ensure technical perfection of the repair. Transit time ultrasound flowmeter does not require trained technicians, requires less time than other completion studies such as duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography, and is noninvasive. Flowmetry was compared with duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography to determine if the relatively simpler flowmetry could replace these two more widely accepted completion studies in the intraoperative assessment of carotid endarterectomy. Comparative intraoperative assessment was performed in 116 carotid endarterectomies using all three techniques between December 1, 2000 and November 30, 2003. Eversion endarterectomy was performed in 51 cases and standard endarterectomy with prosthetic patching in 65 cases. Patients underwent completion flowmetry, duplex ultrasonography, and contrast arteriography studies of the exposed arteries, which were performed by vascular fellows or senior surgical residents under direct supervision of board-certified vascular surgeons. Duplex ultrasonography surveillance was performed 1 and 6 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). The combined ipsilateral stroke and death rate was 0%. The mean internal carotid artery flow using flowmetry was 249 mL/min (range, 60-750 mL/min). Five (4.3%) patients had flow < 100 mL/min as measured with flowmetry, but completion contrast arteriography and duplex ultrasonography were normal and none of the arteries were re-explored. One carotid endarterectomy was re-explored based on completion duplex ultrasonography that showed markedly elevated internal carotid artery peak systolic velocity (> 500 cm/sec); however, exploration was normal and completion flowmetry and contrast arteriography were normal. Duplex ultrasonography studies revealed internal carotid artery peak systolic

  3. Hydrogeological characterization of soil/weathered zone and underlying fractured bedrocks in DNAPL contaminated areas using the electromagnetic flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, E.; Yeo, I.

    2011-12-01

    Flowmeter tests were carried out to characterize hydrogeology at DNAPL contaminated site in Wonju, Korea. Aquifer and slug tests determined hydraulic conductivity of soil/weathered zone and underlying fractured bed rocks to be 2.95×10-6 to 7.11×10-6 m/sec and 9.14×10-7 to 2.59×10-6 m/sec, respectively. Ambient flowmeter tests under natural hydraulic conditions revealed that the inflow and outflow take place through the borehole of soil/weathered zone with a tendency of down flow in the borehole. In particular, the most permeable layer of 22 to 30 m below the surface was found to form a major groundwater flow channel. On the contrary, a slight inflow and outflow was observed in the borehole, and the groundwater that inflows in the bottom section of the fractured bedrock flows up and exits through to the most permeable layer. Hydraulic heads measured at nearby multi-level boreholes confirmed the down flow in the soil/weathered zone and the up flow in fractured bedrocks. It was also revealed that the groundwater flow converges to the most permeable layer. TCE concentration in groundwater was measured at different depths, and in the borehole of the soil/weathered zone, high TCE concentration was found with higher than 10 mg/L near to the water table and decreased to about 6 mg/L with depth. The fractured bedrocks have a relatively constant low TCE concentration through a 20 m thick screen at less than l mg/L. The hydrogeology of the up flow in the soil/weathered zone and the down flow in underlying fractured bedrock leads the groundwater flow, and subsequently TCE plume, mainly to the most permeable layer that also restricts the advective transport of TCE plume to underlying fractured bedrocks. The cross borehole flowmeter test was carried out to find any hydrogeological connection between the soil/weathered zone and underlying fractured bedrocks. When pumping groundwater from the soil/weathered zone, no induced flow by groundwater extraction was observed at the

  4. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  5. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  6. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  7. Interoceptive accuracy and panic.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, L A; Craske, M G

    1999-12-01

    Psychophysiological models of panic hypothesize that panickers focus attention on and become anxious about the physical sensations associated with panic. Attention on internal somatic cues has been labeled interoception. The present study examined the role of physiological arousal and subjective anxiety on interoceptive accuracy. Infrequent panickers and nonanxious participants participated in an initial baseline to examine overall interoceptive accuracy. Next, participants ingested caffeine, about which they received either safety or no safety information. Using a mental heartbeat tracking paradigm, participants' count of their heartbeats during specific time intervals were coded based on polygraph measures. Infrequent panickers were more accurate in the perception of their heartbeats than nonanxious participants. Changes in physiological arousal were not associated with increased accuracy on the heartbeat perception task. However, higher levels of self-reported anxiety were associated with superior performance. PMID:10596462

  8. An evaluation of borehole flowmeters used to measure horizontal ground-water flow in limestones of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John T.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Bayless, E. Randall; Hanson, Randall T.; Kearl, Peter M.; Kerfoot, William B.; Newhouse, Mark W.; Pedler, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Three borehole flowmeters and hydrophysical logging were used to measure ground-water flow in carbonate bedrock at sites in southeastern Indiana and on the westcentral border of Kentucky and Tennessee. The three flowmeters make point measurements of the direction and magnitude of horizontal flow, and hydrophysical logging measures the magnitude of horizontal flowover an interval. The directional flowmeters evaluated include a horizontal heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and a colloidal borescope flowmeter. Each method was used to measure flow in selected zones where previous geophysical logging had indicated water-producing beds, bedding planes, or other permeable features that made conditions favorable for horizontal-flow measurements. Background geophysical logging indicated that ground-water production from the Indiana test wells was characterized by inflow from a single, 20-foot-thick limestone bed. The Kentucky/Tennessee test wells produced water from one or more bedding planes where geophysical logs indicated the bedding planes had been enlarged by dissolution. Two of the three test wells at the latter site contained measurable vertical flow between two or more bedding planes under ambient hydraulic head conditions. Field measurements and data analyses for each flow-measurement technique were completed by a developer of the technology or by a contractor with extensive experience in the application of that specific technology. Comparison of the horizontal-flow measurements indicated that the three point-measurement techniques rarely measured the same velocities and flow directions at the same measurement stations. Repeat measurements at selected depth stations also failed to consistently reproduce either flow direction, flow magnitude, or both. At a few test stations, two of the techniques provided similar flow magnitude or direction but usually not both. Some of this variability may be attributed to naturally occurring changes in

  9. Accuracy of deception judgments.

    PubMed

    Bond, Charles F; DePaulo, Bella M

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the accuracy of deception judgments, synthesizing research results from 206 documents and 24,483 judges. In relevant studies, people attempt to discriminate lies from truths in real time with no special aids or training. In these circumstances, people achieve an average of 54% correct lie-truth judgments, correctly classifying 47% of lies as deceptive and 61% of truths as nondeceptive. Relative to cross-judge differences in accuracy, mean lie-truth discrimination abilities are nontrivial, with a mean accuracy d of roughly .40. This produces an effect that is at roughly the 60th percentile in size, relative to others that have been meta-analyzed by social psychologists. Alternative indexes of lie-truth discrimination accuracy correlate highly with percentage correct, and rates of lie detection vary little from study to study. Our meta-analyses reveal that people are more accurate in judging audible than visible lies, that people appear deceptive when motivated to be believed, and that individuals regard their interaction partners as honest. We propose that people judge others' deceptions more harshly than their own and that this double standard in evaluating deceit can explain much of the accumulated literature. PMID:16859438

  10. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  11. Local Lorentz force flowmeter at a continuous caster model using a new generation multicomponent force and torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Daniel; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas; Timmel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry is a non-invasive velocity measurement technique for electrical conductive liquids like molten steel. In this technique, the metal flow interacts with a static magnetic field generating eddy currents which, in turn, produce flow-braking Lorentz forces within the fluid. These forces are proportional to the electrical conductivity and to the velocity of the melt. Due to Newton’s third law, a counter force of the same magnitude acts on the source of the applied static magnetic field which is in our case a permanent magnet. In this paper we will present a new multicomponent sensor for the local Lorentz force flowmeter (L2F2) which is able to measure simultaneously all three components of the force as well as all three components of the torque. Therefore, this new sensor is capable of accessing all three velocity components at the same time in the region near the wall. In order to demonstrate the potential of this new sensor, it is used to identify the 3-dimensional velocity field near the wide face of the mold of a continuous caster model available at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. As model melt, the eutectic alloy GaInSn is used.

  12. Quantitative phase-flow MR imaging in dogs by using standard sequences: comparison with in vivo flow-meter measurements.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, R I; Dannels, W; Galloway, J R; Pearson, T; Millikan, W; Henderson, J M; Peterson, J; Bernardino, M E

    1987-02-01

    For evaluation of the feasibility and clinical potential of using the phase data from standard MR imaging sequences to measure blood flow, 11 vessels with diameters of 4 to 7 mm were imaged in seven dogs. The flow in either the superior mesenteric vein or the inferior vena cava was measured first at laparotomy (in ml/min) with electromagnetic flow meters. Immediately thereafter, these vessels were imaged by MR in 25-mm thick sections by using a standard spin echo (SE) 750/30 sequence with a Philips 0.5-T imager. Previous phase-flow calibration of the imager and sequence allowed calculation of the blood flow rates from the phase images that were used to measure the vessels' cross-sectional areas and blood phase values. Comparison of the measurements obtained with each technique showed a significant correlation (r = .977, p less than .05) between MR-imaging values and flow-meter measurements when the blood velocity was less than approximately 40 cm/sec, the known upper limit of the flow dynamic range for the MR hardware and sequence used. There was no correlation for blood velocities greater than 40 cm/sec. However, the range of blood flow velocities in dogs and man extends to more than 100 cm/sec. Thus, these results suggest that this technique might yield valuable adjunctive flow data in routine clinical imaging provided that improvements in hardware and software permit a larger dynamic range. PMID:2948376

  13. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-02-09

    Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

  14. Accuracy in Judgments of Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, David A.; West, Tessa V.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Schwartz, David

    2009-01-01

    Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their understanding of others. Past research has distinguished between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about how a target interacts with others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver’s view of others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about a target when interacting with that target. Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116 9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys each interacted in play groups, during which observations of aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver accuracy. PMID:17575243

  15. Accuracy of tablet splitting.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, J T; Gurst, A H; Chen, Y

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to determine the accuracy of manually splitting hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Ninety-four healthy volunteers each split ten 25-mg hydrochlorothiazide tablets, which were then weighed using an analytical balance. Demographics, grip and pinch strength, digit circumference, and tablet-splitting experience were documented. Subjects were also surveyed regarding their willingness to pay a premium for commercially available, lower-dose tablets. Of 1752 manually split tablet portions, 41.3% deviated from ideal weight by more than 10% and 12.4% deviated by more than 20%. Gender, age, education, and tablet-splitting experience were not predictive of variability. Most subjects (96.8%) stated a preference for commercially produced, lower-dose tablets, and 77.2% were willing to pay more for them. For drugs with steep dose-response curves or narrow therapeutic windows, the differences we recorded could be clinically relevant. PMID:9469693

  16. A 3-D PW ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter: theory and experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Calzolai, M; Capineri, L; Fort, A; Masotti, L; Rocchi, S; Scabia, M

    1999-01-01

    A complete 3-D ultrasonic pulsed Doppler system has been developed to measure quantitatively the velocity vector field of a fluid flow independently of the probe position. The probe consists of four 2.5 MHz piezocomposite ultrasonic transducers (one central transmitter and three receivers separated by 120 degrees ) to measure the velocity projections along three different directions. The Doppler shift of the three channels is calculated by analog phase and quadrature demodulation, then digitally processed to extract the mean velocity from the complex spectrum. The accuracy of the 3-D Doppler technique has been tested on a moving string phantom providing an error of about 4% for both amplitude and direction with an acquisition window of 100 ms. PMID:18238403

  17. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  18. Compact Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF) Fundus Camera for the Assessment of Retinal Blood Perfusion in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Christophe; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Amoos, Serge; Loeuillet, Corinne; Bernabei, Mario; Geiser, Martial

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive techniques for ocular blood perfusion assessment are of crucial importance for exploring microvascular alterations related to systemic and ocular diseases. However, few techniques adapted to rodents are available and most are invasive or not specifically focused on the optic nerve head (ONH), choroid or retinal circulation. Here we present the results obtained with a new rodent-adapted compact fundus camera based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Methods A confocal miniature flowmeter was fixed to a specially designed 3D rotating mechanical arm and adjusted on a rodent stereotaxic table in order to accurately point the laser beam at the retinal region of interest. The linearity of the LDF measurements was assessed using a rotating Teflon wheel and a flow of microspheres in a glass capillary. In vivo reproducibility was assessed in Wistar rats with repeated measurements (inter-session and inter-day) of retinal arteries and ONH blood velocity in six and ten rats, respectively. These parameters were also recorded during an acute intraocular pressure increase to 150 mmHg and after heart arrest (n = 5 rats). Results The perfusion measurements showed perfect linearity between LDF velocity and Teflon wheel or microsphere speed. Intraclass correlation coefficients for retinal arteries and ONH velocity (0.82 and 0.86, respectively) indicated strong inter-session repeatability and stability. Inter-day reproducibility was good (0.79 and 0.7, respectively). Upon ocular blood flow cessation, the retinal artery velocity signal substantially decreased, whereas the ONH signal did not significantly vary, suggesting that it could mostly be attributed to tissue light scattering. Conclusion We have demonstrated that, while not adapted for ONH blood perfusion assessment, this device allows pertinent, stable and repeatable measurements of retinal blood perfusion in rats. PMID:26226150

  19. Borehole geophysical and flowmeter data for eight boreholes in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, Lake Seminole, Jackson County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Hamrick, Michael D.; Holloway, O. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs and flowmeter data were collected in April 2011 from eight boreholes to identify the depth and orientation of cavernous zones within the Miocene Tampa Limestone in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam in Jackson County, Florida. These data are used to assess leakage near the dam. Each of the eight boreholes was terminated in limestone at depths ranging from 84 to 104 feet. Large cavernous zones were encountered in most of the borings, with several exceeding 20-inches in diameter. The cavernous zones generally were between 1 and 5 feet in height, but a cavern in one of the borings reached a height of about 6 feet. The resistivity of limestone layers penetrated by the boreholes generally was less than 1,000 ohm-meters. Formation resistivity near the cavernous zones did not show an appreciable contrast from surrounding bedrock, probably because the bedrock is saturated, owing to its primary permeability. Measured flow rates in the eight boreholes determined using an electromagnetic flowmeter were all less than ±0.1 liter per second. These low flow rates suggest that vertical hydraulic gradients in the boreholes are negligible and that hydraulic head in the various cavernous zones shows only minor, if any, variation.

  20. 10 CFR 72.11 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 72.11 Section 72.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  1. NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR MA BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2011-06-01

    A nuclear data target accuracy assessment has been carried out for two types of transmuters: a critical sodium fast reactor(SFR) and an accelerator driven system (ADMAB). Results are provided for a 7 group energy structure. Considerations about fuel cycle parameters uncertainties illustrate their dependence from the isotope final densities at end of cycle.

  2. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  3. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  4. Use of an extracorporeal circulation perfusion simulator: evaluation of its accuracy and repeatability.

    PubMed

    Tokumine, Asako; Momose, Naoki; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-12-01

    Medical simulators have mainly been used as educational tools. They have been used to train technicians and to educate potential users about safety. We combined software for hybrid-type extracorporeal circulation simulation (ECCSIM) with a CPB-Workshop console. We evaluated the performance of ECCSIM, including its accuracy and repeatability, during simulated ECC. We performed a detailed evaluation of the synchronization of the software with the console and the function of the built-in valves. An S-III heart–lung machine was used for the open circuit. It included a venous reservoir, an oxygenator (RX-25), and an arterial filter. The tubes for venous drainage and the arterial line were connected directly to the ports of the console. The ECCSIM recorded the liquid level of the reservoir continuously. The valve in the console controlled the pressure load of the arterial line. The software made any adjustments necessary to both arterial pressure load and the venous drainage flow volume. No external flowmeters were necessary during simulation. We found the CPB-Workshop to be convenient, reliable, and sufficiently exact. It can be used to validate procedures by monitoring the controls and responses by using a combination of qualitative measures. PMID:24022821

  5. Meditation Experience Predicts Introspective Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kieran C. R.; Zakarauskas, Pierre; Dixon, Matt; Ellamil, Melissa; Thompson, Evan; Christoff, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of subjective reports, especially those involving introspection of one's own internal processes, remains unclear, and research has demonstrated large individual differences in introspective accuracy. It has been hypothesized that introspective accuracy may be heightened in persons who engage in meditation practices, due to the highly introspective nature of such practices. We undertook a preliminary exploration of this hypothesis, examining introspective accuracy in a cross-section of meditation practitioners (1–15,000 hrs experience). Introspective accuracy was assessed by comparing subjective reports of tactile sensitivity for each of 20 body regions during a ‘body-scanning’ meditation with averaged, objective measures of tactile sensitivity (mean size of body representation area in primary somatosensory cortex; two-point discrimination threshold) as reported in prior research. Expert meditators showed significantly better introspective accuracy than novices; overall meditation experience also significantly predicted individual introspective accuracy. These results suggest that long-term meditators provide more accurate introspective reports than novices. PMID:23049790

  6. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  7. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  8. Accuracy assessment system and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Houston, A. G.; Badhwar, G.; Bender, M. J.; Rader, M. L.; Eppler, W. G.; Ahlers, C. W.; White, W. P.; Vela, R. R.; Hsu, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The accuracy and reliability of LACIE estimates of wheat production, area, and yield is determined at regular intervals throughout the year by the accuracy assessment subsystem which also investigates the various LACIE error sources, quantifies the errors, and relates then to their causes. Timely feedback of these error evaluations to the LACIE project was the only mechanism by which improvements in the crop estimation system could be made during the short 3 year experiment.

  9. Evaluating LANDSAT wildland classification accuracies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures to evaluate the accuracy of LANDSAT derived wildland cover classifications are described. The evaluation procedures include: (1) implementing a stratified random sample for obtaining unbiased verification data; (2) performing area by area comparisons between verification and LANDSAT data for both heterogeneous and homogeneous fields; (3) providing overall and individual classification accuracies with confidence limits; (4) displaying results within contingency tables for analysis of confusion between classes; and (5) quantifying the amount of information (bits/square kilometer) conveyed in the LANDSAT classification.

  10. The accuracy of automatic tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastrov, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that tracking accuracy changes similarly to the rate of change of the curve of the measurement conversion. The problem that internal noise increases along with the signals processed by the tracking device and that tracking accuracy thus drops were considered. The main prerequisite for solution is consideration of the dependences of the output signal of the tracking device sensor not only on the measured parameter but on the signal itself.

  11. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  12. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  13. Accuracy in optical overlay metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringoltz, Barak; Marciano, Tal; Yaziv, Tal; DeLeeuw, Yaron; Klein, Dana; Feler, Yoel; Adam, Ido; Gurevich, Evgeni; Sella, Noga; Lindenfeld, Ze'ev; Leviant, Tom; Saltoun, Lilach; Ashwal, Eltsafon; Alumot, Dror; Lamhot, Yuval; Gao, Xindong; Manka, James; Chen, Bryan; Wagner, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the mechanism by which process variations determine the overlay accuracy of optical metrology. We start by focusing on scatterometry, and showing that the underlying physics of this mechanism involves interference effects between cavity modes that travel between the upper and lower gratings in the scatterometry target. A direct result is the behavior of accuracy as a function of wavelength, and the existence of relatively well defined spectral regimes in which the overlay accuracy and process robustness degrades (`resonant regimes'). These resonances are separated by wavelength regions in which the overlay accuracy is better and independent of wavelength (we term these `flat regions'). The combination of flat and resonant regions forms a spectral signature which is unique to each overlay alignment and carries certain universal features with respect to different types of process variations. We term this signature the `landscape', and discuss its universality. Next, we show how to characterize overlay performance with a finite set of metrics that are available on the fly, and that are derived from the angular behavior of the signal and the way it flags resonances. These metrics are used to guarantee the selection of accurate recipes and targets for the metrology tool, and for process control with the overlay tool. We end with comments on the similarity of imaging overlay to scatterometry overlay, and on the way that pupil overlay scatterometry and field overlay scatterometry differ from an accuracy perspective.

  14. Current Concept of Geometrical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görög, Augustín; Görögová, Ingrid

    2014-06-01

    Within the solving VEGA 1/0615/12 research project "Influence of 5-axis grinding parameters on the shank cutteŕs geometric accuracy", the research team will measure and evaluate geometrical accuracy of the produced parts. They will use the contemporary measurement technology (for example the optical 3D scanners). During the past few years, significant changes have occurred in the field of geometrical accuracy. The objective of this contribution is to analyse the current standards in the field of geometric tolerance. It is necessary to bring an overview of the basic concepts and definitions in the field. It will prevent the use of outdated and invalidated terms and definitions in the field. The knowledge presented in the contribution will provide the new perspective of the measurement that will be evaluated according to the current standards.

  15. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  16. ACCURACY AND TRACE ORGANIC ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accuracy in trace organic analysis presents a formidable problem to the residue chemist. He is confronted with the analysis of a large number and variety of compounds present in a multiplicity of substrates at levels as low as parts-per-trillion. At these levels, collection, isol...

  17. Improving Speaking Accuracy through Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormer, Jan Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Increased English learner accuracy can be achieved by leading students through six stages of awareness. The first three awareness stages build up students' motivation to improve, and the second three provide learners with crucial input for change. The final result is "sustained language awareness," resulting in ongoing…

  18. The hidden KPI registration accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Determining the registration accuracy rate is fundamental to improving revenue cycle key performance indicators. A registration quality assurance (QA) process allows errors to be corrected before bills are sent and helps registrars learn from their mistakes. Tools are available to help patient access staff who perform registration QA manually. PMID:21923052

  19. Psychology Textbooks: Examining Their Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuer, Faye B.; Ham, K. Whitfield, II

    2008-01-01

    Sales figures and recollections of psychologists indicate textbooks play a central role in psychology students' education, yet instructors typically must select texts under time pressure and with incomplete information. Although selection aids are available, none adequately address the accuracy of texts. We describe a technique for sampling…

  20. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  1. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  2. A high accuracy sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, H.

    The High Accuracy Sun Sensor (HASS) is described, concentrating on measurement principle, the CCD detector used, the construction of the sensorhead and the operation of the sensor electronics. Tests on a development model show that the main aim of a 0.01-arcsec rms stability over a 10-minute period is closely approached. Remaining problem areas are associated with the sensor sensitivity to illumination level variations, the shielding of the detector, and the test and calibration equipment.

  3. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  4. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  5. Synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sammons, V.O.

    1980-01-01

    This guide is designed for those who wish to learn more about the science and technology of synthetic fuels by reviewing materials in the collections of the Library of Congress. This is not a comprehensive bibliography, it is designed to put the reader on target. Subject headings used by the Library of Congress under which books on synthetic fuels can be located are: oil-shale industry; oil-shales; shale oils; synthetic fuels; synthetic fuels industry; coal gasification; coal liquefaction; fossil fuels; hydrogen as fuel; oil sands; petroleum, synthesis gas; biomass energy; pyrolysis; and thermal oil recovery. Basic texts, handbooks, government publications, journals, etc. were included. (DP)

  6. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  7. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  8. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  9. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2010-01-08

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  10. Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2008-03-26

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  11. Alternate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.W.; Worthen, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    The escalating oil prices and shortages of petroleum based fuels for transportation have made research work on various fuel alternatives, especially for transportation engines, a priority of both the private and public sectors. This book contains 18 papers on this subject. The range of options from the development of completely non-petroleum-based fuels and engines to the use of various non-petroleum gasoline and diesel fuel extenders and improvers are discussed.

  12. Fossil Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  13. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  14. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  15. Accuracy of numerically produced compensators.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H; Evans, M D; Fallone, B G

    1999-01-01

    A feasibility study is performed to assess the utility of a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill to produce compensating filters for conventional clinical use and for the delivery of intensity-modulated beams. A computer aided machining (CAM) software is used to assist in the design and construction of such filters. Geometric measurements of stepped and wedged surfaces are made to examine the accuracy of surface milling. Molds are milled and filled with molten alloy to produce filters, and both the molds and filters are examined for consistency and accuracy. Results show that the deviation of the filter surfaces from design does not exceed 1.5%. The effective attenuation coefficient is measured for CadFree, a cadmium-free alloy, in a 6 MV photon beam. The effective attenuation coefficients at the depth of maximum dose (1.5 cm) and at 10 cm in solid water phantom are found to be 0.546 cm-1 and 0.522 cm-1, respectively. Further attenuation measurements are made with Cerrobend to assess the variations of the effective attenuation coefficient with field size and source-surface distance. The ability of the CNC mill to accurately produce surfaces is verified with dose profile measurements in a 6 MV photon beam. The test phantom is composed of a 10 degrees polystyrene wedge and a 30 degrees polystyrene wedge, presenting both a sharp discontinuity and sloped surfaces. Dose profiles, measured at the depth of compensation (10 cm) beneath the test phantom and beneath a flat phantom, are compared to those produced by a commercial treatment planning system. Agreement between measured and predicted profiles is within 2%, indicating the viability of the system for filter production. PMID:10100166

  16. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  17. Emotional and Social Factors influence Poker Decision Making Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Laakasuo, Michael; Palomäki, Jussi; Salmela, Mikko

    2015-09-01

    Poker is a social game, where success depends on both game strategic knowledge and emotion regulation abilities. Thus, poker provides a productive environment for studying the effects of emotional and social factors on micro-economic decision making. Previous research indicates that experiencing negative emotions, such as moral anger, reduces mathematical accuracy in poker decision making. Furthermore, various social aspects of the game—such as losing against "bad players" due to "bad luck"—seem to fuel these emotional states. We designed an Internet-based experiment, where participants' (N = 459) mathematical accuracy in five different poker decision making tasks were assessed. In addition, we manipulated the emotional and social conditions under which the tasks were presented, in a 2 × 2 experimental setup: (1) Anger versus neutral emotional state—participants were primed either with an anger-inducing, or emotionally neutral story, and (2) Social cue versus non-social cue—during the tasks, either an image of a pair of human eyes was "following" the mouse cursor, or an image of a black moving box was presented. The results showed that anger reduced mathematical accuracy of decision making only when participants were "being watched" by a pair of moving eyes. Experienced poker players made mathematically more accurate decisions than inexperienced ones. The results contribute to current understanding on how emotional and social factors influence decision making accuracy in economic games. PMID:24633674

  18. Data accuracy assessment using enterprise architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närman, Per; Holm, Hannes; Johnson, Pontus; König, Johan; Chenine, Moustafa; Ekstedt, Mathias

    2011-02-01

    Errors in business processes result in poor data accuracy. This article proposes an architecture analysis method which utilises ArchiMate and the Probabilistic Relational Model formalism to model and analyse data accuracy. Since the resources available for architecture analysis are usually quite scarce, the method advocates interviews as the primary data collection technique. A case study demonstrates that the method yields correct data accuracy estimates and is more resource-efficient than a competing sampling-based data accuracy estimation method.

  19. Preschoolers Monitor the Relative Accuracy of Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquini, Elisabeth S.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Koenig, Melissa; Harris, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    In 2 studies, the sensitivity of 3- and 4-year-olds to the previous accuracy of informants was assessed. Children viewed films in which 2 informants labeled familiar objects with differential accuracy (across the 2 experiments, children were exposed to the following rates of accuracy by the more and less accurate informants, respectively: 100% vs.…

  20. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  1. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  2. High accuracy broadband infrared spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan

    Mueller matrix spectroscopy or Spectropolarimetry combines conventional spectroscopy with polarimetry, providing more information than can be gleaned from spectroscopy alone. Experimental studies on infrared polarization properties of materials covering a broad spectral range have been scarce due to the lack of available instrumentation. This dissertation aims to fill the gap by the design, development, calibration and testing of a broadband Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectropolarimeter. The instrument operates over the 3-12 mum waveband and offers better overall accuracy compared to the previous generation instruments. Accurate calibration of a broadband spectropolarimeter is a non-trivial task due to the inherent complexity of the measurement process. An improved calibration technique is proposed for the spectropolarimeter and numerical simulations are conducted to study the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Insights into the geometrical structure of the polarimetric measurement matrix is provided to aid further research towards global optimization of Mueller matrix polarimeters. A high performance infrared wire-grid polarizer is characterized using the spectropolarimeter. Mueller matrix spectrum measurements on Penicillin and pine pollen are also presented.

  3. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  4. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  5. Ground Truth Sampling and LANDSAT Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.; Gunther, F. J.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the key factor in any accuracy assessment of remote sensing data is the method used for determining the ground truth, independent of the remote sensing data itself. The sampling and accuracy procedures developed for nuclear power plant siting study are described. The purpose of the sampling procedure was to provide data for developing supervised classifications for two study sites and for assessing the accuracy of that and the other procedures used. The purpose of the accuracy assessment was to allow the comparison of the cost and accuracy of various classification procedures as applied to various data types.

  6. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  8. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  9. Accuracy of magnetic energy computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, G.; Démoulin, P.; Pariat, E.; Masson, S.

    2013-05-01

    Context. For magnetically driven events, the magnetic energy of the system is the prime energy reservoir that fuels the dynamical evolution. In the solar context, the free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. A trustworthy estimation of the magnetic energy is therefore needed in three-dimensional (3D) models of the solar atmosphere, e.g., in coronal fields reconstructions or numerical simulations. Aims: The expression of the energy of a system as the sum of its potential energy and its free energy (Thomson's theorem) is strictly valid when the magnetic field is exactly solenoidal. For numerical realizations on a discrete grid, this property may be only approximately fulfilled. We show that the imperfect solenoidality induces terms in the energy that can lead to misinterpreting the amount of free energy present in a magnetic configuration. Methods: We consider a decomposition of the energy in solenoidal and nonsolenoidal parts which allows the unambiguous estimation of the nonsolenoidal contribution to the energy. We apply this decomposition to six typical cases broadly used in solar physics. We quantify to what extent the Thomson theorem is not satisfied when approximately solenoidal fields are used. Results: The quantified errors on energy vary from negligible to significant errors, depending on the extent of the nonsolenoidal component of the field. We identify the main source of errors and analyze the implications of adding a variable amount of divergence to various solenoidal fields. Finally, we present pathological unphysical situations where the estimated free energy would appear to be negative, as found in some previous works, and we identify the source of this error to be the presence of a finite divergence. Conclusions: We provide a method of quantifying the effect of a finite divergence in numerical fields, together with

  10. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  11. Tracking accuracy assessment for concentrator photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Matthew S. H.; Anstey, Ben; Bentley, Roger W.; Georghiou, George E.

    2010-10-01

    The accuracy to which a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system can track the sun is an important parameter that influences a number of measurements that indicate the performance efficiency of the system. This paper presents work carried out into determining the tracking accuracy of a CPV system, and illustrates the steps involved in gaining an understanding of the tracking accuracy. A Trac-Stat SL1 accuracy monitor has been used in the determination of pointing accuracy and has been integrated into the outdoor CPV module test facility at the Photovoltaic Technology Laboratories in Nicosia, Cyprus. Results from this work are provided to demonstrate how important performance indicators may be presented, and how the reliability of results is improved through the deployment of such accuracy monitors. Finally, recommendations on the use of such sensors are provided as a means to improve the interpretation of real outdoor performance.

  12. Fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  13. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes a compilation of attitude determination accuracies attained by a number of satellites supported by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The compilation is designed to assist future mission planners in choosing and placing attitude hardware and selecting the attitude determination algorithms needed to achieve given accuracy requirements. The major goal of the compilation is to indicate realistic accuracies achievable using a given sensor complement based on mission experience. It is expected that the use of actual spacecraft experience will make the study especially useful for mission design. A general description of factors influencing spacecraft attitude accuracy is presented. These factors include determination algorithms, inertial reference unit characteristics, and error sources that can affect measurement accuracy. Possible techniques for mitigating errors are also included. Brief mission descriptions are presented with the attitude accuracies attained, grouped by the sensor pairs used in attitude determination. The accuracies for inactive missions represent a compendium of missions report results, and those for active missions represent measurements of attitude residuals. Both three-axis and spin stabilized missions are included. Special emphasis is given to high-accuracy sensor pairs, such as two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and fine Sun sensor plus FHST. Brief descriptions of sensor design and mode of operation are included. Also included are brief mission descriptions and plots summarizing the attitude accuracy attained using various sensor complements.

  14. Survey methods for assessing land cover map accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nusser, S.M.; Klaas, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing availability of digital photographic materials has fueled efforts by agencies and organizations to generate land cover maps for states, regions, and the United States as a whole. Regardless of the information sources and classification methods used, land cover maps are subject to numerous sources of error. In order to understand the quality of the information contained in these maps, it is desirable to generate statistically valid estimates of accuracy rates describing misclassification errors. We explored a full sample survey framework for creating accuracy assessment study designs that balance statistical and operational considerations in relation to study objectives for a regional assessment of GAP land cover maps. We focused not only on appropriate sample designs and estimation approaches, but on aspects of the data collection process, such as gaining cooperation of land owners and using pixel clusters as an observation unit. The approach was tested in a pilot study to assess the accuracy of Iowa GAP land cover maps. A stratified two-stage cluster sampling design addressed sample size requirements for land covers and the need for geographic spread while minimizing operational effort. Recruitment methods used for private land owners yielded high response rates, minimizing a source of nonresponse error. Collecting data for a 9-pixel cluster centered on the sampled pixel was simple to implement, and provided better information on rarer vegetation classes as well as substantial gains in precision relative to observing data at a single-pixel.

  15. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  16. Accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Guo, Jing

    2010-08-01

    Existed simulation works always emphasize on procedural verification, which put too much focus on the simulation models instead of simulation itself. As a result, researches on improving simulation accuracy are always limited in individual aspects. As accuracy is the key in simulation credibility assessment and fidelity study, it is important to give an all-round discussion of the accuracy of distributed simulation systems themselves. First, the major elements of distributed simulation systems are summarized, which can be used as the specific basis of definition, classification and description of accuracy of distributed simulation systems. In Part 2, the framework of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is presented in a comprehensive way, which makes it more sensible to analyze and assess the uncertainty of distributed simulation systems. The concept of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is divided into 4 other factors and analyzed respectively further more in Part 3. In Part 4, based on the formalized description of framework of accuracy analysis in distributed simulation systems, the practical approach are put forward, which can be applied to study unexpected or inaccurate simulation results. Following this, a real distributed simulation system based on HLA is taken as an example to verify the usefulness of the approach proposed. The results show that the method works well and is applicable in accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems.

  17. Accuracy of Parent Identification of Stuttering Occurrence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Ingham, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinicians rely on parents to provide information regarding the onset and development of stuttering in their own children. The accuracy and reliability of their judgments of stuttering is therefore important and is not well researched. Aim: To investigate the accuracy of parent judgements of stuttering in their own children's speech…

  18. Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yueh-Ting, Ed.; And Others

    The preponderance of scholarly theory and research on stereotypes assumes that they are bad and inaccurate, but understanding stereotype accuracy and inaccuracy is more interesting and complicated than simpleminded accusations of racism or sexism would seem to imply. The selections in this collection explore issues of the accuracy of stereotypes…

  19. Accuracy assessment of GPS satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Ho, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    GPS orbit accuracy is examined using several evaluation procedures. The existence is shown of unmodeled effects which correlate with the eclipsing of the sun. The ability to obtain geodetic results that show an accuracy of 1-2 parts in 10 to the 8th or better has not diminished.

  20. The Accuracy of Gender Stereotypes Regarding Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Sylvia; Finnegan, Andrea

    Given the salience of biological sex, it is not surprising that gender stereotypes are pervasive. To explore the prevalence of such stereotypes, the accuracy of gender stereotyping regarding occupations is presented in this paper. The paper opens with an overview of gender stereotype measures that use self-perceptions as benchmarks of accuracy,…

  1. Individual Differences in Eyewitness Recall Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, James D.; Herringer, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    Presents study results comparing college students' self-evaluation of recall accuracy to actual recall of detail after viewing a crime scenario. Reports that self-reported ability to remember detail correlates with accuracy in memory of specifics. Concludes that people may have a good indication early in the eyewitness situation of whether they…

  2. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  3. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  4. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  5. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  6. Optimizing the geometrical accuracy of curvilinear meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulorge, Thomas; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Remacle, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a method to generate valid high order meshes with optimized geometrical accuracy. The high order meshing procedure starts with a linear mesh, that is subsequently curved without taking care of the validity of the high order elements. An optimization procedure is then used to both untangle invalid elements and optimize the geometrical accuracy of the mesh. Standard measures of the distance between curves are considered to evaluate the geometrical accuracy in planar two-dimensional meshes, but they prove computationally too costly for optimization purposes. A fast estimate of the geometrical accuracy, based on Taylor expansions of the curves, is introduced. An unconstrained optimization procedure based on this estimate is shown to yield significant improvements in the geometrical accuracy of high order meshes, as measured by the standard Hausdorff distance between the geometrical model and the mesh. Several examples illustrate the beneficial impact of this method on CFD solutions, with a particular role of the enhanced mesh boundary smoothness.

  7. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  8. Classification of fuels using multilayer perceptron neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Sérgio T. R.; Wiziack, Nadja K. L.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2009-05-01

    Electrical impedance data obtained with an array of conducting polymer chemical sensors was used by a neural network (ANN) to classify fuel adulteration. Real samples were classified with accuracy greater than 90% in two groups: approved and adulterated.

  9. Classification of fuels using multilayer perceptron neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Sergio T. R.; Wiziack, Nadja K. L.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2009-05-23

    Electrical impedance data obtained with an array of conducting polymer chemical sensors was used by a neural network (ANN) to classify fuel adulteration. Real samples were classified with accuracy greater than 90% in two groups: approved and adulterated.

  10. Fuel composition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes a motor fuel composition. It comprises: a mixture of hydrocarbons in the gasoline boiling range containing a deposit preventing or reducing effective amount of poly(olefin)-N-substituted- carbamate.

  11. Anatomy-aware measurement of segmentation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizhoosh, H. R.; Othman, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying the accuracy of segmentation and manual delineation of organs, tissue types and tumors in medical images is a necessary measurement that suffers from multiple problems. One major shortcoming of all accuracy measures is that they neglect the anatomical significance or relevance of different zones within a given segment. Hence, existing accuracy metrics measure the overlap of a given segment with a ground-truth without any anatomical discrimination inside the segment. For instance, if we understand the rectal wall or urethral sphincter as anatomical zones, then current accuracy measures ignore their significance when they are applied to assess the quality of the prostate gland segments. In this paper, we propose an anatomy-aware measurement scheme for segmentation accuracy of medical images. The idea is to create a "master gold" based on a consensus shape containing not just the outline of the segment but also the outlines of the internal zones if existent or relevant. To apply this new approach to accuracy measurement, we introduce the anatomy-aware extensions of both Dice coefficient and Jaccard index and investigate their effect using 500 synthetic prostate ultrasound images with 20 different segments for each image. We show that through anatomy-sensitive calculation of segmentation accuracy, namely by considering relevant anatomical zones, not only the measurement of individual users can change but also the ranking of users' segmentation skills may require reordering.

  12. The Social Accuracy Model of Interpersonal Perception: Assessing Individual Differences in Perceptive and Expressive Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.

    2010-01-01

    The social accuracy model of interpersonal perception (SAM) is a componential model that estimates perceiver and target effects of different components of accuracy across traits simultaneously. For instance, Jane may be generally accurate in her perceptions of others and thus high in "perceptive accuracy"--the extent to which a particular…

  13. Systematic review of discharge coding accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, E.M.; Rigby, E.; Mamidanna, R.; Bottle, A.; Aylin, P.; Ziprin, P.; Faiz, O.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Routinely collected data sets are increasingly used for research, financial reimbursement and health service planning. High quality data are necessary for reliable analysis. This study aims to assess the published accuracy of routinely collected data sets in Great Britain. Methods Systematic searches of the EMBASE, PUBMED, OVID and Cochrane databases were performed from 1989 to present using defined search terms. Included studies were those that compared routinely collected data sets with case or operative note review and those that compared routinely collected data with clinical registries. Results Thirty-two studies were included. Twenty-five studies compared routinely collected data with case or operation notes. Seven studies compared routinely collected data with clinical registries. The overall median accuracy (routinely collected data sets versus case notes) was 83.2% (IQR: 67.3–92.1%). The median diagnostic accuracy was 80.3% (IQR: 63.3–94.1%) with a median procedure accuracy of 84.2% (IQR: 68.7–88.7%). There was considerable variation in accuracy rates between studies (50.5–97.8%). Since the 2002 introduction of Payment by Results, accuracy has improved in some respects, for example primary diagnoses accuracy has improved from 73.8% (IQR: 59.3–92.1%) to 96.0% (IQR: 89.3–96.3), P= 0.020. Conclusion Accuracy rates are improving. Current levels of reported accuracy suggest that routinely collected data are sufficiently robust to support their use for research and managerial decision-making. PMID:21795302

  14. Geometric accuracy in airborne SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacknell, D.; Quegan, S.; Ward, I. A.; Freeman, A.; Finley, I. P.

    1989-01-01

    Uncorrected across-track motions of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) platform can cause both a severe loss of azimuthal positioning accuracy in, and defocusing of, the resultant SAR image. It is shown how the results of an autofocus procedure can be incorporated in the azimuth processing to produce a fully focused image that is geometrically accurate in azimuth. Range positioning accuracy is also discussed, leading to a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of geometric accuracy. The system considered is an X-band SAR.

  15. High accuracy calibration of the fiber spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhifeng; Dai, Caihong; Wang, Yanfei; Chen, Binhua

    2014-11-01

    Comparing to the big-size scanning spectroradiometer, the compact and convenient fiber spectroradiometer is widely used in various kinds of fields, such as the remote sensing, aerospace monitoring, and solar irradiance measurement. High accuracy calibration should be made before the use, which involves the wavelength accuracy, the background environment noise, the nonlinear effect, the bandwidth, the stray light and et al. The wavelength lamp and tungsten lamp are frequently used to calibration the fiber spectroradiometer. The wavelength difference can be easily reduced through the software or calculation. However, the nonlinear effect and the bandwidth always can affect the measurement accuracy significantly.

  16. Accuracy and consistency of modern elastomeric pumps.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Robyn S; Missair, Andres; Pham, Phung; Gutierrez, Juan F; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blockade has become a popular method of achieving postoperative analgesia for many surgical procedures. The safety and reliability of infusion pumps are dependent on their flow rate accuracy and consistency. Knowledge of pump rate profiles can help physicians determine which infusion pump is best suited for their clinical applications and specific patient population. Several studies have investigated the accuracy of portable infusion pumps. Using methodology similar to that used by Ilfeld et al, we investigated the accuracy and consistency of several current elastomeric pumps. PMID:25140510

  17. Discrimination in measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Was, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge monitoring predicts academic outcomes in many contexts. However, measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy are often incomplete. In the current study, a measure of students’ ability to discriminate known from unknown information as a component of knowledge monitoring was considered. Undergraduate students’ knowledge monitoring accuracy was assessed and used to predict final exam scores in a specific course. It was found that gamma, a measure commonly used as the measure of knowledge monitoring accuracy, accounted for a small, but significant amount of variance in academic performance whereas the discrimination and bias indexes combined to account for a greater amount of variance in academic performance. PMID:25339979

  18. Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hope, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

  19. Optimal design of robot accuracy compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Roth, Z.S. . Robotics Center and Electrical Engineering Dept.); Hamano, Fumio . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The problem of optimal design of robot accuracy compensators is addressed. Robot accuracy compensation requires that actual kinematic parameters of a robot be previously identified. Additive corrections of joint commands, including those at singular configurations, can be computed without solving the inverse kinematics problem for the actual robot. This is done by either the damped least-squares (DLS) algorithm or the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) algorithm, which is a recursive version of the DLS algorithm. The weight matrix in the performance index can be selected to achieve specific objectives, such as emphasizing end-effector's positioning accuracy over orientation accuracy or vice versa, or taking into account proximity to robot joint travel limits and singularity zones. The paper also compares the LQR and the DLS algorithms in terms of computational complexity, storage requirement, and programming convenience. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  20. Accuracy analysis of automatic distortion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolecki, Jakub; Rzonca, Antoni

    2015-06-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the automatic distortion removal from images acquired with non-metric SLR camera equipped with prime lenses. From the photogrammetric point of view the following question arises: is the accuracy of distortion control data provided by the manufacturer for a certain lens model (not item) sufficient in order to achieve demanded accuracy? In order to obtain the reliable answer to the aforementioned problem the two kinds of tests were carried out for three lens models. Firstly the multi-variant camera calibration was conducted using the software providing full accuracy analysis. Secondly the accuracy analysis using check points took place. The check points were measured in the images resampled based on estimated distortion model or in distortion-free images simply acquired in the automatic distortion removal mode. The extensive conclusions regarding application of each calibration approach in practice are given. Finally the rules of applying automatic distortion removal in photogrammetric measurements are suggested.

  1. Empathic Embarrassment Accuracy in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Adler, Noga; Dvash, Jonathan; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2015-06-01

    Empathic accuracy refers to the ability of perceivers to accurately share the emotions of protagonists. Using a novel task assessing embarrassment, the current study sought to compare levels of empathic embarrassment accuracy among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with those of matched controls. To assess empathic embarrassment accuracy, we compared the level of embarrassment experienced by protagonists to the embarrassment felt by participants while watching the protagonists. The results show that while the embarrassment ratings of participants and protagonists were highly matched among controls, individuals with ASD failed to exhibit this matching effect. Furthermore, individuals with ASD rated their embarrassment higher than controls when viewing themselves and protagonists on film, but not while performing the task itself. These findings suggest that individuals with ASD tend to have higher ratings of empathic embarrassment, perhaps due to difficulties in emotion regulation that may account for their impaired empathic accuracy and aberrant social behavior. PMID:25732043

  2. Coding accuracy on the psychophysical scale

    PubMed Central

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons are often reported to adjust their coding accuracy to the stimulus statistics. The observed match is not always perfect and the maximal accuracy does not align with the most frequent stimuli. As an alternative to a physiological explanation we show that the match critically depends on the chosen stimulus measurement scale. More generally, we argue that if we measure the stimulus intensity on the scale which is proportional to the perception intensity, an improved adjustment in the coding accuracy is revealed. The unique feature of stimulus units based on the psychophysical scale is that the coding accuracy can be meaningfully compared for different stimuli intensities, unlike in the standard case of a metric scale. PMID:27021783

  3. Measuring the Accuracy of Diagnostic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swets, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the relative operating characteristic analysis of signal detection theory as a measure of diagnostic accuracy. Reports representative values of this measure in several fields. Compares how problems in these fields are handled. (CW)

  4. Sun-pointing programs and their accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Several sun-pointing programs and their accuracy are described. FORTRAN program listings are given. Program descriptions are given for both Hewlett-Packard (HP-67) and Texas Instruments (TI-59) hand-held calculators.

  5. Nonverbal self-accuracy in interpersonal interaction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith A; Murphy, Nora A; Mast, Marianne Schmid

    2007-12-01

    Four studies measure participants' accuracy in remembering, without forewarning, their own nonverbal behavior after an interpersonal interaction. Self-accuracy for smiling, nodding, gazing, hand gesturing, and self-touching is scored by comparing the participants' recollections with coding based on videotape. Self-accuracy is above chance and of modest magnitude on average. Self-accuracy is greatest for smiling; intermediate for nodding, gazing, and gesturing; and lowest for self-touching. It is higher when participants focus attention away from the self (learning as much as possible about the partner, rearranging the furniture in the room, evaluating the partner, smiling and gazing at the partner) than when participants are more self-focused (getting acquainted, trying to make a good impression on the partner, being evaluated by the partner, engaging in more self-touching). The contributions of cognitive demand and affective state are discussed. PMID:18000102

  6. Accuracy potentials for large space antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The relationships among materials selection, truss design, and manufacturing techniques in the interest of surface accuracies for large space antennas are discussed. Among the antenna configurations considered are: tetrahedral truss, pretensioned truss, and geodesic dome and radial rib structures. Comparisons are made of the accuracy achievable by truss and dome structure types for a wide variety of diameters, focal lengths, and wavelength of radiated signal, taking into account such deforming influences as solar heating-caused thermal transients and thermal gradients.

  7. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  8. Novel application-oriented transient fuel model of a port fuel injection S. I. engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cunlei; Zhang, Jianlong; Yin, Chengliang

    2014-03-01

    Most researches on transient fuel control of port fuel injection S.I. engine are carried out from the perspective of advanced mathematical theories. When it comes to practical control, there exist many limitations although they are more intelligent. In order to overcome the fuel wetting effect of PFI engine, the application-oriented transient fuel control is studied by analyzing the key parameters which are closely related with the engine transient characteristics. Both validity and simplicity are taken into consideration. Based on the fuel wall-wetting theory and popular fuel compensation strategy, short-term transient fuel(STF) and long-term transient fuel(LTF), as well as their individual decay approaches, are introduced. STF is to compensate the drastic fuel film loss caused by sudden throttle change, while the function of LTF is to compensate the fuel film loss by manifold air pressure( p) fluctuation. Each of them has their respective pros and cons. The engine fuel mass and air mass are also calculated for air-fuel ratio(AFR) according to ideal gas state equation and empirical equations. The vehicle acceleration test is designed for model validation. The engine experiences several mild and heavy accelerations corresponding to the gear change during vehicle acceleration. STF and LTF control are triggered reliably. The engine transient fuel control simulation adopts the same inputs as the test to ensure consistency. The logged test data are used to check the model output. The results show that the maximum fuel pulse width(FPW) error reaches 2 ms, and it only occurs under engine heavy acceleration condition. The average FPW error is 0.57 ms. The results of simulation and test are close overall, which indicates the accuracy of steady and transient fuel. The proposed research provides an efficient approach not only suitable for practical engineering application, but also for AFR prediction, fuel consumption calculation, and further studies on emission control.

  9. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  10. Fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaweski, E.F.; Niebylski, L.M.

    1986-09-23

    This patent describes a distillate fuel for indirect injection compression ignition engines containing at least the combination of (i) organic nitrate ignition accelerator, and (ii) an additive selected from the group consisting of alkenyl substituted succinimide, alkenyl substituted succinamide and mixtures thereof. The alkenyl substituent contains about 12-36 carbon atoms, the additive being made by the process comprising (a) isomerizing the double bond of an ..cap alpha..-olefin containing about 12-36 carbon atoms to obtain a mixture of internal olefins, (b) reacting the mixture of internal olefins with maleic acid, anhydride or ester to obtain an intermediate alkenyl substituted succinic acid, anhydride or ester, and (c) reacting the intermediate with ammonia to form a succinimide, succinamide or mixture thereof. The combination is present in an amount sufficient to minimize the coking characteristics of such fuel, especially throttling nozzle coking in the prechambers or swirl chambers of indirect injection compression ignition engines operated on such fuel.

  11. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  12. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  13. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  14. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  15. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996. 24 tabs.

  16. Intelligent and mass vortex flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Ribolini, E.

    1996-02-01

    In nature, Karman vortices are quite common. For instance, they happen when an airstream flows past a mountain, house, pole, tower, or skyscraper, or, more simply, when it blows among branches of a tree. The typical spiral shape of these swirls is invisible because there is no tracing element, such as the clouds in the satellite photo. Also, the observation point is rarely above or below the plane of these classic spiral shapes. Or you can watch the alternating whirlpool train that a river or stream makes behind bridge piers. Regular Karman vortices form downstream of a bluff body along two distinct wakes: the vortices of one wake rotate clockwise, those of the other rotate counterclockwise. Close to the bluff body, the wake distance is always constant and depends on bluff body shape and dimensions. The distance between two adjacent vortices is also constant and independent of fluid parameters such as velocity, pressure, density, and temperature. Vortices interact with their surrounding space by stimulating or choking every other nearby swirl on the verge of birth and development. Two Karman vortices cannot be generated simultaneously, but only one at a time, alternately on the left and right side of the bluff body. The process works just like a fluidic flip-flop. This natural phenomenon can be created artificially by placing a trapezoidal, or similarly symmetrical, bar across the diameter of a pipe section. Parallelism of the internal walls of the pipe and the corners of the trapezoidal bar ensure stability of the separation point of the boundary layer. Consequently, the separation point of each vortex with respect to the bar remains stable and the vortex train is regular. If the fluid speed doubles, creation of swirls doubles while the small volume encompassed by each vortex remains constant. So, by counting the number of swirls passing a fixed point during a defined time interval, one can compute the total passed fluid volume. 3 figs.

  17. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  18. Accuracy of polyp localization at colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Sam A.; Hewett, David G.; Watson, Marcus O.; Kendall, Bradley J.; Hourigan, Luke F.; Holtmann, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurate documentation of lesion localization at the time of colonoscopic polypectomy is important for future surveillance, management of complications such as delayed bleeding, and for guiding surgical resection. We aimed to assess the accuracy of endoscopic localization of polyps during colonoscopy and examine variables that may influence this accuracy. Patients and methods: We conducted a prospective observational study in consecutive patients presenting for elective, outpatient colonoscopy. All procedures were performed by Australian certified colonoscopists. The endoscopic location of each polyp was reported by the colonoscopist at the time of resection and prospectively recorded. Magnetic endoscope imaging was used to determine polyp location, and colonoscopists were blinded to this image. Three experienced colonoscopists, blinded to the endoscopist’s assessment of polyp location, independently scored the magnetic endoscope images to obtain a reference standard for polyp location (Cronbach alpha 0.98). The accuracy of colonoscopist polyp localization using this reference standard was assessed, and colonoscopist, procedural and patient variables affecting accuracy were evaluated. Results: A total of 155 patients were enrolled and 282 polyps were resected in 95 patients by 14 colonoscopists. The overall accuracy of polyp localization was 85 % (95 % confidence interval, CI; 60 – 96 %). Accuracy varied significantly (P < 0.001) by colonic segment: caecum 100 %, ascending 77 % (CI;65 – 90), transverse 84 % (CI;75 – 92), descending 56 % (CI;32 – 81), sigmoid 88 % (CI;79 – 97), rectum 96 % (CI;90 – 101). There were significant differences in accuracy between colonoscopists (P < 0.001), and colonoscopist experience was a significant independent predictor of accuracy (OR 3.5, P = 0.028) after adjustment for patient and procedural variables. Conclusions: Accuracy of

  19. Towards Experimental Accuracy from the First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, O. L.; Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.; Zobov, N. F.

    2013-06-01

    Producing ab initio ro-vibrational energy levels of small, gas-phase molecules with an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} would constitute a significant step forward in theoretical spectroscopy and would place calculated line positions considerably closer to typical experimental accuracy. Such an accuracy has been recently achieved for the H_3^+ molecular ion for line positions up to 17 000 cm ^{-1}. However, since H_3^+ is a two-electron system, the electronic structure methods used in this study are not applicable to larger molecules. A major breakthrough was reported in ref., where an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} was achieved ab initio for seven water isotopologues. Calculated vibrational and rotational energy levels up to 15 000 cm^{-1} and J=25 resulted in a standard deviation of 0.08 cm^{-1} with respect to accurate reference data. As far as line intensities are concerned, we have already achieved for water a typical accuracy of 1% which supersedes average experimental accuracy. Our results are being actively extended along two major directions. First, there are clear indications that our results for water can be improved to an accuracy of the order of 0.01 cm^{-1} by further, detailed ab initio studies. Such level of accuracy would already be competitive with experimental results in some situations. A second, major, direction of study is the extension of such a 0.1 cm^{-1} accuracy to molecules containg more electrons or more than one non-hydrogen atom, or both. As examples of such developments we will present new results for CO, HCN and H_2S, as well as preliminary results for NH_3 and CH_4. O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky and A.G. Csaszar, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A, {370}, 5014-5027 (2012). O.L. Polyansky, R.I. Ovsyannikov, A.A. Kyuberis, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and N.F. Zobov, J. Phys. Chem. A, (in press). L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O.L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011).

  20. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  1. Future Fuel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1991-01-01

    Tough new environmental laws, coupled with fluctuating oil prices, are likely to prompt hundreds of school systems to examine alternative fuels. Literature reviews and interviews with 45 government, education, and industry officials provided data for a comparative analysis of gasoline, diesel, natural gas, methanol, and propane. (MLF)

  2. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The API publication 4312 reports a detailed study carried out by Battelle on the energy balances for five alcohol-fuel-producing technologies. The results indicate that processes for producing ethanol from corn are net consumers of energy while ethanol from sugar cane and methanol from wood are net energy producers.

  3. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  4. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  5. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  6. Activity monitor accuracy in persons using canes.

    PubMed

    Wendland, Deborah Michael; Sprigle, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    The StepWatch activity monitor has not been validated on multiple indoor and outdoor surfaces in a population using ambulation aids. The aims of this technical report are to report on strategies to configure the StepWatch activity monitor on subjects using a cane and to report the accuracy of both leg-mounted and cane-mounted StepWatch devices on people ambulating over different surfaces while using a cane. Sixteen subjects aged 67 to 85 yr (mean 75.6) who regularly use a cane for ambulation participated. StepWatch calibration was performed by adjusting sensitivity and cadence. Following calibration optimization, accuracy was tested on both the leg-mounted and cane-mounted devices on different surfaces, including linoleum, sidewalk, grass, ramp, and stairs. The leg-mounted device had an accuracy of 93.4% across all surfaces, while the cane-mounted device had an aggregate accuracy of 84.7% across all surfaces. Accuracy of the StepWatch on the stairs was significantly less accurate (p < 0.001) when comparing surfaces using repeated measures analysis of variance. When monitoring community mobility, placement of a StepWatch on a person and his/her ambulation aid can accurately document both activity and device use. PMID:23341318

  7. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  8. Decreased interoceptive accuracy following social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Durlik, Caroline; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-04-01

    The need for social affiliation is one of the most important and fundamental human needs. Unsurprisingly, humans display strong negative reactions to social exclusion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of social exclusion on interoceptive accuracy - accuracy in detecting signals arising inside the body - measured with a heartbeat perception task. We manipulated exclusion using Cyberball, a widely used paradigm of a virtual ball-tossing game, with half of the participants being included during the game and the other half of participants being ostracized during the game. Our results indicated that heartbeat perception accuracy decreased in the excluded, but not in the included, participants. We discuss these results in the context of social and physical pain overlap, as well as in relation to internally versus externally oriented attention. PMID:25701592

  9. Affecting speed and accuracy in perception.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2014-12-01

    An account of affective modulations in perceptual speed and accuracy (ASAP: Affecting Speed and Accuracy in Perception) is proposed and tested. This account assumes an emotion-induced inhibitory interaction between parallel channels in the visual system that modulates the onset latencies and response durations of visual signals. By trading off speed and accuracy between channels, this mechanism achieves (a) fast visuo-motor responding to course-grained information, and (b) accurate visuo-attentional selection of fine-grained information. ASAP gives a functional account of previously counterintuitive findings, and may be useful for explaining affective influences in both featural-level single-stimulus tasks and object-level multistimulus tasks. PMID:24853268

  10. Training in timing improves accuracy in golf.

    PubMed

    Libkuman, Terry M; Otani, Hajime; Steger, Neil

    2002-01-01

    In this experiment, the authors investigated the influence of training in timing on performance accuracy in golf. During pre- and posttesting, 40 participants hit golf balls with 4 different clubs in a golf course simulator. The dependent measure was the distance in feet that the ball ended from the target. Between the pre- and posttest, participants in the experimental condition received 10 hr of timing training with an instrument that was designed to train participants to tap their hands and feet in synchrony with target sounds. The participants in the control condition read literature about how to improve their golf swing. The results indicated that the participants in the experimental condition significantly improved their accuracy relative to the participants in the control condition, who did not show any improvement. We concluded that training in timing leads to improvement in accuracy, and that our results have implications for training in golf as well as other complex motor activities. PMID:12038497

  11. Fuel issues for fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Borroni-Bird, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the near-term, infrastructure and energy density concerns dictate that the most appropriate fuel for a light-duty fuel cell vehicle is probably not hydrogen; there are also several concerns with using methanol, the generally accepted most convenient fuel. In order to accelerate fuel cell commercialization it may be necessary to use petroleum-based fuels and on-board fuel processors. In the near-term, this approach may reduce fuel cell system efficiency to a level comparable with advanced diesel engines but in the long-term fuel cells powered by hydrogen should be the most efficient and cleanest of all automotive powertrains.

  12. Fuel cells: A handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, K.; McLarnon, F. R.; Cairns, E. J.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information describing fuel cells that is helpful to scientists, engineers, and technical managers who are not experienced in this technology, as well as to provide an update on the current technical status of the various types of fuel cells. Following the introduction, contents of this handbook are: fuel cell performance variables; phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell; solid oxide fuel cell; alternative fuel cell technologies; fuel cell systems; and concluding remarks.

  13. Final Technical Report: Increasing Prediction Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Hansen, Clifford; Stein, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    PV performance models are used to quantify the value of PV plants in a given location. They combine the performance characteristics of the system, the measured or predicted irradiance and weather at a site, and the system configuration and design into a prediction of the amount of energy that will be produced by a PV system. These predictions must be as accurate as possible in order for finance charges to be minimized. Higher accuracy equals lower project risk. The Increasing Prediction Accuracy project at Sandia focuses on quantifying and reducing uncertainties in PV system performance models.

  14. The accuracy of Halley's cometary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    The accuracy of a scientific computation depends in the main on the data fed in and the analysis method used. This statement is certainly true of Edmond Halley's cometary orbit work. Considering the 420 comets that had been seen before Halley's era of orbital calculation (1695 - 1702) only 24, according to him, had been observed well enough for their orbits to be calculated. Two questions are considered in this paper. Do all the orbits listed by Halley have the same accuracy? and, secondly, how accurate was Halley's method of calculation?

  15. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  16. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  17. Supplemental fuel vapor system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P.M.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes a supplemental fuel system utilizing fuel vapor. It comprises: an internal combustion engine including a carburetor and an intake manifold; a fuel tank provided with air vents; a fuel conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank and in communication with liquid fuel in the tank and a second end connected to the carburetor; the fuel conduit delivering the liquid fuel to the carburetor from the fuel tank; a fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank at a location displaced from contact with the liquid fuel and a second end connected to a carbon canister; a PCV conduit having a first end connected to a pollution control valve and a second end connected to the intake manifold; and, an intermediate fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel vapor conduit and a second end connected to the PCV conduit; wherein the air vents continuously provide air to the tank to mix with the liquid fuel and form fuel vapor. The fuel vapor drawn from the fuel tank by vacuum developed in the intake manifold and flows through the fuel vapor conduit. The intermediate fuel vapor conduit and the intake manifold to combustion chambers of the internal combustion engine so as to supplement fuel delivered to the engine by the fuel conduit. The liquid fuel and the fuel vapor constantly delivered to the engine during normal operation.

  18. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  19. Fuel composition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.H.

    1990-08-07

    This patent describes a concentrate suitable for use in liquid fuels in the gasoline boiling range. It comprises: from about 25 to about 500 ppm by weight of at least one poly(olefin)-N-substituted-carbamate; from about 0 to about 20 ppm by weight of a dehazer; and balance of diluent, boiling in the range from about 50{degrees}C. to about 232{degrees}C.

  20. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, Charles E.; Mar, Alan; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  1. High accuracy in short ISS missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüeger, J. M.

    1986-06-01

    Traditionally Inertial Surveying Systems ( ISS) are used for missions of 30 km to 100 km length. Today, a new type of ISS application is emanating from an increased need for survey control densification in urban areas often in connection with land information systems or cadastral surveys. The accuracy requirements of urban surveys are usually high. The loss in accuracy caused by the coordinate transfer between IMU and ground marks is investigated and an offsetting system based on electronic tacheometers is proposed. An offsetting system based on a Hewlett-Packard HP 3820A electronic tacheometer has been tested in Sydney (Australia) in connection with a vehicle mounted LITTON Auto-Surveyor System II. On missions over 750 m ( 8 stations, 25 minutes duration, 3.5 minute ZUPT intervals, mean offset distances 9 metres) accuracies of 37 mm (one sigma) in position and 8 mm in elevation were achieved. Some improvements to the LITTON Auto-Surveyor System II are suggested which would improve the accuracies even further.

  2. Direct Behavior Rating: Considerations for Rater Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavior rating (DBR) offers users a flexible, feasible method for the collection of behavioral data. Previous research has supported the validity of using DBR to rate three target behaviors: academic engagement, disruptive behavior, and compliance. However, the effect of the base rate of behavior on rater accuracy has not been established.…

  3. Vowel Space Characteristics and Vowel Identification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between vowel production characteristics and intelligibility. Method: Acoustic characteristics of 10 vowels produced by 45 men and 48 women from the J. M. Hillenbrand, L. A. Getty, M. J. Clark, and K. Wheeler (1995) study were examined and compared with identification accuracy. Global (mean f0, F1, and F2;…

  4. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  5. Accuracy Assessment for AG500, Electromagnetic Articulograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Mefferd, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the AG500 (Carstens Medizinelectronik, Lenglern, Germany), an electromagnetic device developed recently to register articulatory movements in three dimensions. This technology seems to have unprecedented capabilities to provide rich information about time-varying…

  6. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  7. Navigation Accuracy Guidelines for Orbital Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2004-01-01

    Some simple guidelines based on the accuracy in determining a satellite formation s semi-major axis differences are useful in making preliminary assessments of the navigation accuracy needed to support such missions. These guidelines are valid for any elliptical orbit, regardless of eccentricity. Although maneuvers required for formation establishment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping require accurate prediction of the state estimate to the maneuver time, and hence are directly affected by errors in all the orbital elements, experience has shown that determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. Furthermore, any differences among the member s semi-major axes are undesirable for a satellite formation, since it will lead to differential along-track drift due to period differences. Since inevitable navigation errors prevent these differences from ever being zero, one may use the guidelines this paper presents to determine how much drift will result from a given relative navigation accuracy, or conversely what navigation accuracy is required to limit drift to a given rate. Since the guidelines do not account for non-two-body perturbations, they may be viewed as useful preliminary design tools, rather than as the basis for mission navigation requirements, which should be based on detailed analysis of the mission configuration, including all relevant sources of uncertainty.

  8. Accuracy of Information Processing under Focused Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    This paper reports the results of an experiment on the accuracy of information processing during attention focused arousal under two conditions: single estimation and double estimation. The attention of 187 college students was focused by a task requiring high level competition for a monetary prize ($10) under severely limited time conditions. The…

  9. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  10. Accuracy of References in Five Entomology Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristof, Cynthia

    ln this paper, the bibliographical references in five core entomology journals are examined for citation accuracy in order to determine if the error rates are similar. Every reference printed in each journal's first issue of 1992 was examined, and these were compared to the original (cited) publications, if possible, in order to determine the…

  11. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  12. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement. PMID:27044032

  13. Measuring Tracking Accuracy of CCD Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, R. H.; Dennison, E. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tracking accuracy and resolution of charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging arrays measured by instrument originally developed for measuring performance of star-tracking telescope. Operates by projecting one or more artifical star images on surface of CCD array, moving stars in controlled patterns, and comparing star locations computed from CCD outputs with those calculated from step coordinates of micropositioner.

  14. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  15. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  16. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  17. The impact of accuracy motivation on interpretation, comparison, and correction processes: accuracy x knowledge accessibility effects.

    PubMed

    Stapel, D A; Koomen, W; Zeelenberg, M

    1998-04-01

    Four studies provide evidence for the notion that there may be boundaries to the extent to which accuracy motivation may help perceivers to escape the influence of fortuitously activated information. Specifically, although accuracy motivations may eliminate assimilative accessibility effects, they are less likely to eliminate contrastive accessibility effects. It was found that the occurrence of different types of contrast effects (comparison and correction) was not significantly affected by participants' accuracy motivations. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanisms instigated by accuracy motivations differ from those ignited by correction instructions: Accuracy motivations attenuate assimilation effects because perceivers add target interpretations to the one suggested by primed information. Conversely, it was found that correction instructions yield contrast and prompt respondents to remove the priming event's influence from their reaction to the target. PMID:9569650

  18. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  19. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  20. Fuel densifier converts biomass into fuel cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    A new cost-effective means to produce clean-burning and low cost commercial and industrial fuel is being introduced by Columbia Fuel Densification Corp., Phoenix. The Columbia Commercial Hydraulic Fuel Densifier converts raw biomass materials such as wood chips, paper, peat moss and rice hulls into densified fuel cubes. The densifier is mobile and its operation is briefly outlined.

  1. Diesel Surrogate Fuels for Engine Testing and Chemical-Kinetic Modeling: Compositions and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Charles J.; Cannella, William J.; Bays, J. Timothy; Bruno, Thomas J.; DeFabio, Kathy; Dettman, Heather D.; Gieleciak, Rafal M.; Huber, Marcia L.; Kweon, Chol-Bum; McConnell, Steven S.; Pitz, William J.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objectives of this work were to formulate, blend, and characterize a set of four ultralow-sulfur diesel surrogate fuels in quantities sufficient to enable their study in single-cylinder-engine and combustion-vessel experiments. The surrogate fuels feature increasing levels of compositional accuracy (i.e., increasing exactness in matching hydrocarbon structural characteristics) relative to the single target diesel fuel upon which the surrogate fuels are based. This approach was taken to assist in determining the minimum level of surrogate-fuel compositional accuracy that is required to adequately emulate the performance characteristics of the target fuel under different combustion modes. For each of the four surrogate fuels, an approximately 30 L batch was blended, and a number of the physical and chemical properties were measured. This work documents the surrogate-fuel creation process and the results of the property measurements. PMID:27330248

  2. Positional Accuracy Assessment of Googleearth in Riyadh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf; Algarni, Dafer

    2014-06-01

    Google Earth is a virtual globe, map and geographical information program that is controlled by Google corporation. It maps the Earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS 3D globe. With millions of users all around the globe, GoogleEarth® has become the ultimate source of spatial data and information for private and public decision-support systems besides many types and forms of social interactions. Many users mostly in developing countries are also using it for surveying applications, the matter that raises questions about the positional accuracy of the Google Earth program. This research presents a small-scale assessment study of the positional accuracy of GoogleEarth® Imagery in Riyadh; capital of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The results show that the RMSE of the GoogleEarth imagery is 2.18 m and 1.51 m for the horizontal and height coordinates respectively.

  3. Accuracy control in Monte Carlo radiative calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almazan, P. Planas

    1993-01-01

    The general accuracy law that rules the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing algorithms used commonly for the calculation of the radiative entities in the thermal analysis of spacecraft are presented. These entities involve transfer of radiative energy either from a single source to a target (e.g., the configuration factors). or from several sources to a target (e.g., the absorbed heat fluxes). In fact, the former is just a particular case of the latter. The accuracy model is later applied to the calculation of some specific radiative entities. Furthermore, some issues related to the implementation of such a model in a software tool are discussed. Although only the relative error is considered through the discussion, similar results can be derived for the absolute error.

  4. Do saccharide doped PAGAT dosimeters increase accuracy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, B.; Skyt, P. S.; Holloway, L.; Hill, R.; Sankar, A.; De Deene, Y.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the dosimetric accuracy of normoxic polyacrylamide gelatin (PAGAT) gel dosimeters, the addition of saccharides (glucose and sucrose) has been suggested. An increase in R2-response sensitivity upon irradiation will result in smaller uncertainties in the derived dose if all other uncertainties are conserved. However, temperature variations during the magnetic resonance scanning of polymer gels result in one of the highest contributions to dosimetric uncertainties. The purpose of this project was to study the dose sensitivity against the temperature sensitivity. The overall dose uncertainty of PAGAT gel dosimeters with different concentrations of saccharides (0, 10 and 20%) was investigated. For high concentrations of glucose or sucrose, a clear improvement of the dose sensitivity was observed. For doses up to 6 Gy, the overall dose uncertainty was reduced up to 0.3 Gy for all saccharide loaded gels compared to PAGAT gel. Higher concentrations of glucose and sucrose deteriorate the accuracy of PAGAT dosimeters for doses above 9 Gy.

  5. Accuracy of forecasts in strategic intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, David R.; Barnes, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of 1,514 strategic intelligence forecasts abstracted from intelligence reports was assessed. The results show that both discrimination and calibration of forecasts was very good. Discrimination was better for senior (versus junior) analysts and for easier (versus harder) forecasts. Miscalibration was mainly due to underconfidence such that analysts assigned more uncertainty than needed given their high level of discrimination. Underconfidence was more pronounced for harder (versus easier) forecasts and for forecasts deemed more (versus less) important for policy decision making. Despite the observed underconfidence, there was a paucity of forecasts in the least informative 0.4–0.6 probability range. Recalibrating the forecasts substantially reduced underconfidence. The findings offer cause for tempered optimism about the accuracy of strategic intelligence forecasts and indicate that intelligence producers aim to promote informativeness while avoiding overstatement. PMID:25024176

  6. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research. PMID:20858782

  7. Improvement in Rayleigh Scattering Measurement Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous velocity, density, and temperature measurements. The Fabry-Perot interferometer or etalon is a commonly employed instrument for resolving the spectrum of molecular Rayleigh scattered light for the purpose of evaluating these flow properties. This paper investigates the use of an acousto-optic frequency shifting device to improve measurement accuracy in Rayleigh scattering experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The frequency shifting device is used as a means of shifting the incident or reference laser frequency by 1100 MHz to avoid overlap of the Rayleigh and reference signal peaks in the interference pattern used to obtain the velocity, density, and temperature measurements, and also to calibrate the free spectral range of the Fabry-Perot etalon. The measurement accuracy improvement is evaluated by comparison of Rayleigh scattering measurements acquired with and without shifting of the reference signal frequency in a 10 mm diameter subsonic nozzle flow.

  8. Simultaneous nuclear data target accuracy study for innovative fast reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL; CEA Cadarache

    2007-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the major outcomes of a study conducted within a Nuclear Energy Agency Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (NEA WPEC) initiative aiming to investigate data needs for future innovative nuclear systems, to quantify them and to propose a strategy to meet them. Within the NEA WPEC Subgroup 26 an uncertainty assessment has been carried out using covariance data recently processed by joint efforts of several US and European Labs. In general, the uncertainty analysis shows that for the wide selection of fast reactor concepts considered, the present integral parameters uncertainties resulting from the assumed uncertainties on nuclear data are probably acceptable in the early phases of design feasibility studies. However, in the successive phase of preliminary conceptual designs and in later design phases of selected reactor and fuel cycle concepts, there will be the need for improved data and methods, in order to reduce margins, both for economic and safety reasons. It is then important to define as soon as possible priority issues, i.e. which are the nuclear data (isotope, reaction type, energy range) that need improvement, in order to quantify target accuracies and to select a strategy to meet the requirements needed (e.g. by some selected new differential measurements and by the use of integral experiments). In this context one should account for the wide range of high accuracy integral experiments already performed and available in national or, better, international data basis, in order to indicate new integral experiments that will be needed to account for new requirements due to innovative design features, and to provide the necessary full integral data base to be used for validation of the design simulation tools.

  9. Marginal accuracy of temporary composite crowns.

    PubMed

    Tjan, A H; Tjan, A H; Grant, B E

    1987-10-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to quantitatively compare the marginal adaptation of temporary crowns made from Protemp material with those made from Scutan, Provisional, and Trim materials. A direct technique was used to make temporary restorations on prepared teeth with an impression as a matrix. Protem, Trim, and Provisional materials produced temporary crowns of comparable accuracy. Crowns made from Scutan material had open margins. PMID:2959770

  10. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  11. Measurement Accuracy Limitation Analysis on Synchrophasors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiecheng; Zhan, Lingwei; Liu, Yilu; Qi, Hairong; Gracia, Jose R; Ewing, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the theoretical accuracy limitation of synchrophasors measurements on phase angle and frequency of the power grid. Factors that cause the measurement error are analyzed, including error sources in the instruments and in the power grid signal. Different scenarios of these factors are evaluated according to the normal operation status of power grid measurement. Based on the evaluation and simulation, the errors of phase angle and frequency caused by each factor are calculated and discussed.

  12. Gravitational model effects on ICBM accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. T.

    This paper describes methods used to assess the contribution of ICBM gravitational model errors to targeting accuracy. The evolution of gravitational model complexity, in both format and data base development, is summarized. Error analysis methods associated with six identified error sources are presented: geodetic coordinate errors; spherical harmonic potential function errors of commission and omission; and surface gravity anomaly errors of reduction, representation, and omission.

  13. Hydrogen Fuel Capability Added to Combustor Flametube Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfield, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Facility capabilities have been expanded at Test Cell 23, Research Combustor Lab (RCL23) at the NASA Glenn Research Center, with a new gaseous hydrogen fuel system. The purpose of this facility is to test a variety of fuel nozzle and flameholder hardware configurations for use in aircraft combustors. Previously, this facility only had jet fuel available to perform these various combustor flametube tests. The new hydrogen fuel system will support the testing and development of aircraft combustors with zero carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Research information generated from this test rig includes combustor emissions and performance data via gas sampling probes and emissions measuring equipment. The new gaseous hydrogen system is being supplied from a 70 000-standard-ft3 tube trailer at flow rates up to 0.05 lb/s (maximum). The hydrogen supply pressure is regulated, and the flow is controlled with a -in. remotely operated globe valve. Both a calibrated subsonic venturi and a coriolis mass flowmeter are used to measure flow. Safety concerns required the placement of all hydrogen connections within purge boxes, each of which contains a small nitrogen flow that is vented past a hydrogen detector. If any hydrogen leaks occur, the hydrogen detectors alert the operators and automatically safe the facility. Facility upgrades and modifications were also performed on other fluids systems, including the nitrogen gas, cooling water, and air systems. RCL23 can provide nonvitiated heated air to the research combustor, up to 350 psig at 1200 F and 3.0 lb/s. Significant modernization of the facility control systems and the data acquisition systems was completed. A flexible control architecture was installed that allows quick changes of research configurations. The labor-intensive hardware interface has been removed and changed to a software-based system. In addition, the operation of this facility has been greatly enhanced with new software programming and graphic operator interface

  14. Accuracy of pointing a binaural listening array.

    PubMed

    Letowski, T R; Ricard, G L; Kalb, J T; Mermagen, T J; Amrein, K M

    1997-12-01

    We measured the accuracy with which sounds heard over a binaural, end-fire array could be located when the angular separation of the array's two arms was varied. Each individual arm contained nine cardioid electret microphones, the responses of which were combined to produce a unidirectional, band-limited pattern of sensitivity. We assessed the desirable angular separation of these arms by measuring the accuracy with which listeners could point to the source of a target sound presented against high-level background noise. We employed array separations of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees, and signal-to-noise ratios of +5, -5, and -15 dB. Pointing accuracy was best for a separation of 60 degrees; this performance was indistinguishable from pointing during unaided listening conditions. In addition, the processing of the array was modeled to depict the information that was available for localization. The model indicates that highly directional binaural arrays can be expected to support accurate localization of sources of sound only near the axis of the array. Wider enhanced listening angles may be possible if the forward coverage of the sensor system is made less directional and more similar to that of human listeners. PMID:9473975

  15. Accuracy test procedure for image evaluation techniques.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A

    1968-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to determine the accuracy of image evaluation techniques. In the procedure, a target having orthogonal test arrays is photographed with a high quality optical system. During the exposure, the target is subjected to horizontal linear image motion. The modulation transfer functions of the images in the horizontal and vertical directions are obtained using the evaluation technique. Since all other degradations are symmetrical, the quotient of the two modulation transfer functions represents the modulation transfer function of the experimentally induced linear image motion. In an accurate experiment, any discrepancy between the experimental determination and the true value is due to inaccuracy in the image evaluation technique. The procedure was used to test the Perkin-Elmer automated edge gradient analysis technique over the spatial frequency range of 0-200 c/m. This experiment demonstrated that the edge gradient technique is accurate over this region and that the testing procedure can be controlled with the desired accuracy. Similarly, the test procedure can be used to determine the accuracy of other image evaluation techniques. PMID:20062421

  16. Determination of GPS orbits to submeter accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W. I.; Lichten, S. M.; Katsigris, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    Orbits for satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS) were determined with submeter accuracy. Tests used to assess orbital accuracy include orbit comparisons from independent data sets, orbit prediction, ground baseline determination, and formal errors. One satellite tracked 8 hours each day shows rms error below 1 m even when predicted more than 3 days outside of a 1-week data arc. Differential tracking of the GPS satellites in high Earth orbit provides a powerful relative positioning capability, even when a relatively small continental U.S. fiducial tracking network is used with less than one-third of the full GPS constellation. To demonstrate this capability, baselines of up to 2000 km in North America were also determined with the GPS orbits. The 2000 km baselines show rms daily repeatability of 0.3 to 2 parts in 10 to the 8th power and agree with very long base interferometry (VLBI) solutions at the level of 1.5 parts in 10 to the 8th power. This GPS demonstration provides an opportunity to test different techniques for high-accuracy orbit determination for high Earth orbiters. The best GPS orbit strategies included data arcs of at least 1 week, process noise models for tropospheric fluctuations, estimation of GPS solar pressure coefficients, and combine processing of GPS carrier phase and pseudorange data. For data arc of 2 weeks, constrained process noise models for GPS dynamic parameters significantly improved the situation.

  17. Precision standoff guidance antenna accuracy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, F. H.; Landesberg, M. M.

    1981-02-01

    This report presents a summary of work done to determine the inherent angular accuracy achievable with the guidance and control precision standoff guidance antenna. The antenna is a critical element in the anti-jam single station guidance program since its characteristics can limit the intrinsic location guidance accuracy. It was important to determine the extent to which high ratio beamsplitting results could be achieved repeatedly and what issues were involved with calibrating the antenna. The antenna accuracy has been found to be on the order of 0.006 deg. through the use of a straightforward lookup table concept. This corresponds to a cross range error of 21 m at a range of 200 km. This figure includes both pointing errors and off-axis estimation errors. It was found that the antenna off-boresight calibration is adequately represented by a straight line for each position plus a lookup table for pointing errors relative to broadside. In the event recalibration is required, it was found that only 1% of the model would need to be corrected.

  18. A Family of Rater Accuracy Models.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Edward W; Jiao, Hong; Song, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Engelhard (1996) proposed a rater accuracy model (RAM) as a means of evaluating rater accuracy in rating data, but very little research exists to determine the efficacy of that model. The RAM requires a transformation of the raw score data to accuracy measures by comparing rater-assigned scores to true scores. Indices computed based on raw scores also exist for measuring rater effects, but these indices ignore deviations of rater-assigned scores from true scores. This paper demonstrates the efficacy of two versions of the RAM (based on dichotomized and polytomized deviations of rater-assigned scores from true scores) to two versions of raw score rater effect models (i.e., a Rasch partial credit model, PCM, and a Rasch rating scale model, RSM). Simulated data are used to demonstrate the efficacy with which these four models detect and differentiate three rater effects: severity, centrality, and inaccuracy. Results indicate that the RAMs are able to detect, but not differentiate, rater severity and inaccuracy, but not rater centrality. The PCM and RSM, on the other hand, are able to both detect and differentiate all three of these rater effects. However, the RSM and PCM do not take into account true scores and may, therefore, be misleading when pervasive trends exist in the rater-assigned data. PMID:26075664

  19. Speed/accuracy tradeoff in force perception.

    PubMed

    Rank, Markus; Di Luca, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    There is a well-known tradeoff between speed and accuracy in judgments made under uncertainty. Diffusion models have been proposed to capture the increase in response time for more uncertain decisions and the change in performance due to a prioritization of speed or accuracy in the responses. Experimental paradigms have been confined to the visual modality and model analysis have mostly used quantile-probability (QP) plots--response probability as a function of quantized RTs. Here, we extend diffusion modeling to haptics and test a novel type of analysis for judging model fitting. Participants classified force stimuli applied to the hand as "high" or "low." Data in QP plots indicate that the diffusion model captures well the overall pattern of responses in conditions where either speed or accuracy has been prioritized. To further the analysis, we compute just noticeable difference (JND) values separately for responses delivered with different RTs--we define these plots as JND quantile. The pattern of results evidences that slower responses lead to better force discrimination up to a plateau that is unaffected by prioritization instructions. Instead, the diffusion model predicts two well-separated plateaus depending on the condition. We propose that analyzing the relation between JNDs and response time should be considered in the evaluation of the diffusion model beyond the haptic modality, thus including vision. PMID:25867512

  20. Solving Nonlinear Euler Equations with Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program that efficiently solves the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations in two dimensions to an arbitrarily high order of accuracy has been developed. The program implements a modified form of a prior arbitrary- accuracy simulation algorithm that is a member of the class of algorithms known in the art as modified expansion solution approximation (MESA) schemes. Whereas millions of lines of code were needed to implement the prior MESA algorithm, it is possible to implement the present MESA algorithm by use of one or a few pages of Fortran code, the exact amount depending on the specific application. The ability to solve the Euler equations to arbitrarily high accuracy is especially beneficial in simulations of aeroacoustic effects in settings in which fully nonlinear behavior is expected - for example, at stagnation points of fan blades, where linearizing assumptions break down. At these locations, it is necessary to solve the full nonlinear Euler equations, and inasmuch as the acoustical energy is of the order of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude below that of the mean flow, it is necessary to achieve an overall fractional error of less than 10-6 in order to faithfully simulate entropy, vortical, and acoustical waves.

  1. Ground Truth Accuracy Tests of GPS Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosegui, P.; Oberlander, D. J.; Davis, J. L.; Baena, R.; Ekstrom, G.

    2005-12-01

    As the precision of GPS determinations of site position continues to improve the detection of smaller and faster geophysical signals becomes possible. However, lack of independent measurements of these signals often precludes an assessment of the accuracy of such GPS position determinations. This may be particularly true for high-rate GPS applications. We have built an apparatus to assess the accuracy of GPS position determinations for high-rate applications, in particular the application known as "GPS seismology." The apparatus consists of a bidirectional, single-axis positioning table coupled to a digitally controlled stepping motor. The motor, in turn, is connected to a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip that synchronously sequences through real historical earthquake profiles stored in Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory's (EPROM). A GPS antenna attached to this positioning table undergoes the simulated seismic motions of the Earth's surface while collecting high-rate GPS data. Analysis of the time-dependent position estimates can then be compared to the "ground truth," and the resultant GPS error spectrum can be measured. We have made extensive measurements with this system while inducing simulated seismic motions either in the horizontal plane or the vertical axis. A second stationary GPS antenna at a distance of several meters was simultaneously collecting high-rate (5 Hz) GPS data. We will present the calibration of this system, describe the GPS observations and data analysis, and assess the accuracy of GPS for high-rate geophysical applications and natural hazards mitigation.

  2. Piezoresistive position microsensors with ppm-accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrov, Vladimir; Shulev, Assen; Stavreva, Galina; Todorov, Vencislav

    2015-05-01

    In this article, the relation between position accuracy and the number of simultaneously measured values, such as coordinates, has been analyzed. Based on this, a conceptual layout of MEMS devices (microsensors) for multidimensional position monitoring comprising a single anchored and a single actuated part has been developed. Both parts are connected with a plurality of micromechanical flexures, and each flexure includes position detecting cantilevers. Microsensors having detecting cantilevers oriented in X and Y direction have been designed and prototyped. Experimentally measured results at characterization of 1D, 2D and 3D position microsensors are reported as well. Exploiting different flexure layouts, a travel range between 50μm and 1.8mm and sensors' sensitivity in the range between 30μV/μm and 5mV/μm@ 1V DC supply voltage have been demonstrated. A method for accurate calculation of all three Cartesian coordinates, based on measurement of at least three microsensors' signals has also been described. The analyses of experimental results prove the capability of position monitoring with ppm-(part per million) accuracy. The technology for fabrication of MEMS devices with sidewall embedded piezoresistors removes restrictions in strong improvement of their usability for position sensing with a high accuracy. The present study is, also a part of a common strategy for developing a novel MEMS-based platform for simultaneous accurate measurement of various physical values when they are transduced to a change of position.

  3. Speed versus accuracy in collective decision making.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Nigel R; Dornhaus, Anna; Fitzsimmons, Jon P; Stevens, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a speed versus accuracy trade-off in collective decision making. House-hunting ant colonies choose a new nest more quickly in harsh conditions than in benign ones and are less discriminating. The errors that occur in a harsh environment are errors of judgement not errors of omission because the colonies have discovered all of the alternative nests before they initiate an emigration. Leptothorax albipennis ants use quorum sensing in their house hunting. They only accept a nest, and begin rapidly recruiting members of their colony, when they find within it a sufficient number of their nest-mates. Here we show that these ants can lower their quorum thresholds between benign and harsh conditions to adjust their speed-accuracy trade-off. Indeed, in harsh conditions these ants rely much more on individual decision making than collective decision making. Our findings show that these ants actively choose to take their time over judgements and employ collective decision making in benign conditions when accuracy is more important than speed. PMID:14667335

  4. On the Accuracy of Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Rabier, Charles-Elie; Barre, Philippe; Asp, Torben; Charmet, Gilles; Mangin, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Genomic selection is focused on prediction of breeding values of selection candidates by means of high density of markers. It relies on the assumption that all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) tend to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with at least one marker. In this context, we present theoretical results regarding the accuracy of genomic selection, i.e., the correlation between predicted and true breeding values. Typically, for individuals (so-called test individuals), breeding values are predicted by means of markers, using marker effects estimated by fitting a ridge regression model to a set of training individuals. We present a theoretical expression for the accuracy; this expression is suitable for any configurations of LD between QTLs and markers. We also introduce a new accuracy proxy that is free of the QTL parameters and easily computable; it outperforms the proxies suggested in the literature, in particular, those based on an estimated effective number of independent loci (Me). The theoretical formula, the new proxy, and existing proxies were compared for simulated data, and the results point to the validity of our approach. The calculations were also illustrated on a new perennial ryegrass set (367 individuals) genotyped for 24,957 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this case, most of the proxies studied yielded similar results because of the lack of markers for coverage of the entire genome (2.7 Gb). PMID:27322178

  5. 146. FUEL LINE TO SKID 2 (FUEL LOADER) IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. FUEL LINE TO SKID 2 (FUEL LOADER) IN FUEL CONTROL ROOM (215), LSB (BLDG. 751). LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER ON RIGHT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. Aviation fuels outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momenthy, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Options for satisfying the future demand for commercial jet fuels are analyzed. It is concluded that the most effective means to this end are to attract more refiners to the jet fuel market and encourage development of processes to convert oil shale and coal to transportation fuels. Furthermore, changing the U.S. refineries fuel specification would not significantly alter jet fuel availability.

  7. 100% Classification Accuracy Considered Harmful: The Normalized Information Transfer Factor Explains the Accuracy Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J.; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to “cheat” using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  8. 100% classification accuracy considered harmful: the normalized information transfer factor explains the accuracy paradox.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to "cheat" using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  9. Intelligence: The Speed and Accuracy Tradeoff in High Aptitude Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajoie, Suzanne P.; Shore, Bruce M.

    1986-01-01

    The relative contributions of mental speed and accuracy to Primary Mental Ability (PMA) IQ prediction were studied in 52 high ability grade 10 students. Both speed and accuracy independently predicted IQ, but not speed over and above accuracy. Accuracy was demonstrated to be universally advantageous in IQ performance, but speed varied according to…

  10. Carburetor fuel discharge assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, R.M.

    1993-06-29

    An improved carburetor for use on an internal combustion engine is described, the carburetor having an airflow passage and fuel discharge means for admitting fuel into the airflow passage for mixing the fuel with air flowing in the airflow passage to form a fuel/air mixture to be supplied to the combustion chamber(s) of the engine, the fuel discharge means including a fuel discharge assembly which comprises a hollow discharge tube and fuel supplying means connected to the discharge tube for admitting fuel into the interior of the discharge tube, wherein the discharge tube has a longitudinal internal bore in fluid communication with the fuel supplying means, wherein the internal bore extends between an inlet that is closest to the fuel supplying means and an outlet that is furthest from the fuel supplying means with the outlet of the bore being located within the airflow passage of the carburetor to supply fuel into this passage after the fuel passes from the fuel supplying means through the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the improvement relates to the fuel discharge assembly and comprises: a hollow fuel flow guide tube telescopically received inside the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the fuel flow guide tube extends from approximately the location of the inlet of the bore up at least a portion of the length of the bore towards the outlet of the bore to conduct fuel from the fuel supplying means into the bore of the discharge tube.

  11. Estimation of forest fuel load from radar remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saatchi, S.; Halligan, K.; Despain, D.G.; Crabtree, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding fire behavior characteristics and planning for fire management require maps showing the distribution of wildfire fuel loads at medium to fine spatial resolution across large landscapes. Radar sensors from airborne or spaceborne platforms have the potential of providing quantitative information about the forest structure and biomass components that can be readily translated to meaningful fuel load estimates for fire management. In this paper, we used multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired over a large area of the Yellowstone National Park by the Airborne SAR sensor to estimate the distribution of forest biomass and canopy fuel loads. Semiempirical algorithms were developed to estimate crown and stem biomass and three major fuel load parameters, namely: 1) canopy fuel weight; 2) canopy bulk density; and 3) foliage moisture content. These estimates, when compared directly to measurements made at plot and stand levels, provided more than 70% accuracy and, when partitioned into fuel load classes, provided more than 85% accuracy. Specifically, the radar-generated fuel parameters were in good agreement with the field-based fuel measurements, resulting in coefficients of determination of R2 = 85 for the canopy fuel weight, R 2 = 0.84 for canopy bulk density, and R2 =0.78 for the foliage biomass. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  12. Estimation of Forest Fuel Load from Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sassan; Despain, Don G.; Halligan, Kerry; Crabtree, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Understanding fire behavior characteristics and planning for fire management require maps showing the distribution of wildfire fuel loads at medium to fine spatial resolution across large landscapes. Radar sensors from airborne or spaceborne platforms have the potential of providing quantitative information about the forest structure and biomass components that can be readily translated to meaningful fuel load estimates for fire management. In this paper, we used multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery acquired over a large area of the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) by the AIRSAR sensor, to estimate the distribution of forest biomass and canopy fuel loads. Semi-empirical algorithms were developed to estimate crown and stem biomass and three major fuel load parameters, canopy fuel weight, canopy bulk density, and foliage moisture content. These estimates when compared directly to measurements made at plot and stand levels, provided more than 70% accuracy, and when partitioned into fuel load classes, provided more than 85% accuracy. Specifically, the radar generated fuel parameters were in good agreement with the field-based fuel measurements, resulting in coefficients of determination of R(sup 2) = 85 for the canopy fuel weight, R(sup 2)=.84 for canopy bulk density and R(sup 2) = 0.78 for the foliage biomass.

  13. Fuel processors for fuel cell APU applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aicher, T.; Lenz, B.; Gschnell, F.; Groos, U.; Federici, F.; Caprile, L.; Parodi, L.

    The conversion of liquid hydrocarbons to a hydrogen rich product gas is a central process step in fuel processors for auxiliary power units (APUs) for vehicles of all kinds. The selection of the reforming process depends on the fuel and the type of the fuel cell. For vehicle power trains, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline, kerosene, and diesel are utilized and, therefore, they will also be the fuel for the respective APU systems. The fuel cells commonly envisioned for mobile APU applications are molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Since high-temperature fuel cells, e.g. MCFCs or SOFCs, can be supplied with a feed gas that contains carbon monoxide (CO) their fuel processor does not require reactors for CO reduction and removal. For PEMFCs on the other hand, CO concentrations in the feed gas must not exceed 50 ppm, better 20 ppm, which requires additional reactors downstream of the reforming reactor. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the fuel processor development for APU applications and APU system developments. Furthermore, it will present the latest developments at Fraunhofer ISE regarding fuel processors for high-temperature fuel cell APU systems on board of ships and aircrafts.

  14. Fuel cells: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  15. PHAT: PHoto-z Accuracy Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Arnouts, S.; Capak, P.; Moustakas, L. A.; Wolf, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Assef, R. J.; Banerji, M.; Benítez, N.; Brammer, G. B.; Budavári, T.; Carliles, S.; Coe, D.; Dahlen, T.; Feldmann, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gillis, B.; Ilbert, O.; Kotulla, R.; Lahav, O.; Li, I. H.; Miralles, J.-M.; Purger, N.; Schmidt, S.; Singal, J.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Photometric redshifts (photo-z's) have become an essential tool in extragalactic astronomy. Many current and upcoming observing programmes require great accuracy of photo-z's to reach their scientific goals. Aims: Here we introduce PHAT, the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing programme, an international initiative to test and compare different methods of photo-z estimation. Methods: Two different test environments are set up, one (PHAT0) based on simulations to test the basic functionality of the different photo-z codes, and another one (PHAT1) based on data from the GOODS survey including 18-band photometry and ~2000 spectroscopic redshifts. Results: The accuracy of the different methods is expressed and ranked by the global photo-z bias, scatter, and outlier rates. While most methods agree very well on PHAT0 there are differences in the handling of the Lyman-α forest for higher redshifts. Furthermore, different methods produce photo-z scatters that can differ by up to a factor of two even in this idealised case. A larger spread in accuracy is found for PHAT1. Few methods benefit from the addition of mid-IR photometry. The accuracy of the other methods is unaffected or suffers when IRAC data are included. Remaining biases and systematic effects can be explained by shortcomings in the different template sets (especially in the mid-IR) and the use of priors on the one hand and an insufficient training set on the other hand. Some strategies to overcome these problems are identified by comparing the methods in detail. Scatters of 4-8% in Δz/(1+z) were obtained, consistent with other studies. However, somewhat larger outlier rates (>7.5% with Δz/(1+z)>0.15; >4.5% after cleaning) are found for all codes that can only partly be explained by AGN or issues in the photometry or the spec-z catalogue. Some outliers were probably missed in comparisons of photo-z's to other, less complete spectroscopic surveys in the past. There is a general trend that empirical codes produce

  16. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  17. [True color accuracy in digital forensic photography].

    PubMed

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Birngruber, Christoph G; Kröll, Ann-Katrin; Kettner, Mattias; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2016-01-01

    Forensic photographs not only need to be unaltered and authentic and capture context-relevant images, along with certain minimum requirements for image sharpness and information density, but color accuracy also plays an important role, for instance, in the assessment of injuries or taphonomic stages, or in the identification and evaluation of traces from photos. The perception of color not only varies subjectively from person to person, but as a discrete property of an image, color in digital photos is also to a considerable extent influenced by technical factors such as lighting, acquisition settings, camera, and output medium (print, monitor). For these reasons, consistent color accuracy has so far been limited in digital photography. Because images usually contain a wealth of color information, especially for complex or composite colors or shades of color, and the wavelength-dependent sensitivity to factors such as light and shadow may vary between cameras, the usefulness of issuing general recommendations for camera capture settings is limited. Our results indicate that true image colors can best and most realistically be captured with the SpyderCheckr technical calibration tool for digital cameras tested in this study. Apart from aspects such as the simplicity and quickness of the calibration procedure, a further advantage of the tool is that the results are independent of the camera used and can also be used for the color management of output devices such as monitors and printers. The SpyderCheckr color-code patches allow true colors to be captured more realistically than with a manual white balance tool or an automatic flash. We therefore recommend that the use of a color management tool should be considered for the acquisition of all images that demand high true color accuracy (in particular in the setting of injury documentation). PMID:27386623

  18. Accuracy Assessment of Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, R. R.; Powell, B. S.; Born, G. H.; Guinasso, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Along track sea surface height anomaly gradients are proportional to cross track geostrophic velocity anomalies allowing satellite altimetry to provide much needed satellite observations of changes in the geostrophic component of surface ocean currents. Often, surface height gradients are computed from altimeter data archives that have been corrected to give the most accurate absolute sea level, a practice that may unnecessarily increase the error in the cross track velocity anomalies and thereby require excessive smoothing to mitigate noise. Because differentiation along track acts as a high-pass filter, many of the path length corrections applied to altimeter data for absolute height accuracy are unnecessary for the corresponding gradient calculations. We report on a study to investigate appropriate altimetric corrections and processing techniques for improving geostrophic velocity accuracy. Accuracy is assessed by comparing cross track current measurements from two moorings placed along the descending TOPEX/POSEIDON ground track number 52 in the Gulf of Mexico to the corresponding altimeter velocity estimates. The buoys are deployed and maintained by the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) under Interagency Contracts with Texas A&M University. The buoys telemeter observations in near real-time via satellite to the TABS station located at the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M. Buoy M is located in shelf waters of 57 m depth with a second, Buoy N, 38 km away on the shelf break at 105 m depth. Buoy N has been operational since the beginning of 2002 and has a current meter at 2m depth providing in situ measurements of surface velocities coincident with Jason and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter over flights. This allows one of the first detailed comparisons of shallow water near surface current meter time series to coincident altimetry.

  19. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  20. Accuracy of abdominal auscultation for bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Breum, Birger Michael; Rud, Bo; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy and inter-observer variation of bowel sound assessment in patients with clinically suspected bowel obstruction. METHODS: Bowel sounds were recorded in patients with suspected bowel obstruction using a Littmann® Electronic Stethoscope. The recordings were processed to yield 25-s sound sequences in random order on PCs. Observers, recruited from doctors within the department, classified the sound sequences as either normal or pathological. The reference tests for bowel obstruction were intraoperative and endoscopic findings and clinical follow up. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each observer and compared between junior and senior doctors. Interobserver variation was measured using the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Bowel sound sequences from 98 patients were assessed by 53 (33 junior and 20 senior) doctors. Laparotomy was performed in 47 patients, 35 of whom had bowel obstruction. Two patients underwent colorectal stenting due to large bowel obstruction. The median sensitivity and specificity was 0.42 (range: 0.19-0.64) and 0.78 (range: 0.35-0.98), respectively. There was no significant difference in accuracy between junior and senior doctors. The median frequency with which doctors classified bowel sounds as abnormal did not differ significantly between patients with and without bowel obstruction (26% vs 23%, P = 0.08). The 53 doctors made up 1378 unique pairs and the median Kappa value was 0.29 (range: -0.15-0.66). CONCLUSION: Accuracy and inter-observer agreement was generally low. Clinical decisions in patients with possible bowel obstruction should not be based on auscultatory assessment of bowel sounds. PMID:26379407

  1. Accuracy requirements. [for monitoring of climate changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgenio, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Satellite and surface measurements, if they are to serve as a climate monitoring system, must be accurate enough to permit detection of changes of climate parameters on decadal time scales. The accuracy requirements are difficult to define a priori since they depend on unknown future changes of climate forcings and feedbacks. As a framework for evaluation of candidate Climsat instruments and orbits, we estimate the accuracies that would be needed to measure changes expected over two decades based on theoretical considerations including GCM simulations and on observational evidence in cases where data are available for rates of change. One major climate forcing known with reasonable accuracy is that caused by the anthropogenic homogeneously mixed greenhouse gases (CO2, CFC's, CH4 and N2O). Their net forcing since the industrial revolution began is about 2 W/sq m and it is presently increasing at a rate of about 1 W/sq m per 20 years. Thus for a competing forcing or feedback to be important, it needs to be of the order of 0.25 W/sq m or larger on this time scale. The significance of most climate feedbacks depends on their sensitivity to temperature change. Therefore we begin with an estimate of decadal temperature change. Presented are the transient temperature trends simulated by the GISS GCM when subjected to various scenarios of trace gas concentration increases. Scenario B, which represents the most plausible near-term emission rates and includes intermittent forcing by volcanic aerosols, yields a global mean surface air temperature increase Delta Ts = 0.7 degrees C over the time period 1995-2015. This is consistent with the IPCC projection of about 0.3 degrees C/decade global warming (IPCC, 1990). Several of our estimates below are based on this assumed rate of warming.

  2. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  3. Comparison of traditional nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel plates with digital radiographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsmeier, T.; Koehl, R.; Lanham, R.; O'Hare, E.; Wiencek, T

    2008-07-15

    The current design and fabrication process for RERTR fuel plates utilizes film radiography during the nondestructive testing and characterization. Digital radiographic methods offer a potential increases in efficiency and accuracy. The traditional and digital radiographic methods are described and demonstrated on a fuel plate constructed with and average of 51% by volume fuel using the dispersion method. Fuel loading data from each method is analyzed and compared to a third baseline method to assess accuracy. The new digital method is shown to be more accurate, save hours of work, and provide additional information not easily available in the traditional method. Additional possible improvements suggested by the new digital method are also raised. (author)

  4. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  5. High accuracy radiation efficiency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relatively large antenna subarrays (tens of meters) to be used in the Solar Power Satellite, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance, dictate the requirement for specialized measurement techniques. The error contributors associated with both far-field and near-field antenna measurement concepts were quantified. As a result, instrumentation configurations with measurement accuracy potential were identified. In every case, advances in the state of the art of associated electronics were found to be required. Relative cost trade-offs between a candidate far-field elevated antenna range and near-field facility were also performed.

  6. Accuracy and precision of an IGRT solution.

    PubMed

    Webster, Gareth J; Rowbottom, Carl G; Mackay, Ranald I

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within +/- 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  7. Accuracy of the river discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han

    2013-04-01

    Discharge values recorded for water conservancy and hydrological analysis is a very important work. Flood control projects, watershed remediation and river environmental planning projects quite need the discharge measurement data. In Taiwan, we have 129 rivers, in accordance with the watershed situation, economic development and other factors, divided into 24 major rivers, 29 minor rivers and 79 ordinary rivers. If each river needs to measure and record these discharge values, it will be enormous work. In addition, the characteristics of Taiwan's rivers contain steep slope, flow rapidly and sediment concentration higher, so it really encounters some difficulties in high flow measurement. When the flood hazards come, to seek a solution for reducing the time, manpower and material resources in river discharge measurement is very important. In this study, the river discharge measurement accuracy is used to determine the tolerance percentage to reduce the number of vertical velocity measurements, thereby reducing the time, manpower and material resources in the river discharge measurement. The velocity data sources used in this study form Yang (1998). Yang (1998) used the Fiber-optic Laser Doppler Velocimetery (FLDV) to obtain different velocity data under different experimental conditions. In this study, we use these data to calculate the mean velocity of each vertical line by three different velocity profile formula (that is, the law of the wall, Chiu's theory, Hu's theory), and then multiplied by each sub-area to obtain the discharge measurement values and compared with the true values (obtained by the direct integration mode) to obtain the accuracy of discharge. The research results show that the discharge measurement values obtained by Chiu's theory are closer to the true value, while the maximum error is the law of the wall. The main reason is that the law of the wall can't describe the maximum velocity occurred in underwater. In addition, the results also show

  8. New analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Boo-Hyun; Yun, Sangho; Kwak, Min-Cheol; Ha, Soon Mok; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Nam, Suk-Woo

    2012-03-01

    The extension of optical lithography to 2Xnm and beyond is often challenged by overlay control. With reduced overlay measurement error budget in the sub-nm range, conventional Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) data is no longer sufficient. Also there is no sufficient criterion in overlay accuracy. In recent years, numerous authors have reported new method of the accuracy of the overlay metrology: Through focus and through color. Still quantifying uncertainty in overlay measurement is most difficult work in overlay metrology. According to the ITRS roadmap, total overlay budget is getting tighter than former device node as a design rule shrink on each device node. Conventionally, the total overlay budget is defined as the square root of square sum of the following contributions: the scanner overlay performance, wafer process, metrology and mask registration. All components have been supplying sufficiently performance tool to each device nodes, delivering new scanner, new metrology tools, and new mask e-beam writers. Especially the scanner overlay performance was drastically decreased from 9nm in 8x node to 2.5nm in 3x node. The scanner overlay seems to reach the limitation the overlay performance after 3x nod. The importance of the wafer process overlay as a contribution of total wafer overlay became more important. In fact, the wafer process overlay was decreased by 3nm between DRAM 8x node and DRAM 3x node. We develop an analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy. And a concept of nondestructive method is proposed in this paper. For on product layer we discovered the layer has overlay inaccuracy. Also we use find out source of the overlay error though the new technique. In this paper, authors suggest an analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy. And a concept of non-destructive method is proposed in this paper. For on product layers, we discovered it has overlay inaccuracy. Also we use find out source of the overlay error though the new technique. Furthermore

  9. Evaluating the accuracy of transcribed clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, R.; Pennisi, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of data transcribed into a computer-stored record from a handwritten listing of pediatric immunizations. The immunization records of 459 children seen in the UCLA Children's Health Center in March, 1993 were transcribed into a clinical computer system on an ongoing basis. Of these records, 27 (5.9%) were subsequently found to be inaccurate. Reasons for inaccuracy in the transcribed records included incomplete written records, incomplete transcription of written records, and unavailability of immunization records from multiple health-care providers. The utility of a computer-stored clinical record may be adversely affected by unavoidable inaccuracies in transcribed clinical data. PMID:8130478

  10. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Springer, Thomas E.; Huff, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  11. Fuel economy of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.; Rousseau, A.; Kumar, R.

    On the basis of on-road energy consumption, fuel economy (FE) of hydrogen fuel cell light-duty vehicles is projected to be 2.5-2.7 times the fuel economy of the conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEV) on the same platforms. Even with a less efficient but higher power density 0.6 V per cell than the base case 0.7 V per cell at the rated power point, the hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are projected to offer essentially the same fuel economy multiplier. The key to obtaining high fuel economy as measured on standardized urban and highway drive schedules lies in maintaining high efficiency of the fuel cell (FC) system at low loads. To achieve this, besides a high performance fuel cell stack, low parasitic losses in the air management system (i.e., turndown and part load efficiencies of the compressor-expander module) are critical.

  12. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  13. Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Levi T. Thompson

    2008-08-08

    Fuel cells are being developed to power cleaner, more fuel efficient automobiles. The fuel cell technology favored by many automobile manufacturers is PEM fuel cells operating with H2 from liquid fuels like gasoline and diesel. A key challenge to the commercialization of PEM fuel cell based powertrains is the lack of sufficiently small and inexpensive fuel processors. Improving the performance and cost of the fuel processor will require the development of better performing catalysts, new reactor designs and better integration of the various fuel processing components. These components and systems could also find use in natural gas fuel processing for stationary, distributed generation applications. Prototype fuel processors were produced, and evaluated against the Department of Energy technical targets. Significant advances were made by integrating low-cost microreactor systems, high activity catalysts, π-complexation adsorbents, and high efficiency microcombustor/microvaporizers developed at the University of Michigan. The microreactor system allowed (1) more efficient thermal coupling of the fuel processor operations thereby minimizing heat exchanger requirements, (2) improved catalyst performance due to optimal reactor temperature profiles and increased heat and mass transport rates, and (3) better cold-start and transient responses.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  15. Millimeter accuracy satellites for two color ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The principal technical challenge in designing a millimeter accuracy satellite to support two color observations at high altitudes is to provide high optical cross-section simultaneously with minimal pulse spreading. In order to address this issue, we provide, a brief review of some fundamental properties of optical retroreflectors when used in spacecraft target arrays, develop a simple model for a spherical geodetic satellite, and use the model to determine some basic design criteria for a new generation of geodetic satellites capable of supporting millimeter accuracy two color laser ranging. We find that increasing the satellite diameter provides: a larger surface area for additional cube mounting thereby leading to higher cross-sections; and makes the satellite surface a better match for the incoming planar phasefront of the laser beam. Restricting the retroreflector field of view (e.g. by recessing it in its holder) limits the target response to the fraction of the satellite surface which best matches the optical phasefront thereby controlling the amount of pulse spreading. In surveying the arrays carried by existing satellites, we find that European STARLETTE and ERS-1 satellites appear to be the best candidates for supporting near term two color experiments in space.

  16. Curation accuracy of model organism databases.

    PubMed

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Skrzypek, Marek; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Chen, Albert Y; Fulcher, Carol; Li, Gene-Wei; Lemmer, Kimberly C; Mladinich, Katherine M; Chow, Edmond D; Sherlock, Gavin; Karp, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Manual extraction of information from the biomedical literature-or biocuration-is the central methodology used to construct many biological databases. For example, the UniProt protein database, the EcoCyc Escherichia coli database and the Candida Genome Database (CGD) are all based on biocuration. Biological databases are used extensively by life science researchers, as online encyclopedias, as aids in the interpretation of new experimental data and as golden standards for the development of new bioinformatics algorithms. Although manual curation has been assumed to be highly accurate, we are aware of only one previous study of biocuration accuracy. We assessed the accuracy of EcoCyc and CGD by manually selecting curated assertions within randomly chosen EcoCyc and CGD gene pages and by then validating that the data found in the referenced publications supported those assertions. A database assertion is considered to be in error if that assertion could not be found in the publication cited for that assertion. We identified 10 errors in the 633 facts that we validated across the two databases, for an overall error rate of 1.58%, and individual error rates of 1.82% for CGD and 1.40% for EcoCyc. These data suggest that manual curation of the experimental literature by Ph.D-level scientists is highly accurate. Database URL: http://ecocyc.org/, http://www.candidagenome.org// PMID:24923819

  17. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

  18. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

  19. Does reader visual fatigue impact interpretation accuracy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Berbaum, Kevin S.

    2010-02-01

    To measure the impact of reader of reader visual fatigue by assessing symptoms, the ability to keep the eye focused on the display and diagnostic accuracy. Twenty radiology residents and 20 radiologists were given a diagnostic performance test containing 60 skeletal radiographic studies, half with fractures, before and after a day of clinical reading. Diagnostic accuracy was measured using area under the proper binormal curve (AUC). Error in visual accommodation was measured before and after each test session and subjects completed the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) and the oculomotor strain subscale of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) before each session. Average AUC was 0.89 for before work test and 0.85 for the after work test, (F(1,36) = 4.15, p = 0.049 < 0.05). There was significantly greater error in accommodation after the clinical workday (F(1,14829) = 7.81, p = 0.005 < 0.01), and after the reading test (F(1,14829) = 839.33, p < 0.0001). SOFI measures of lack of energy, physical discomfort and sleepiness were higher after a day of clinical reading (p < 0.05). The SSQ measure of oculomotor symptoms (i.e., difficulty focusing, blurred vision) was significantly higher after a day of clinical reading (F(1,75) = 20.38, p < 0.0001). Radiologists are visually fatigued by their clinical reading workday. This reduces their ability to focus on diagnostic images and to accurately interpret them.

  20. Accuracy assessment of landslide prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A. N.; Mohd, W. M. N. W.; Noraini, S.

    2014-02-01

    The increasing population and expansion of settlements over hilly areas has greatly increased the impact of natural disasters such as landslide. Therefore, it is important to developed models which could accurately predict landslide hazard zones. Over the years, various techniques and models have been developed to predict landslide hazard zones. The aim of this paper is to access the accuracy of landslide prediction models developed by the authors. The methodology involved the selection of study area, data acquisition, data processing and model development and also data analysis. The development of these models are based on nine different landslide inducing parameters i.e. slope, land use, lithology, soil properties, geomorphology, flow accumulation, aspect, proximity to river and proximity to road. Rank sum, rating, pairwise comparison and AHP techniques are used to determine the weights for each of the parameters used. Four (4) different models which consider different parameter combinations are developed by the authors. Results obtained are compared to landslide history and accuracies for Model 1, Model 2, Model 3 and Model 4 are 66.7, 66.7%, 60% and 22.9% respectively. From the results, rank sum, rating and pairwise comparison can be useful techniques to predict landslide hazard zones.

  1. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  2. Dust trajectory sensor: accuracy and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Sternovsky, Z; Grün, E; Auer, S; Duncan, N; Drake, K; Le, H; Horanyi, M; Srama, R

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction. PMID:22047326

  3. Accuracy of the blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, F; Del Colle, S; Testa, E; Naso, D; Veglio, F

    2006-08-01

    Blood pressure measurement is the cornerstone for the diagnosis, the treatment and the research on arterial hypertension, and all of the decisions about one of these single aspects may be dramatically influenced by the accuracy of the measurement. Over the past 20 years or so, the accuracy of the conventional Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff technique of blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with automated devices. In the same period, recognition of the phenomenon of white coat hypertension, whereby some individuals with an apparent increase in blood pressure have normal, or reduced, blood pressures when measurement is repeated away from the medical environment, has focused attention on methods of measurement that provide profiles of blood pressure behavior rather than relying on isolated measurements under circumstances that may in themselves influence the level of blood pressure recorded. These methodologies have included repeated measurements of blood pressure using the traditional technique, self-measurement of blood pressure in the home or work place, and ambulatory blood pressure measurement using innovative automated devices. The purpose of this review to serve as a source of practical information about the commonly used methods for blood pressure measurement: the traditional Riva-Rocci method and the automated methods. PMID:17016412

  4. Dust trajectory sensor: Accuracy and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Grün, E.; Auer, S.; Duncan, N.; Drake, K.; Le, H.; Horanyi, M.; Srama, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008), 10.1063/1.2960566] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010), 10.1016/j.nima.2010.06.091]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction.

  5. Measuring the Accuracy of Diagnostic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swets, John A.

    1988-06-01

    Diagnostic systems of several kinds are used to distinguish between two classes of events, essentially ``signals'' and ``noise.'' For then, analysis in terms of the ``relative operating characteristic'' of signal detection theory provides a precise and valid measure of diagnostic accuracy. It is the only measure available that is uninfluenced by decision biases and prior probabilities, and it places the performances of diverse systems on a common, easily interpreted scale. Representative values of this measure are reported here for systems in medical imaging, materials testing, weather forecasting, information retrieval, polygraph lie detection, and aptitude testing. Though the measure itself is sound, the values obtained from tests of diagnostic systems often require qualification because the test data on which they are based are of unsure quality. A common set of problems in testing is faced in all fields. How well these problems are handled, or can be handled in a given field, determines the degree of confidence that can be placed in a measured value of accuracy. Some fields fare much better than others.

  6. Approaching chemical accuracy with quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Petruzielo, F R; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2012-03-28

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space. PMID:22462844

  7. Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Novacco, Lawrence J.; Allen, Jeffrey P.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

  8. Fuel control system

    SciTech Connect

    Staniak, W.A.; Samuelson, R.E.; Moncelle, M.E.

    1986-10-14

    A fuel control system is described comprising: a fuel rack movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; a rack control member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; servo system means for moving the fuel rack in response to movement of the rack control member an electrically energizable member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions, the electrically energizable member being urged to move in its fuel-decreasing direction when energized; first coupling means for connecting the electrically energizable member to the rack control member to move the rack control member in its fuel-decreasing direction in response to movement of the electrically energizable member in its fuel-decreasing direction; a mechanical governor control having a member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; second coupling means for connecting the mechanical governor to the rack control member to move the rack control member in its fuel-decreasing direction in response to movement of the mechanical governor member in its fuel-decreasing direction; bias means for biasing the rack control member to move in its fuel-increasing direction.

  9. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  10. Statistical fitting accuracy in photon correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing our experimental investigation of the fitting accuracy associated with photon correlation spectroscopy, we collect 150 correlograms of light scattered at 90 deg from a thermostated sample of 91-nm-diameter, polystyrene latex spheres in water. The correlograms are taken with two correlators: one with linearly spaced channels and one with geometrically spaced channels. Decay rates are extracted from the single-exponential correlograms with both nonlinear least-squares fits and second-order cumulant fits. We make several statistical comparisons between the two fitting techniques and verify an earlier result that there is no sample-time dependence in the decay rate errors. We find, however, that the two fitting techniques give decay rates that differ by 1 percent.

  11. Laser focus positioning method with submicrometer accuracy.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Ilya; Strauss, Johannes; Gröschl, Andreas; Cvecek, Kristian; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-01-20

    Accurate positioning of a sample is one of the primary challenges in laser micromanufacturing. There are a number of methods that allow detection of the surface position; however, only a few of them use the beam of the processing laser as a basis for the measurement. Those methods have an advantage that any changes in the processing laser beam can be inherently accommodated. This work describes a direct, contact-free method to accurately determine workpiece position with respect to the structuring laser beam focal plane based on nonlinear harmonic generation. The method makes workpiece alignment precise and time efficient due to ease of automation and provides the repeatability and accuracy of the surface detection of less than 1 μm. PMID:23338188

  12. Quantitative code accuracy evaluation of ISP33

    SciTech Connect

    Kalli, H.; Miwrrin, A.; Purhonen, H.

    1995-09-01

    Aiming at quantifying code accuracy, a methodology based on the Fast Fourier Transform has been developed at the University of Pisa, Italy. The paper deals with a short presentation of the methodology and its application to pre-test and post-test calculations submitted to the International Standard Problem ISP33. This was a double-blind natural circulation exercise with a stepwise reduced primary coolant inventory, performed in PACTEL facility in Finland. PACTEL is a 1/305 volumetrically scaled, full-height simulator of the Russian type VVER-440 pressurized water reactor, with horizontal steam generators and loop seals in both cold and hot legs. Fifteen foreign organizations participated in ISP33, with 21 blind calculations and 20 post-test calculations, altogether 10 different thermal hydraulic codes and code versions were used. The results of the application of the methodology to nine selected measured quantities are summarized.

  13. Accuracy of lineaments mapping from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nicholas M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of Landsat and other space imaging systems for lineaments detection is analyzed in terms of their effectiveness in recognizing and mapping fractures and faults, and the results of several studies providing a quantitative assessment of lineaments mapping accuracies are discussed. The cases under investigation include a Landsat image of the surface overlying a part of the Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma, the Landsat images and selected radar imagery of major lineaments systems distributed over much of Canadian Shield, and space imagery covering a part of the East African Rift in Kenya. It is demonstrated that space imagery can detect a significant portion of a region's fracture pattern, however, significant fractions of faults and fractures recorded on a field-produced geological map are missing from the imagery as it is evident in the Kenya case.

  14. Accuracy evaluation of residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yerman, J.A.; Kroenke, W.C.; Long, W.H.

    1996-05-01

    The accuracy of residual stress measurement techniques is difficult to assess due to the lack of available reference standards. To satisfy the need for reference standards, two specimens were designed and developed to provide known stress magnitudes and distributions: one with a uniform stress distribution and one with a nonuniform linear stress distribution. A reusable, portable load fixture was developed for use with each of the two specimens. Extensive bench testing was performed to determine if the specimens provide desired known stress magnitudes and distributions and stability of the known stress with time. The testing indicated that the nonuniform linear specimen and load fixture provided the desired known stress magnitude and distribution but that modifications were required for the uniform stress specimen. A trial use of the specimens and load fixtures using hole drilling was successful.

  15. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  16. Quantum mechanical calculations to chemical accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of current molecular-structure calculations is illustrated with examples of quantum mechanical solutions for chemical problems. Two approaches are considered: (1) the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with a perturbational estimate of the contribution of connected triple excitations, or CCDS(T); and (2) the multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approach to the correlation problem. The MRCI approach gains greater applicability by means of size-extensive modifications such as the averaged-coupled pair functional approach. The examples of solutions to chemical problems include those for C-H bond energies, the vibrational frequencies of O3, identifying the ground state of Al2 and Si2, and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow and the Hermann IR system of N2. Accurate molecular-wave functions can be derived from a combination of basis-set saturation studies and full configuration-interaction calculations.

  17. Accuracy of the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    2004-01-01

    Potential error sources for measurements with the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer (CIN) are discussed and analyzed, including systematic errors of the measurement approach, flow and particle-trajectory deviations at flight velocity, ice-crystal breakup on probe surfaces, and errors in calibration and developing scaling constants. It is concluded that errors are minimal, and that the accuracy of the CIN should be close to the systematic behavior of the CIN derived in Gerber et al (2000). Absolute calibration of the CIN with a transmissometer operating co-located in a mountain-top cloud shows that the earlier scaling constant for the optical extinction coefficient obtained by other means is within 5% of the absolute calibration value, and that the CIN measurements on the Citation aircraft flights during the CRYSTAL-FACE study are accurate.

  18. Positioning accuracy of the neurotron 1000

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.S.; Murphy, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Neuotron 1000 is a novel treatment machine under development for frameless stereotaxic radiosurgery that consists of a compact X-band accelerator mounted on a robotic arm. The therapy beam is guided to the lesion by an imaging system, which included two diagnostic x-ray cameras that view the patient during treatment. Patient position and motion are measured by the imaging system and appropriate corrections are communicated in real time to the robotic arm for beam targeting and motion tracking. The three tests reported here measured the pointing accuracy of the therapy beam and the present capability of the imaging guidance system. The positioning and pointing test measured the ability of the robotic arm to direct the beam through a test isocenter from arbitrary arm positions. The test isocenter was marked by a small light-sensitive crystal and the beam axis was simulated by a laser.

  19. Copper disk pyrheliometer of high accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, C.K.; Wang, X.A.

    1983-01-01

    A copper disk pyrheliometer has been designed and constructed that utilizes a new methodology to measure solar radiation. By operating the shutter of the instrument and measuring the heating and cooling rates of the sensor at the very moment when the sensor is at the same temperature, the solar radiation can be accurately determined with these rates. The method is highly accurate and is shown to be totally independent of the loss coefficient in the measurement. The pyrheliometer has been tested using a standard irradiance lamp in the laboratory. The uncertainty of the instrument is identified to be +- 0.61%. Field testing was also conducted by comparing data with that of a calibrated (Eppley) Normal Incidence Pyrheliometer. This paper spells out details of the construction and testing of the instrument; the analysis underlying the methodology was also covered in detail. Because of the high accuracy, the instrument is considered to be well suited for a bench standard for measurement of solar radiation.

  20. ACCURACY LIMITATIONS IN LONG TRACE PROFILOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS,P.Z.; QIAN,S.

    2003-08-25

    As requirements for surface slope error quality of grazing incidence optics approach the 100 nanoradian level, it is necessary to improve the performance of the measuring instruments to achieve accurate and repeatable results at this level. We have identified a number of internal error sources in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that affect measurement quality at this level. The LTP is sensitive to phase shifts produced within the millimeter diameter of the pencil beam probe by optical path irregularities with scale lengths of a fraction of a millimeter. We examine the effects of mirror surface ''macroroughness'' and internal glass homogeneity on the accuracy of the LTP through experiment and theoretical modeling. We will place limits on the allowable surface ''macroroughness'' and glass homogeneity required to achieve accurate measurements in the nanoradian range.

  1. Accuracy Limitations in Long-Trace Profilometry

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian Shinan

    2004-05-12

    As requirements for surface slope error quality of grazing incidence optics approach the 100 nanoradian level, it is necessary to improve the performance of the measuring instruments to achieve accurate and repeatable results at this level. We have identified a number of internal error sources in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that affect measurement quality at this level. The LTP is sensitive to phase shifts produced within the millimeter diameter of the pencil beam probe by optical path irregularities with scale lengths of a fraction of a millimeter. We examine the effects of mirror surface 'macroroughness' and internal glass homogeneity on the accuracy of the LTP through experiment and theoretical modeling. We will place limits on the allowable surface 'macroroughness' and glass homogeneity required to achieve accurate measurements in the nanoradian range.

  2. Guiding Center Equations of High Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White, G. Spizzo and M. Gobbin

    2013-03-29

    Guiding center simulations are an important means of predicting the effect of resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities on particle distributions in toroidal magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion research devices. Because saturated instabilities typically have amplitudes of δ B/B of a few times 10-4 numerical accuracy is of concern in discovering the effect of mode particle resonances. We develop a means of following guiding center orbits which is greatly superior to the methods currently in use. In the presence of ripple or time dependent magnetic perturbations both energy and canonical momentum are conserved to better than one part in 1014, and the relation between changes in canonical momentum and energy is also conserved to very high order.

  3. The empirical accuracy of uncertain inference models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, David S.; Yadrick, Robert M.; Perrin, Bruce M.; Wise, Ben P.

    1987-01-01

    Uncertainty is a pervasive feature of the domains in which expert systems are designed to function. Research design to test uncertain inference methods for accuracy and robustness, in accordance with standard engineering practice is reviewed. Several studies were conducted to assess how well various methods perform on problems constructed so that correct answers are known, and to find out what underlying features of a problem cause strong or weak performance. For each method studied, situations were identified in which performance deteriorates dramatically. Over a broad range of problems, some well known methods do only about as well as a simple linear regression model, and often much worse than a simple independence probability model. The results indicate that some commercially available expert system shells should be used with caution, because the uncertain inference models that they implement can yield rather inaccurate results.

  4. On the Accuracy of the MINC approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.H.; Pruess, K.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-02-01

    The method of ''multiple interacting continua'' is based on the assumption that changes in thermodynamic conditions of rock matrix blocks are primarily controlled by the distance from the nearest fracture. The accuracy of this assumption was evaluated for regularly shaped (cubic and rectangular) rock blocks with uniform initial conditions, which are subjected to a step change in boundary conditions on the surface. Our results show that pressures (or temperatures) predicted from the MINC approximation may deviate from the exact solutions by as much as 10 to 15% at certain points within the blocks. However, when fluid (or heat) flow rates are integrated over the entire block surface, MINC-approximation and exact solution agree to better than 1%. This indicates that the MINC approximation can accurately represent transient inter-porosity flow in fractured porous media, provided that matrix blocks are indeed subjected to nearly uniform boundary conditions at all times.

  5. Meteor orbit determination with improved accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Vasily; Lupovla, Valery; Gritsevich, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Modern observational techniques make it possible to retrive meteor trajectory and its velocity with high accuracy. There has been a rapid rise in high quality observational data accumulating yearly. This fact creates new challenges for solving the problem of meteor orbit determination. Currently, traditional technique based on including corrections to zenith distance and apparent velocity using well-known Schiaparelli formula is widely used. Alternative approach relies on meteoroid trajectory correction using numerical integration of equation of motion (Clark & Wiegert, 2011; Zuluaga et al., 2013). In our work we suggest technique of meteor orbit determination based on strict coordinate transformation and integration of differential equation of motion. We demonstrate advantage of this method in comparison with traditional technique. We provide results of calculations by different methods for real, recently occurred fireballs, as well as for simulated cases with a priori known retrieval parameters. Simulated data were used to demonstrate the condition, when application of more complex technique is necessary. It was found, that for several low velocity meteoroids application of traditional technique may lead to dramatically delusion of orbit precision (first of all, due to errors in Ω, because this parameter has a highest potential accuracy). Our results are complemented by analysis of sources of perturbations allowing to quantitatively indicate which factors have to be considered in orbit determination. In addition, the developed method includes analysis of observational error propagation based on strict covariance transition, which is also presented.Acknowledgements. This work was carried out at MIIGAiK and supported by the Russian Science Foundation, project No. 14-22-00197.References:Clark, D. L., & Wiegert, P. A. (2011). A numerical comparison with the Ceplecha analytical meteoroid orbit determination method. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 46(8), pp. 1217

  6. Classification Accuracy Increase Using Multisensor Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarau, A.; Palubinskas, G.; Reinartz, P.

    2011-09-01

    The practical use of very high resolution visible and near-infrared (VNIR) data is still growing (IKONOS, Quickbird, GeoEye-1, etc.) but for classification purposes the number of bands is limited in comparison to full spectral imaging. These limitations may lead to the confusion of materials such as different roofs, pavements, roads, etc. and therefore may provide wrong interpretation and use of classification products. Employment of hyperspectral data is another solution, but their low spatial resolution (comparing to multispectral data) restrict their usage for many applications. Another improvement can be achieved by fusion approaches of multisensory data since this may increase the quality of scene classification. Integration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical data is widely performed for automatic classification, interpretation, and change detection. In this paper we present an approach for very high resolution SAR and multispectral data fusion for automatic classification in urban areas. Single polarization TerraSAR-X (SpotLight mode) and multispectral data are integrated using the INFOFUSE framework, consisting of feature extraction (information fission), unsupervised clustering (data representation on a finite domain and dimensionality reduction), and data aggregation (Bayesian or neural network). This framework allows a relevant way of multisource data combination following consensus theory. The classification is not influenced by the limitations of dimensionality, and the calculation complexity primarily depends on the step of dimensionality reduction. Fusion of single polarization TerraSAR-X, WorldView-2 (VNIR or full set), and Digital Surface Model (DSM) data allow for different types of urban objects to be classified into predefined classes of interest with increased accuracy. The comparison to classification results of WorldView-2 multispectral data (8 spectral bands) is provided and the numerical evaluation of the method in comparison to

  7. Food Label Accuracy of Common Snack Foods

    PubMed Central

    Jumpertz, Reiner; Venti, Colleen A; Le, Duc Son; Michaels, Jennifer; Parrington, Shannon; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition labels have raised awareness of the energetic value of foods, and represent for many a pivotal guideline to regulate food intake. However, recent data have created doubts on label accuracy. Therefore we tested label accuracy for energy and macronutrient content of prepackaged energy-dense snack food products. We measured “true” caloric content of 24 popular snack food products in the U.S. and determined macronutrient content in 10 selected items. Bomb calorimetry and food factors were used to estimate energy content. Macronutrient content was determined according to Official Methods of Analysis. Calorimetric measurements were performed in our metabolic laboratory between April 20th and May 18th and macronutrient content was measured between September 28th and October 7th of 2010. Serving size, by weight, exceeded label statements by 1.2% [median] (25th percentile −1.4, 75th percentile 4.3, p=0.10). When differences in serving size were accounted for, metabolizable calories were 6.8 kcal (0.5, 23.5, p=0.0003) or 4.3% (0.2, 13.7, p=0.001) higher than the label statement. In a small convenience sample of the tested snack foods, carbohydrate content exceeded label statements by 7.7% (0.8, 16.7, p=0.01); however fat and protein content were not significantly different from label statements (−12.8% [−38.6, 9.6], p=0.23; 6.1% [−6.1, 17.5], p=0.32). Carbohydrate content explained 40% and serving size an additional 55% of the excess calories. Among a convenience sample of energy-dense snack foods, caloric content is higher than stated on the nutrition labels, but overall well within FDA limits. This discrepancy may be explained by inaccurate carbohydrate content and serving size. PMID:23505182

  8. Combining Multiple Gyroscope Outputs for Increased Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of processing the outputs of multiple gyroscopes to increase the accuracy of rate (that is, angular-velocity) readings has been developed theoretically and demonstrated by computer simulation. Although the method is applicable, in principle, to any gyroscopes, it is intended especially for application to gyroscopes that are parts of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The method is based on the concept that the collective performance of multiple, relatively inexpensive, nominally identical devices can be better than that of one of the devices considered by itself. The method would make it possible to synthesize the readings of a single, more accurate gyroscope (a virtual gyroscope) from the outputs of a large number of microscopic gyroscopes fabricated together on a single MEMS chip. The big advantage would be that the combination of the MEMS gyroscope array and the processing circuitry needed to implement the method would be smaller, lighter in weight, and less power-hungry, relative to a conventional gyroscope of equal accuracy. The method (see figure) is one of combining and filtering the digitized outputs of multiple gyroscopes to obtain minimum-variance estimates of rate. In the combining-and-filtering operations, measurement data from the gyroscopes would be weighted and smoothed with respect to each other according to the gain matrix of a minimum- variance filter. According to Kalman-filter theory, the gain matrix of the minimum-variance filter is uniquely specified by the filter covariance, which propagates according to a matrix Riccati equation. The present method incorporates an exact analytical solution of this equation.

  9. Improving Accuracy of Image Classification Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Prasad, T. S.; Bala Manikavelu, P. M.; Vijayan, D.

    The Remote Sensing signal which reaches sensor on-board the satellite is the complex aggregation of signals (in agriculture field for example) from soil (with all its variations such as colour, texture, particle size, clay content, organic and nutrition content, inorganic content, water content etc.), plant (height, architecture, leaf area index, mean canopy inclination etc.), canopy closure status and atmospheric effects, and from this we want to find say, characteristics of vegetation. If sensor on- board the satellite makes measurements in n-bands (n of n*1 dimension) and number of classes in an image are c (f of c*1 dimension), then considering linear mixture modeling the pixel classification problem could be written as n = m* f +, where m is the transformation matrix of (n*c) dimension and therepresents the error vector (noise). The problem is to estimate f by inverting the above equation and the possible solutions for such problem are many. Thus, getting back individual classes from satellite data is an ill-posed inverse problem for which unique solution is not feasible and this puts limit to the obtainable classification accuracy. Maximum Likelihood (ML) is the constraint mostly practiced in solving such a situation which suffers from the handicaps of assumed Gaussian distribution and random nature of pixels (in-fact there is high auto-correlation among the pixels of a specific class and further high auto-correlation among the pixels in sub- classes where the homogeneity would be high among pixels). Due to this, achieving of very high accuracy in the classification of remote sensing images is not a straight proposition. With the availability of the GIS for the area under study (i) a priori probability for different classes could be assigned to ML classifier in more realistic terms and (ii) the purity of training sets for different thematic classes could be better ascertained. To what extent this could improve the accuracy of classification in ML classifier

  10. Bulk Fuel Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by bulk fuel workers. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: bulk fuel equipment, bulk fuel systems, procedures for handling fuels, and…

  11. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  12. Microemulsion fuel system

    SciTech Connect

    Hazbun, E.A.; Schon, S.G.; Grey, R.A.

    1988-05-17

    A microemulsion fuel composition is described comprising: (a) a jet fuel, fuel oil or diesel hydrocarbon fuel; (b) about 3.0 to about 40% by weight water and/or methanol; and (c) a surface active amount of a combination of surface active agents consisting of: (1) tertiary butyl alcohol; and (2) at least one amphoteric; anionic, cationic or nonionic surfactant.

  13. Insensitivity of the octahedral spherical hohlraum to power imbalance, pointing accuracy, and assemblage accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Wen Yi; Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2014-11-15

    The random radiation asymmetry in the octahedral spherical hohlraum [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 0 10704 (2014)] arising from the power imbalance, pointing accuracy of laser quads, and the assemblage accuracy of capsule is investigated by using the 3-dimensional view factor model. From our study, for the spherical hohlraum, the random radiation asymmetry arising from the power imbalance of the laser quads is about half of that in the cylindrical hohlraum; the random asymmetry arising from the pointing error is about one order lower than that in the cylindrical hohlraum; and the random asymmetry arising from the assemblage error of capsule is about one third of that in the cylindrical hohlraum. Moreover, the random radiation asymmetry in the spherical hohlraum is also less than the amount in the elliptical hohlraum. The results indicate that the spherical hohlraum is more insensitive to the random variations than the cylindrical hohlraum and the elliptical hohlraum. Hence, the spherical hohlraum can relax the requirements to the power imbalance and pointing accuracy of laser facility and the assemblage accuracy of capsule.

  14. Matters of Accuracy and Conventionality: Prior Accuracy Guides Children's Evaluations of Others' Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Jason; Gilpin, Ansley Tullos; Pierucci, Jillian; Morgan, Reed

    2013-01-01

    Studies show that children trust previously reliable sources over previously unreliable ones (e.g., Koenig, Clement, & Harris, 2004). However, it is unclear from these studies whether children rely on accuracy or conventionality to determine the reliability and, ultimately, the trustworthiness of a particular source. In the current study, 3- and…

  15. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  16. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  17. Fuel cells seminar

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

  18. Fuel cells: principles, types, fuels, and applications.

    PubMed

    Carrette, L; Friedrich, K A; Stimming, U

    2000-12-15

    During the last decade, fuel cells have received enormous attention from research institutions and companies as novel electrical energy conversion systems. In the near future, they will see application in automotive propulsion, distributed power generation, and in low power portable devices (battery replacement). This review gives an introduction into the fundamentals and applications of fuel cells: Firstly, the environmental and social factors promoting fuel cell development are discussed, with an emphasis on the advantages of fuel cells compared to the conventional techniques. Then, the main reactions, which are responsible for the conversion of chemical into electrical energy in fuel cells, are given and the thermodynamic and kinetic fundamentals are stated. The theoretical and real efficiencies of fuel cells are also compared to that of internal combustion engines. Next, the different types of fuel cells and their main components are explained and the related material issues are presented. A section is devoted to fuel generation and storage, which is of paramount importance for the practical aspects of fuel cell use. Finally, attention is given to the integration of the fuel cells into complete systems. PMID:23696319

  19. Influence of the gaseous mixture composition on accuracy of molecular iodine on-line detection by laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper informs on research into the influence of the composition of gaseous mixtures analyzed on the accuracy of on-line molecular iodine detection by laser-induced fluorescence in various gaseous media—in atmospheric air and in technological mixtures formed during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The paper shows that by considering the composition of buffer media and parts of its components, the accuracy of iodine content measurement may be increased in several times.

  20. Numerical accuracy of linear triangular finite elements in modeling multi-holed structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.; Griffen, J.E.

    1980-06-01

    A study has been performed to quantify the accuracy of linear triangular finite elements for modeling temperature and stress fields in structures with multiple holes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of these elements for the analysis of HTGR fuel blocks, which may contain up to 325 holes. Since an accurate full scale analysis was not feasible with existing methods, a representative small scale benchmark problem containing only seven holes was selected. The finite element codes used in this study were TEPC-2D for thermal analysis and SAFIRE for stress analysis. It was concluded that linear triangular finite elements are too inefficient for this application. An accurate analysis of stresses in HTGR fuel blocks will require the use of higher order elements, such as the 8-node quadrilaterals in the new TWOD code.

  1. Methods in Use for Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Evaluation, and Target Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; G. Aliberti

    2007-10-01

    Sensitivity coefficients can be used for different objectives like uncertainty estimates, design optimization, determination of target accuracy requirements, adjustment of input parameters, and evaluations of the representativity of an experiment with respect to a reference design configuration. In this paper the theory, based on the adjoint approach, that is implemented in the ERANOS fast reactor code system is presented along with some unique tools and features related to specific types of problems as is the case for nuclide transmutation, reactivity loss during the cycle, decay heat, neutron source associated to fuel fabrication, and experiment representativity.

  2. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ACCURACY OF ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use...

  3. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. METHODS: The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow generated by a computer driven, servo controlled pump and their response was compared with that of a pneumotachograph. RESULTS: For each device tested the readings were highly repeatable to within the limits of accuracy with which the pointer position can be assessed by eye. The between instrument variation in reading for six identical devices expressed as a 95% confidence limit was, on average across the range of flows, +/- 8.5 l/min for the Mini-Wright, +/- 7.9 l/min for the Vitalograph, and +/- 6.4 l/min for the Ferraris. PEF meters based on the Wright meter all had similar error profiles with overreading of up to 80 l/min in the mid flow range from 300 to 500 l/min. This overreading was greatest for the Mini-Wright and Ferraris devices, and less so for the original Wright and Vitalograph meters. A Micro-Medical Turbine meter was accurate up to 400 l/min and then began to underread by up to 60 l/min at 720 l/min. For the low range devices the Vitalograph device was accurate to within 10 l/min up to 200 l/min, with the Mini-Wright overreading by up to 30 l/min above 150 l/min. CONCLUSION: Although the Mini-Wright, Ferraris, and Vitalograph meters gave remarkably repeatable results their error profiles for the full range meters will lead to important errors in recording PEF variability. This may lead to incorrect diagnosis and bias in implementing strategies of asthma treatment based on PEF measurement. PMID:1465746

  4. Accuracy of commercial geocoding: assessment and implications

    PubMed Central

    Whitsel, Eric A; Quibrera, P Miguel; Smith, Richard L; Catellier, Diane J; Liao, Duanping; Henley, Amanda C; Heiss, Gerardo

    2006-01-01

    Background Published studies of geocoding accuracy often focus on a single geographic area, address source or vendor, do not adjust accuracy measures for address characteristics, and do not examine effects of inaccuracy on exposure measures. We addressed these issues in a Women's Health Initiative ancillary study, the Environmental Epidemiology of Arrhythmogenesis in WHI. Results Addresses in 49 U.S. states (n = 3,615) with established coordinates were geocoded by four vendors (A-D). There were important differences among vendors in address match rate (98%; 82%; 81%; 30%), concordance between established and vendor-assigned census tracts (85%; 88%; 87%; 98%) and distance between established and vendor-assigned coordinates (mean ρ [meters]: 1809; 748; 704; 228). Mean ρ was lowest among street-matched, complete, zip-coded, unedited and urban addresses, and addresses with North American Datum of 1983 or World Geodetic System of 1984 coordinates. In mixed models restricted to vendors with minimally acceptable match rates (A-C) and adjusted for address characteristics, within-address correlation, and among-vendor heteroscedasticity of ρ, differences in mean ρ were small for street-type matches (280; 268; 275), i.e. likely to bias results relying on them about equally for most applications. In contrast, differences between centroid-type matches were substantial in some vendor contrasts, but not others (5497; 4303; 4210) pinteraction < 10-4, i.e. more likely to bias results differently in many applications. The adjusted odds of an address match was higher for vendor A versus C (odds ratio = 66, 95% confidence interval: 47, 93), but not B versus C (OR = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.3). That of census tract concordance was no higher for vendor A versus C (OR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.2) or B versus C (OR = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.3). Misclassification of a related exposure measure – distance to the nearest highway – increased with mean ρ and in the absence of confounding, non

  5. Lummus clean fuels from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, J.E.; Hefferan, J.K.; Chorba, W.F.; Schachtschneider, A.B.; Schulze, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    This report compares two direct, catalytic, hydroliquefaction processes - H-Coal and Lummus Clean Fuels From Coal (LCFFC). These processes are compared for two sets of operating conditions. In the first, the reactors are operated to produce a product suitable for use as fuel oil (fuel oil mode). In the second, the operating conditions are more severe, so the resulting product slates more closely resemble crude oil (syncrude mode). The comparisons are performed using conceptual designs based on single point run data, with a design basis of 25,000 tpd (moisture-free basis) of Illinois No. 6 coal. Although all cost comparisons are well within the estimated 25% accuracy of the estimates, LCFFC shows generally lower costs. Three types of economic evaluation are performed: computation of internal rate of return (IRR) with product values set to estimated market value, computation of overall average product cost ($/MM Btu) with the discount rate set at 20%, and calculation of average product cost with naphtha credited at estimated market value and the discount rate set at 20%. H-Coal has a lower cost only in the fuel oil mode analysis with naphtha valued at market price. The processes are also compared with respect to the potential for commercialization and anticipated operability differences. It is concluded that the lower hydrogen content of LCFFC product may offset its advantage of lower cost if it is used as refinery feed, and that the design of the LCFFC reactor may make it harder to control. Suggestions for future research are presented.

  6. Accuracy of the vivofit activity tracker.

    PubMed

    Alsubheen, Sana'a A; George, Amanda M; Baker, Alicia; Rohr, Linda E; Basset, Fabien A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the vivofit activity tracker in assessing energy expenditure and step count. Thirteen participants wore the vivofit activity tracker for five days. Participants were required to independently perform 1 h of self-selected activity each day of the study. On day four, participants came to the lab to undergo BMR and a treadmill-walking task (TWT). On day five, participants completed 1 h of office-type activities. BMR values estimated by the vivofit were not significantly different from the values measured through indirect calorimetry (IC). The vivofit significantly underestimated EE for treadmill walking, but responded to the differences in the inclination. Vivofit underestimated step count for level walking but provided an accurate estimate for incline walking. There was a strong correlation between EE and the exercise intensity. The vivofit activity tracker is on par with similar devices and can be used to track physical activity. PMID:27266422

  7. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patients). The correlation study was done between pre-operative diagnosis, MRI and arthroscopic diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis was as accurate as the MRI with 79% agreement between the preoperative diagnosis and arthroscopy compared to 77% agreement between MRI scan and arthroscopy. There was no evidence, in this study, that MRI scan can reduce the number of negative arthroscopies. Four normal MRI scans had positive arthroscopic diagnosis (two torn medial meniscus, one torn lateral meniscus and one chondromalacia patella). Out of 240 arthroscopies, there were only 10 normal knees (negative arthroscopy) representing 4% of the total number of knee arthroscopies; one patient of those 10 cases had MRI scan with ACL rupture diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12215031

  8. Improving DNA sequencing accuracy and throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O. |

    1996-12-31

    LLNL is beginning to explore statistical approaches to the problem of determining the DNA sequence underlying data obtained from fluorescence-based gel electrophoresis. Among the features of this problem that make it interesting to statisticians include: (1) the underlying mechanics of electrophoresis is quite complex and still not completely understood; (2) the yield of fragments of any given size can be quite small and variable; (3) the mobility of fragments of a given size can depend on the terminating base; (4) the data consists of samples from one or more continuous, non-stationary signals; (5) boundaries between segments generated by distinct elements of the underlying sequence are ill-defined or nonexistent in the signal; and (6) the sampling rate of the signal greatly exceeds the rate of evolution of the underlying discrete sequence. Current approaches to base calling address only some of these issues, and usually in a heuristic, ad hoc way. In this article we describe some of our initial efforts towards increasing base calling accuracy and throughput by providing a rational, statistical foundation to the process of deducing sequence from signal. 31 refs., 12 figs.

  9. High accuracy wall thickness loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacsi, Attila; Cegla, Frederic

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of wall thickness in pipes is a standard technique applied widely in the petrochemical industry. The potential precision of repeat measurements with permanently installed ultrasonic sensors however significantly surpasses that of handheld sensors as uncertainties associated with coupling fluids and positional offsets are eliminated. With permanently installed sensors the precise evaluation of very small wall loss rates becomes feasible in a matter of hours. The improved accuracy and speed of wall loss rate measurements can be used to evaluate and develop more effective mitigation strategies. This paper presents an overview of factors causing variability in the ultrasonic measurements which are then systematically addressed and an experimental setup with the best achievable stability based on these considerations is presented. In the experimental setup galvanic corrosion is used to induce predictable and very small wall thickness loss. Furthermore, it is shown that the experimental measurements can be used to assess the effect of reduced wall loss that is produced by the injection of corrosion inhibitor. The measurements show an estimated standard deviation of about 20nm, which in turn allows us to evaluate the effect and behaviour of corrosion inhibitors within less than an hour.

  10. The accuracy of a voice vote

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.; Palaparthi, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of a voice vote was addressed by systematically varying group size, individual voter loudness, and words that are typically used to express agreement or disagreement. Five judges rated the loudness of two competing groups in A-B comparison tasks. Acoustic analysis was performed to determine the sound energy level of each word uttered by each group. Results showed that individual voter differences in energy level can grossly alter group loudness and bias the vote. Unless some control is imposed on the sound level of individual voters, it is difficult to establish even a two-thirds majority, much less a simple majority. There is no symmetry in the bias created by unequal sound production of individuals. Soft voices do not bias the group loudness much, but loud voices do. The phonetic balance of the two words chosen (e.g., “yea” and “nay” as opposed to “aye” and “no”) seems to be less of an issue. PMID:24437776

  11. Lung Ultrasound Diagnostic Accuracy in Neonatal Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Copetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pneumothorax (PTX) still remains a common cause of morbidity in critically ill and ventilated neonates. At the present time, lung ultrasound (LUS) is not included in the diagnostic work-up of PTX in newborns despite of excellent evidence of reliability in adults. The aim of this study was to compare LUS, chest X-ray (CXR), and chest transillumination (CTR) for PTX diagnosis in a group of neonates in which the presence of air in the pleural space was confirmed. Methods. In a 36-month period, 49 neonates with respiratory distress were enrolled in the study. Twenty-three had PTX requiring aspiration or chest drainage (birth weight 2120 ± 1640 grams; gestational age = 36 ± 5 weeks), and 26 were suffering from respiratory distress without PTX (birth weight 2120 ± 1640 grams; gestational age = 34 ± 5 weeks). Both groups had done LUS, CTR, and CXR. Results. LUS was consistent with PTX in all 23 patients requiring chest aspiration. In this group, CXR did not detect PTX in one patient while CTR did not detect it in 3 patients. Sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing PTX were therefore 1 for LUS, 0.96 and 1 for CXR, and 0.87 and 0.96 for CTR. Conclusions. Our results confirm that also in newborns LUS is at least as accurate as CXR in the diagnosis of PTX while CTR has a lower accuracy.

  12. Time and position accuracy using codeless GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Jefferson, D. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Thomas, J. B.; Vigue, Y.; Young, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has allowed scientists and engineers to make measurements having accuracy far beyond the original 15 meter goal of the system. Using global networks of P-Code capable receivers and extensive post-processing, geodesists have achieved baseline precision of a few parts per billion, and clock offsets have been measured at the nanosecond level over intercontinental distances. A cloud hangs over this picture, however. The Department of Defense plans to encrypt the P-Code (called Anti-Spoofing, or AS) in the fall of 1993. After this event, geodetic and time measurements will have to be made using codeless GPS receivers. However, there appears to be a silver lining to the cloud. In response to the anticipated encryption of the P-Code, the geodetic and GPS receiver community has developed some remarkably effective means of coping with AS without classified information. We will discuss various codeless techniques currently available and the data noise resulting from each. We will review some geodetic results obtained using only codeless data, and discuss the implications for time measurements. Finally, we will present the status of GPS research at JPL in relation to codeless clock measurements.

  13. Dual Tank Fuel System

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  14. Fuel injector system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  15. Alternative aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P.; Grobman, J.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the anticipated impossibility to provide on a long-term basis liquid fuels derived from petroleum, an investigation has been conducted with the objective to assess the suitability of jet fuels made from oil shale and coal and to develop a data base which will allow optimization of future fuel characteristics, taking energy efficiency of manufacture and the tradeoffs in aircraft and engine design into account. The properties of future aviation fuels are examined and proposed solutions to problems of alternative fuels are discussed. Attention is given to the refining of jet fuel to current specifications, the control of fuel thermal stability, and combustor technology for use of broad specification fuels. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source.

  16. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    SciTech Connect

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  17. Fuel economy of hybrid fuel cell vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.; Wang, X.; Rousseau, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2004-01-01

    The potential improvement in fuel economy of a mid-size fuel-cell vehicle by combining it with an energy storage system has been assessed. An energy management strategy is developed and used to operate the direct hydrogen, pressurized fuel-cell system in a load-following mode and the energy storage system in a charge-sustaining mode. The strategy places highest priority on maintaining the energy storage system in a state where it can supply unanticipated boost power when the fuel-cell system alone cannot meet the power demand. It is found that downsizing a fuel-cell system decreases its efficiency on a drive cycle which is compensated by partial regenerative capture of braking energy. On a highway cycle with limited braking energy the increase in fuel economy with hybridization is small but on the stop-and-go urban cycle the fuel economy can improve by 27%. On the combined highway and urban drive cycles the fuel economy of the fuel-cell vehicle is estimated to increase by up to 15% by hybridizing it with an energy storage system.

  18. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  19. The Good Judge of Personality: Characteristics, Behaviors, and Observer Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Letzring, Tera D.

    2008-01-01

    Personality characteristics and behaviors related to judgmental accuracy following unstructured interactions among previously unacquainted triads were examined. Judgmental accuracy was related to social skill, agreeableness, and adjustment. Accuracy of observers of the interactions was positively related to the number of good judges in the interaction, which implies that the personality and behaviors of the judge are important for creating a situation in which targets will reveal relevant personality cues. Furthermore, the finding that observer accuracy was positively related to the number of good judge partners suggests that judgmental accuracy is based on more than detection and utilization skills of the judge. PMID:19649134

  20. Accuracy of schemes with nonuniform meshes for compressible fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the space discretization for time-dependent problems when a nonuniform mesh is used is considered. Many schemes reduce to first-order accuracy while a popular finite volume scheme is even inconsistent for general grids. This accuracy is based on physical variables. However, when accuracy is measured in computational variables then second-order accuracy can be obtained. This is meaningful only if the mesh accurately reflects the properties of the solution. In addition, the stability properties of some improved accurate schemes are analyzed and it can be shown that they also allow for larger time steps when Runge-Kutta type methods are used to advance in time.

  1. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  2. Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabihian, Farshid

    The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique

  3. On the Standardization of Vertical Accuracy Figures in Dems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, V.; Padova, B.

    2013-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a key role in hydrological risk prevention and mitigation: hydraulic numeric simulations, slope and aspect maps all heavily rely on DEMs. Hydraulic numeric simulations require the used DEM to have a defined accuracy, in order to obtain reliable results. Are the DEM accuracy figures clearly and uniquely defined? The paper focuses on some issues concerning DEM accuracy definition and assessment. Two DEM accuracy definitions can be found in literature: accuracy at the interpolated point and accuracy at the nodes. The former can be estimated by means of randomly distributed check points, while the latter by means of check points coincident with the nodes. The two considered accuracy figures are often treated as equivalent, but they aren't. Given the same DEM, assessing it through one or the other approach gives different results. Our paper performs an in-depth characterization of the two figures and proposes standardization coefficients.

  4. Optimizing Tsunami Forecast Model Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, P.; Nyland, D. L.; Huang, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent tsunamis provide a means to determine the accuracy that can be expected of real-time tsunami forecast models. Forecast accuracy using two different tsunami forecast models are compared for seven events since 2006 based on both real-time application and optimized, after-the-fact "forecasts". Lessons learned by comparing the forecast accuracy determined during an event to modified applications of the models after-the-fact provide improved methods for real-time forecasting for future events. Variables such as source definition, data assimilation, and model scaling factors are examined to optimize forecast accuracy. Forecast accuracy is also compared for direct forward modeling based on earthquake source parameters versus accuracy obtained by assimilating sea level data into the forecast model. Results show that including assimilated sea level data into the models increases accuracy by approximately 15% for the events examined.

  5. Kinematics of a striking task: accuracy and speed-accuracy considerations.

    PubMed

    Parrington, Lucy; Ball, Kevin; MacMahon, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Handballing in Australian football (AF) is the most efficient passing method, yet little research exists examining technical factors associated with accuracy. This study had three aims: (a) To explore the kinematic differences between accurate and inaccurate handballers, (b) to compare within-individual successful (hit target) and unsuccessful (missed target) handballs and (c) to assess handballing when both accuracy and speed of ball-travel were combined using a novel approach utilising canonical correlation analysis. Three-dimensional data were collected on 18 elite AF players who performed handballs towards a target. More accurate handballers exhibited a significantly straighter hand-path, slower elbow angular velocity and smaller elbow range of motion (ROM) compared to the inaccurate group. Successful handballs displayed significantly larger trunk ROM, maximum trunk rotation velocity and step-angle and smaller elbow ROM in comparison to the unsuccessful handballs. The canonical model explained 73% of variance shared between the variable sets, with a significant relationship found between hand-path, elbow ROM and maximum elbow angular velocity (predictors) and hand-speed and accuracy (dependant variables). Interestingly, not all parameters were the same across each of the analyses, with technical differences between inaccurate and accurate handballers different from those between successful and unsuccessful handballs in the within-individual analysis. PMID:25079111

  6. Supercritical fuel injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Cooper, L. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    a fuel injection system for gas turbines is described including a pair of high pressure pumps. The pumps provide fuel and a carrier fluid such as air at pressures above the critical pressure of the fuel. A supercritical mixing chamber mixes the fuel and carrier fluid and the mixture is sprayed into a combustion chamber. The use of fuel and a carrier fluid at supercritical pressures promotes rapid mixing of the fuel in the combustion chamber so as to reduce the formation of pollutants and promote cleaner burning.

  7. FUEL ELEMENT SUPPORT

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, W.L.

    1961-06-27

    The described cylindrical fuel element has longitudinally spaced sets of short longitudinal ribs circumferentially spaced from one another. The ribs support the fuel element in a coolant tube so that there is an annular space for coolant flow between the fuel element and the interior of the coolant tube. If the fuel element grows as a result of reactor operation, the circumferential distribution of the ribs maintains the uniformity of the annular space between the coolant tube and the fuel element, and the collapsibility of the ribs prevents the fuel element from becoming jammed in the coolant tube.

  8. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hockaday, R.

    1998-12-31

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  9. Effect of atmospherics on beamforming accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    Two mathematical representations of noise due to atmospheric turbulence are presented. These representations are derived and used in computer simulations of the Bartlett Estimate implementation of beamforming. Beamforming is an array processing technique employing an array of acoustic sensors used to determine the bearing of an acoustic source. Atmospheric wind conditions introduce noise into the beamformer output. Consequently, the accuracy of the process is degraded and the bearing of the acoustic source is falsely indicated or impossible to determine. The two representations of noise presented here are intended to quantify the effects of mean wind passing over the array of sensors and to correct for these effects. The first noise model is an idealized case. The effect of the mean wind is incorporated as a change in the propagation velocity of the acoustic wave. This yields an effective phase shift applied to each term of the spatial correlation matrix in the Bartlett Estimate. The resultant error caused by this model can be corrected in closed form in the beamforming algorithm. The second noise model acts to change the true direction of propagation at the beginning of the beamforming process. A closed form correction for this model is not available. Efforts to derive effective means to reduce the contributions of the noise have not been successful. In either case, the maximum error introduced by the wind is a beam shift of approximately three degrees. That is, the bearing of the acoustic source is indicated at a point a few degrees from the true bearing location. These effects are not quite as pronounced as those seen in experimental results. Sidelobes are false indications of acoustic sources in the beamformer output away from the true bearing angle. The sidelobes that are observed in experimental results are not caused by these noise models. The effects of mean wind passing over the sensor array as modeled here do not alter the beamformer output as

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring irradiated fuel profiles

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.

    1982-01-01

    A new apparatus is used to substantially instantaneously obtain a profile of an object, for example a spent fuel assembly, which profile (when normalized) has unexpectedly been found to be substantially identical to the normalized profile of the burnup monitor Cs-137 obtained with a germanium detector. That profile can be used without normalization in a new method of identifying and monitoring in order to determine for example whether any of the fuel has been removed. Alternatively, two other new methods involve calibrating that profile so as to obtain a determination of fuel burnup (which is important for complying with safeguards requirements, for utilizing fuel to an optimal extent, and for storing spent fuel in a minimal amount of space). Using either of these two methods of determining burnup, one can reduce the required measurement time significantly (by more than an order of magnitude) over existing methods, yet retain equal or only slightly reduced accuracy.

  11. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (ReFUEL). ReFUEL is a world-class research and testing facility dedicated to future fuels and advanced heavy-duty vehicle research, located in Denver, Colorado.

  12. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  13. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  14. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  15. Microscale Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

    2005-11-03

    Perhaprs some of the most innovative work on fuel cells has been the research dedicated to applying silicon fabrication techniques to fuel cells technology creating low power microscale fuel cells applicable to microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS), microsensors, cell phones, PDA’s, and other low power (0.001 to 5 We) applications. In this small power range, fuel cells offer the decoupling of the energy converter from the energy storage which may enable longer operating times and instant or near instant charging. To date, most of the microscale fuel cells being developed have been based on proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. This section will discuss requirements and considerations that need to be addressed in the development of microscale fuel cells, as well as some proposed designs and fabrication strategies.

  16. Alternative aircraft fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA is studying the characteristics of future aircraft fuels produced from either petroleum or nonpetroleum sources such as oil shale or coal. These future hydrocarbon based fuels may have chemical and physical properties that are different from present aviation turbine fuels. This research is aimed at determining what those characteristics may be, how present aircraft and engine components and materials would be affected by fuel specification changes, and what changes in both aircraft and engine design would be required to utilize these future fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety. This fuels technology program was organized to include both in-house and contract research on the synthesis and characterization of fuels, component evaluations of combustors, turbines, and fuel systems, and, eventually, full-scale engine demonstrations. A review of the various elements of the program and significant results obtained so far are presented.

  17. Fuel quality combustion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naegeli, D. W.; Moses, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A high pressure research combustor operating over a wide range of burner inlet conditions was used to determine the effects of fuel molecular structure on soot formation. Six test fuels with equal hydrogen content (12.8%) were blended to stress different molecular components and final boiling points. The fuels containing high concentrations (20%) of polycyclic aromatics and partially saturated polycyclic structures such as tetralin, produced more soot than would be expected from a hydrogen content correlation for typical petroleum based fuels. Fuels containing naphthenes such as decalin agreed with the hydrogen content correlation. The contribution of polycyclic aromatics to soot formation was equivalent to a reduction in fuel hydrogen content of about one percent. The fuel sensitivity to soot formation due to the polycyclic aromatic contribution decreased as burner inlet pressure and fuel/air ratio increased.

  18. Accuracy of quantitative visual soil assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; Heuvelink, Gerard; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Wallinga, Jakob; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Essen, Everhard; Moolenaar, Simon; Verhoeven, Frank; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Visual soil assessment (VSA) is a method to assess soil quality visually, when standing in the field. VSA is increasingly used by farmers, farm organisations and companies, because it is rapid and cost-effective, and because looking at soil provides understanding about soil functioning. Often VSA is regarded as subjective, so there is a need to verify VSA. Also, many VSAs have not been fine-tuned for contrasting soil types. This could lead to wrong interpretation of soil quality and soil functioning when contrasting sites are compared to each other. We wanted to assess accuracy of VSA, while taking into account soil type. The first objective was to test whether quantitative visual field observations, which form the basis in many VSAs, could be validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The second objective was to assess whether quantitative visual field observations are reproducible, when used by observers with contrasting backgrounds. For the validation study, we made quantitative visual observations at 26 cattle farms. Farms were located at sand, clay and peat soils in the North Friesian Woodlands, the Netherlands. Quantitative visual observations evaluated were grass cover, number of biopores, number of roots, soil colour, soil structure, number of earthworms, number of gley mottles and soil compaction. Linear regression analysis showed that four out of eight quantitative visual observations could be well validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The following quantitative visual observations correlated well with standardized field or laboratory measurements: grass cover with classified images of surface cover; number of roots with root dry weight; amount of large structure elements with mean weight diameter; and soil colour with soil organic matter content. Correlation coefficients were greater than 0.3, from which half of the correlations were significant. For the reproducibility study, a group of 9 soil scientists and 7

  19. Testing the accuracy of synthetic stellar libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Lucimara P.; Coelho, Paula

    2007-11-01

    One of the main ingredients of stellar population synthesis models is a library of stellar spectra. Both empirical and theoretical libraries are used for this purpose, and the question about which one is preferable is still debated in the literature. Empirical and theoretical libraries are being improved significantly over the years, and many libraries have become available lately. However, it is not clear in the literature what are the advantages of using each of these new libraries, and how far behind models are compared to observations. Here we compare in detail some of the major theoretical libraries available in the literature with observations, aiming at detecting weaknesses and strengths from the stellar population modelling point of view. Our test is twofold: we compared model predictions and observations for broad-band colours and for high-resolution spectral features. Concerning the broad-band colours, we measured the stellar colour given by three recent sets of model atmospheres and flux distributions, and compared them with a recent UBVRIJHK calibration which is mostly based on empirical data. We found that the models can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the stellar colours for a fair interval in effective temperatures and gravities. The exceptions are (1) the U - B colour, where the models are typically redder than the observations, and (2) the very cool stars in general (V - K >~ 3). Castelli & Kurucz is the set of models that best reproduce the bluest colours (U - B, B - V) while Gustafsson et al. and Brott & Hauschildt more accurately predict the visual colours. The three sets of models perform in a similar way for the infrared colours. Concerning the high-resolution spectral features, we measured 35 spectral indices defined in the literature on three high-resolution synthetic libraries, and compared them with the observed measurements given by three empirical libraries. The measured indices cover the wavelength range from ~3500 to ~8700Å. We

  20. Mechanical modeling of porous oxide fuel pellet A Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Nukala, Phani K; Barai, Pallab; Simunovic, Srdjan; Ott, Larry J

    2009-10-01

    A poro-elasto-plastic material model has been developed to capture the response of oxide fuels inside the nuclear reactors under operating conditions. Behavior of the oxide fuel and variation in void volume fraction under mechanical loading as predicted by the developed model has been reported in this article. The significant effect of void volume fraction on the overall stress distribution of the fuel pellet has also been described. An important oxide fuel issue that can have significant impact on the fuel performance is the mechanical response of oxide fuel pellet and clad system. Specifically, modeling the thermo-mechanical response of the fuel pellet in terms of its thermal expansion, mechanical deformation, swelling due to void formation and evolution, and the eventual contact of the fuel with the clad is of significant interest in understanding the fuel-clad mechanical interaction (FCMI). These phenomena are nonlinear and coupled since reduction in the fuel-clad gap affects thermal conductivity of the gap, which in turn affects temperature distribution within the fuel and the material properties of the fuel. Consequently, in order to accurately capture fuel-clad gap closure, we need to account for fuel swelling due to generation, retention, and evolution of fission gas in addition to the usual thermal expansion and mechanical deformation. Both fuel chemistry and microstructure also have a significant effect on the nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles. Fuel-clad gap closure leading to eventual contact of the fuel with the clad introduces significant stresses in the clad, which makes thermo-mechanical response of the clad even more relevant. The overall aim of this test problem is to incorporate the above features in order to accurately capture fuel-clad mechanical interaction. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems with increasing multi-physics coupling features, modeling accuracy, and complexity are defined with the