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Sample records for accurate analytical model

  1. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  2. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  4. Accurate Analytic Results for the Steady State Distribution of the Eigen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guan-Rong; Saakian, David B.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Eigen model of molecular evolution is popular in studying complex biological and biomedical systems. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation method, we have calculated analytic equations for the steady state distribution of the Eigen model with a relative accuracy of O(1/N), where N is the length of genome. Our results can be applied for the case of small genome length N, as well as the cases where the direct numerics can not give accurate result, e.g., the tail of distribution.

  5. Development and application of accurate analytical models for single active electron potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michelle; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Becker, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The single active electron (SAE) approximation is a theoretical model frequently employed to study scenarios in which inner-shell electrons may productively be treated as frozen spectators to a physical process of interest, and accurate analytical approximations for these potentials are sought as a useful simulation tool. Density function theory is often used to construct a SAE potential, requiring that a further approximation for the exchange correlation functional be enacted. In this study, we employ the Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) modification to the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method to reduce the complexity of the problem to the straightforward solution of a system of linear equations through simple arguments regarding the behavior of the exchange-correlation potential in regions where a single orbital dominates. We employ this method for the solution of atomic and molecular potentials, and use the resultant curve to devise a systematic construction for highly accurate and useful analytical approximations for several systems. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship, Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  6. New possibilities of accurate particle characterisation by applying direct boundary models to analytical centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Johannes; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Süß, Sebastian; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Analytical centrifugation (AC) is a powerful technique for the characterisation of nanoparticles in colloidal systems. As a direct and absolute technique it requires no calibration or measurements of standards. Moreover, it offers simple experimental design and handling, high sample throughput as well as moderate investment costs. However, the full potential of AC for nanoparticle size analysis requires the development of powerful data analysis techniques. In this study we show how the application of direct boundary models to AC data opens up new possibilities in particle characterisation. An accurate analysis method, successfully applied to sedimentation data obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) in the past, was used for the first time in analysing AC data. Unlike traditional data evaluation routines for AC using a designated number of radial positions or scans, direct boundary models consider the complete sedimentation boundary, which results in significantly better statistics. We demonstrate that meniscus fitting, as well as the correction of radius and time invariant noise significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and prevents the occurrence of false positives due to optical artefacts. Moreover, hydrodynamic non-ideality can be assessed by the residuals obtained from the analysis. The sedimentation coefficient distributions obtained by AC are in excellent agreement with the results from AUC. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate numerical sedimentation data to study the influence of diffusion on the obtained distributions. Our approach is further validated using polystyrene and silica nanoparticles. In particular, we demonstrate the strength of AC for analysing multimodal distributions by means of gold nanoparticles.

  7. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  8. New possibilities of accurate particle characterisation by applying direct boundary models to analytical centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Johannes; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Süss, Sebastian; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    Analytical centrifugation (AC) is a powerful technique for the characterisation of nanoparticles in colloidal systems. As a direct and absolute technique it requires no calibration or measurements of standards. Moreover, it offers simple experimental design and handling, high sample throughput as well as moderate investment costs. However, the full potential of AC for nanoparticle size analysis requires the development of powerful data analysis techniques. In this study we show how the application of direct boundary models to AC data opens up new possibilities in particle characterisation. An accurate analysis method, successfully applied to sedimentation data obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) in the past, was used for the first time in analysing AC data. Unlike traditional data evaluation routines for AC using a designated number of radial positions or scans, direct boundary models consider the complete sedimentation boundary, which results in significantly better statistics. We demonstrate that meniscus fitting, as well as the correction of radius and time invariant noise significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and prevents the occurrence of false positives due to optical artefacts. Moreover, hydrodynamic non-ideality can be assessed by the residuals obtained from the analysis. The sedimentation coefficient distributions obtained by AC are in excellent agreement with the results from AUC. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate numerical sedimentation data to study the influence of diffusion on the obtained distributions. Our approach is further validated using polystyrene and silica nanoparticles. In particular, we demonstrate the strength of AC for analysing multimodal distributions by means of gold nanoparticles. PMID:25789666

  9. Accurate analytical method for the extraction of solar cell model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, J. C. H.; Chan, D. S. H.; Phillips, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    Single diode solar cell model parameters are rapidly extracted from experimental data by means of the presently derived analytical expressions. The parameter values obtained have a less than 5 percent error for most solar cells, in light of the extraction of model parameters for two cells of differing quality which were compared with parameters extracted by means of the iterative method.

  10. Accurate analytical modelling of cosmic ray induced failure rates of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Friedhelm D.

    2009-06-01

    A new, simple and efficient approach is presented to conduct estimations of the cosmic ray induced failure rate for high voltage silicon power devices early in the design phase. This allows combining common design issues such as device losses and safe operating area with the constraints imposed by the reliability to result in a better and overall more efficient design methodology. Starting from an experimental and theoretical background brought forth a few yeas ago [Kabza H et al. Cosmic radiation as a cause for power device failure and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 9-12, Zeller HR. Cosmic ray induced breakdown in high voltage semiconductor devices, microscopic model and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 339-40, and Matsuda H et al. Analysis of GTO failure mode during d.c. blocking. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 221-5], an exact solution of the failure rate integral is derived and presented in a form which lends itself to be combined with the results available from commercial semiconductor simulation tools. Hence, failure rate integrals can be obtained with relative ease for realistic two- and even three-dimensional semiconductor geometries. Two case studies relating to IGBT cell design and planar junction termination layout demonstrate the purpose of the method.

  11. Accurate semi analytical model of an optical fiber having Kerr nonlinearity using a robust nonlinear unconstrained optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RoyChoudhury, Raja; RoyChoudhury, Arundhati

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a semi analytical formulation of modal properties of a non linear optical fiber having Kerr non linearity with a three parameter approximation of fundamental modal field. The minimization of core parameter ( U) which involves Kerr nonlinearity through the non-stationary expression of propagation constant, is carried out by Nelder-Mead Simplex method of non linear unconstrained minimization, suitable for problems with non-smooth functions as the method does not require any derivative information. Use of three parameters in modal approximation and implementation of Simplex methods enables our semi analytical description to be an alternative way having less computational burden for calculation of modal parameters than full numerical methods.

  12. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-11-03

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  13. Anatomically accurate individual face modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C; Sung, Eric

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new 3D face model of a specific person constructed from the anatomical perspective. By exploiting the laser range data, a 3D facial mesh precisely representing the skin geometry is reconstructed. Based on the geometric facial mesh, we develop a deformable multi-layer skin model. It takes into account the nonlinear stress-strain relationship and dynamically simulates the non-homogenous behavior of the real skin. The face model also incorporates a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators and underlying skull structure. Lagrangian mechanics governs the facial motion dynamics, dictating the dynamic deformation of facial skin in response to the muscle contraction. PMID:15455936

  14. An accurate analytic representation of the water pair potential.

    PubMed

    Cencek, Wojciech; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Leforestier, Claude; van Harrevelt, Rob; van der Avoird, Ad

    2008-08-28

    The ab initio water dimer interaction energies obtained from coupled cluster calculations and used in the CC-pol water pair potential (Bukowski et al., Science, 2007, 315, 1249) have been refitted to a site-site form containing eight symmetry-independent sites in each monomer and denoted as CC-pol-8s. Initially, the site-site functions were assumed in a B-spline form, which allowed a precise optimization of the positions of the sites. Next, these functions were assumed in the standard exponential plus inverse powers form. The root mean square error of the CC-pol-8s fit with respect to the 2510 ab initio points is 0.10 kcal mol(-1), compared to 0.42 kcal mol(-1) of the CC-pol fit (0.010 kcal mol(-1) compared to 0.089 kcal mol(-1) for points with negative interaction energies). The energies of the stationary points in the CC-pol-8s potential are considerably more accurate than in the case of CC-pol. The water dimer vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum predicted by the CC-pol-8s potential agrees substantially and systematically better with experiment than the already very accurate spectrum predicted by CC-pol, while specific features that could not be accurately predicted previously now agree very well with experiment. This shows that the uncertainties of the fit were the largest source of error in the previous predictions and that the present potential sets a new standard of accuracy in investigations of the water dimer. PMID:18688514

  15. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  16. Pre-Modeling Ensures Accurate Solid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2010-01-01

    Successful solid modeling requires a well-organized design tree. The design tree is a list of all the object's features and the sequential order in which they are modeled. The solid-modeling process is faster and less prone to modeling errors when the design tree is a simple and geometrically logical definition of the modeled object. Few high…

  17. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  18. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  19. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  20. Analytic Time Depending Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Considerando las hip6tesis de Chandrasekhar para el estudjo de la GalActicaq se han desarrollado varios modelos analiticos integrables con simetria axial y dependientes del . . By considering Chandrasekhar hypotheses +or the study o+ Galactic Dynamics, several integrable analytic axisymmetric time-depending galactic models have been developed. Ke ords; GALAXY-DYNAMICS - GALAXY-STRUCTURE

  1. University Macro Analytic Simulation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert; Gulko, Warren

    The University Macro Analytic Simulation System (UMASS) has been designed as a forecasting tool to help university administrators budgeting decisions. Alternative budgeting strategies can be tested on a computer model and then an operational alternative can be selected on the basis of the most desirable projected outcome. UMASS uses readily…

  2. Highly accurate analytical energy of a two-dimensional exciton in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Ngoc-Tram D.; Nguyen, Duy-Anh P.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2016-08-01

    Explicit expressions are given for analytically describing the dependence of the energy of a two-dimensional exciton on magnetic field intensity. These expressions are highly accurate with the precision of up to three decimal places for the whole range of the magnetic field intensity. The results are shown for the ground state and some excited states; moreover, we have all formulae to obtain similar expressions of any excited state. Analysis of numerical results shows that the precision of three decimal places is maintained for the excited states with the principal quantum number of up to n=100.

  3. Accurate analytical approximation of the OTFTs surface potential by means of the Lagrange Reversion Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colalongo, Luigi; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Torricelli, Fabrizio; Kovács-Vajna, Zsolt Miklos

    2015-12-01

    Surface-potential-based mathematical models are among the most accurate and physically based compact models of Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs) and, in turn, of Organic Thin-Film Transistors (OTFTs), available today. However, the need for iterative computations of the surface potential limits their computational efficiency and diffusion in CAD applications. The existing closed-form approximations of the surface potential are based on regional approximations and empirical smoothing functions that could result not enough accurate to model OTFTs and, in particular, transconductances and transcapacitances. In this paper we present an accurate and computationally efficient closed-form approximation of the surface potential, based on the Lagrange Reversion Theorem, that can be exploited in advanced surface-potential-based OTFTs and TFTs device models.

  4. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  5. Highly accurate analytic formulae for projectile motion subjected to quadratic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    The classical phenomenon of motion of a projectile fired (thrown) into the horizon through resistive air charging a quadratic drag onto the object is revisited in this paper. No exact solution is known that describes the full physical event under such an exerted resistance force. Finding elegant analytical approximations for the most interesting engineering features of dynamical behavior of the projectile is the principal target. Within this purpose, some analytical explicit expressions are derived that accurately predict the maximum height, its arrival time as well as the flight range of the projectile at the highest ascent. The most significant property of the proposed formulas is that they are not restricted to the initial speed and firing angle of the object, nor to the drag coefficient of the medium. In combination with the available approximations in the literature, it is possible to gain information about the flight and complete the picture of a trajectory with high precision, without having to numerically simulate the full governing equations of motion.

  6. Accurate astronomical atmospheric dispersion models in ZEMAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, P.

    2014-07-01

    ZEMAX provides a standard built-in atmospheric model to simulate atmospheric refraction and dispersion. This model has been compared with other ones to assess its intrinsic accuracy, critical for very demanding application like ADCs for AO-assisted extremely large telescopes. A revised simple model, based on updated published data of the air refractivity, is proposed by using the "Gradient 5" surface of Zemax. At large zenith angles (65 deg), discrepancies up to 100 mas in the differential refraction are expected near the UV atmospheric transmission cutoff. When high-accuracy modeling is required, the latter model should be preferred.

  7. Analytical modeling of the steady radiative shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boireau, L.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Clique, C.

    2006-06-01

    In a paper dated 2000 [1], a fully analytical theory of the radiative shock has been presented. This early model had been used to design [2] radiative shock experiments at the Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers (LULI) [3 5]. It became obvious from numerical simulations [6, 7] that this model had to be improved in order to accurately recover experiments. In this communication, we present a new theory in which the ionization rates in the unshocked (bar{Z_1}) and shocked (bar{Z_2} neq bar{Z_1}) material, respectively, are included. Associated changes in excitation energy are also taken into account. We study the influence of these effects on the compression and temperature in the shocked medium.

  8. Modeling Biodegradation and Reactive Transport: Analytical and Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y; Glascoe, L

    2005-06-09

    The computational modeling of the biodegradation of contaminated groundwater systems accounting for biochemical reactions coupled to contaminant transport is a valuable tool for both the field engineer/planner with limited computational resources and the expert computational researcher less constrained by time and computer power. There exists several analytical and numerical computer models that have been and are being developed to cover the practical needs put forth by users to fulfill this spectrum of computational demands. Generally, analytical models provide rapid and convenient screening tools running on very limited computational power, while numerical models can provide more detailed information with consequent requirements of greater computational time and effort. While these analytical and numerical computer models can provide accurate and adequate information to produce defensible remediation strategies, decisions based on inadequate modeling output or on over-analysis can have costly and risky consequences. In this chapter we consider both analytical and numerical modeling approaches to biodegradation and reactive transport. Both approaches are discussed and analyzed in terms of achieving bioremediation goals, recognizing that there is always a tradeoff between computational cost and the resolution of simulated systems.

  9. Accurate spectral modeling for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gupta, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Direct line-by-line integration and quasi-random band model techniques are employed to calculate the spectral transmittance and total band absorptance of 4.7 micron CO, 4.3 micron CO2, 15 micron CO2, and 5.35 micron NO bands. Results are obtained for different pressures, temperatures, and path lengths. These are compared with available theoretical and experimental investigations. For each gas, extensive tabulations of results are presented for comparative purposes. In almost all cases, line-by-line results are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental values. The range of validity of other models and correlations are discussed.

  10. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  11. Accurate FDTD modelling for dispersive media using rational function and particle swarm optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Haejun; Ha, Sang-Gyu; Choi, Jaehoon; Jung, Kyung-Young

    2015-07-01

    This article presents an accurate finite-difference time domain (FDTD) dispersive modelling suitable for complex dispersive media. A quadratic complex rational function (QCRF) is used to characterise their dispersive relations. To obtain accurate coefficients of QCRF, in this work, we use an analytical approach and a particle swarm optimisation (PSO) simultaneously. In specific, an analytical approach is used to obtain the QCRF matrix-solving equation and PSO is applied to adjust a weighting function of this equation. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the validity of the proposed FDTD dispersion model.

  12. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  13. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  14. Analytic Model of Antenna Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2008-11-01

    RF sheaths are generated on ICRF antennas whenever the launched fast wave also drives a slow wave, e.g. when the magnetic field is tilted (not perpendicular to the current straps). A new approach to sheath modeling was recently proposed in which the RF waves are computed using a modified boundary condition at the sheath surface to describe the plasma-sheath coupling. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for antenna sheaths by a model electromagnetic perturbation calculation, treating the B field tilt as a small parameter. Analytic expressions are obtained for the sheath voltage and the rf electric field parallel to B in both sheath and plasma regions, including the Child-Langmuir (self-consistency) constraint. It is shown that the plasma corrections to the sheath voltage (which screen the rf field) can be important. The simple vacuum-field sheath-voltage estimate is obtained as a limiting case. Implications for antenna codes such as TOPICA will be discussed. D.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006).

  15. Analytic Modeling of Pressurization and Cryogenic Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Jeremy H.

    2010-01-01

    An analytic model for pressurization and cryogenic propellant conditions during all mission phases of any liquid rocket based vehicle has been developed and validated. The model assumes the propellant tanks to be divided into five nodes and also implements an empirical correlation for liquid stratification if desired. The five nodes include a tank wall node exposed to ullage gas, an ullage gas node, a saturated propellant vapor node at the liquid-vapor interface, a liquid node, and a tank wall node exposed to liquid. The conservation equations of mass and energy are then applied across all the node boundaries and, with the use of perfect gas assumptions, explicit solutions for ullage and liquid conditions are derived. All fluid properties are updated real time using NIST Refprop.1 Further, mass transfer at the liquid-vapor interface is included in the form of evaporation, bulk boiling of liquid propellant, and condensation given the appropriate conditions for each. Model validation has proven highly successful against previous analytic models and various Saturn era test data and reasonably successful against more recent LH2 tank self pressurization ground test data. Finally, this model has been applied to numerous design iterations for the Altair Lunar Lander, Ares V Core Stage, and Ares V Earth Departure Stage in order to characterize Helium and autogenous pressurant requirements, propellant lost to evaporation and thermodynamic venting to maintain propellant conditions, and non-uniform tank draining in configurations utilizing multiple LH2 or LO2 propellant tanks. In conclusion, this model provides an accurate and efficient means of analyzing multiple design configurations for any cryogenic propellant tank in launch, low-acceleration coast, or in-space maneuvering and supplies the user with pressurization requirements, unusable propellants from evaporation and liquid stratification, and general ullage gas, liquid, and tank wall conditions as functions of time.

  16. An accurate analytic approximation to the non-linear change in volume of solids with applied pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    An accurate analytic expression for the nonlinear change of the volume of a solid as a function of applied pressure is of great interest in high-pressure experimentation. It is found that a two-parameter analytic expression, fits the experimental volume-change data to within a few percent over the entire experimentally attainable pressure range. Results are presented for 24 different materials including metals, ceramic semiconductors, polymers, and ionic and rare-gas solids.

  17. Simple analytic model for astrophysical S factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Beard, M.; Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a physically transparent analytic model of astrophysical S factors as a function of a center-of-mass energy E of colliding nuclei (below and above the Coulomb barrier) for nonresonant fusion reactions. For any given reaction, the S(E) model contains four parameters [two of which approximate the barrier potential, U(r)]. They are easily interpolated along many reactions involving isotopes of the same elements; they give accurate practical expressions for S(E) with only several input parameters for many reactions. The model reproduces the suppression of S(E) at low energies (of astrophysical importance) due to the shape of the low-r wing of U(r). The model can be used to reconstruct U(r) from computed or measured S(E). For illustration, we parametrize our recent calculations of S(E) (using the Sao Paulo potential and the barrier penetration formalism) for 946 reactions involving stable and unstable isotopes of C, O, Ne, and Mg (with nine parameters for all reactions involving many isotopes of the same elements, e.g., C+O). In addition, we analyze astrophysically important {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction, compare theoretical models with experimental data, and discuss the problem of interpolating reliably known S(E) values to low energies (E < or approx. 2-3 MeV).

  18. An analytic performance model of disk arrays and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    As disk arrays become widely used, tools for understanding and analyzing their performance become increasingly important. In particular, performance models can be invaluable in both configuring and designing disk arrays. Accurate analytic performance models are desirable over other types of models because they can be quickly evaluated, are applicable under a wide range of system and workload parameters, and can be manipulated by a range of mathematical techniques. Unfortunately, analytical performance models of disk arrays are difficult to formulate due to the presence of queuing and fork-join synchronization; a disk array request is broken up into independent disk requests which must all complete to satisfy the original request. We develop, validate, and apply an analytic performance model for disk arrays. We derive simple equations for approximating their utilization, response time, and throughput. We then validate the analytic model via simulation and investigate the accuracy of each approximation used in deriving the analytical model. Finally, we apply the analytical model to derive an equation for the optimal unit of data striping in disk arrays.

  19. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  20. Analytic barrage attack model. Final report, January 1986-January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    St Ledger, J.W.; Naegeli, R.E.; Dowden, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    An analytic model is developed for a nuclear barrage attack, assuming weapons with no aiming error and a cookie-cutter damage function. The model is then extended with approximations for the effects of aiming error and distance damage sigma. The final result is a fast running model which calculates probability of damage for a barrage attack. The probability of damage is accurate to within seven percent or better, for weapon reliabilities of 50 to 100 percent, distance damage sigmas of 0.5 or less, and zero to very large circular error probabilities. FORTRAN 77 coding is included in the report for the analytic model and for a numerical model used to check the analytic results.

  1. Evaluation of one dimensional analytical models for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narendra S.; Kuusk, Andres

    1992-01-01

    The SAIL model for one-dimensional homogeneous vegetation canopies has been modified to include the specular reflectance and hot spot effects. This modified model and the Nilson-Kuusk model are evaluated by comparing the reflectances given by them against those given by a radiosity-based computer model, Diana, for a set of canopies, characterized by different leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution (LAD). It is shown that for homogeneous canopies, the analytical models are generally quite accurate in the visible region, but not in the infrared region. For architecturally realistic heterogeneous canopies of the type found in nature, these models fall short. These shortcomings are quantified.

  2. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Wei; Ju, Lili; Gunzburger, Max; Price, Stephen; Ringler, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  3. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance—Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  4. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance-Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-02-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  5. Fixing a rigorous formalism for the accurate analytic derivation of halo properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Enric; Salvador-Solé, Eduard; Domènech, Guillem; Manrique, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    We establish a one-to-one correspondence between virialized haloes and their seeds, namely peaks with a given density contrast at appropriate Gaussian-filtering radii, in the initial Gaussian random density field. This fixes a rigorous formalism for the analytic derivation of halo properties from the linear power spectrum of density perturbations in any hierarchical cosmology. The typical spherically averaged density profile and mass function of haloes so obtained match those found in numerical simulations.

  6. Adaptive Analytic Mapping Procedures for Simple and Accurate Calculation of Scattering Lengths and Photoassociation Absorption Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Meshkov, Vladimir V.; Stolyarov, Andrej V.

    2009-06-01

    We have shown that one and two-parameter analytical mapping functions such as r(y;bar{r}, α)=bar{r}[1 + {1}/{α} tan(π y/2)] and r(y;bar{r})=bar{r} [ {1+ y}/{1-y} ] transform the conventional radial Schrödinger equation into equivalent alternate forms {d^2φ(y)}/{dy^2} = [{π^2}/{4}+({2μ}/ {hbar^2} ) g^2(y) [E - U(r(y))

  7. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters' utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  8. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  9. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  10. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:24209920

  11. Knowledge Generation Model for Visual Analytics.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Dominik; Stoffel, Andreas; Stoffel, Florian; Kwon, Bum Chul; Ellis, Geoffrey; Keim, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Visual analytics enables us to analyze huge information spaces in order to support complex decision making and data exploration. Humans play a central role in generating knowledge from the snippets of evidence emerging from visual data analysis. Although prior research provides frameworks that generalize this process, their scope is often narrowly focused so they do not encompass different perspectives at different levels. This paper proposes a knowledge generation model for visual analytics that ties together these diverse frameworks, yet retains previously developed models (e.g., KDD process) to describe individual segments of the overall visual analytic processes. To test its utility, a real world visual analytics system is compared against the model, demonstrating that the knowledge generation process model provides a useful guideline when developing and evaluating such systems. The model is used to effectively compare different data analysis systems. Furthermore, the model provides a common language and description of visual analytic processes, which can be used for communication between researchers. At the end, our model reflects areas of research that future researchers can embark on. PMID:26356874

  12. Water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2010-05-01

    Cotter and Bokhove (Journal of Engineering Mathematics 2010) derived a variational water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity. In one limit, it leads to Luke's variational principle for potential flow water waves. In the another limit it leads to the depth-averaged shallow water equations including vertical vorticity. Presently, focus will be put on the Hamiltonian formulation of the variational model and its boundary conditions.

  13. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  14. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  15. Analytical Grid Generation for accurate representation of clearances in CFD for Screw Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, S.; Kovačević, A.; Stošić, N.

    2015-08-01

    One of the major factors affecting the performance prediction of twin screw compressors by use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is the accuracy with which the leakage gaps are captured by the discretization methods. The accuracy of mapping leakage flows can be improved by increasing the number of grid points on the profile. However, this method faces limitations when it comes to the complex deforming domains of a twin screw compressor because the computational time increases tremendously. In order to address this problem, an analytical grid distribution procedure is formulated that can independently refine the region of high importance for leakage flows in the interlobe space. This paper describes the procedure of analytical grid generation with the refined mesh in the interlobe area and presents a test case to show the influence of the mesh refinement in that area on the performance prediction. It is shown that by using this method, the flow domains in the vicinity of the interlobe gap and the blowhole area are refined which improves accuracy of leakage flow predictions.

  16. Analytical models of slug tests

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper, attempts are made to develop solutions to various models of slug tests that may be applicable in analyzing the results of such tests where existing solutions are inadequate. Various geometries that may be encountered in heterogeneous systems such as fractured rocks are considered. Solutions are presented for linear flow, radial flow with boundaries, two layer, and concentric composite models with different flow geometries between the inner and outer region. Solutions are obtained in Laplace space and inverted back to real space numerically. Type curves are presented for each solution. Analyses of the type curves and derivative response curves reveal that many curves have unique shapes only for certain combination of the flow parameters and the distance. Other sets of type curves are similar in shape, although log-log plots and derivative plots may emphasize some features that may not be apparent in semilog plots. These results show that slug tests suffer problems of nonuniqueness to a greater extent than other well tests.

  17. An analytic model for the Phobos surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived to model the surface topography and the normal to the surface of Phobos. The analytic expressions are comprised of a spherical harmonic expansion for the global figure of Phobos, augmented by addition terms for the large crater Stickney and other craters. Over 300 craters were measured in more than 100 Viking Orbiter images to produce the model. In general, the largest craters were measured since they have a significant effect on topography. The topographic model derived has a global spatial and topographic accuracy ranging from about 100 m in areas having the highest resolution and convergent, stereo coverage, up to 500 m in the poorest areas.

  18. Analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Seough, J. J.; Yoon, P. H.

    2009-09-15

    The present paper is concerned with analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations for electromagnetic waves propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Specifically, effects of finite betas on two slow modes, namely, the left-hand circularly polarized ion-cyclotron mode and the right-hand circularly polarized whistler mode, are investigated. Analytic models of the warm plasma dispersion relations are constructed on the basis of conjecture and upon comparisons with numerically found roots. It is shown that the model solutions are good substitutes for actual roots. The significance of the present work in the context of nonlinear plasma research is discussed.

  19. WELLHEAD ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODEL FOR WINDOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    WhAEM2000 (wellhead analytic element model for Win 98/00/NT/XP) is a public domain, ground-water flow model designed to facilitate capture zone delineation and protection area mapping in support of the State's and Tribe's Wellhead Protection Programs (WHPP) and Source Water Asses...

  20. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINITIES IN FACTOR ANALYTIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When interpreting results from factor analytic models as used in receptor modeling, it is important to quantify the uncertainties in those results. For example, if the presence of a species on one of the factors is necessary to interpret the factor as originating from a certain ...

  1. ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of ground-water flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a ground-water model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM...

  2. Palm: Easing the Burden of Analytical Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, Nathan R.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2014-06-01

    Analytical (predictive) application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult because they must be both accurate and concise. To ease the burden of performance modeling, we developed Palm, a modeling tool that combines top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. To express insight, Palm defines a source code modeling annotation language. By coordinating models and source code, Palm's models are `first-class' and reproducible. Unlike prior work, Palm formally links models, functions, and measurements. As a result, Palm (a) uses functions to either abstract or express complexity (b) generates hierarchical models (representing an application's static and dynamic structure); and (c) automatically incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. We discuss generating models for three different applications.

  3. Analytical models for electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-04-01

    This work presents analytical models for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) electrically thin lenses and reflectors. The 2D formulation is based on infinite current line sources, whereas the 3D formulation is based on electrically small dipoles. These models emulate the energy convergence of an electrically thin flat lens and reflector when illuminated by a plane wave with specific polarization. The advantages of these models are twofold: first, prediction of the performance of electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors can be made significantly faster than full-wave simulators, and second, providing insight on the performance of these electrically thin devices. The analytic models were validated by comparison with full-wave simulation for several interesting examples. The validation results show that the focal point of the electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors can be accurately predicted through a design that assumes low coupling between different layers of an inhomogeneous media. PMID:26366759

  4. A novel fast and accurate pseudo-analytical simulation approach for MOAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron, É.; Charara, A.; Abdelfattah, A.; Gratadour, D.; Keyes, D.; Ltaief, H.; Morel, C.; Vidal, F.; Sevin, A.; Rousset, G.

    2014-08-01

    Multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) is a novel adaptive optics (AO) technique for wide-field multi-object spectrographs (MOS). MOAO aims at applying dedicated wavefront corrections to numerous separated tiny patches spread over a large field of view (FOV), limited only by that of the telescope. The control of each deformable mirror (DM) is done individually using a tomographic reconstruction of the phase based on measurements from a number of wavefront sensors (WFS) pointing at natural and artificial guide stars in the field. We have developed a novel hybrid, pseudo-analytical simulation scheme, somewhere in between the end-to- end and purely analytical approaches, that allows us to simulate in detail the tomographic problem as well as noise and aliasing with a high fidelity, and including fitting and bandwidth errors thanks to a Fourier-based code. Our tomographic approach is based on the computation of the minimum mean square error (MMSE) reconstructor, from which we derive numerically the covariance matrix of the tomographic error, including aliasing and propagated noise. We are then able to simulate the point-spread function (PSF) associated to this covariance matrix of the residuals, like in PSF reconstruction algorithms. The advantage of our approach is that we compute the same tomographic reconstructor that would be computed when operating the real instrument, so that our developments open the way for a future on-sky implementation of the tomographic control, plus the joint PSF and performance estimation. The main challenge resides in the computation of the tomographic reconstructor which involves the inversion of a large matrix (typically 40 000 × 40 000 elements). To perform this computation efficiently, we chose an optimized approach based on the use of GPUs as accelerators and using an optimized linear algebra library: MORSE providing a significant speedup against standard CPU oriented libraries such as Intel MKL. Because the covariance matrix is

  5. Local Debonding and Fiber Breakage in Composite Materials Modeled Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    A prerequisite for full utilization of composite materials in aerospace components is accurate design and life prediction tools that enable the assessment of component performance and reliability. Such tools assist both structural analysts, who design and optimize structures composed of composite materials, and materials scientists who design and optimize the composite materials themselves. NASA Glenn Research Center's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/LPB/mac) addresses this need for composite design and life prediction tools by providing a widely applicable and accurate approach to modeling composite materials. Furthermore, MAC/GMC serves as a platform for incorporating new local models and capabilities that are under development at NASA, thus enabling these new capabilities to progress rapidly to a stage in which they can be employed by the code's end users.

  6. An Analytical Model for the Influence of Contact Resistance on Thermoelectric Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model is presented that can account for both electrical and hot and cold thermal contact resistances when calculating the efficiency of a thermoelectric generator. The model is compared to a numerical model of a thermoelectric leg for 16 different thermoelectric materials, as well as to the analytical models of Ebling et al. (J Electron Mater 39:1376, 2010) and Min and Rowe (J Power Sour 38:253, 1992). The model presented here is shown to accurately calculate the efficiency for all systems and all contact resistances considered, with an average difference in efficiency between the numerical model and the analytical model of -0.07 ± 0.35pp. This makes the model more accurate than previously published models. The maximum absolute difference in efficiency between the analytical model and the numerical model is 1.14pp for all materials and all contact resistances considered.

  7. An Accurate Temperature Correction Model for Thermocouple Hygrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred; de Jager, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques. In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38°C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration. The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25°C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  8. An accurate temperature correction model for thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A; de Jager, J M

    1982-02-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques.In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38 degrees C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration.The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25 degrees C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  9. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  10. On the importance of having accurate data for astrophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Francois

    2016-06-01

    The Herschel telescope and the ALMA and NOEMA interferometers have opened new windows of observation for wavelengths ranging from far infrared to sub-millimeter with spatial and spectral resolutions previously unmatched. To make the most of these observations, an accurate knowledge of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar media is essential.In this presentation, I will discuss what are the current needs of astrophysics in terms of molecular data and I will show that accurate molecular data are crucial for the proper determination of the physical conditions in molecular clouds.First, I will focus on collisional excitation studies that are needed for molecular lines modelling beyond the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) approach. In particular, I will show how new collisional data for the HCN and HNC isomers, two tracers of star forming conditions, have allowed solving the problem of their respective abundance in cold molecular clouds. I will also present the last collisional data that have been computed in order to analyse new highly resolved observations provided by the ALMA interferometer.Then, I will present the calculation of accurate rate constants for the F+H2 → HF+H and Cl+H2 ↔ HCl+H reactions, which have allowed a more accurate determination of the physical conditions in diffuse molecular clouds. I will also present the recent work on the ortho-para-H2 conversion due to hydrogen exchange that allow more accurate determination of the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio in the universe and that imply a significant revision of the cooling mechanism in astrophysical media.

  11. Accurate method of modeling cluster scaling relations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-hua; Li, Baojiu

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new method to model cluster scaling relations in modified gravity. Using a suite of nonradiative hydrodynamical simulations, we show that the scaling relations of accumulated gas quantities, such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (Compton-y parameter) and the x-ray Compton-y parameter, can be accurately predicted using the known results in the Λ CDM model with a precision of ˜3 % . This method provides a reliable way to analyze the gas physics in modified gravity using the less demanding and much more efficient pure cold dark matter simulations. Our results therefore have important theoretical and practical implications in constraining gravity using cluster surveys.

  12. Anisotropic Turbulence Modeling for Accurate Rod Bundle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baglietto, Emilio

    2006-07-01

    An improved anisotropic eddy viscosity model has been developed for accurate predictions of the thermal hydraulic performances of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. The proposed model adopts a non-linear formulation of the stress-strain relationship in order to include the reproduction of the anisotropic phenomena, and in combination with an optimized low-Reynolds-number formulation based on Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) to produce correct damping of the turbulent viscosity in the near wall region. This work underlines the importance of accurate anisotropic modeling to faithfully reproduce the scale of the turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels, by comparison with various isothermal and heated experimental cases. The very low scale secondary motion is responsible for the increased turbulence transport which produces a noticeable homogenization of the velocity distribution and consequently of the circumferential cladding temperature distribution, which is of main interest in bundle design. Various fully developed bare bundles test cases are shown for different geometrical and flow conditions, where the proposed model shows clearly improved predictions, in close agreement with experimental findings, for regular as well as distorted geometries. Finally the applicability of the model for practical bundle calculations is evaluated through its application in the high-Reynolds form on coarse grids, with excellent results. (author)

  13. Bond indices in solids: extended analytical model.

    PubMed

    Ponec, Robert

    2011-11-15

    The analytical model suggested some time ago for the calculation of bond indices in infinite periodical structures was reconsidered and extended so as to provide not only realistic estimate of the extent of electron sharing localized among individual pairs of the atoms in the lattice but also to detect the eventual presence of multicenter bonding in metallic solids. PMID:21823136

  14. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  15. Accurate Analytical and Statistical Approaches to Reduce O-C Discrepancies in the Precessional Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. J.; Marco, F. J.; López, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    The Hipparcos catalog provides a reference frame at optical wavelengths for the new International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). This new reference system was adopted following the resolution agreed at the 23rd IAU General Assembly held in Kyoto in 1997. Differences in the Hipparcos system of proper motions and the previous materialization of the reference frame, the FK5, are expected to be caused only by the combined effects of the motion of the equinox of the FK5 and the precession of the equator and the ecliptic. Several authors have pointed out an inconsistency between the differences in proper motion of the Hipparcos-FK5 and the correction of the precessional values derived from VLBI and lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations. Most of them have claimed that these discrepancies are due to slightly biased proper motions in the FK5 catalog. The different mathematical models that have been employed to explain these errors have not fully accounted for the discrepancies in the correction of the precessional parameters. Our goal here is to offer an explanation for this fact. We propose the use of independent parametric and nonparametric models. The introduction of a nonparametric model, combined with the inner product in the square integrable functions over the unitary sphere, would give us values which do not depend on the possible interdependencies existing in the data set. The evidence shows that zonal studies are needed. This would lead us to introduce a local nonparametric model. All these models will provide independent corrections to the precessional values, which could then be compared in order to study the reliability in each case. Finally, we obtain values for the precession corrections that are very consistent with those that are currently adopted.

  16. Analytical modeling for microwave and optical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Alessio; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface is an artificial structure composed by an ultrathin surface textured at a subwavelength scale. In the last years, metasurfaces have been revealed to be particularly useful in the design of electromagnetic scattering cancellation devices operating at microwave and optical frequencies. In this contribution we summarize our results about the analytical modelling of microwave and optical metasurfaces composed, respectively, by patterned metallic surfaces and arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles. The analytical results are compared with the numerical ones obtained with a proper set of full-wave simulations showing an excellent agreement.

  17. Analytic Model for the Rototranslational Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, F.; Bassan, M.; Pucacco, G.; Marconi, L.; Stanga, R.; Visco, M.

    2013-01-01

    We develop an analytic model to describe the motion of the RotoTranslational Torsion Pendulum PETER in a wide range of frequencies (from 1mHz up to 10-15Hz). We also try to explain some unexpected features we found in the data with only 1 soft degree of freedom and we estimate values for the misalignment angles and other parameters of the model.

  18. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry. PMID:20707461

  19. Automated statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J J

    1992-08-01

    The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) has been completely automated through computer software. The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems is one part of a complete quality control program used by the Remote Analytical Laboratory (RAL) at the ICPP. The quality control program is an integration of automated data input, measurement system calibration, database management, and statistical process control. The quality control program and statistical modeling program meet the guidelines set forth by the American Society for Testing Materials and American National Standards Institute. A statistical model is a set of mathematical equations describing any systematic bias inherent in a measurement system and the precision of a measurement system. A statistical model is developed from data generated from the analysis of control standards. Control standards are samples which are made up at precise known levels by an independent laboratory and submitted to the RAL. The RAL analysts who process control standards do not know the values of those control standards. The object behind statistical modeling is to describe real process samples in terms of their bias and precision and, to verify that a measurement system is operating satisfactorily. The processing of control standards gives us this ability.

  20. Fast micromagnetic simulations using an analytic mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiantos, Vassilios; Miles, Jim

    2006-02-01

    In this paper an analytic mathematical model is presented for fast micromagnetic simulations. In dynamic micromagnetic simulations the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is solved for the observation of the reversal magnetisation mechanisms. In stiff micromagnetic simulations the large system of ordinary differential equations has to be solved with an appropriate method, such as the Backward Differentiation Formulas (BDF) method, which leads to the solution of a large linear system. The latter is solved efficiently employing matrix-free techniques, such as Krylov methods with preconditioning. Within the Krylov methods framework a product of a matrix times a vector is involved which is usually approximated with directional differences. This paper provides an analytic mathematical model to calculate efficiently this product, leading to more accurate calculations and consequently faster micromagnetic simulations due to better convergence properties.

  1. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  2. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  3. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M Eileen; Kogan, Scott C; Downing, James R; Lowe, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  4. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  5. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  6. Innovations in Mass Spectrometry for Precise and Accurate Isotope Ratio Determination from Very Small Analyte Quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. S.; Bouman, C.; Horstwood, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes progress in mass spectrometry for analysing very small analyte quantities, illustrated by example applications from nuclear forensics. In this challenging application, precise and accurate (‰) uranium isotope ratios are required from 1 - 2 µm diameter uranium oxide particles, which comprise less than 40 pg of uranium. Traditionally these are analysed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), and more recently using secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS). Multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can offer higher productivity compared to these techniques, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of analyte utilisation (sample through to ion detection). Samples can either be introduced as a solution, or sampled directly from solid using laser ablation. Large multi-isotope ratio datasets can help identify provenance and intended use of anthropogenic uranium and other nuclear materials [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus (Bremen, Germany) with ‘Jet Interface’ option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity. An analyte utilisation of c. 4% has previously been reported for uranium [2]. This high-sensitivity configuration utilises a dry high-capacity (100 m3/h) interface pump, special skimmer and sampler cones and a desolvating nebuliser system. Coupled with new acquisition methodologies, this sensitivity enhancement makes possible the analysis of micro-particles and small sample volumes at higher precision levels than previously achieved. New, high-performance, full-size and compact discrete dynode secondary electron multipliers (SEM) exhibit excellent stability and linearity over a large dynamic range and can be configured to simultaneously measure all of the uranium isotopes. Options for high abundance-sensitivity filters on two ion beams are also available, e.g. for 236U and 234U. Additionally, amplifiers with high ohm (1012 - 1013) feedback resistors have been developed to

  7. Analytical steam injection model for layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abdual-Razzaq; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    Screening, evaluation and optimization of the steam flooding process in homogeneous reservoirs can be performed by using simple analytical predictive models. In the absence of any analytical model for layered reservoirs, at present, only numerical simulators can be used. And these are expensive. In this study, an analytical model has been developed considering two isolated layers of differing permeabilities. The principle of equal flow potential is applied across the two layers. Gajdica`s (1990) single layer linear steam drive model is extended for the layered system. The formulation accounts for variation of heat loss area in the higher permeability layer, and the development of a hot liquid zone in the lower permeability layer. These calculations also account for effects of viscosity, density, fractional flow curves and pressure drops in the hot liquid zone. Steam injection rate variations in the layers are represented by time weighted average rates. For steam zone calculations, Yortsos and Gavalas`s (1981) upper bound method is used with a correction factor. The results of the model are compared with a numerical simulator. Comparable oil and water flow rates, and breakthrough times were achieved for 100 cp oil. Results with 10 cp and 1000 cp oils indicate the need to improve the formulation to properly handle differing oil viscosities.

  8. A parsimonious analytical model for simulating multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Liang, C.-P.; Liu, C.-W.; Li, L. Y.

    2015-09-01

    A parsimonious analytical model for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent is presented in this study. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived for the two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving an arbitrary number of species in groundwater system. The solution techniques involve the sequential applications of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transforms to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are verified against the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the parsimonious analytical solutions are robust and accurate. The solutions are useful for serving as simulation or screening tools for assessing plume behaviors of decaying contaminants including the radionuclides and dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater systems.

  9. Some analytical models of anisotropic strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Over the years of the concept of local isotropy has become a too stringent condition in modeling relativistic self-gravitating objects. Taking local anisotropy into consideration, in this work, some analytical models of relativistic anisotropic charged strange stars have been developed. The Einstein-Maxwell gravitational field equations have been solved with a particular form of one of the metric potentials. The radial pressure and the energy density have been assumed to follow the usual linear equation of state of strange quark matter, the MIT bag model.

  10. Combining Modeling and Gaming for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2012-08-22

    Many of our most significant challenges involve people. While human behavior has long been studied, there are recent advances in computational modeling of human behavior. With advances in computational capabilities come increases in the volume and complexity of data that humans must understand in order to make sense of and capitalize on these modeling advances. Ultimately, models represent an encapsulation of human knowledge. One inherent challenge in modeling is efficient and accurate transfer of knowledge from humans to models, and subsequent retrieval. The simulated real-world environment of games presents one avenue for these knowledge transfers. In this paper we describe our approach of combining modeling and gaming disciplines to develop predictive capabilities, using formal models to inform game development, and using games to provide data for modeling.

  11. An analytical model of memristors in plants

    PubMed Central

    Markin, Vladislav S; Volkov, Alexander G; Chua, Leon

    2014-01-01

    The memristor, a resistor with memory, was postulated by Chua in 1971 and the first solid-state memristor was built in 2008. Recently, we found memristors in vivo in plants. Here we propose a simple analytical model of 2 types of memristors that can be found within plants. The electrostimulation of plants by bipolar periodic waves induces electrical responses in the Aloe vera and Mimosa pudica with fingerprints of memristors. Memristive properties of the Aloe vera and Mimosa pudica are linked to the properties of voltage gated K+ ion channels. The potassium channel blocker TEACl transform plant memristors to conventional resistors. The analytical model of a memristor with a capacitor connected in parallel exhibits different characteristic behavior at low and high frequency of applied voltage, which is the same as experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry in vivo. PMID:25482769

  12. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26355331

  13. Analytical Solution of Traffic Cellular Automata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Hung

    2009-08-01

    Complex traffic system seems to be simulated successfully by cellular automaton (CA) models. Various models are developed to understand single-lane traffic, multilane traffic, lane-changing behavior and network traffic situations. However, the result of CA simulation can only be obtained after massive microscopic computation. Although, the mean field theory (MFT) has been studied to be the approximation of CA model, the MFT can only applied to the simple CA rules or small value of parameters. In this study, we simulate traffic flow by the NaSch model under different combination of parameters, which are maximal speed, dawdling probability and density. After that, the position of critical density, the slope of free-flow and congested regime are observed and modeled due to the simulated data. Finally, the coefficients of the model will be calibrated by the simulated data and the analytical solution of traffic CA is obtained.

  14. Accurate verification of the conserved-vector-current and standard-model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Sirlin, A.; Zucchini, R.

    1986-10-20

    An approximate analytic calculation of O(Z..cap alpha../sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays is presented. When the analysis of Koslowsky et al. is modified to take into account the new results, it is found that each of the eight accurately studied scrFt values differs from the average by approx. <1sigma, thus significantly improving the comparison of experiments with conserved-vector-current predictions. The new scrFt values are lower than before, which also brings experiments into very good agreement with the three-generation standard model, at the level of its quantum corrections.

  15. An Analytic Function of Lunar Surface Temperature for Exospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Grava, Cesare; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Retherford, Kurt D.; Siegler, Matthew; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Paige, David

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic expression to represent the lunar surface temperature as a function of Sun-state latitude and local time. The approximation represents neither topographical features nor compositional effects and therefore does not change as a function of selenographic latitude and longitude. The function reproduces the surface temperature measured by Diviner to within +/-10 K at 72% of grid points for dayside solar zenith angles of less than 80, and at 98% of grid points for nightside solar zenith angles greater than 100. The analytic function is least accurate at the terminator, where there is a strong gradient in the temperature, and the polar regions. Topographic features have a larger effect on the actual temperature near the terminator than at other solar zenith angles. For exospheric modeling the effects of topography on the thermal model can be approximated by using an effective longitude for determining the temperature. This effective longitude is randomly redistributed with 1 sigma of 4.5deg. The resulting ''roughened'' analytical model well represents the statistical dispersion in the Diviner data and is expected to be generally useful for future models of lunar surface temperature, especially those implemented within exospheric simulations that address questions of volatile transport.

  16. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  17. Inverter Modeling For Accurate Energy Predictions Of Tracking HCPV Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J.; Jensen, S.; McDonald, Mark

    2010-10-01

    High efficiency high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) solar plants of megawatt scale are now operational, and opportunities for expanded adoption are plentiful. However, effective bidding for sites requires reliable prediction of energy production. HCPV module nameplate power is rated for specific test conditions; however, instantaneous HCPV power varies due to site specific irradiance and operating temperature, and is degraded by soiling, protective stowing, shading, and electrical connectivity. These factors interact with the selection of equipment typically supplied by third parties, e.g., wire gauge and inverters. We describe a time sequence model accurately accounting for these effects that predicts annual energy production, with specific reference to the impact of the inverter on energy output and interactions between system-level design decisions and the inverter. We will also show two examples, based on an actual field design, of inverter efficiency calculations and the interaction between string arrangements and inverter selection.

  18. Petermann I and II spot size: Accurate semi analytical description involving Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained optimization and three parameter fundamental modal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Raja; Roy Choudhury, Arundhati; Kanti Ghose, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    A semi-analytical model with three optimizing parameters and a novel non-Gaussian function as the fundamental modal field solution has been proposed to arrive at an accurate solution to predict various propagation parameters of graded-index fibers with less computational burden than numerical methods. In our semi analytical formulation the optimization of core parameter U which is usually uncertain, noisy or even discontinuous, is being calculated by Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained minimizations as it is an efficient and compact direct search method and does not need any derivative information. Three optimizing parameters are included in the formulation of fundamental modal field of an optical fiber to make it more flexible and accurate than other available approximations. Employing variational technique, Petermann I and II spot sizes have been evaluated for triangular and trapezoidal-index fibers with the proposed fundamental modal field. It has been demonstrated that, the results of the proposed solution identically match with the numerical results over a wide range of normalized frequencies. This approximation can also be used in the study of doped and nonlinear fiber amplifier.

  19. Analytical modeling of worldwide medical radiation use

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Davis, M.; Kelsey, C.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Williams, A.

    1987-02-01

    An analytical model was developed to estimate the availability and frequency of medical radiation use on a worldwide basis. This model includes medical and dental x-ray, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy. The development of an analytical model is necessary as the first step in estimating the radiation dose to the world's population from this source. Since there is no data about the frequency of medical radiation use in more than half the countries in the world and only fragmentary data in an additional one-fourth of the world's countries, such a model can be used to predict the uses of medical radiation in these countries. The model indicates that there are approximately 400,000 medical x-ray machines worldwide and that approximately 1.2 billion diagnostic medical x-ray examinations are performed annually. Dental x-ray examinations are estimated at 315 million annually and approximately 22 million in-vivo diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations. Approximately 4 million radiation therapy procedures or courses of treatment are undertaken annually.

  20. Accurate, low-cost 3D-models of gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnen, Nils; Gronz, Oliver; Ries, Johannes B.; Brings, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem in arid and semi-arid areas. The most severe form is the gully erosion. They often cut into agricultural farmland and can make a certain area completely unproductive. To understand the development and processes inside and around gullies, we calculated detailed 3D-models of gullies in the Souss Valley in South Morocco. Near Taroudant, we had four study areas with five gullies different in size, volume and activity. By using a Canon HF G30 Camcorder, we made varying series of Full HD videos with 25fps. Afterwards, we used the method Structure from Motion (SfM) to create the models. To generate accurate models maintaining feasible runtimes, it is necessary to select around 1500-1700 images from the video, while the overlap of neighboring images should be at least 80%. In addition, it is very important to avoid selecting photos that are blurry or out of focus. Nearby pixels of a blurry image tend to have similar color values. That is why we used a MATLAB script to compare the derivatives of the images. The higher the sum of the derivative, the sharper an image of similar objects. MATLAB subdivides the video into image intervals. From each interval, the image with the highest sum is selected. E.g.: 20min. video at 25fps equals 30.000 single images. The program now inspects the first 20 images, saves the sharpest and moves on to the next 20 images etc. Using this algorithm, we selected 1500 images for our modeling. With VisualSFM, we calculated features and the matches between all images and produced a point cloud. Then, MeshLab has been used to build a surface out of it using the Poisson surface reconstruction approach. Afterwards we are able to calculate the size and the volume of the gullies. It is also possible to determine soil erosion rates, if we compare the data with old recordings. The final step would be the combination of the terrestrial data with the data from our aerial photography. So far, the method works well and we

  1. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  2. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu

    2009-01-15

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  3. Analytic Models of Plausible Gravitational Lens Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2007-05-04

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modeled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasizing that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential.We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modeled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  4. Accurate modelling of flow induced stresses in rigid colloidal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A method has been developed to estimate the motion and the internal stresses induced by a fluid flow on a rigid aggregate. The approach couples Stokesian dynamics and structural mechanics in order to take into account accurately the effect of the complex geometry of the aggregates on hydrodynamic forces and the internal redistribution of stresses. The intrinsic error of the method, due to the low-order truncation of the multipole expansion of the Stokes solution, has been assessed by comparison with the analytical solution for the case of a doublet in a shear flow. In addition, it has been shown that the error becomes smaller as the number of primary particles in the aggregate increases and hence it is expected to be negligible for realistic reproductions of large aggregates. The evaluation of internal forces is performed by an adaptation of the matrix methods of structural mechanics to the geometric features of the aggregates and to the particular stress-strain relationship that occurs at intermonomer contacts. A preliminary investigation on the stress distribution in rigid aggregates and their mode of breakup has been performed by studying the response to an elongational flow of both realistic reproductions of colloidal aggregates (made of several hundreds monomers) and highly simplified structures. A very different behaviour has been evidenced between low-density aggregates with isostatic or weakly hyperstatic structures and compact aggregates with highly hyperstatic configuration. In low-density clusters breakup is caused directly by the failure of the most stressed intermonomer contact, which is typically located in the inner region of the aggregate and hence originates the birth of fragments of similar size. On the contrary, breakup of compact and highly cross-linked clusters is seldom caused by the failure of a single bond. When this happens, it proceeds through the removal of a tiny fragment from the external part of the structure. More commonly, however

  5. An accurate and simple quantum model for liquid water.

    PubMed

    Paesani, Francesco; Zhang, Wei; Case, David A; Cheatham, Thomas E; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-14

    The path-integral molecular dynamics and centroid molecular dynamics methods have been applied to investigate the behavior of liquid water at ambient conditions starting from a recently developed simple point charge/flexible (SPC/Fw) model. Several quantum structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical properties have been computed and compared to the corresponding classical values, as well as to the available experimental data. The path-integral molecular dynamics simulations show that the inclusion of quantum effects results in a less structured liquid with a reduced amount of hydrogen bonding in comparison to its classical analog. The nuclear quantization also leads to a smaller dielectric constant and a larger diffusion coefficient relative to the corresponding classical values. Collective and single molecule time correlation functions show a faster decay than their classical counterparts. Good agreement with the experimental measurements in the low-frequency region is obtained for the quantum infrared spectrum, which also shows a higher intensity and a redshift relative to its classical analog. A modification of the original parametrization of the SPC/Fw model is suggested and tested in order to construct an accurate quantum model, called q-SPC/Fw, for liquid water. The quantum results for several thermodynamic and dynamical properties computed with the new model are shown to be in a significantly better agreement with the experimental data. Finally, a force-matching approach was applied to the q-SPC/Fw model to derive an effective quantum force field for liquid water in which the effects due to the nuclear quantization are explicitly distinguished from those due to the underlying molecular interactions. Thermodynamic and dynamical properties computed using standard classical simulations with this effective quantum potential are found in excellent agreement with those obtained from significantly more computationally demanding full centroid molecular dynamics

  6. Analytical Performance Models for Geologic Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi,A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Savoshy, S.J.

    1982-10-01

    This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in the present report are: (a) Solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (Chapter 2); (b) Transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (Chapter 3); (c) Advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (Chapter 4); (d) Radionuclide.transport in fractured media (Chapter 5); (e) A mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (Chapter 6); and (f) Dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (Chapter 7).

  7. Analytical model for crosstalk analysis of optoelectronic transmitter modules for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukaegbu, Ikechi Augustine; Sangirov, Jamshid; Cho, Mu Hee; Lee, Tae-Woo; Park, Hyo-Hoon

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a crosstalk expression and equivalent circuit model have been proposed based on RLC line model and interconnect parameters for wire-bonded and flip-chip bonded multichannel optoelectronic modules. The analytical expression and model are accurate for computing crosstalk of interconnects used in chip packaging. In addition, full-wave simulation and experimental results from total crosstalk measurement are discussed.

  8. Analytical Ion Thruster Discharge Performance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Wirz, Richard E.; Katz, Ira

    2006-01-01

    A particle and energy balance model of the plasma discharge in magnetic ring-cusp ion thrusters has been developed. The model follows the original work of Brophy in the development of global 0-D discharge models that utilize conservation of particles into and out of the thruster and conservation of energy into the discharge and out of the plasma in the form of charged particles to the walls and beam and plasma radiation. The present model is significantly expanded over Brophy's original work by including self-consistent calculations of the internal neutral pressure, electron temperature, primary electron density, electrostatic ion confinement (due to the ring-cusp fields), plasma potential, discharge stability, and time dependent behavior during recycling. The model only requires information on the thruster geometry, ion optics performance and electrical inputs such as discharge voltage and currents, etc. to produce accurate performance curves of discharge loss versus mass utilization efficiency. The model has been benchmarked against the NEXIS Laboratory Model (LM) and Development Model (DM) thrusters, and successfully predicts the thruster discharge loss as a function of mass utilization efficiency for a variety of thrusters. The discharge performance model will be presented and results showing ion thruster performance and stability given.

  9. Multilayer analytic element modeling of radial collector wells.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A; Luther, Kenneth H

    2005-01-01

    A new multilayer approach is presented for the modeling of ground water flow to radial collector wells. The approach allows for the inclusion of all aspects of the unique boundary condition along the lateral arms of a collector well, including skin effect and internal friction losses due to flow in the arms. The hydraulic conductivity may differ between horizontal layers within the aquifer, and vertical anisotropy can be taken into account. The approach is based on the multilayer analytic element method, such that regional flow and local three-dimensional detail may be simulated simultaneously and accurately within one regional model. Horizontal flow inside a layer is computed analytically, while vertical flow is approximated with a standard finite-difference scheme. Results obtained with the proposed approach compare well to results obtained with three-dimensional analytic element solutions for flow in unconfined aquifers. The presented approach may be applied to predict the yield of a collector well in a regional setting and to compute the origin and residence time, and thus the quality, of water pumped by the collector well. As an example, the addition of three lateral arms to a collector well that already has three laterals is investigated. The new arms are added at an elevation of 2 m above the existing laterals. The yield increase of the collector well is computed as a function of the lengths of the three new arms. PMID:16324013

  10. Analytical model of batch magnetophoretic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashevsky, S. B.; Kashevsky, B. E.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetophoresis (the motion of magnetic particles driven by the nonuniform magnetic field), that for a long time has been used for extracting magnetically susceptible objects in diverse industries, now attracts interest to develop more sophisticated microfluidic and batch techniques for separation and manipulation of biological particles, and magnetically assisted absorption and catalysis in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and petrochemistry. A deficiency of magnetic separation science is the lack of simple analytical models imitating real processes of magnetic separation. We have studied the motion of superparamagnetic (generally, soft magnetic) particles in liquid in the three-dimensional field of the diametrically polarized permanent cylindrical magnet; this geometry is basically representative of the batch separation mode. In the limit of the infinite-length magnet, we found the particle magnetophoresis proceeds independently of the magnet polarization direction, following the simple analytical relation incorporating all the relevant physical and geometrical parameters of the particle-magnet system. In experiments with a finite-length magnet we have shown applicability of the developed theory as to analyze the performance of the real batch separation systems in the noncooperative mode, and finally, we have presented an example of such analysis for the case of immunomagnetic cell separation and developed a criterion of the model limitation imposed by the magnetic aggregation of particles.

  11. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  12. An analytical model of a longitudinal-torsional ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Budairi, Hassan; Lucas, Margaret

    2012-08-01

    The combination of longitudinal and torsional (LT) vibrations at high frequencies finds many applications such as ultrasonic drilling, ultrasonic welding, and ultrasonic motors. The LT mode can be obtained by modifications to the design of a standard bolted Langevin ultrasonic transducer driven by an axially poled piezoceramic stack, by a technique that degenerates the longitudinal mode to an LT motion by a geometrical alteration of the wave path. The transducer design is developed and optimised through numerical modelling which can represent the geometry and mechanical properties of the transducer and its vibration response to an electrical input applied across the piezoceramic stack. However, although these models can allow accurate descriptions of the mechanical behaviour, they do not generally provide adequate insights into the electrical characteristics of the transducer. In this work, an analytical model is developed to present the LT transducer based on the equivalent circuit method. This model can represent both the mechanical and electrical aspects and is used to extract many of the design parameters, such as resonance and anti-resonance frequencies, the impedance spectra and the coupling coefficient of the transducer. The validity of the analytical model is demonstrated by close agreement with experimental results.

  13. Coarse-grained red blood cell model with accurate mechanical properties, rheology and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained red blood cell (RBC) model with accurate and realistic mechanical properties, rheology and dynamics. The modeled membrane is represented by a triangular mesh which incorporates shear inplane energy, bending energy, and area and volume conservation constraints. The macroscopic membrane elastic properties are imposed through semi-analytic theory, and are matched with those obtained in optical tweezers stretching experiments. Rheological measurements characterized by time-dependent complex modulus are extracted from the membrane thermal fluctuations, and compared with those obtained from the optical magnetic twisting cytometry results. The results allow us to define a meaningful characteristic time of the membrane. The dynamics of RBCs observed in shear flow suggests that a purely elastic model for the RBC membrane is not appropriate, and therefore a viscoelastic model is required. The set of proposed analyses and numerical tests can be used as a complete model testbed in order to calibrate the modeled viscoelastic membranes to accurately represent RBCs in health and disease. PMID:19965026

  14. An analytically enriched finite element method for cohesive crack modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.

    2010-04-01

    Meaningful computational investigations of many solid mechanics problems require accurate characterization of material behavior through failure. A recent approach to fracture modeling has combined the partition of unity finite element method (PUFEM) with cohesive zone models. Extension of the PUFEM to address crack propagation is often referred to as the extended finite element method (XFEM). In the PUFEM, the displacement field is enriched to improve the local approximation. Most XFEM studies have used simplified enrichment functions (e.g., generalized Heaviside functions) to represent the strong discontinuity but have lacked an analytical basis to represent the displacement gradients in the vicinity of the cohesive crack. As such, the mesh had to be sufficiently fine for the FEM basis functions to capture these gradients.In this study enrichment functions based upon two analytical investigations of the cohesive crack problem are examined. These functions have the potential of representing displacement gradients in the vicinity of the cohesive crack with a relatively coarse mesh and allow the crack to incrementally advance across each element. Key aspects of the corresponding numerical formulation are summarized. Analysis results for simple model problems are presented to evaluate if quasi-static crack propagation can be accurately followed with the proposed formulation. A standard finite element solution with interface elements is used to provide the accurate reference solution, so the model problems are limited to a straight, mode I crack in plane stress. Except for the cohesive zone, the material model for the problems is homogenous, isotropic linear elasticity. The effects of mesh refinement, mesh orientation, and enrichment schemes that enrich a larger region around the cohesive crack are considered in the study. Propagation of the cohesive zone tip and crack tip, time variation of the cohesive zone length, and crack profiles are presented. The analysis

  15. The Immediate Exchange model: an analytical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We study the Immediate Exchange model, recently introduced by Heinsalu and Patriarca [Eur. Phys. J. B 87, 170 (2014)], who showed by simulations that the wealth distribution in this model converges to a Gamma distribution with shape parameter 2. Here we justify this conclusion analytically, in the infinite-population limit. An infinite-population version of the model is derived, describing the evolution of the wealth distribution in terms of iterations of a nonlinear operator on the space of probability densities. It is proved that the Gamma distributions with shape parameter 2 are fixed points of this operator, and that, starting with an arbitrary wealth distribution, the process converges to one of these fixed points. We also discuss the mixed model introduced in the same paper, in which exchanges are either bidirectional or unidirectional with fixed probability. We prove that, although, as found by Heinsalu and Patriarca, the equilibrium distribution can be closely fit by Gamma distributions, the equilibrium distribution for this model is not a Gamma distribution.

  16. Comparison between analytical and numerical solution of mathematical drying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahari, N.; Rasmani, K.; Jamil, N.

    2016-02-01

    Drying is often related to the food industry as a process of shifting heat and mass inside food, which helps in preserving food. Previous research using a mass transfer equation showed that the results were mostly concerned with the comparison between the simulation model and the experimental data. In this paper, the finite difference method was used to solve a mass equation during drying using different kinds of boundary condition, which are equilibrium and convective boundary conditions. The results of these two models provide a comparison between the analytical and the numerical solution. The result shows a close match between the two solution curves. It is concluded that the two proposed models produce an accurate solution to describe the moisture distribution content during the drying process. This analysis indicates that we have confidence in the behaviour of moisture in the numerical simulation. This result demonstrated that a combined analytical and numerical approach prove that the system is behaving physically. Based on this assumption, the model of mass transfer was extended to include the temperature transfer, and the result shows a similar trend to those presented in the simpler case.

  17. ANALYTIC MODELING OF THE MORETON WAVE KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2009-09-10

    The issue whether Moreton waves are flare-ignited or coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven, or a combination of both, is still a matter of debate. We develop an analytical model describing the evolution of a large-amplitude coronal wave emitted by the expansion of a circular source surface in order to mimic the evolution of a Moreton wave. The model results are confronted with observations of a strong Moreton wave observed in association with the X3.8/3B flare/CME event from 2005 January 17. Using different input parameters for the expansion of the source region, either derived from the real CME observations (assuming that the upward moving CME drives the wave), or synthetically generated scenarios (expanding flare region, lateral expansion of the CME flanks), we calculate the kinematics of the associated Moreton wave signature. Those model input parameters are determined which fit the observed Moreton wave kinematics best. Using the measured kinematics of the upward moving CME as the model input, we are not able to reproduce the observed Moreton wave kinematics. The observations of the Moreton wave can be reproduced only by applying a strong and impulsive acceleration for the source region expansion acting in a piston mechanism scenario. Based on these results we propose that the expansion of the flaring region or the lateral expansion of the CME flanks is more likely the driver of the Moreton wave than the upward moving CME front.

  18. Analytic Modeling of Collector Current and Delay Time in Hbts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hee-Bum

    1992-01-01

    Collector current in abrupt Al_ {0.48}In_{0.52} As/In_{0.53}Ga _{0.47}As HBTs is investigated. Because tunneling plays an important role for abrupt heterojunctions, thermionic field emission (TF) mechanism is included, as a part of the model, in addition to thermionic emission (TE) theory. To model the modulation of the effective barrier height correctly, non-ideal doping profile across the heterojunction is considered. Calculations showed that under nominal operating conditions, TF is dominant over TE in determining the collector current. Furthermore, modulation of the effective barrier height manifests itself in the collector ideality factor that is greater than unity. It is shown that, by calculating the above mentioned transport mechanisms and including the barrier height modulation, the collector current and its temperature dependence in abrupt AlInAs/InGaAs HBTs can be predicted correctly. The detailed calculation is reduced to an analytical closed -form model by assuming a Gaussian energy spectrum for TF current. The model is determined to be accurate over a wide range of bias and temperatures. A simple TE/TF Ebers -Moll model for abrupt HBTs is derived. The classical expression for collector small signal delay time is inadequate for vertically scaled transistors where transient velocity effects can no longer be ignored. Analytical expressions for collector transit time and small signal delay time are proposed for circuit simulation. These models use a general non-uniform velocity profile described entirely in terms of five physical parameters: momentum and energy relaxation times, and initial, peak, and saturated velocities. A C_infty-continuous function approximation for the transit time is used to obtain analytical closed-form expressions for collector small signal delay time in terms of physically meaningful transport parameters. An accurate empirical two-piece model is also proposed. As the collector thickness is scaled down, the ratio of small signal

  19. Analytical model of Europa's O2 exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Anna; Plainaki, Christina; Orsini, Stefano; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Mangano, Valeria; Massetti, Stefano; Mura, Alessandro; Rispoli, Rosanna; Colasanti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The origin of the exosphere of Europa is its water ice surface. The existing exosphere models, assuming either a collisionless environment (simple Monte Carlo techniques) or a kinetic approach (Direct Monte Carlo Method) both predict that the major constituent of the exosphere is molecular oxygen. Specifically, O2 is generated at the surface through radiolysis and chemical interactions of the water dissociation products. The non-escaping O2 molecules circulate around the moon impacting the surface several times, due to their long lifetime and due to their non- sticking, suffering thermalization to the surface temperature after each impact. In fact, the HST observations of the O emission lines have manifested the presence of an asymmetric atomic Oxygen envelope, evidencing the possible existence of a thin asymmetric molecular Oxygen atmosphere. The existing Monte Carlo models are not easily applicable as input of simulations devoted to the study of the plasma interactions with the moon. On the other hand, the simple exponential density profiles cannot well depict the higher temperature/higher altitudes component originating by radiolysis. On the contrary, it would be important to have a suitable and user-friendly model to use as a tool. This study presents an analytical 3D model that is able to describe the molecular Oxygen exosphere by reproducing the asymmetries due to two configurations among Europa, Jupiter and the Sun, that is illumination at leading and at trailing side. This model is obtained by a non-linear fit procedure of the EGEON Monte Carlo model to a Chamberlain density profile. Different parameters of the model are able to describe various exosphere properties thus allowing a detailed investigation of the exospheric characteristics.

  20. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volumeconstancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  1. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volume-constancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  2. WHAEM: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION FOR THE WELLHEAD ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wellhead Analytic Element Model (WhAEM) demonstrates a new technique for the definition of time-of-travel capture zones in relatively simple geohydrologic settings. he WhAEM package includes an analytic element model that uses superposition of (many) analytic solutions to gen...

  3. Incorporating photon recycling into the analytical drift-diffusion model of high efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lumb, Matthew P.; Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Walters, Robert J.

    2014-11-21

    The analytical drift-diffusion formalism is able to accurately simulate a wide range of solar cell architectures and was recently extended to include those with back surface reflectors. However, as solar cells approach the limits of material quality, photon recycling effects become increasingly important in predicting the behavior of these cells. In particular, the minority carrier diffusion length is significantly affected by the photon recycling, with consequences for the solar cell performance. In this paper, we outline an approach to account for photon recycling in the analytical Hovel model and compare analytical model predictions to GaAs-based experimental devices operating close to the fundamental efficiency limit.

  4. Applying an accurate spherical model to gamma-ray burst afterglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventis, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; van Eerten, H. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2013-05-01

    We present results of model fits to afterglow data sets of GRB 970508, GRB 980703 and GRB 070125, characterized by long and broad-band coverage. The model assumes synchrotron radiation (including self-absorption) from a spherical adiabatic blast wave and consists of analytic flux prescriptions based on numerical results. For the first time it combines the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulations through different stages of the outflow dynamics with the flexibility of simple heuristic formulas. The prescriptions are especially geared towards accurate description of the dynamical transition of the outflow from relativistic to Newtonian velocities in an arbitrary power-law density environment. We show that the spherical model can accurately describe the data only in the case of GRB 970508, for which we find a circumburst medium density n ∝ r-2. We investigate in detail the implied spectra and physical parameters of that burst. For the microphysics we show evidence for equipartition between the fraction of energy density carried by relativistic electrons and magnetic field. We also find that for the blast wave to be adiabatic, the fraction of electrons accelerated at the shock has to be smaller than 1. We present best-fitting parameters for the afterglows of all three bursts, including uncertainties in the parameters of GRB 970508, and compare the inferred values to those obtained by different authors.

  5. Simple and accurate modelling of the gravitational potential produced by thick and thin exponential discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Flynn, C.; Candlish, G. N.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    We present accurate models of the gravitational potential produced by a radially exponential disc mass distribution. The models are produced by combining three separate Miyamoto-Nagai discs. Such models have been used previously to model the disc of the Milky Way, but here we extend this framework to allow its application to discs of any mass, scalelength, and a wide range of thickness from infinitely thin to near spherical (ellipticities from 0 to 0.9). The models have the advantage of simplicity of implementation, and we expect faster run speeds over a double exponential disc treatment. The potentials are fully analytical, and differentiable at all points. The mass distribution of our models deviates from the radial mass distribution of a pure exponential disc by <0.4 per cent out to 4 disc scalelengths, and <1.9 per cent out to 10 disc scalelengths. We tabulate fitting parameters which facilitate construction of exponential discs for any scalelength, and a wide range of disc thickness (a user-friendly, web-based interface is also available). Our recipe is well suited for numerical modelling of the tidal effects of a giant disc galaxy on star clusters or dwarf galaxies. We consider three worked examples; the Milky Way thin and thick disc, and a discy dwarf galaxy.

  6. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The dual-wall, Whipple shield is the shield of choice for lightweight, long-duration flight. The shield uses an initial sacrificial wall to initiate fragmentation and melt an impacting threat that expands over a void before hitting a subsequent shield wall of a critical component. The key parameters to this type of shield are the rear wall and its mass which stops the debris, as well as the minimum shock wave strength generated by the threat particle impact of the sacrificial wall and the amount of room that is available for expansion. Ensuring the shock wave strength is sufficiently high to achieve large scale fragmentation/melt of the threat particle enables the expansion of the threat and reduces the momentum flux of the debris on the rear wall. Three key factors in the shock wave strength achieved are the thickness of the sacrificial wall relative to the characteristic dimension of the impacting particle, the density and material cohesion contrast of the sacrificial wall relative to the threat particle and the impact speed. The mass of the rear wall and the sacrificial wall are desirable to minimize for launch costs making it important to have an understanding of the effects of density contrast and impact speed. An analytic model is developed here, to describe the influence of these three key factors. In addition this paper develops a description of a fourth key parameter related to fragmentation and its role in establishing the onset of projectile expansion.

  7. Analytic wave model of Stark deceleration dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, Koos; Meijer, Gerard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2006-06-15

    Stark deceleration relies on time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields which repetitively exert a decelerating force on polar molecules. Fourier analysis reveals that such fields, generated by an array of field stages, consist of a superposition of partial waves with well-defined phase velocities. Molecules whose velocities come close to the phase velocity of a given wave get a ride from that wave. For a square-wave temporal dependence of the Stark field, the phase velocities of the waves are found to be odd-fraction multiples of a fundamental phase velocity {lambda}/{tau}, with {lambda} and {tau} the spatial and temporal periods of the field. Here we study explicitly the dynamics due to any of the waves as well as due to their mutual perturbations. We first solve the equations of motion for the case of single-wave interactions and exploit their isomorphism with those for the biased pendulum. Next we analyze the perturbations of the single-wave dynamics by other waves and find that these have no net effect on the phase stability of the acceleration or deceleration process. Finally, we find that a packet of molecules can also ride a wave which results from an interference of adjacent waves. In this case, small phase stability areas form around phase velocities that are even-fraction multiples of the fundamental velocity. A detailed comparison with classical trajectory simulations and with experiment demonstrates that the analytic 'wave model' encompasses all the longitudinal physics encountered in a Stark decelerator.

  8. Digitalized accurate modeling of SPCB with multi-spiral surface based on CPC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhua; Gu, Lizhi

    2015-09-01

    The main methods of the existing multi-spiral surface geometry modeling include spatial analytic geometry algorithms, graphical method, interpolation and approximation algorithms. However, there are some shortcomings in these modeling methods, such as large amount of calculation, complex process, visible errors, and so on. The above methods have, to some extent, restricted the design and manufacture of the premium and high-precision products with spiral surface considerably. This paper introduces the concepts of the spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface and spatially parallel coupling body. The typical geometry and topological features of each spiral surface forming the multi-spiral surface body are determined, by using the extraction principle of datum point cluster, the algorithm of coupling point cluster by removing singular point, and the "spatially parallel coupling" principle based on the non-uniform B-spline for each spiral surface. The orientation and quantitative relationships of datum point cluster and coupling point cluster in Euclidean space are determined accurately and in digital description and expression, coupling coalescence of the surfaces with multi-coupling point clusters under the Pro/E environment. The digitally accurate modeling of spatially parallel coupling body with multi-spiral surface is realized. The smooth and fairing processing is done to the three-blade end-milling cutter's end section area by applying the principle of spatially parallel coupling with multi-spiral surface, and the alternative entity model is processed in the four axis machining center after the end mill is disposed. And the algorithm is verified and then applied effectively to the transition area among the multi-spiral surface. The proposed model and algorithms may be used in design and manufacture of the multi-spiral surface body products, as well as in solving essentially the problems of considerable modeling errors in computer graphics and

  9. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M; Firago, V A; Sobchuk, A N

    2014-01-31

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions. (biophotonics)

  10. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Firago, V. A.; Sobchuk, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions.

  11. Analytical modeling of Cosmic Winds and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Nektarios

    1998-11-01

    stellar wind and the Blandford and Payne (1982) model of a disk-wind; it also contains nonpolytropic models, such as those of winds/jets in Sauty and Tsinganos (1994), Lima et al (1996) and Trussoni et al (1997). Besides the unification of all known cases under a common scheme, several new classes emerge and some are briefly analyzed; they could be explored for a further understanding of the physical properties of MHD outflows from various magnetized astrophysical rotators. We also propose a new class of exact and self-consistent MHD solutions which describe steady and axisymmetric hydromagnetic outflows from the magnetized atmosphere of a rotating gravitating central object with possibly an orbiting accretion disk. The plasma is driven by a thermal pressure gradient, as well as by magnetic rotator and radiative forces. At the Alfvenic and fast critical points the appropriate criticality conditions are applied. The outflows start almost radially but after the Alfven transition and before the fast critical surface is encountered the magnetic pinching force bends the poloidal streamlines into a cylindrical jet-type shape. The terminal speed, Alfven number, cross-sectional area of the jet, as well as its final pressure and density obtain uniform values at large distances from the source. The goal of the study is to give an analytical discussion of the two-dimensional interplay of the thermal pressure gradient, gravitational, Lorentz and inertial forces in accelerating and collimating an MHD flow. A parametric study of the model is given, as well as a brief sketch of its applicability to a self-consistent modeling of collimated outflows from various astrophysical objects. For example, the obtained characteristics of the collimated outflow in agreement with those in jets associated with YSO's. General theoretical arguments and various analytic self-similar solutions have recently shown that magnetized and rotating astrophysical outflows may become asymptotically cylindrical

  12. New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. )

    1994-07-25

    A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

  13. Coupling Efforts to the Accurate and Efficient Tsunami Modelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we couple two different types of tsunami models, i.e., nondispersive shallow water model of characteristic form(MOST ver.4) and dispersive Boussinesq model of non-characteristic form(Son et al. (2011)) in an attempt to improve modelling accuracy and efficiency. Since each model deals with different type of primary variables, additional care on matching boundary condition is required. Using an absorbing-generating boundary condition developed by Van Dongeren and Svendsen(1997), model coupling and integration is achieved. Characteristic variables(i.e., Riemann invariants) in MOST are converted to non-characteristic variables for Boussinesq solver without any loss of physical consistency. Established modelling system has been validated through typical test problems to realistic tsunami events. Simulated results reveal good performance of developed modelling system. Since coupled modelling system provides advantageous flexibility feature during implementation, great efficiencies and accuracies are expected to be gained through spot-focusing application of Boussinesq model inside the entire domain of tsunami propagation.

  14. Numerical-analytical modeling of the Earth's pole oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Y.; Filippova, A.

    2015-08-01

    For the purpose of more accurate forecasting the oscillatory process of the Earth pole in time periods with significant anomalies (irregular deviations) a numerical-analytical approach is presented for the combined modeling of the interdependent dynamical processes - the oscillatory-rotational motion of the Earth and the time dependent coefficients of the geopotential. The oscillations of the inertia tensor components of the Earth depend on various factors such as mechanical and physical parameters of the planet, the motions of the tide-generating bodies and observed large scale natural events. Time variations of these and some other factors affect the Earth orientation parameters. The generalization of the previously researched mathematical model of Chandler and annual oscillations of the Earth pole is being held with the use of celestial mechanics methods and the mathematical description of the Earth gravitational field's temporal variations. The latter makes possible to improve the forecast precision of the Earth pole trajectory. Also the more precise model is to have small number of parameters and to agree with the previously developed one (to have the same structural features and to have a correspondence between the averaged dynamical parameters and the parameters of the basic model).

  15. Analytical model for CO(2) laser ablation of fused quartz.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2015-10-10

    This paper reports the development of an analytical model, with supporting experimental data, which quite accurately describes the key features of CO2 laser ablation of fused silica glass. The quantitative model of nonexplosive, evaporative material removal is shown to match the experimental data very well, to the extent that it can be used as a tool for ablative measurements of absorption coefficient and vaporization energy. The experimental results indicated that a minimum of 12  MJ kg-1 is required to fully vaporize fused quartz initially held at room temperature, which is in good agreement with the prediction of the model supplied with input data available in the literature. An optimal window for the machining of fused quartz was revealed in terms of pulse duration 20-80 μs and CO2 laser wavelength optimized for maximum absorption coefficient. Material removal rates of 0.33 μm per J cm-2 allow for a high-precision depth control with modest laser stability. The model may also be used as a parameter selection guide for CO2 laser ablation of fused silica or other materials of similar thermophysical properties. PMID:26479800

  16. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  17. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  18. Analytical Model of Nano-Electromechanical (NEM) Nonvolatile Memory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Boram; Choi, Woo Young

    The fringe field effects of nano-electromechanical (NEM) nonvolatile memory cells have been investigated analytically for the accurate evaluation of NEM memory cells. As the beam width is scaled down, fringe field effect becomes more severe. It has been observed that pull-in, release and hysteresis voltage decrease more than our prediction. Also, the fringe field on cell characteristics has been discussed.

  19. Accurate and Fast Simulation of Channel Noise in Conductance-Based Model Neurons by Diffusion Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Linaro, Daniele; Storace, Marco; Giugliano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic channel gating is the major source of intrinsic neuronal noise whose functional consequences at the microcircuit- and network-levels have been only partly explored. A systematic study of this channel noise in large ensembles of biophysically detailed model neurons calls for the availability of fast numerical methods. In fact, exact techniques employ the microscopic simulation of the random opening and closing of individual ion channels, usually based on Markov models, whose computational loads are prohibitive for next generation massive computer models of the brain. In this work, we operatively define a procedure for translating any Markov model describing voltage- or ligand-gated membrane ion-conductances into an effective stochastic version, whose computer simulation is efficient, without compromising accuracy. Our approximation is based on an improved Langevin-like approach, which employs stochastic differential equations and no Montecarlo methods. As opposed to an earlier proposal recently debated in the literature, our approximation reproduces accurately the statistical properties of the exact microscopic simulations, under a variety of conditions, from spontaneous to evoked response features. In addition, our method is not restricted to the Hodgkin-Huxley sodium and potassium currents and is general for a variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion currents. As a by-product, the analysis of the properties emerging in exact Markov schemes by standard probability calculus enables us for the first time to analytically identify the sources of inaccuracy of the previous proposal, while providing solid ground for its modification and improvement we present here. PMID:21423712

  20. Health Informatics for Neonatal Intensive Care Units: An Analytical Modeling Perspective.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Hamzeh; Mench-Bressan, Nadja; McGregor, Carolyn; Pugh, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of data within intensive care units (ICUs) has great potential to create new cloud-based health analytics solutions for disease prevention or earlier condition onset detection. The Artemis project aims to achieve the above goals in the area of neonatal ICUs (NICU). In this paper, we proposed an analytical model for the Artemis cloud project which will be deployed at McMaster Children's Hospital in Hamilton. We collect not only physiological data but also the infusion pumps data that are attached to NICU beds. Using the proposed analytical model, we predict the amount of storage, memory, and computation power required for the system. Capacity planning and tradeoff analysis would be more accurate and systematic by applying the proposed analytical model in this paper. Numerical results are obtained using real inputs acquired from McMaster Children's Hospital and a pilot deployment of the system at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto. PMID:27170907

  1. Analytic Models of High-Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W.A.; Olson, R.E.; Spielman, R.B.; Leeper, R.J.

    2000-11-29

    A unified set of high-temperature-hohlraum models has been developed. For a simple hohlraum, P{sub s} = [A{sub s}+(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4} + (4V{sigma}/c)(dT{sub R}{sup r}/dt) where P{sub S} is the total power radiated by the source, A{sub s} is the source area, A{sub W} is the area of the cavity wall excluding the source and holes in the wall, A{sub H} is the area of the holes, {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, T{sub R} is the radiation brightness temperature, V is the hohlraum volume, and c is the speed of light. The wall albedo {alpha}{sub W} {triple_bond} (T{sub W}/T{sub R}){sup 4} where T{sub W} is the brightness temperature of area A{sub W}. The net power radiated by the source P{sub N} = P{sub S}-A{sub S}{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4}, which suggests that for laser-driven hohlraums the conversion efficiency {eta}{sub CE} be defined as P{sub N}/P{sub LASER}. The characteristic time required to change T{sub R}{sup 4} in response to a change in P{sub N} is 4V/C[(l{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]. Using this model, T{sub R}, {alpha}{sub W}, and {eta}{sub CE} can be expressed in terms of quantities directly measurable in a hohlraum experiment. For a steady-state hohlraum that encloses a convex capsule, P{sub N} = {l_brace}(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}+[(1{minus}{alpha}{sub C})(A{sub S}+A{sub W}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub C}/A{sub T}]{r_brace}{sigma}T{sub RC}{sup 4} where {alpha}{sub C} is the capsule albedo, A{sub C} is the capsule area, A{sub T} {triple_bond} (A{sub S}+A{sub W}+A{sub H}), and T{sub RC} is the brightness temperature of the radiation that drives the capsule. According to this relation, the capsule-coupling efficiency of the baseline National-Ignition-Facility (NIF) hohlraum is 15% higher than predicted by previous analytic expressions. A model of a hohlraum that encloses a z pinch is also presented.

  2. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  3. Project Summary. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  4. An Accurate In Vitro Model of the E. coli Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Hughes, Arwel V; Daulton, Emma L; Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Heinrich, Frank; Khalid, Syma; Jefferies, Damien; Charlton, Timothy R; Webster, John R P; Kinane, Christian J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are an increasingly serious source of antibiotic-resistant infections, partly owing to their characteristic protective envelope. This complex, 20 nm thick barrier includes a highly impermeable, asymmetric bilayer outer membrane (OM), which plays a pivotal role in resisting antibacterial chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the OM molecular structure and its dynamics are poorly understood because the structure is difficult to recreate or study in vitro. The successful formation and characterization of a fully asymmetric model envelope using Langmuir–Blodgett and Langmuir–Schaefer methods is now reported. Neutron reflectivity and isotopic labeling confirmed the expected structure and asymmetry and showed that experiments with antibacterial proteins reproduced published in vivo behavior. By closely recreating natural OM behavior, this model provides a much needed robust system for antibiotic development. PMID:26331292

  5. Leidenfrost effect: accurate drop shape modeling and new scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we theoretically investigate the shape of a drop in a Leidenfrost state, focusing on the geometry of the vapor layer. The drop geometry is modeled by numerically matching the solution of the hydrostatic shape of a superhydrophobic drop (for the upper part) with the solution of the lubrication equation of the vapor flow underlying the drop (for the bottom part). The results highlight that the vapor layer, fed by evaporation, forms a concave depression in the drop interface that becomes increasingly marked with the drop size. The vapor layer then consists of a gas pocket in the center and a thin annular neck surrounding it. The film thickness increases with the size of the drop, and the thickness at the neck appears to be of the order of 10--100 μm in the case of water. The model is compared to recent experimental results [Burton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 074301 (2012)] and shows an excellent agreement, without any fitting parameter. New scaling laws also emerge from this model. The geometry of the vapor pocket is only weakly dependent on the superheat (and thus on the evaporation rate), this weak dependence being more pronounced in the neck region. In turn, the vapor layer characteristics strongly depend on the drop size.

  6. Automated dynamic analytical model improvement for damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, J. S.; Berman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described to improve a linear nonproportionally damped analytical model of a structure. The procedure finds the smallest changes in the analytical model such that the improved model matches the measured modal parameters. Features of the method are: (1) ability to properly treat complex valued modal parameters of a damped system; (2) applicability to realistically large structural models; and (3) computationally efficiency without involving eigensolutions and inversion of a large matrix.

  7. Analytic model for the bispectrum of galaxies in redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Sheth, Ravi K.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2008-07-15

    We develop an analytic theory for the redshift space bispectrum of dark matter, haloes, and galaxies. This is done within the context of the halo model of structure formation, as this allows for the self-consistent inclusion of linear and nonlinear redshift-space distortions and also for the nonlinearity of the halo bias. The model is applicable over a wide range of scales: on the largest scales the predictions reduce to those of the standard perturbation theory (PT); on smaller scales they are determined primarily by the nonlinear virial velocities of galaxies within haloes, and this gives rise to the U-shaped anisotropy in the reduced bispectrum--a finger print of the Finger-Of-God distortions. We then confront the predictions with measurements of the redshift-space bispectrum of dark matter from an ensemble of numerical simulations. On very large scales, k=0.05h Mpc{sup -1}, we find reasonably good agreement between our halo model, PT and the data, to within the errors. On smaller scales, k=0.1h Mpc{sup -1}, the measured bispectra differ from the PT at the level of {approx}10%-20%, especially for colinear triangle configurations. The halo model predictions improve over PT, but are accurate to no better than 10%. On smaller scales k=0.5-1.0h Mpc{sup -1}, our model provides a significant improvement over PT, which breaks down. This implies that studies which use the lowest order PT to extract galaxy bias information are not robust on scales k > or approx. 0.1h Mpc{sup -1}. The analytic and simulation results also indicate that there is no observable scale for which the configuration dependence of the reduced bispectrum is constant--hierarchical models for the higher-order correlation functions in redshift space are unlikely to be useful. It is hoped that our model will facilitate extraction of information from large-scale structure surveys of the Universe, because different galaxy populations are naturally included into our description.

  8. An analytically linearized helicopter model with improved modeling accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Patrick T.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analytically linearized model for helicopter flight response including rotor blade dynamics and dynamic inflow, that was recently developed, was studied with the objective of increasing the understanding, the ease of use, and the accuracy of the model. The mathematical model is described along with a description of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter and flight test used to validate the model. To aid in utilization of the model for sensitivity analysis, a new, faster, and more efficient implementation of the model was developed. It is shown that several errors in the mathematical modeling of the system caused a reduction in accuracy. These errors in rotor force resolution, trim force and moment calculation, and rotor inertia terms were corrected along with improvements to the programming style and documentation. Use of a trim input file to drive the model is examined. Trim file errors in blade twist, control input phase angle, coning and lag angles, main and tail rotor pitch, and uniform induced velocity, were corrected. Finally, through direct comparison of the original and corrected model responses to flight test data, the effect of the corrections on overall model output is shown.

  9. An accurate halo model for fitting non-linear cosmological power spectra and baryonic feedback models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Heymans, C.; Joudaki, S.; Heavens, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present an optimized variant of the halo model, designed to produce accurate matter power spectra well into the non-linear regime for a wide range of cosmological models. To do this, we introduce physically motivated free parameters into the halo-model formalism and fit these to data from high-resolution N-body simulations. For a variety of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and wCDM models, the halo-model power is accurate to ≃ 5 per cent for k ≤ 10h Mpc-1 and z ≤ 2. An advantage of our new halo model is that it can be adapted to account for the effects of baryonic feedback on the power spectrum. We demonstrate this by fitting the halo model to power spectra from the OWLS (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations) hydrodynamical simulation suite via parameters that govern halo internal structure. We are able to fit all feedback models investigated at the 5 per cent level using only two free parameters, and we place limits on the range of these halo parameters for feedback models investigated by the OWLS simulations. Accurate predictions to high k are vital for weak-lensing surveys, and these halo parameters could be considered nuisance parameters to marginalize over in future analyses to mitigate uncertainty regarding the details of feedback. Finally, we investigate how lensing observables predicted by our model compare to those from simulations and from HALOFIT for a range of k-cuts and feedback models and quantify the angular scales at which these effects become important. Code to calculate power spectra from the model presented in this paper can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  10. Fast Analytical Methods for Macroscopic Electrostatic Models in Biomolecular Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenli; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We review recent developments of fast analytical methods for macroscopic electrostatic calculations in biological applications, including the Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) and the generalized Born models for electrostatic solvation energy. The focus is on analytical approaches for hybrid solvation models, especially the image charge method for a spherical cavity, and also the generalized Born theory as an approximation to the PB model. This review places much emphasis on the mathematical details behind these methods. PMID:23745011

  11. Analytic Model For Estimation Of Cold Bulk Metal Forming Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Skunca, Marko; Keran, Zdenka; Math, Miljenko

    2007-05-17

    Numerical simulation of bulk metal forming plays an important role in predicting a key parameters in cold forging. Comparison of numerical and experimental data is of great importance, but there is always a need of more universal analytical tools. Therefore, many papers besides experiment and simulation of a particular bulk metal forming technology, include an analytic model. In this paper an analytical model for evaluation of commercially available simulation program packages is proposed. Based on elementary theory of plasticity, being only geometry dependent, model represents a good analytical reference to estimate given modeling preferences like; element types, solver, remeshing influence and many others. Obtained, geometry dependent, stress fields compared with numerical data give a clear picture of numerical possibilities and limitations of particular modeling program package.

  12. Feedbacks Between Numerical and Analytical Models in Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Toundykov, D.; Cohn, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogeology is a relatively young discipline which combines elements of Earth science and engineering. Mature fundamental disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, fluid mechanics) have centuries-long history of mathematical modeling even prior to discovery of Darcy's law. Thus, in hydrogeology, relatively few classic analytical models (such those by Theis, Polubarinova-Kochina, Philip, Toth, Henry, Dagan, Neuman) were developed by the early 1970's. The advent of computers and practical demands refocused mathematical models towards numerical techniques. With more diverse but less mathematically-oriented training, most hydrogeologists shifted from analytical methods to use of standardized computational software. Spatial variability in internal properties and external boundary conditions and geometry, and the added complexity of chemical and biological processes will remain major challenges for analytical modeling. Possibly, analytical techniques will play a subordinate role to numerical approaches in many applications. On the other hand, the rise of analytical element modeling of groundwater flow is a strong alternative to numerical models when data demand and computational efficiency is considered. The hallmark of analytical models - transparency and accuracy - will remain indispensable for scientific exploration of complex phenomena and for benchmarking numerical models. Therefore, there will always be feedbacks and complementarities between numerical and analytical techniques, as well as a certain ideological schism among various views to modeling. We illustrate the idea of feedbacks by reviewing evolution of Joszef Toth's analytical model of gravity driven flow systems. Toth's (1963) approach was to reduce the flow domain to a rectangle which allowed for closed-form solution of the governing equations. Succeeding numerical finite-element models by Freeze and Witherspoon (1966-1968) explored the effects of geometry and heterogeneity on regional groundwater flow

  13. Towards an analytical model of water: The octupolar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Vericat, F.; Bratko, D.

    1995-01-01

    A simple potential for the water intermolecular potential, consisting of hard spheres with a point dipole and a potential well with the symmetry of a tetrahedral octupole was proposed by Bratko, Blum, and Luzar some time ago. This structural model was formally solved by Blum, Cummings, and Bratko, and explicit solutions have been recently obtained. We show here that this very simple model agrees surprisingly well with the experimental pair correlation functions of Soper and Phillips. The agreement with the gOH(r) and gHH(r) functions is quite good. For the gOO(r) the agreement is not as good, but this has to do with the hard core nature of the potential. Analytical solutions for soft spherical cores exist.

  14. Computational and analytical modeling of eye refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Delia

    As the number of corneal refractive procedures increases annually, concerns about their long-term stability and predictability have become the center of attention in the ophthalmic community. This thesis focuses on developing quantitative biomechanical models of the cornea that will overcome shortcomings of previous models and incorporate new observations of corneal elastic properties. Our intent is to provide a more accurate model of the corneal structure to guide current and future developments. The second chapter shows that neural networks could rapidly prototype practical solutions to obtain a better estimate of the average corneal power using the contrast and image size parameters provided by the topographic systems. After establishing improved measurements of the corneal shape the thesis focuses on the development of various corneal models. The analytical model proposed shows that geometric optics, corneal structural properties and surgical nomograms could be used to gain a better understanding of corneal response to surgical interventions. The predictions of this model are closer to the values provided by the published nomograms and clinical data than that obtained by the traditional geometric model. Three surgical procedures (Ultrafast Laser-Automated Lamellar Keratomileusis, Corneal Transplant and Intrastromal Refractive Keratectomy) were simulated using the finite element method. A new formulation was developed that simulates the changes on corneal curvature after refractive surgery when the stiffness inhomogeneities across the corneal thickness are considered. It has been shown that the predictability of the surgical outcome is improved when the stiffness inhomogeneities and nonlinearities of the deformations are included in the finite element simulations. Moreover, a finite element formulation has been developed first time to characterize the intrastromal refractive keratectomy procedure. An inhomogeneous (small displacements) model was identified as an

  15. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed model frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems, and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental model data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  16. Analytical modelling of Thirty Meter Telescope optics polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anche, Ramya M.; Anupama, G. C.; Reddy, Krishna; Sen, Asoke; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Sengupta, Sujan; Skidmore, Warren; Atwood, Jenny; Tirupathi, Sivarani; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2015-06-01

    The polarization introduced due to Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) optics is calculated using an analytical model. Mueller matrices are also generated for each optical element using Zemax, based on which the instrumental polarization due to the entire system at the focal plane is estimated and compared with the analytical model. This study is significant in the estimation of the telescope sensitivity and also has great implications for future instruments.

  17. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  18. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  19. Analytical model for orbital debris environmental management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talent, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation, also referred to as the PIB (particle-in-a-box) model, expressing the time rate of change of the number of objects in orbit, is developed, and its applicability is illustrated. The model can be used as a tool for the assessment of LEO environment stability, and as a starting point for the development of numerical evolutionary models. Within the context of the model, evolutionary scenarios are examined, and found to be sensitive to the growth rate. It is determined that the present environment is slightly unstable to catastrophic growth, and that the number of particles on orbit will continue to increase until approximately 2250-2350 AD, with a maximum of 2,000,000. The model is expandable to the more realistic (complex) case of multiple species in a multiple-tier system.

  20. Experimental and analytical generic space station dynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Edighoffer, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic model used for verification of analytical and experimental methods is documented. The model consists of five substructures to simulate the multibody, low frequency nature of large space structures. Design considerations which led to a fundamental vibration frequency of less than one Hz are described. Finite element analysis used to predict the vibration modes and frequencies of the experimental model is presented. In addition, modeling of cable suspension effects using prestressed vibration analysis is described. Details of the expermental and analytical models are included to permit replication of the study. Results of the modal vibration tests and analysis are presented in a separate document.

  1. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-04-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental modal data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  2. Accurate modeling and inversion of electrical resistivity data in the presence of metallic infrastructure with known location and dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2015-06-26

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been widely used in environmental applications to study processes associated with subsurface contaminants and contaminant remediation. Anthropogenic alterations in subsurface electrical conductivity associated with contamination often originate from highly industrialized areas with significant amounts of buried metallic infrastructure. The deleterious influence of such infrastructure on imaging results generally limits the utility of ERT where it might otherwise prove useful for subsurface investigation and monitoring. In this manuscript we present a method of accurately modeling the effects of buried conductive infrastructure within the forward modeling algorithm, thereby removing them from the inversion results. The method is implemented in parallel using immersed interface boundary conditions, whereby the global solution is reconstructed from a series of well-conditioned partial solutions. Forward modeling accuracy is demonstrated by comparison with analytic solutions. Synthetic imaging examples are used to investigate imaging capabilities within a subsurface containing electrically conductive buried tanks, transfer piping, and well casing, using both well casings and vertical electrode arrays as current sources and potential measurement electrodes. Results show that, although accurate infrastructure modeling removes the dominating influence of buried metallic features, the presence of metallic infrastructure degrades imaging resolution compared to standard ERT imaging. However, accurate imaging results may be obtained if electrodes are appropriately located.

  3. An Analytical Model of Tribocharging in Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, D. P.; Hartzell, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Nongravitational forces, including electrostatic forces and cohesion, can drive the behavior of regolith in low gravity environments such as the Moon and asteroids. Regolith is the 'skin' of solid planetary bodies: it is the outer coating that is observed by orbiters and the first material contacted by landers. Triboelectric charging, the phenomenon by which electrical charge accumulates during the collision or rubbing of two surfaces, has been found to occur in initially electrically neutral granular mixtures. Although charge transfer is often attributed to chemical differences between the different materials, charge separation has also been found to occur in mixtures containing grains of a single material, but with a variety of grain sizes. In such cases, the charge always separates according to grain size; typically the smaller grains acquire a more negative charge than the larger grains. Triboelectric charging may occur in a variety of planetary phenomena (including mass wasting and dust storms) as well as during spacecraft-surface interactions (including sample collection and wheel motion). Interactions between charged grains or with the solar wind plasma could produce regolith motion. However, a validated, predictive model of triboelectric charging between dielectric grains has not yet been developed. A model for such size-dependent charge separation will be presented, demonstrating how random collisions between initially electrically neutral grains lead to net migration of electrons toward the smaller grains. The model is applicable to a wide range of single-material granular mixtures, including those with unusual or wildly varying size distributions, and suggests a possible mechanism for the reversal of the usual size-dependent charge polarity described above. This is a significant improvement over existing charge exchange models, which are restricted to two discrete grains sizes and provide severely limited estimates for charge magnitude. We will also

  4. Analytical modelling of soil effects on electromagnetic induction sensor for humanitarian demining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, D.; Ambruš, D.; Bilas, V.

    2013-06-01

    Accurate compensation of the soil effect is essential for a new generation of sensitive classification-based electromagnetic induction landmine detectors. We present an analytical model for evaluation of the soil effect suitable for straightforward numerical implementation. The modelled soil consists of arbitrary number of conductive and magnetic layers. The solution region is truncated leading to the solution in form of a series rather than infinite integrals. Frequency-dependent permeability is inherent to the model, and time domain analysis can be made using DFT. In order to illustrate the model usage, we evaluate performances of three metal detector designs.

  5. Hybrid experimental/analytical models of structural dynamics - Creation and use for predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmes, Etienne

    1993-01-01

    An original complete methodology for the construction of predictive models of damped structural vibrations is introduced. A consistent definition of normal and complex modes is given which leads to an original method to accurately identify non-proportionally damped normal mode models. A new method to create predictive hybrid experimental/analytical models of damped structures is introduced, and the ability of hybrid models to predict the response to system configuration changes is discussed. Finally a critical review of the overall methodology is made by application to the case of the MIT/SERC interferometer testbed.

  6. Precise and accurate assessment of uncertainties in model parameters from stellar interferometry. Application to stellar diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaume, Regis; Rabus, Markus; Jordan, Andres

    2015-08-01

    In stellar interferometry, the assumption that the observables can be seen as Gaussian, independent variables is the norm. In particular, neither the optical interferometry FITS (OIFITS) format nor the most popular fitting software in the field, LITpro, offer means to specify a covariance matrix or non-Gaussian uncertainties. Interferometric observables are correlated by construct, though. Also, the calibration by an instrumental transfer function ensures that the resulting observables are not Gaussian, even if uncalibrated ones happened to be so.While analytic frameworks have been published in the past, they are cumbersome and there is no generic implementation available. We propose here a relatively simple way of dealing with correlated errors without the need to extend the OIFITS specification or making some Gaussian assumptions. By repeatedly picking at random which interferograms, which calibrator stars, and which are the errors on their diameters, and performing the data processing on the bootstrapped data, we derive a sampling of p(O), the multivariate probability density function (PDF) of the observables O. The results can be stored in a normal OIFITS file. Then, given a model m with parameters P predicting observables O = m(P), we can estimate the PDF of the model parameters f(P) = p(m(P)) by using a density estimation of the observables' PDF p.With observations repeated over different baselines, on nights several days apart, and with a significant set of calibrators systematic errors are de facto taken into account. We apply the technique to a precise and accurate assessment of stellar diameters obtained at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer with PIONIER.

  7. Analytical and numerical modeling for flexible pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Geng

    2011-12-01

    The unbonded flexible pipe of eight layers, in which all the layers except the carcass layer are assumed to have isotropic properties, has been analyzed. Specifically, the carcass layer shows the orthotropic characteristics. The effective elastic moduli of the carcass layer have been developed in terms of the influence of deformation to stiffness. With consideration of the effective elastic moduli, the structure can be properly analyzed. Also the relative movements of tendons and relative displacements of wires in helical armour layer have been investigated. A three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model has been presented to predict the response of flexible pipes under axial force and torque. Further, the friction and contact of interlayer have been considered. Comparison between the finite element model and experimental results obtained in literature has been given and discussed, which might provide practical and technical support for the application of unbonded flexible pipes.

  8. Analytical model for screening potential CO2 repositories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okwen, R.T.; Stewart, M.T.; Cunningham, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing potential repositories for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide using numerical models can be complicated, costly, and time-consuming, especially when faced with the challenge of selecting a repository from a multitude of potential repositories. This paper presents a set of simple analytical equations (model), based on the work of previous researchers, that could be used to evaluate the suitability of candidate repositories for subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide. We considered the injection of carbon dioxide at a constant rate into a confined saline aquifer via a fully perforated vertical injection well. The validity of the analytical model was assessed via comparison with the TOUGH2 numerical model. The metrics used in comparing the two models include (1) spatial variations in formation pressure and (2) vertically integrated brine saturation profile. The analytical model and TOUGH2 show excellent agreement in their results when similar input conditions and assumptions are applied in both. The analytical model neglects capillary pressure and the pressure dependence of fluid properties. However, simulations in TOUGH2 indicate that little error is introduced by these simplifications. Sensitivity studies indicate that the agreement between the analytical model and TOUGH2 depends strongly on (1) the residual brine saturation, (2) the difference in density between carbon dioxide and resident brine (buoyancy), and (3) the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation. The results achieved suggest that the analytical model is valid when the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation is linear or quasi-linear and when the irreducible saturation of brine is zero or very small. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, S. A. Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-15

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  10. Ab initio calculations of accurate dissociation energy and analytic potential energy function for the second excited state B1Π of 7LiH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Heng; Liu, Yu-Fang; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhu, Zun-Lue; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2006-12-01

    The reasonable dissociation limit of the second excited singlet state B1Π of 7LiH molecule is obtained. The accurate dissociation energy and equilibrium geometry of the B1Π state are calculated using a symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction method in full active space. The whole potential energy curve for the B1Π state is obtained over the internuclear distance ranging from about 0.10 nm to 0.54 nm, and has a least-square fit to the analytic Murrell-Sorbie function form. The vertical excitation energy is calculated from the ground state to the B1Π state and compared with previous theoretical results. The equilibrium internuclear distance obtained by geometry optimization is found to be quite different from that obtained by single-point energy scanning under the same calculation condition. Based on the analytic potential energy function, the harmonic frequency value of the B1Π state is estimated. A comparison of the theoretical calculations of dissociation energies, equilibrium interatomic distances and the analytic potential energy function with those obtained by previous theoretical results clearly shows that the present work is more comprehensive and in better agreement with experiments than previous theories, thus it is an improvement on previous theories.

  11. A new analytic model for fracture-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    A new analytic model for analyzing well test data from fracture-dominated reservoirs is presented. It is a concentric composite model with a finite-radius well located in the center. In the inner region the flow is assumed to be linear, and in the outer region the flow is assumed to be radial. Solutions are obtained analytically and type curves for ranges of dimensionless parameters are presented. The model can be used to find the extent and the flow parameters of the fractures near the well and the average values for the entire system provided that wellbore-storage effects do not mask the early-time data.

  12. Analytical modelling of no-vent fill process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, David A.; Schmidt, George R.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical model called FILL is presented which represents the first step in attaining the capability for no-vent fill of cryogens in space. The model's analytical structure is described, including the equations used to calculate transient thermodynamic behavior in different regions of the tank. The code predictions are compared with data from recent no-vent fill ground tests using Freon-114. The results are used to validate the FILL model to evaluate the viability of universal submerged jet theory in predicting system-level condensation effects.

  13. MONA: An accurate two-phase well flow model based on phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Asheim, H.

    1984-10-01

    In two phase flow, holdup and pressure loss are related to interfacial slippage. A model based on the slippage concept has been developed and tested using production well data from Forties, the Ekofisk area, and flowline data from Prudhoe Bay. The model developed turned out considerably more accurate than the standard models used for comparison.

  14. ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS - PROJECT SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model
    of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAE...

  15. Analytical development and optimization of a graphene-solution interface capacitance model.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Rasoul; Mashayekhi, Reza; Ranjbari, Leyla; Shirdel, Amir H; Haghighian, Niloofar; Movahedi, Parisa; Hadiyan, Moein; Ismail, Razali

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, which as a new carbon material shows great potential for a range of applications because of its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties, becomes a matter of attention in these years. The use of graphene in nanoscale devices plays an important role in achieving more accurate and faster devices. Although there are lots of experimental studies in this area, there is a lack of analytical models. Quantum capacitance as one of the important properties of field effect transistors (FETs) is in our focus. The quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated transistors (EGFETs) along with a relevant equivalent circuit is suggested in terms of Fermi velocity, carrier density, and fundamental physical quantities. The analytical model is compared with the experimental data and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is calculated to be 11.82. In order to decrease the error, a new function of E composed of α and β parameters is suggested. In another attempt, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm is implemented for optimization and development of an analytical model to obtain a more accurate capacitance model. To further confirm this viewpoint, based on the given results, the accuracy of the optimized model is more than 97% which is in an acceptable range of accuracy. PMID:24991496

  16. Analytical development and optimization of a graphene–solution interface capacitance model

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Rasoul; Mashayekhi, Reza; Ranjbari, Leyla; Shirdel, Amir H; Haghighian, Niloofar; Movahedi, Parisa; Hadiyan, Moein

    2014-01-01

    Summary Graphene, which as a new carbon material shows great potential for a range of applications because of its exceptional electronic and mechanical properties, becomes a matter of attention in these years. The use of graphene in nanoscale devices plays an important role in achieving more accurate and faster devices. Although there are lots of experimental studies in this area, there is a lack of analytical models. Quantum capacitance as one of the important properties of field effect transistors (FETs) is in our focus. The quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated transistors (EGFETs) along with a relevant equivalent circuit is suggested in terms of Fermi velocity, carrier density, and fundamental physical quantities. The analytical model is compared with the experimental data and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is calculated to be 11.82. In order to decrease the error, a new function of E composed of α and β parameters is suggested. In another attempt, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm is implemented for optimization and development of an analytical model to obtain a more accurate capacitance model. To further confirm this viewpoint, based on the given results, the accuracy of the optimized model is more than 97% which is in an acceptable range of accuracy. PMID:24991496

  17. Experimental verification of the SP-100 TEM pump analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Salamah, S.A.; Miller, D.D.; Sinha, U.N.; Narkiewicz, R.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Validation of the TEM pump analytical model is conducted via experimental verification of the model prediction. Two key tests that have provided essential information toward this objective are the Magnetic Bench Test (MBT) and the ElectroMagnetic Integration Test (EMIT). The tests are briefly described and experimental results are compared with predictions of simulation models that form part of overall TEM pump performance model.

  18. Creation of Anatomically Accurate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Solid Models from Medical Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, John E.; Graham, R. Scott; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Oberlander, Eric J.; Broaddus, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Most surgical instrumentation and implants used in the world today are designed with sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software. This software automates the mechanical development of a product from its conceptual design through manufacturing. CAD software also provides a means of manipulating solid models prior to Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Few surgical products are designed in conjunction with accurate CAD models of human anatomy because of the difficulty with which these models are created. We have developed a novel technique that creates anatomically accurate, patient specific CAD solids from medical images in a matter of minutes.

  19. An accurate modeling, simulation, and analysis tool for predicting and estimating Raman LIDAR system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Russo, Leonard P.; Barrett, John L.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Egbert, Paul I.

    2007-09-01

    BAE Systems presents the results of a program to model the performance of Raman LIDAR systems for the remote detection of atmospheric gases, air polluting hydrocarbons, chemical and biological weapons, and other molecular species of interest. Our model, which integrates remote Raman spectroscopy, 2D and 3D LADAR, and USAF atmospheric propagation codes permits accurate determination of the performance of a Raman LIDAR system. The very high predictive performance accuracy of our model is due to the very accurate calculation of the differential scattering cross section for the specie of interest at user selected wavelengths. We show excellent correlation of our calculated cross section data, used in our model, with experimental data obtained from both laboratory measurements and the published literature. In addition, the use of standard USAF atmospheric models provides very accurate determination of the atmospheric extinction at both the excitation and Raman shifted wavelengths.

  20. Semi-analytical modelling of piezoelectric excitation of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkowski, Michał K.; Rustighi, Emiliano; Waters, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    Piezoelectric elements are a key component of modern non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and play a significant role in many other areas involving dynamic interaction with the structure such as energy harvesting, active control, power ultrasonics or removal of surface accretions using structural waves. In this paper we present a wave-based technique for modelling waveguides equipped with piezoelectric actuators in which there is no need for common simplifications regarding their dynamic behaviour or mutual interaction with the structure. The proposed approach is based on the semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) method. We developed a new piezoelectric semi-analytical element and employed the analytical wave approach to model the distributed electric excitation and scattering of the waves at discontinuities. The model is successfully validated against an experiment on a beam-like waveguide with emulated anechoic terminations.

  1. Combined experimental/analytical modeling of shell/payload structures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Miller, A.K.; Carne, T.G.

    1985-12-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model of a shell/payload structure. A component mode synthesis technique was used which incorporated free modes and residual effects. The total structure is physically divided into the two subsystems which are connected through stiff joints. The payload was tested to obtain its free-free modes, while a finite element model of the shell was analyzed to obtain its modal description. Both the translational and rotational components of the experimental mode shapes at the payload interface were used in the coupling. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of neglecting the residual terms of the payload. Results from a previous study of a combined experimental/analytical model for a beam structure are also given. The beam structure was used to examine the basic procedures and difficulties in experimentally measuring, and analytically accounting for the rotational and residual quantities.

  2. An analytical model of the HINT performance metric

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Q.O.; Gustafson, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The HINT benchmark was developed to provide a broad-spectrum metric for computers and to measure performance over the full range of memory sizes and time scales. We have extended our understanding of why HINT performance curves look the way they do and can now predict the curves using an analytical model based on simple hardware specifications as input parameters. Conversely, by fitting the experimental curves with the analytical model, hardware specifications such as memory performance can be inferred to provide insight into the nature of a given computer system.

  3. Analytical modeling of the radial pn junction nanowire solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nouran M.; Allam, Nageh K.; Abdel Haleem, Ashraf M.; Rafat, Nadia H.

    2014-07-01

    In photovoltaic solar cells, radial p-n junctions have been considered a very promising structure to improve the carrier collection efficiency and accordingly the conversion efficiency. In the present study, the semiconductor equations, namely Poisson's and continuity equations for a cylindrical p-n junction solar cell, have been solved analytically. The analytical model is based on Green's function theory to calculate the current density, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and conversion efficiency. The model has been used to simulate p-n and p-i-n silicon radial solar cells. The validity and accuracy of the present simulator were confirmed through a comparison with previously published experimental and numerical reports.

  4. Experimental validation of an analytical model for nonlinear propagation in uncompensated optical links.

    PubMed

    Torrengo, E; Cigliutti, R; Bosco, G; Carena, A; Curri, V; Poggiolini, P; Nespola, A; Zeolla, D; Forghieri, F

    2011-12-12

    Link design for optical communication systems requires accurate modeling of nonlinear propagation in fibers. This topic has been widely analyzed in last decades with partial successes in special conditions, but without a comprehensive solution. Since the introduction of coherent detection with electronic signal processing the scenario completely changed because this category of systems shows better performances in links without in-line dispersion management. This change to uncompensated transmission allowed to modify the approach in the study of nonlinear fiber propagation and in recent years a series of promising analytical models have been proposed. In this paper, we present an experimental validation over different fiber types of an analytical model for nonlinear propagation over uncompensated optical transmission links. Considering an ultra-dense WDM system, we transmitted ten 120-Gb/s PM-QPSK signals over a multi-span system probing different fiber types: SSMF, PSCF and NZDSF. A good matching was found in all cases showing the potential of the analytical model for accurate performance estimation that could lead to powerful tools for link design. PMID:22274104

  5. Helicopter derivative identification from analytic models and flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molusis, J. H.; Briczinski, S.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results of stability derivative identification from helicopter analytic models and flight test data are presented. Six and nine degree-of-freedom (DOF) linear models are identified from an analytic nonlinear helicopter simulation using a least square technique. The identified models are compared with the convectional partial differentiation method for obtaining derivatives to form the basis for interpretation of derivatives identified from flight data. Six degree-of-freedom models are identified from CH-53A and CH-54B flight data, using an extended Kalman filter modified to process several maneuvers simultaneously. The a priori derivative estimate is obtained by optimal filtering of the data and then using a least square method. The results demonstrate that a six DOF identified model is sufficient to determine the low frequency modes of motion, but a nine DOF rotor/body model is necessary for proper representation of short-term response.

  6. Analytic models of the chemical evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for constructing analytic models of the chemical evolution of galaxies subject to infall of metal-poor material onto a maturing disk. A class of linear models is discussed which takes the star-formation rate within a defined region to be proportional to the mass of interstellar gas within that region, and the instantaneous recycling approximation is adopted. The solutions are obtained by approximately matching the infall rate to parametrized familiies of functions for which the equations are exactly soluble. The masses, the primary and secondary metallicities, and the gas concentrations of radioactive chronometers can all then be analytically expressed. Surveys of galactic abundances in location and in time can be compared to the parameter spaces of the analytic representations.

  7. Analytical modeling for gamma radiation damage on silicon photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation-induced damage in PIN silicon photodiode induces degradation of the photodiode parameters. In this work, by presenting an analytical model, the effect of gamma dose on the dark current in a PIN photodiode array was investigated. Geant4 was used to obtain the damage constant as a result of primary incident particle fluence and NIEL distribution calculations. Experimental measurements as well as numerical simulation of the semiconductor with ATLAS were carried out to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. A reasonable agreement has been found between analytical results and experimental data for BPX65 silicon photodiodes irradiated by a Co-60 gamma source at total doses up to 500 krad under different reverse voltages. Moreover, the results showed that the dark current of each photodiode array pixel has considerably increased by gamma dose irradiation.

  8. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered.

  9. Large-signal numerical and analytical HBT models

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, D.A.; East, J.R.; Mains, R.K.; Haddad, G.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Several large-signal HBT models are investigated in this paper to determine their usefulness at millimeter-wave frequencies. The most detailed model involves numerically solving moments of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. A description of the numerical model is given along with several simulated results. The numerical model is then used to evaluate two analytical HBT models, the conventional Gummel-Poon model and a modified Ebers-Moll model. It is found that the commonly used Gummel-Poon model exhibits poor agreement with numerical and experimental data at millimeter-wave frequencies due to neglect of transit-time delays. Improved agreement between measured and modeled data result by including transit-time effects in an Ebers-Moll model. This simple model has direct application to millimeter-wave power amplifier and oscillator design. Several measured results are presented to help verify the simple model.

  10. A new analytical model for wind farm power prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayifar, Amin; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a new analytical approach is presented and validated to predict wind farm power production. The new model assumes a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake which has been recently proposed by Bastankhah and Porté-Agel (2014). To estimate the velocity deficit in the wake, this model needs the local wake growth rate parameter which is calculated based on the local turbulence intensity in the wind farm. The interaction of the wakes is modeled by use of the velocity deficit superposition principle. Finally, the power curve is used to estimate the power production from the wind turbines. The wind farm model is compared to large-eddy simulation (LES) data of Horns Rev wind farm for a wide range of wind directions. Reasonable agreement between the proposed analytical model and LES data is obtained. This prediction is substantially better than the one obtained with common wind farm softwares such as WAsP.

  11. Modeling Analyte Transport and Capture in Porous Bead Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jie; Lennart, Alexis; Wong, Jorge; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Camp, James; McDevitt, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Porous agarose microbeads, with high surface to volume ratios and high binding densities, are attracting attention as highly sensitive, affordable sensor elements for a variety of high performance bioassays. While such polymer microspheres have been extensively studied and reported on previously and are now moving into real-world clinical practice, very little work has been completed to date to model the convection, diffusion, and binding kinetics of soluble reagents captured within such fibrous networks. Here, we report the development of a three-dimensional computational model and provide the initial evidence for its agreement with experimental outcomes derived from the capture and detection of representative protein and genetic biomolecules in 290μm porous beads. We compare this model to antibody-mediated capture of C-reactive protein and bovine serum albumin, along with hybridization of oligonucleotide sequences to DNA probes. These results suggest that due to the porous interior of the agarose bead, internal analyte transport is both diffusion- and convection-based, and regardless of the nature of analyte, the bead interiors reveal an interesting trickle of convection-driven internal flow. Based on this model, the internal to external flow rate ratio is found to be in the range of 1:3100 to 1:170 for beads with agarose concentration ranging from 0.5% to 8% for the sensor ensembles here studied. Further, both model and experimental evidence suggest that binding kinetics strongly affect analyte distribution of captured reagents within the beads. These findings reveal that high association constants create a steep moving boundary in which unbound analytes are held back at the periphery of the bead sensor. Low association constants create a more shallow moving boundary in which unbound analytes diffuse further into the bead before binding. These models agree with experimental evidence and thus serve as a new tool set for the study of bio-agent transport processes

  12. FACTOR ANALYTIC MODELS OF CLUSTERED MULTIVARIATE DATA WITH INFORMATIVE CENSORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a general class of factor analytic models for the analysis of clustered multivariate data in the presence of informative missingness. We assume that there are distinct sets of cluster-level latent variables related to the primary outcomes and to the censorin...

  13. Analytical properties of the anisotropic cubic Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, D.; Maillard, J.M.; Oitmaa, J.; Velgakis, M.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors combine an exact functional relation, the inversion relation, with conventional high-temperature expansions to explore the analytic properties of the anisotropic Ising model on both the square and simple cubic lattice. In particular, they investigate the nature of the singularities that occur in partially resummed expansions of the partition function and of the susceptibility.

  14. An analytic spin chain model with fractional revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Jean-Michel; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    New analytic spin chains with fractional revival are introduced. Their nearest-neighbor couplings and local magnetic fields correspond to the recurrence coefficients of para-Racah polynomials which are orthogonal on quadratic bi-lattices. These models generalize the spin chain associated to the dual-Hahn polynomials. Instances where perfect state transfer also occurs are identified.

  15. Analytical Models of Legislative Texts for Muslim Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwan, Ammar Abdullah Naseh; Yusoff, Mohd Yakubzulkifli Bin Mohd; Al-Hami, Mohammad Said M.

    2011-01-01

    The significance of the analytical models in traditional Islamic studies is that they contribute in sharpening the intellectual capacity of the students of Islamic studies. Research literature in Islamic studies has descriptive side predominantly; the information is gathered and compiled and rarely analyzed properly. This weakness is because of…

  16. Improving light propagation Monte Carlo simulations with accurate 3D modeling of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D light propagation model to simulate multispectral reflectance images of large skin surface areas. In particular, we aim to simulate more accurately the effects of various physiological properties of the skin in the case of subcutaneous vein imaging compared to existing models. Our method combines a Monte Carlo light propagation model, a realistic three-dimensional model of the skin using parametric surfaces and a vision system for data acquisition. We describe our model in detail, present results from the Monte Carlo modeling and compare our results with those obtained with a well established Monte Carlo model and with real skin reflectance images.

  17. Analytic model of electron self-injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator in the strongly nonlinear bubble regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    Self-injection of background electrons in plasma wakefield accelerators in the highly nonlinear bubble regime is analyzed using particle-in-cell and semi-analytic modeling. It is shown that the return current in the bubble sheath layer is crucial for accurate determination of the trapped particle trajectories.

  18. An analytic model of toroidal half-wave oscillations: Implication on plasma density estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, Geeta

    2015-06-01

    The developed analytic model for toroidal oscillations under infinitely conducting ionosphere ("Rigid-end") has been extended to "Free-end" case when the conjugate ionospheres are infinitely resistive. The present direct analytic model (DAM) is the only analytic model that provides the field line structures of electric and magnetic field oscillations associated with the "Free-end" toroidal wave for generalized plasma distribution characterized by the power law ρ = ρo(ro/r)m, where m is the density index and r is the geocentric distance to the position of interest on the field line. This is important because different regions in the magnetosphere are characterized by different m. Significant improvement over standard WKB solution and an excellent agreement with the numerical exact solution (NES) affirms validity and advancement of DAM. In addition, we estimate the equatorial ion number density (assuming H+ atom as the only species) using DAM, NES, and standard WKB for Rigid-end as well as Free-end case and illustrate their respective implications in computing ion number density. It is seen that WKB method overestimates the equatorial ion density under Rigid-end condition and underestimates the same under Free-end condition. The density estimates through DAM are far more accurate than those computed through WKB. The earlier analytic estimates of ion number density were restricted to m = 6, whereas DAM can account for generalized m while reproducing the density for m = 6 as envisaged by earlier models.

  19. Terahertz microstructured optical fibers: An analytical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have wavelength scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional microstructured cladding might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms over an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz (THz) frequency region. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. We analytically study the modal properties of terahertz microstructured optical fiber (THz MOF), by using our analytical field model, developed for optical waveguides.

  20. Improvements to the analytical linescan model for SEM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.; Bunday, Benjamin D.

    2016-03-01

    Critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology has long used empirical approaches to determine edge locations. While such solutions are very flexible, physics-based models offer the potential for improved accuracy and precision for specific applications. Here, Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate theoretical linescans from single step and line/space targets in order to build a physics-based analytical model, including the presence of bottom footing and top corner rounding. The resulting analytical linescan model fits the Monte Carlo simulation results for different feature heights, widths, pitches, sidewall angles, bottom footing, and top corner rounding. This model has also been successfully applied to asymetric features such as sidewall spacers encountered in self-aligned double patterning.

  1. On the Development of Parameterized Linear Analytical Longitudinal Airship Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric A.; Johnson, Joseph R.; Bayard, David S.; Elfes, Alberto; Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore Titan, a moon of Saturn, airships must be able to traverse the atmosphere autonomously. To achieve this, an accurate model and accurate control of the vehicle must be developed so that it is understood how the airship will react to specific sets of control inputs. This paper explains how longitudinal aircraft stability derivatives can be used with airship parameters to create a linear model of the airship solely by combining geometric and aerodynamic airship data. This method does not require system identification of the vehicle. All of the required data can be derived from computational fluid dynamics and wind tunnel testing. This alternate method of developing dynamic airship models will reduce time and cost. Results are compared to other stable airship dynamic models to validate the methods. Future work will address a lateral airship model using the same methods.

  2. Analytic model of an IR radiation heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Pamela J.

    1990-01-01

    An IR radiation heat pipe made from multilayer insulation blankets and proposed to be used aboard spacecraft to transfer waste heat was modeled analytically. A circular cross section pipe 9-in. in diameter, 10-ft long, with a specular reflectivity of 0.94 was found to have an efficiency of 58.6 percent. Several key parameters were varied for the circular model to understand their significance. In addition, square and triangular cross section pipes were investigated.

  3. Analytical modeling of thermoluminescent albedo detectors for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Glickstein, S S

    1983-02-01

    In order to gain an in-depth understanding of the neutron physics of a 6LiF TLD when used as an albedo neutron dosimeter, an analytical model was developed to simulate the response of a 6LiF chip. The analytical model was used to examine the sensitivity of the albedo TLD response to incident monoenergetic neutrons and to evaluate a multiple chip TLD neutron dosimeter. Contrary to initial experimental studies, which were hampered by statistical uncertainties, the analytical evaluation revealed that a three-energy-group detector could not reliably measure the dose equivalent to personnel exposed to multiple neutron spectra. The analysis clearly illustrates that there may be order of magnitude errors in the measured neutron dose if the dosimeter has not been calibrated for the same flux spectrum to which it is exposed. As a result of this analysis, it was concluded that, for personnel neutron monitoring, a present TLD badge must be calibrated for the neutron spectrum into which the badge is to be introduced. The analytical model used in this study can readily be adopted for evaluating other possible detectors and shield material that might be proposed in the future as suitable for use in neutron dosimetry applications. PMID:6826377

  4. Analytic model for assessing thermal performance of SCUBA divers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    To assist design of adequate protective clothing, mathematical model of man's thermoregulatory system has been developed so that body thermal responses under immersed conditions can be predicted accurately. Experimental data encompassed wide range of water temperatures, protective clothing, breathing-gas mixtures, and durations of immersion.

  5. An analytical model for permeability of isotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Lu, Tian Jian; Kim, Tongbeum

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate that permeability of isotropic porous media e.g., open-cell foams can be analytically presented as a function of two morphological parameters: porosity and pore size. Adopting a cubic unit cell model, an existing tortuosity model from the branching algorithm method is incorporated into a generalized permeability model. The present model shows that dimensionless permeability significantly increases as the porosity of isotropic porous media and unifies the previously reported data in a wide range of porosity (ɛ=0.55-0.98) and pore size (Dp=0.254 mm-5.08 mm).

  6. Comparison of Cluster, Slab, and Analytic Potential Models for the Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP)/TiO2 (110) Intermolecular Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Tunega, Daniel; Xu, Lai; Govind, Niranjan; Sun, Rui; Taylor, Ramona; Lischka, Hans; De Jong, Wibe A.; Hase, William L.

    2013-08-29

    In a previous study (J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 12403) cluster models for the TiO2 rutile (110) surface and MP2 calculations were used to develop an analytic potential energy function for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) interacting with this surface. In the work presented here, this analytic potential and MP2 cluster models are compared with DFT "slab" calculations for DMMP interacting with the TiO2 (110) surface and with DFT cluster models for the TiO2 (110) surface. The DFT slab calculations were performed with the PW91 and PBE functionals. The analytic potential gives DMMP/ TiO2 (110) potential energy curves in excellent agreement with those obtained from the slab calculations. The cluster models for the TiO2 (110) surface, used for the MP2 calculations, were extended to DFT calculations with the B3LYP, PW91, and PBE functional. These DFT calculations do not give DMMP/TiO2 (110) interaction energies which agree with those from the DFT slab calculations. Analyses of the wave functions for these cluster models show that they do not accurately represent the HOMO and LUMO for the surface, which should be 2p and 3d orbitals, respectively, and the models also do not give an accurate band gap. The MP2 cluster models do not accurately represent the LUMO and that they give accurate DMMP/TiO2 (110) interaction energies is apparently fortuitous, arising from their highly inaccurate band gaps. Accurate cluster models, consisting of 7, 10, and 15 Ti-atoms and which have the correct HOMO and LUMO properties, are proposed. The work presented here illustrates the care that must be taken in "constructing" cluster models which accurately model surfaces.

  7. How accurate are polymer models in the analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer experiments on proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Edward P.; Morrison, Greg; Brooks, Bernard R.; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-03-01

    Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are used to infer the properties of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins. From the measured average FRET efficiency, ⟨E⟩, the distance distribution P(R ) is inferred by assuming that the DSE can be described as a polymer. The single parameter in the appropriate polymer model (Gaussian chain, wormlike chain, or self-avoiding walk) for P(R ) is determined by equating the calculated and measured ⟨E⟩. In order to assess the accuracy of this "standard procedure," we consider the generalized Rouse model (GRM), whose properties [⟨E⟩ and P(R )] can be analytically computed, and the Molecular Transfer Model for protein L for which accurate simulations can be carried out as a function of guanadinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) concentration. Using the precisely computed ⟨E⟩ for the GRM and protein L, we infer P(R ) using the standard procedure. We find that the mean end-to-end distance can be accurately inferred (less than 10% relative error) using ⟨E⟩ and polymer models for P(R ). However, the value extracted for the radius of gyration (Rg) and the persistence length (lp) are less accurate. For protein L, the errors in the inferred properties increase as the GdmCl concentration increases for all polymer models. The relative error in the inferred Rg and lp, with respect to the exact values, can be as large as 25% at the highest GdmCl concentration. We propose a self-consistency test, requiring measurements of ⟨E⟩ by attaching dyes to different residues in the protein, to assess the validity of describing DSE using the Gaussian model. Application of the self-consistency test to the GRM shows that even for this simple model, which exhibits an order→disorder transition, the Gaussian P(R ) is inadequate. Analysis of experimental data of FRET efficiencies with dyes at several locations for the cold shock protein, and simulations results for protein L, for which accurate FRET

  8. Comprehensive analytical model to characterize randomness in optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhe; Gallion, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive the corresponding stochastic differential equations (SDEs) for the modal amplitude evolution inside optical waveguides with random refractive index variations. Based on the SDEs, the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are derived to analyze the statistics of the modal amplitudes, such as the optical power and power variations as well as the power correlation coefficients between the different modal powers. These ODEs can be solved analytically and therefore, it greatly simplifies the analysis. It is demonstrated that the ODEs for the power evolution of the modes are in excellent agreement with the Marcuse' coupled power model. The higher order statistics, such as the power variations and power correlation coefficients, which are not exactly analyzed in the Marcuse' model, are discussed afterwards. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the analytical model. PMID:27136981

  9. Analytical Modeling for the Grating Eddy Current Displacement Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chunfeng; Tao, Wei; Lei, Huaming; Jiang, Yingying; Zhao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    As a new type of displacement sensor, grating eddy current displacement sensor (GECDS) combines traditional eddy current sensors and grating structure in one. The GECDS performs a wide range displacement measurement without precision reduction. This paper proposes an analytical modeling approach for the GECDS. The solution model is established in the Cartesian coordinate system, and the solving domain is limited to finite extents by using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. Based on the second order vector potential, expressions for the electromagnetic field as well as coil impedance related to the displacement can be expressed in closed-form. Theoretical results are then confirmed by experiments, which prove the suitability and effectiveness of the analytical modeling approach.

  10. An analytical model of thermal mechanical stress induced by through silicon via

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Gang; Shi, Tao; Zhao, Ying-Bo; Yang, Yin-Tang

    2015-05-01

    We present an accurate through silicon via (TSV) thermal mechanical stress analytical model which is verified by using finite element method (FEM). The results show only a very small error. By using the proposed analytical model, we also study the impacts of the TSV radius size, the thickness, the material of Cu diffusion barrier, and liner on the stress. It is found that the liner can absorb the stress effectively induced by coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. The stress decreases with the increase of liner thickness. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) as a liner material is better than SiO2. However, the Cu diffusion barrier has little effect on the stress. The stress with a smaller TSV has a smaller value. Based on the analytical model, we explore and validate the linear superposition principle of stress tensors and demonstrate the accuracy of this method against detailed FEM simulations. The analytic solutions of stress of two TSVs and three TSVs have high precision against the finite element result. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61334003) and the Kunshan Innovation Institute of Xidian University.

  11. Health Informatics for Neonatal Intensive Care Units: An Analytical Modeling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mench-Bressan, Nadja; McGregor, Carolyn; Pugh, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of data within intensive care units (ICUs) has great potential to create new cloud-based health analytics solutions for disease prevention or earlier condition onset detection. The Artemis project aims to achieve the above goals in the area of neonatal ICUs (NICU). In this paper, we proposed an analytical model for the Artemis cloud project which will be deployed at McMaster Children’s Hospital in Hamilton. We collect not only physiological data but also the infusion pumps data that are attached to NICU beds. Using the proposed analytical model, we predict the amount of storage, memory, and computation power required for the system. Capacity planning and tradeoff analysis would be more accurate and systematic by applying the proposed analytical model in this paper. Numerical results are obtained using real inputs acquired from McMaster Children’s Hospital and a pilot deployment of the system at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto. PMID:27170907

  12. Analytical Model for Thermal Elastoplastic Stresses of Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, P. C.; Chen, G.; Liu, L. S.; Fang, C.; Zhang, Q. J.

    2008-02-15

    A modification analytical model is presented for the thermal elastoplastic stresses of functionally graded materials subjected to thermal loading. The presented model follows the analytical scheme presented by Y. L. Shen and S. Suresh [6]. In the present model, the functionally graded materials are considered as multilayered materials. Each layer consists of metal and ceramic with different volume fraction. The ceramic layer and the FGM interlayers are considered as elastic brittle materials. The metal layer is considered as elastic-perfectly plastic ductile materials. Closed-form solutions for different characteristic temperature for thermal loading are presented as a function of the structure geometries and the thermomechanical properties of the materials. A main advance of the present model is that the possibility of the initial and spread of plasticity from the two sides of the ductile layers taken into account. Comparing the analytical results with the results from the finite element analysis, the thermal stresses and deformation from the present model are in good agreement with the numerical ones.

  13. Galactic chemical evolution and nucleocosmochronology - Analytic quadratic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Quadratic models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy for a star formation rate proportional to the square of the gas mass are studied. The search for analytic solutions to the gas mass and star mass for time-dependent rates of gaseous infall onto the disk is examined. The quadratic models are compared to models having linear star formation rates. The mass, metallicity, number of stars, and U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio for the models which are subjected to the same infall rate, the same initial disk mass, and the same final gas fraction are compared. The results of the comparison indicate that: (1) the average dwarf age is greater in the quadratic model, (2) the metallicity grows initially faster in the quadratic model, (3) the quadratic model has a smaller percentage of low-Z dwarfs, and (4) the U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio indicates a younger quadratic model.

  14. Identification of accurate nonlinear rainfall-runoff models with unique parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoups, G.; Vrugt, J. A.; Fenicia, F.; van de Giesen, N.

    2009-04-01

    We propose a strategy to identify models with unique parameters that yield accurate streamflow predictions, given a time-series of rainfall inputs. The procedure consists of five general steps. First, an a priori range of model structures is specified based on prior general and site-specific hydrologic knowledge. To this end, we rely on a flexible model code that allows a specification of a wide range of model structures, from simple to complex. Second, using global optimization each model structure is calibrated to a record of rainfall-runoff data, yielding optimal parameter values for each model structure. Third, accuracy of each model structure is determined by estimating model prediction errors using independent validation and statistical theory. Fourth, parameter identifiability of each calibrated model structure is estimated by means of Monte Carlo Markov Chain simulation. Finally, an assessment is made about each model structure in terms of its accuracy of mimicking rainfall-runoff processes (step 3), and the uniqueness of its parameters (step 4). The procedure results in the identification of the most complex and accurate model supported by the data, without causing parameter equifinality. As such, it provides insight into the information content of the data for identifying nonlinear rainfall-runoff models. We illustrate the method using rainfall-runoff data records from several MOPEX basins in the US.

  15. Secondary metallicity in analytic models of chemical evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Pantelaki, I.

    1986-01-01

    Analytic models of the chemical evolution of galactic regions that grow in mass owing to the continuous infall of matter are characterized, emphasizing the solutions for secondary nuclei (defined as those nuclei whose stellar yields are proportional to the abundance of a primary seed nucleus) in the families of models described by Clayton (1984 and 1985). Wide variations in time dependence of both primary and secondary nuclei as well as in the ratio of secondary to primary are displayed by these model families, confirming again the usefulness of these families as interpretive guides if galaxies do in fact evolve with substantial infall. Additionally, analytic solutions are presented for two other possible interesting systems: the evolution of abundances if the primary metallicity in the infall is increasing in time, and the evolution of abundances if the primary yield changes linearly with time owing to continuous changes in the stellar mass function, the opacity, or other astrophysical agents. Finally, test evaluations of the instantaneous recycling approximation on which these analytic models rely are presented.

  16. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E.; Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

    2008-10-01

    A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

  17. Material Models for Accurate Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming and Springback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Fusahito

    2010-06-01

    For anisotropic sheet metals, modeling of anisotropy and the Bauschinger effect is discussed in the framework of Yoshida-Uemori kinematic hardening model incorporating with anisotropic yield functions. The performances of the models in predicting yield loci, cyclic stress-strain responses on several types of steel and aluminum sheets are demonstrated by comparing the numerical simulation results with the corresponding experimental observations. From some examples of FE simulation of sheet metal forming and springback, it is concluded that modeling of both the anisotropy and the Bauschinger effect is essential for the accurate numerical simulation.

  18. Progress on Analytical Modeling of Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.; Webb, S.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent progresses on analytical studies of Coherent Electron Cooling. The phase space electron beam distribution obtained from the 1D FEL amplifier is applied to an infinite electron plasma model and the electron density evolution inside the kicker is derived. We also investigate the velocity modulation in the modulator and obtain a closed form solution for the current density evolution for infinite homogeneous electron plasma.

  19. Development of modified cable models to simulate accurate neuronal active behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In large network and single three-dimensional (3-D) neuron simulations, high computing speed dictates using reduced cable models to simulate neuronal firing behaviors. However, these models are unwarranted under active conditions and lack accurate representation of dendritic active conductances that greatly shape neuronal firing. Here, realistic 3-D (R3D) models (which contain full anatomical details of dendrites) of spinal motoneurons were systematically compared with their reduced single unbranched cable (SUC, which reduces the dendrites to a single electrically equivalent cable) counterpart under passive and active conditions. The SUC models matched the R3D model's passive properties but failed to match key active properties, especially active behaviors originating from dendrites. For instance, persistent inward currents (PIC) hysteresis, frequency-current (FI) relationship secondary range slope, firing hysteresis, plateau potential partial deactivation, staircase currents, synaptic current transfer ratio, and regional FI relationships were not accurately reproduced by the SUC models. The dendritic morphology oversimplification and lack of dendritic active conductances spatial segregation in the SUC models caused significant underestimation of those behaviors. Next, SUC models were modified by adding key branching features in an attempt to restore their active behaviors. The addition of primary dendritic branching only partially restored some active behaviors, whereas the addition of secondary dendritic branching restored most behaviors. Importantly, the proposed modified models successfully replicated the active properties without sacrificing model simplicity, making them attractive candidates for running R3D single neuron and network simulations with accurate firing behaviors. The present results indicate that using reduced models to examine PIC behaviors in spinal motoneurons is unwarranted. PMID:25277743

  20. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Analytical models quantify the military benefit of collaborative search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Melvin H.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Flug, Eric A.

    2010-04-01

    Analytical Model 1 describes how long it takes the first observer to find a target when multiple observers search a field of regard using imagery provided by a single sensor. This model, developed using probability concepts, suggests considerable benefits accrue from collaborative search: when P is near one and with ten observers the mean detection time (in reduced time) is reduced by almost an order of magnitude when compared to that of a single observer. To get the instant of detection in clock time we add the delay time td to the reduced time. Empirical fits for td and are also given in the paper. Model 1 was verified/validated by computer simulation and perception experiments. Here ten observers searched sixty computer generated fields of regard (each one was 60 x 20 degrees) for a single military vehicle. Analytical Model 2 describes how the probability of target acquisition increases with the number of observers. The results of Model 2 suggest that probability of target acquisition increases considerably when multiple observers independently search a field of regard. Model 2 was verified by simulation but not by perception experiment. Models 1 and 2 are pertinent to development of search strategies with multiple observers and are expected to find use in wargaming for evaluating the efficacy of networked imaging sensors.

  2. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  3. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  4. Generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth model accurately describing the switching processes in pseudo-single ferromagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cimpoesu, Dorin Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru

    2013-12-14

    We propose a generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) type model to describe various experimentally observed angular dependencies of the switching field in non-single-domain magnetic particles. Because the nonuniform magnetic states are generally characterized by complicated spin configurations with no simple analytical description, we maintain the macrospin hypothesis and we phenomenologically include the effects of nonuniformities only in the anisotropy energy, preserving as much as possible the elegance of SW model, the concept of critical curve and its geometric interpretation. We compare the results obtained with our model with full micromagnetic simulations in order to evaluate the performance and limits of our approach.

  5. Bridging the gap between global models and full fluid models: a fast 1D semi-analytical fluid model for electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbatt, A.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2016-08-01

    Analytical and numerical models allow investigation of complicated discharge phenomena and the interplay that makes plasmas such a complex environment. Global models are quick to implement and can have almost negligible computation cost, but provide only bulk or spatially averaged values. Full fluid models take longer to develop, and can take days to solve, but provide accurate spatio-temporal profiles of the whole plasma. The work presented here details a different type of model, analytically similar to fluid models, but computationally closer to a global model, and able to give spatially resolved solutions for the challenging environment of electronegative plasmas. Included are non-isothermal electrons, gas heating, and coupled neutral dynamics. Solutions are reached in seconds to minutes, and spatial profiles are given for densities, fluxes, and temperatures. This allows the semi-analytical model to fill the gap that exists between global and full fluid models, extending the tools available to researchers. The semi-analytical model can perform broad parameter sweeps that are not practical with more computationally expensive models, as well as exposing non-trivial trends that global models cannot capture. Examples are given for a low pressure oxygen CCP. Excellent agreement is shown with a full fluid model, and comparisons are drawn with the corresponding global model.

  6. A new analytical model for wind farm power prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayifar, Amin; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a new analytical approach is presented and validated to predict wind farm power production. The new model is an extension of the recently proposed by Bastankhah and Porté-Agel for a single wake. It assumes a self-similar Gaussian shape of the velocity deficit and satisfies conservation of mass and momentum. To estimate the velocity deficit in the wake, this model needs the local wake growth rate parameter which is calculated based on the local turbulence intensity in the wind farm. The interaction of the wakes is modeled by use of the velocity deficit superposition principle. Finally, the power curve is used to estimate the power production from the wind turbines. The wind farm model is compared to large-eddy simulation (LES) data and measurments of Horns Rev wind farm for a wide range of wind directions. Reasonable agreement between the proposed analytical model, LES data and measurments is obtained. This prediction is also found to be substantially better than the one obtained with a commonly used wind farm wake model.

  7. Methodology to set up accurate OPC model using optical CD metrology and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yeon-Ah; Kang, Jaehyun; Lee, Sang-Uk; Kim, Jeahee; Kim, Keeho

    2007-03-01

    For the 90nm node and beyond, smaller Critical Dimension(CD) control budget is required and the ways to control good CD uniformity are needed. Moreover Optical Proximity Correction(OPC) for the sub-90nm node demands more accurate wafer CD data in order to improve accuracy of OPC model. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is the typical method for measuring CD until ArF process. However SEM can give serious attack such as shrinkage of Photo Resist(PR) by burning of weak chemical structure of ArF PR due to high energy electron beam. In fact about 5nm CD narrowing occur when we measure CD by using CD-SEM in ArF photo process. Optical CD Metrology(OCD) and Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM) has been considered to the method for measuring CD without attack of organic materials. Also the OCD and AFM measurement system have the merits of speed, easiness and accurate data. For model-based OPC, the model is generated using CD data of test patterns transferred onto the wafer. In this study we discuss to generate accurate OPC model using OCD and AFM measurement system.

  8. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  9. Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

    2011-09-29

    This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to

  10. Aspirating Seal Development: Analytical Modeling and Seal Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagepalli, Bharat

    1996-01-01

    This effort is to develop large diameter (22 - 36 inch) Aspirating Seals for application in aircraft engines. Stein Seal Co. will be fabricating the 36-inch seal(s) for testing. GE's task is to establish a thorough understanding of the operation of Aspirating Seals through analytical modeling and full-scale testing. The two primary objectives of this project are to develop the analytical models of the aspirating seal system, to upgrade using GE's funds, GE's 50-inch seal test rig for testing the Aspirating Seal (back-to-back with a corresponding brush seal), test the aspirating seal(s) for seal closure, tracking and maneuver transients (tilt) at operating pressures and temperatures, and validate the analytical model. The objective of the analytical model development is to evaluate the transient and steady-state dynamic performance characteristics of the seal designed by Stein. The transient dynamic model uses a multi-body system approach: the Stator, Seal face and the rotor are treated as individual bodies with relative degrees of freedom. Initially, the thirty-six springs are represented as a single one trying to keep open the aspirating face. Stops (Contact elements) are provided between the stator and the seal (to compensate the preload in the fully-open position) and between the rotor face and Seal face (to detect rub). The secondary seal is considered as part of the stator. The film's load, damping and stiffness characteristics as functions of pressure and clearance are evaluated using a separate (NASA) code GFACE. Initially, a laminar flow theory is used. Special two-dimensional interpolation routines are written to establish exact film load and damping values at each integration time step. Additionally, other user-routines are written to read-in actual pressure, rpm, stator-growth and rotor growth data and, later, to transfer these as appropriate loads/motions in the system-dynamic model. The transient dynamic model evaluates the various motions, clearances

  11. An Analytical Thermal Model for Autonomous Soaring Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing an analytical thermal model used to enable research on autonomous soaring for a small UAV aircraft is given. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Approach; 3) SURFRAD Data; 4) Convective Layer Thickness; 5) Surface Heat Budget; 6) Surface Virtual Potential Temperature Flux; 7) Convective Scaling Velocity; 8) Other Calculations; 9) Yearly trends; 10) Scale Factors; 11) Scale Factor Test Matrix; 12) Statistical Model; 13) Updraft Strength Calculation; 14) Updraft Diameter; 15) Updraft Shape; 16) Smoothed Updraft Shape; 17) Updraft Spacing; 18) Environment Sink; 19) Updraft Lifespan; 20) Autonomous Soaring Research; 21) Planned Flight Test; and 22) Mixing Ratio.

  12. Peat pyrolysis and the analytical semi-empirical model

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Green, A.E.S.

    2007-07-01

    Pyrolysis of peat could convert this material into useful fuels and valuable hydrocarbons. A study of peat pyrolysis can also serve as a useful bridge between studies of coal pyrolysis and biomass pyrolysis. Using an analytical model of pyrolysis that has previously been applied to biomass and to coal, we present here the results of applications of this model to a representative peat. The analysis suggests means of organizing and processing rate and yield data that should be useful in applications of pyrolysis for the production of fuels and chemicals.

  13. Analytical dynamics models for space missions around minor bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso dos Santos, Josué; dos Santos Carvalho, Jean Paulo; Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho; Bertachini de Almeida Prado, Antônio Fernando

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the dynamics of orbits around minor bodies and icy moons in our solar system has become important in planning future missions that intend to visit dwarf planets, planetary moons, asteroids and comets. Due to their special characteristics, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Enceladus, Titan and Triton are among the group of objects with greater potential to receive missions in a near future. In order to provide a semi-analytical theory for tuture space exploration of these celestial bodies, this work aims to present two analytical models to describe and evaluate gravitational disturbances over a spacecrat's orbit around a minor body. A search for these less perturbed orbits is performed. An analytical model for the third-body perturbation is presented and consideres it in an eccentric-inclined orbit. Some harmonic terms due to the non-uniform distribuition of mass are considered according they are available in the literature. The dynamic of these orbits is explored by numerical simulations. The results are in accordance with the requirements for missions present in the literature.

  14. An Analytic Model for Buoyancy Resonances in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2014-04-01

    Zhu et al. found in three-dimensional shearing box simulations a new form of planet-disk interaction that they attributed to a vertical buoyancy resonance in the disk. We describe an analytic linear model for this interaction. We adopt a simplified model involving azimuthal forcing that produces the resonance and permits an analytic description of its structure. We derive an analytic expression for the buoyancy torque and show that the vertical torque distribution agrees well with the results of the Athena simulations and a Fourier method for linear numerical calculations carried out with the same forcing. The buoyancy resonance differs from the classic Lindblad and corotation resonances in that the resonance lies along tilted planes. Its width depends on damping effects and is independent of the gas sound speed. The resonance does not excite propagating waves. At a given large azimuthal wavenumber ky > h -1 (for disk thickness h), the buoyancy resonance exerts a torque over a region that lies radially closer to the corotation radius than the Lindblad resonance. Because the torque is localized to the region of excitation, it is potentially subject to the effects of nonlinear saturation. In addition, the torque can be reduced by the effects of radiative heat transfer between the resonant region and its surroundings. For each azimuthal wavenumber, the resonance establishes a large scale density wave pattern in a plane within the disk.

  15. An analytic model for buoyancy resonances in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Zhu, Zhaohuan E-mail: zhzhu@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-10

    Zhu et al. found in three-dimensional shearing box simulations a new form of planet-disk interaction that they attributed to a vertical buoyancy resonance in the disk. We describe an analytic linear model for this interaction. We adopt a simplified model involving azimuthal forcing that produces the resonance and permits an analytic description of its structure. We derive an analytic expression for the buoyancy torque and show that the vertical torque distribution agrees well with the results of the Athena simulations and a Fourier method for linear numerical calculations carried out with the same forcing. The buoyancy resonance differs from the classic Lindblad and corotation resonances in that the resonance lies along tilted planes. Its width depends on damping effects and is independent of the gas sound speed. The resonance does not excite propagating waves. At a given large azimuthal wavenumber k{sub y} > h {sup –1} (for disk thickness h), the buoyancy resonance exerts a torque over a region that lies radially closer to the corotation radius than the Lindblad resonance. Because the torque is localized to the region of excitation, it is potentially subject to the effects of nonlinear saturation. In addition, the torque can be reduced by the effects of radiative heat transfer between the resonant region and its surroundings. For each azimuthal wavenumber, the resonance establishes a large scale density wave pattern in a plane within the disk.

  16. Can phenological models predict tree phenology accurately under climate change conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuine, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean Michel; García de Cortázar-Atauri, Inaki; Charrier, Guillaume; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The onset of the growing season of trees has been globally earlier by 2.3 days/decade during the last 50 years because of global warming and this trend is predicted to continue according to climate forecast. The effect of temperature on plant phenology is however not linear because temperature has a dual effect on bud development. On one hand, low temperatures are necessary to break bud dormancy, and on the other hand higher temperatures are necessary to promote bud cells growth afterwards. Increasing phenological changes in temperate woody species have strong impacts on forest trees distribution and productivity, as well as crops cultivation areas. Accurate predictions of trees phenology are therefore a prerequisite to understand and foresee the impacts of climate change on forests and agrosystems. Different process-based models have been developed in the last two decades to predict the date of budburst or flowering of woody species. They are two main families: (1) one-phase models which consider only the ecodormancy phase and make the assumption that endodormancy is always broken before adequate climatic conditions for cell growth occur; and (2) two-phase models which consider both the endodormancy and ecodormancy phases and predict a date of dormancy break which varies from year to year. So far, one-phase models have been able to predict accurately tree bud break and flowering under historical climate. However, because they do not consider what happens prior to ecodormancy, and especially the possible negative effect of winter temperature warming on dormancy break, it seems unlikely that they can provide accurate predictions in future climate conditions. It is indeed well known that a lack of low temperature results in abnormal pattern of bud break and development in temperate fruit trees. An accurate modelling of the dormancy break date has thus become a major issue in phenology modelling. Two-phases phenological models predict that global warming should delay

  17. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  18. Universal analytic model for tunnel FET circuit simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Esseni, David; Seabaugh, Alan

    2015-06-01

    A simple analytic model based on the Kane-Sze formula is used to describe the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). This model captures the unique features of the TFET including the decrease in subthreshold swing with drain current and the superlinear onset of the output characteristic. The model also captures the ambipolar current characteristic at negative gate-source bias and the negative differential resistance for negative drain-source biases. A simple empirical capacitance model is also included to enable circuit simulation. The model has fairly general validity and is not specific to a particular TFET geometry. Good agreement is shown with published atomistic simulations of an InAs double-gate TFET with gate perpendicular to the tunnel junction and with numerical simulations of a broken-gap AlGaSb/InAs TFET with gate in parallel with the tunnel junction.

  19. Building an accurate 3D model of a circular feature for robot vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, an accurate 3D model analysis of a circular feature is built with error compensation for robot vision. We propose an efficient method of fitting ellipses to data points by minimizing the algebraic distance subject to the constraint that a conic should be an ellipse and solving the ellipse parameters through a direct ellipse fitting method by analysing the 3D geometrical representation in a perspective projection scheme, the 3D position of a circular feature with known radius can be obtained. A set of identical circles, machined on a calibration board whose centres were known, was calibrated with a camera and did the model analysis that our method developed. Experimental results show that our method is more accurate than other methods.

  20. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  1. Analytical modeling of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have received widespread attention as promising carbon-based nanoelectronic devices. Due to their exceptional physical, chemical, and electrical properties, namely a high surface-to-volume ratio, their enhanced electron transfer properties, and their high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes can be used effectively as electrochemical sensors. The integration of carbon nanotubes with a functional group provides a good and solid support for the immobilization of enzymes. The determination of glucose levels using biosensors, particularly in the medical diagnostics and food industries, is gaining mass appeal. Glucose biosensors detect the glucose molecule by catalyzing glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. This action provides high accuracy and a quick detection rate. In this paper, a single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose detection is analytically modeled. In the proposed model, the glucose concentration is presented as a function of gate voltage. Subsequently, the proposed model is compared with existing experimental data. A good consensus between the model and the experimental data is reported. The simulated data demonstrate that the analytical model can be employed with an electrochemical glucose sensor to predict the behavior of the sensing mechanism in biosensors. PMID:24428818

  2. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J; Morrow, Liam C

    2015-05-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems. PMID:26064648

  3. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Morrow, Liam C.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems. PMID:26064648

  4. Toward an Accurate Modeling of Hydrodynamic Effects on the Translational and Rotational Dynamics of Biomolecules in Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Maciej; Antosiewicz, Jan M

    2015-07-01

    Proper treatment of hydrodynamic interactions is of importance in evaluation of rigid-body mobility tensors of biomolecules in Stokes flow and in simulations of their folding and solution conformation, as well as in simulations of the translational and rotational dynamics of either flexible or rigid molecules in biological systems at low Reynolds numbers. With macromolecules conveniently modeled in calculations or in dynamic simulations as ensembles of spherical frictional elements, various approximations to hydrodynamic interactions, such as the two-body, far-field Rotne-Prager approach, are commonly used, either without concern or as a compromise between the accuracy and the numerical complexity. Strikingly, even though the analytical Rotne-Prager approach fails to describe (both in the qualitative and quantitative sense) mobilities in the simplest system consisting of two spheres, when the distance between their surfaces is of the order of their size, it is commonly applied to model hydrodynamic effects in macromolecular systems. Here, we closely investigate hydrodynamic effects in two and three-body systems, consisting of bead-shell molecular models, using either the analytical Rotne-Prager approach, or an accurate numerical scheme that correctly accounts for the many-body character of hydrodynamic interactions and their short-range behavior. We analyze mobilities, and translational and rotational velocities of bodies resulting from direct forces acting on them. We show, that with the sufficient number of frictional elements in hydrodynamic models of interacting bodies, the far-field approximation is able to provide a description of hydrodynamic effects that is in a reasonable qualitative as well as quantitative agreement with the description resulting from the application of the virtually exact numerical scheme, even for small separations between bodies. PMID:26068580

  5. Research on bathymetry estimation by Worldview-2 based with the semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, L.; Bai, J.; Zhou, G.-W.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Y.-C.

    2015-04-01

    South Sea Islands of China are far away from the mainland, the reefs takes more than 95% of south sea, and most reefs scatter over interested dispute sensitive area. Thus, the methods of obtaining the reefs bathymetry accurately are urgent to be developed. Common used method, including sonar, airborne laser and remote sensing estimation, are limited by the long distance, large area and sensitive location. Remote sensing data provides an effective way for bathymetry estimation without touching over large area, by the relationship between spectrum information and bathymetry. Aimed at the water quality of the south sea of China, our paper develops a bathymetry estimation method without measured water depth. Firstly the semi-analytical optimization model of the theoretical interpretation models has been studied based on the genetic algorithm to optimize the model. Meanwhile, OpenMP parallel computing algorithm has been introduced to greatly increase the speed of the semi-analytical optimization model. One island of south sea in China is selected as our study area, the measured water depth are used to evaluate the accuracy of bathymetry estimation from Worldview-2 multispectral images. The results show that: the semi-analytical optimization model based on genetic algorithm has good results in our study area;the accuracy of estimated bathymetry in the 0-20 meters shallow water area is accepted.Semi-analytical optimization model based on genetic algorithm solves the problem of the bathymetry estimation without water depth measurement. Generally, our paper provides a new bathymetry estimation method for the sensitive reefs far away from mainland.

  6. Compact analytical modeling of SOI partially depleted MOSFETs with LETISOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faynot, O.; Poiroux, T.; Pelloie, J. L.

    2001-04-01

    As SOI technology becomes very attractive for ULSI CMOS, a dedicated and accurate SOI model has to be developed in order to take into account all specific electrical effects related to the SOI structure. The LETISOI model has been developed for partially depleted SOI devices; current and charge equations are built on a physical basis. In addition to the classical MOS conduction, FB effects, self-heating and bipolar transistor action have to be accurately modeled. The transient behavior, very different from the static one, has to be analyzed and kept in mind by designers to take full benefit of SOI devices in circuits, while avoiding any design issue due to SOI. Both FB and body-contacted devices can be described with this model. This paper describes how the model is built with an emphasis on the specific SOI needs and the related strategy for parameter extraction. Typical simulation results are also presented, outlining the capability of the model to simulate SOI specific dynamic behavior like bipolar activation and history effects.

  7. Accurate and interpretable nanoSAR models from genetic programming-based decision tree construction approaches.

    PubMed

    Oksel, Ceyda; Winkler, David A; Ma, Cai Y; Wilkins, Terry; Wang, Xue Z

    2016-09-01

    The number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) being exploited commercially is growing rapidly, due to the novel properties they exhibit. Clearly, it is important to understand and minimize any risks to health or the environment posed by the presence of ENMs. Data-driven models that decode the relationships between the biological activities of ENMs and their physicochemical characteristics provide an attractive means of maximizing the value of scarce and expensive experimental data. Although such structure-activity relationship (SAR) methods have become very useful tools for modelling nanotoxicity endpoints (nanoSAR), they have limited robustness and predictivity and, most importantly, interpretation of the models they generate is often very difficult. New computational modelling tools or new ways of using existing tools are required to model the relatively sparse and sometimes lower quality data on the biological effects of ENMs. The most commonly used SAR modelling methods work best with large datasets, are not particularly good at feature selection, can be relatively opaque to interpretation, and may not account for nonlinearity in the structure-property relationships. To overcome these limitations, we describe the application of a novel algorithm, a genetic programming-based decision tree construction tool (GPTree) to nanoSAR modelling. We demonstrate the use of GPTree in the construction of accurate and interpretable nanoSAR models by applying it to four diverse literature datasets. We describe the algorithm and compare model results across the four studies. We show that GPTree generates models with accuracies equivalent to or superior to those of prior modelling studies on the same datasets. GPTree is a robust, automatic method for generation of accurate nanoSAR models with important advantages that it works with small datasets, automatically selects descriptors, and provides significantly improved interpretability of models. PMID:26956430

  8. Accurate and efficient halo-based galaxy clustering modelling with simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Small- and intermediate-scale galaxy clustering can be used to establish the galaxy-halo connection to study galaxy formation and evolution and to tighten constraints on cosmological parameters. With the increasing precision of galaxy clustering measurements from ongoing and forthcoming large galaxy surveys, accurate models are required to interpret the data and extract relevant information. We introduce a method based on high-resolution N-body simulations to accurately and efficiently model the galaxy two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) in projected and redshift spaces. The basic idea is to tabulate all information of haloes in the simulations necessary for computing the galaxy 2PCFs within the framework of halo occupation distribution or conditional luminosity function. It is equivalent to populating galaxies to dark matter haloes and using the mock 2PCF measurements as the model predictions. Besides the accurate 2PCF calculations, the method is also fast and therefore enables an efficient exploration of the parameter space. As an example of the method, we decompose the redshift-space galaxy 2PCF into different components based on the type of galaxy pairs and show the redshift-space distortion effect in each component. The generalizations and limitations of the method are discussed.

  9. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Numerical Relativity Waveforms from Binary Black Hole Coalescences Using Surrogate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott E.; Galley, Chad R.; Szilágyi, Béla; Scheel, Mark A.; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. Using reduced order modeling techniques, we construct an accurate surrogate model, which is evaluated in a millisecond to a second, for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios in [1, 10] and durations corresponding to about 15 orbits before merger. We assess the model's uncertainty and show that our modeling strategy predicts NR waveforms not used for the surrogate's training with errors nearly as small as the numerical error of the NR code. Our model includes all spherical-harmonic -2Yℓm waveform modes resolved by the NR code up to ℓ=8 . We compare our surrogate model to effective one body waveforms from 50 M⊙ to 300 M⊙ for advanced LIGO detectors and find that the surrogate is always more faithful (by at least an order of magnitude in most cases).

  10. Can phenological models predict tree phenology accurately in the future? The unrevealed hurdle of endodormancy break.

    PubMed

    Chuine, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean-Michel; García de Cortázar-Atauri, Iñaki; Charrier, Guillaume; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    The onset of the growing season of trees has been earlier by 2.3 days per decade during the last 40 years in temperate Europe because of global warming. The effect of temperature on plant phenology is, however, not linear because temperature has a dual effect on bud development. On one hand, low temperatures are necessary to break bud endodormancy, and, on the other hand, higher temperatures are necessary to promote bud cell growth afterward. Different process-based models have been developed in the last decades to predict the date of budbreak of woody species. They predict that global warming should delay or compromise endodormancy break at the species equatorward range limits leading to a delay or even impossibility to flower or set new leaves. These models are classically parameterized with flowering or budbreak dates only, with no information on the endodormancy break date because this information is very scarce. Here, we evaluated the efficiency of a set of phenological models to accurately predict the endodormancy break dates of three fruit trees. Our results show that models calibrated solely with budbreak dates usually do not accurately predict the endodormancy break date. Providing endodormancy break date for the model parameterization results in much more accurate prediction of this latter, with, however, a higher error than that on budbreak dates. Most importantly, we show that models not calibrated with endodormancy break dates can generate large discrepancies in forecasted budbreak dates when using climate scenarios as compared to models calibrated with endodormancy break dates. This discrepancy increases with mean annual temperature and is therefore the strongest after 2050 in the southernmost regions. Our results claim for the urgent need of massive measurements of endodormancy break dates in forest and fruit trees to yield more robust projections of phenological changes in a near future. PMID:27272707

  11. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James M.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining , 13C, and 15N backbone and 13Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2–1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9–1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments. PMID:22665781

  12. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration. PMID:25195174

  13. Analytical model for contaminant mass removal by air sparging

    SciTech Connect

    Rabideau, A.J.; Blayden, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    An analytical model was developed to predict the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from ground water by air sparging (AS). The model treats the air sparging zone as a completely mixed reactor subject to the removal of dissolved contaminants by volatilization, advection, and first-order decay. Nonequilibrium desorption is approximated as a first-order mass transfer process. The model reproduces the tailing and rebound behavior often observed at AS sites, and would normally require the estimation of three site-specific parameters. Dimensional analysis demonstrates that predicting tailing can be interpreted in terms of kinetic desorption or diffusion of aqueous phase contaminants into discrete air channels. Related work is ongoing to test the model against field data.

  14. Laser satellite constellations for strategic defense - an analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentola, J.A.; Milton, A.F.

    1987-10-01

    Using mainly geometric reasoning, an analytic model is constructed that predicts the required characteristics of an orbiting constellation of laser battle stations, each of which is designed to destroy ballistic missiles during their boost phase. The geometry of the constellation configuration and some general aspects of the coverage problem are discussed. The determination of the absentee ratio falls into two main categories that depend upon whether the Soviet ICBM threat is concentrated at a single location or whether it is distributed as it is now. A point-threat model and a distributive threat model are considered, the determination of the respective kill rates for these models is discussed, and the scaling properties of the laser constellation with respect to a change in the quantitative nature of the two types of ICBM threats are considered.

  15. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    2015-05-15

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  16. A two-dimensional analytical model of petroleum vapor intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present an analytical solution of a two-dimensional petroleum vapor intrusion model, which incorporates a steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil and piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability. This new model can help practitioners to easily generate two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles for both hydrocarbons and oxygen and estimate hydrocarbon indoor air concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. The soil gas concentration profiles generated by this new model are shown in good agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations and two-dimensional measured soil gas data from a field study. This implies that for cases involving diffusion dominated soil gas transport, steady state conditions and homogenous source and soil, this analytical model can be used as a fast and easy-to-use risk screening tool by replicating the results of 3-D numerical simulations but with much less computational effort.

  17. Generalized Analytical Model for the Radio-Frequency Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    An analytical model for the planar radio frequency (RF) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed based on the applied RF voltage as the boundary condition. The model applies to all kind of waveforms for the applied RF voltage, includes both sheaths in a discharge of arbitrary symmetry, and allows for an arbitrary degree of ion collisionallity in the sheaths (charge-exchange collisions). Further, effects of the finite floating potential during sheath collapse are included. The model can even be extended to electronegative plasmas with low bulk conductivity. The individual sheath voltages, the self-bias, and the RF floating potentials are explicitly calculated by a voltage balance equation using a cubic-charge voltage relation for the sheaths. In particular, the RF-phase as a function of the sheath voltage is determined. This is an input for a single second order non-linear integro-differential equation which is governing the ion flow velocity in the sheath. Fast numerical integration is straight forward and in many cases approximate analytical solutions can be obtained. Based on the solution for the ion flow velocity, densities, electric fields, currents, and charge-voltage relations are calculated. Further, the Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case are derived. Very good agreement between model and experiments is obtained.

  18. Analytical model for flow duration curves in seasonally dry climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Marc F.; Dralle, David N.; Thompson, Sally E.

    2014-07-01

    Flow duration curves (FDC) display streamflow values against their relative exceedance time. They provide critical information for watershed management by representing the variation in the availability and reliability of surface water to supply ecosystem services and satisfy anthropogenic needs. FDCs are particularly revealing in seasonally dry climates, where surface water supplies are highly variable. While useful, the empirical computation of FDCs is data intensive and challenging in sparsely gauged regions, meaning that there is a need for robust, predictive models to evaluate FDCs with simple parameterization. Here, we derive a process-based analytical expression for FDCs in seasonally dry climates. During the wet season, streamflow is modeled as a stochastic variable driven by rainfall, following the stochastic analytical model of Botter et al. (2007a). During the dry season, streamflow is modeled as a deterministic recession with a stochastic initial condition that accounts for the carryover of catchment storage across seasons. The resulting FDC model is applied to 38 catchments in Nepal, coastal California, and Western Australia, where FDCs are successfully modeled using five physically meaningful parameters with minimal calibration. A Monte Carlo analysis revealed that the model is robust to deviations from its assumptions of Poissonian rainfall, exponentially distributed response times and constant seasonal timing. The approach successfully models period-of-record FDCs and allows interannual and intra-annual sources of variations in dry season streamflow to be separated. The resulting median annual FDCs and confidence intervals allow the simulation of the consequences of interannual flow variations for infrastructure projects. We present an example using run-of-river hydropower in Nepal as a case study.

  19. Analytical model of solute transport by unsteady unsaturated gravitational infiltration.

    PubMed

    Lessoff, S C; Indelman, P

    2004-08-01

    Penetration of reactive solute into a soil during a cycle of water infiltration and redistribution is investigated by deriving analytical closed form solutions for fluid flux, moisture content and contaminant concentration. The solution is developed for gravitational flow and advective transport and is applied to two scenarios of solute applications encountered in the applications: a finite pulse of solute dissolved in irrigation water and an instantaneous pulse broadcasted onto the soil surface. Through comparison to simulations of Richards' flow, capillary suction is shown to have contrasting effects on the upper and lower boundaries of the fluid pulse, speeding penetration of the wetting front and reducing the rate of drying. This leads to agreement between the analytical and numerical solutions for typical field and experimental conditions. The analytical solution is further incorporated into a stochastic column model of flow and transport to compute mean solute concentration in a heterogeneous field. An unusual phenomenon of plume contraction is observed at long times of solute propagation during the drying stage. The mean concentration profiles match those of the Monte-Carlo simulations for capillary length scales typical of sandy soils. PMID:15240168

  20. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  1. A hybrid finite-difference and analytic element groundwater model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J; Gusyev, M A

    2010-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models tend to have large cell sizes, often on the order of 1-2 km on a side. Although the regional flow patterns in deeper formations may be adequately represented by such a model, the intricate surface water and groundwater interactions in the shallower layers are not. Several stream reaches and nearby wells may occur in a single cell, precluding any meaningful modeling of the surface water and groundwater interactions between the individual features. We propose to replace the upper MODFLOW layer or layers, in which the surface water and groundwater interactions occur, by an analytic element model (GFLOW) that does not employ a model grid; instead, it represents wells and surface waters directly by the use of point-sinks and line-sinks. For many practical cases it suffices to provide GFLOW with the vertical leakage rates calculated in the original coarse MODFLOW model in order to obtain a good representation of surface water and groundwater interactions. However, when the combined transmissivities in the deeper (MODFLOW) layers dominate, the accuracy of the GFLOW solution diminishes. For those cases, an iterative coupling procedure, whereby the leakages between the GFLOW and MODFLOW model are updated, appreciably improves the overall solution, albeit at considerable computational cost. The coupled GFLOW-MODFLOW model is applicable to relatively large areas, in many cases to the entire model domain, thus forming an attractive alternative to local grid refinement or inset models. PMID:20132324

  2. Digital forensics: an analytical crime scene procedure model (ACSPM).

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Halil Ibrahim; Yavuzcan, H Guclu; Ozel, Mesut

    2013-12-10

    In order to ensure that digital evidence is collected, preserved, examined, or transferred in a manner safeguarding the accuracy and reliability of the evidence, law enforcement and digital forensic units must establish and maintain an effective quality assurance system. The very first part of this system is standard operating procedures (SOP's) and/or models, conforming chain of custody requirements, those rely on digital forensics "process-phase-procedure-task-subtask" sequence. An acceptable and thorough Digital Forensics (DF) process depends on the sequential DF phases, and each phase depends on sequential DF procedures, respectively each procedure depends on tasks and subtasks. There are numerous amounts of DF Process Models that define DF phases in the literature, but no DF model that defines the phase-based sequential procedures for crime scene identified. An analytical crime scene procedure model (ACSPM) that we suggest in this paper is supposed to fill in this gap. The proposed analytical procedure model for digital investigations at a crime scene is developed and defined for crime scene practitioners; with main focus on crime scene digital forensic procedures, other than that of whole digital investigation process and phases that ends up in a court. When reviewing the relevant literature and interrogating with the law enforcement agencies, only device based charts specific to a particular device and/or more general perspective approaches to digital evidence management models from crime scene to courts are found. After analyzing the needs of law enforcement organizations and realizing the absence of crime scene digital investigation procedure model for crime scene activities we decided to inspect the relevant literature in an analytical way. The outcome of this inspection is our suggested model explained here, which is supposed to provide guidance for thorough and secure implementation of digital forensic procedures at a crime scene. In digital forensic

  3. Analytical model for nanoscale viscoelastic properties characterization using dynamic nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuya, Philip A.; Patel, Nimitt G.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few decades, nanoindentation has gained widespread acceptance as a technique for materials properties characterization at micron and submicron length scales. Accurate and precise characterization of material properties with a nanoindenter is critically dependent on the ability to correctly model the response of the test equipment in contact with the material. In dynamic nanoindention analysis, a simple Kelvin-Voigt model is commonly used to capture the viscoelastic response. However, this model oversimplifies the response of real viscoelastic materials such as polymers. A model is developed that captures the dynamic nanoindentation response of a viscoelastic material. Indenter tip-sample contact forces are modelled using a generalized Maxwell model. The results on a silicon elastomer were analysed using conventional two element Kelvin-Voigt model and contrasted to analysis done using the Maxwell model. The results show that conventional Kelvin-Voigt model overestimates the storage modulus of the silicone elastomer by ~30%. Maxwell model represents a significant improvement in capturing the viscoelastic material behaviour over the Voigt model.

  4. Analytical modeling of laser pulse heating of embedded biological targets: An application to cutaneous vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkov, Mirko; Sherr, Evan A.; Sierra, Rafael A.; Lloyd, Jenifer R.; Tanghetti, Emil

    2006-06-01

    Detailed understanding of the thermal processes in biological targets undergoing laser irradiation continues to be a challenging problem. For example, the contemporary pulsed dye laser (PDL) delivers a complex pulse format which presents specific challenges for theoretical understanding and further development. Numerical methods allow for adequate description of the thermal processes, but are lacking for clarifying the effects of the laser parameters. The purpose of this work is to derive a simplified analytical model that can guide the development of future laser designs. A mathematical model of heating and cooling processes in tissue is developed. Exact analytical solutions of the model are found when applied to specific temporal and spatial profiles of heat sources. Solutions are reduced to simple algebraic expressions. An algorithm is presented for approximating realistic cases of laser heating of skin structures by heat sources of the type found to have exact solutions. The simple algebraic expressions are used to provide insight into realistic laser irradiation cases. The model is compared with experiments on purpura threshold radiant exposure for PDL. These include data from four independent groups over a period of 20 years. Two of the data sets are taken from previously published articles. Two more data sets were collected from two groups of patients that were treated with two PDLs (585 and 595 nm) on normal buttocks skin. Laser pulse durations were varied between 0.5 and 40 ms radiant exposures were varied between 3 and 20 J/cm2. Treatment sites were evaluated 0.5, 1, and 24 hours later to determine purpuric threshold. The analytical model is in excellent agreement with a wide range of experimental data for purpura threshold radiant exposure. The data collected by independent research groups over the last 20 years with PDLs with wavelengths ranged from 577 to 595 nm were described accurately by this model. The simple analytical model provides an accurate

  5. Improved analytic extreme-mass-ratio inspiral model for scoping out eLISA data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Alvin J. K.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave detector eLISA has been selected as the ESA L3 mission, and the mission design will be finalized by the end of this decade. To prepare for mission formulation over the next few years, several outstanding and urgent questions in data analysis will be addressed using mock data challenges, informed by instrument measurements from the LISA Pathfinder satellite launching at the end of 2015. These data challenges will require accurate and computationally affordable waveform models for anticipated sources such as the extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) of stellar-mass compact objects into massive black holes. Previous data challenges have made use of the well-known analytic EMRI waveforms of Barack and Cutler, which are extremely quick to generate but dephase relative to more accurate waveforms within hours, due to their mismatched radial, polar and azimuthal frequencies. In this paper, we describe an augmented Barack-Cutler model that uses a frequency map to the correct Kerr frequencies, along with updated evolution equations and a simple fit to a more accurate model. The augmented waveforms stay in phase for months and may be generated with virtually no additional computational cost.

  6. Toward accurate modelling of the non-linear matter bispectrum: standard perturbation theory and transients from initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, Nuala; Jeong, Donghui; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modelling of non-linearities in the galaxy bispectrum, the Fourier transform of the galaxy three-point correlation function, is essential to fully exploit it as a cosmological probe. In this paper, we present numerical and theoretical challenges in modelling the non-linear bispectrum. First, we test the robustness of the matter bispectrum measured from N-body simulations using different initial conditions generators. We run a suite of N-body simulations using the Zel'dovich approximation and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) at different starting redshifts, and find that transients from initial decaying modes systematically reduce the non-linearities in the matter bispectrum. To achieve 1 per cent accuracy in the matter bispectrum at z ≤ 3 on scales k < 1 h Mpc-1, 2LPT initial conditions generator with initial redshift z ≳ 100 is required. We then compare various analytical formulas and empirical fitting functions for modelling the non-linear matter bispectrum, and discuss the regimes for which each is valid. We find that the next-to-leading order (one-loop) correction from standard perturbation theory matches with N-body results on quasi-linear scales for z ≥ 1. We find that the fitting formula in Gil-Marín et al. accurately predicts the matter bispectrum for z ≤ 1 on a wide range of scales, but at higher redshifts, the fitting formula given in Scoccimarro & Couchman gives the best agreement with measurements from N-body simulations.

  7. Automated refinement and inference of analytical models for metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael D.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Jenkins, Jerry W.; Hood, Jonathan E.; Soni, Abhishek S.; Wikswo, John P.; Lipson, Hod

    2011-10-01

    The reverse engineering of metabolic networks from experimental data is traditionally a labor-intensive task requiring a priori systems knowledge. Using a proven model as a test system, we demonstrate an automated method to simplify this process by modifying an existing or related model--suggesting nonlinear terms and structural modifications--or even constructing a new model that agrees with the system's time series observations. In certain cases, this method can identify the full dynamical model from scratch without prior knowledge or structural assumptions. The algorithm selects between multiple candidate models by designing experiments to make their predictions disagree. We performed computational experiments to analyze a nonlinear seven-dimensional model of yeast glycolytic oscillations. This approach corrected mistakes reliably in both approximated and overspecified models. The method performed well to high levels of noise for most states, could identify the correct model de novo, and make better predictions than ordinary parametric regression and neural network models. We identified an invariant quantity in the model, which accurately derived kinetics and the numerical sensitivity coefficients of the system. Finally, we compared the system to dynamic flux estimation and discussed the scaling and application of this methodology to automated experiment design and control in biological systems in real time.

  8. Automated refinement and inference of analytical models for metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael D; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Soni, Abhishek S; Wikswo, John P; Lipson, Hod

    2013-01-01

    The reverse engineering of metabolic networks from experimental data is traditionally a labor-intensive task requiring a priori systems knowledge. Using a proven model as a test system, we demonstrate an automated method to simplify this process by modifying an existing or related model – suggesting nonlinear terms and structural modifications – or even constructing a new model that agrees with the system’s time-series observations. In certain cases, this method can identify the full dynamical model from scratch without prior knowledge or structural assumptions. The algorithm selects between multiple candidate models by designing experiments to make their predictions disagree. We performed computational experiments to analyze a nonlinear seven-dimensional model of yeast glycolytic oscillations. This approach corrected mistakes reliably in both approximated and overspecified models. The method performed well to high levels of noise for most states, could identify the correct model de novo, and make better predictions than ordinary parametric regression and neural network models. We identified an invariant quantity in the model, which accurately derived kinetics and the numerical sensitivity coefficients of the system. Finally, we compared the system to dynamic flux estimation and discussed the scaling and application of this methodology to automated experiment design and control in biological systems in real-time. PMID:21832805

  9. Analytical and numerical modeling of surface morphologies in thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, F.Y.

    1995-05-01

    Experimental studies have show that strains due to thermal expansion mismatch between a film and its substrate can produce very large stresses in the film that can lead to the formation of holes and hillocks. Based on a phenomenological description of the evolution of a solid surface under both capillary and stress driving forces and for surface and grain boundary self-diffusion, this article provides analytical and numerical solutions for surface profiles of model geometries in polycrystalline thin films. Results can explain a variety of surface morphologies commonly observed experimentally and are discussed to give some practical insights on how to control the growth of holes and hillocks in thin films.

  10. HTS axial flux induction motor with analytic and FEA modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Fan, Y.; Fang, J.; Qin, W.; Lv, G.; Li, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) axial-flux induction motor, which can output levitation force and torque simultaneously. In order to analyze the character of the force, analytic method and finite element method are adopted to model the motor. To make sure the HTS can carry sufficiently large current and work well, the magnetic field distribution in HTS coil is calculated. An effective method to improve the critical current of HTS coil is presented. Then, AC losses in HTS windings in the motor are estimated and tested.

  11. "Violent Intent Modeling: Incorporating Cultural Knowledge into the Analytical Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Nibbs, Faith G.

    2007-08-24

    While culture has a significant effect on the appropriate interpretation of textual data, the incorporation of cultural considerations into data transformations has not been systematic. Recognizing that the successful prevention of terrorist activities could hinge on the knowledge of the subcultures, Anthropologist and DHS intern Faith Nibbs has been addressing the need to incorporate cultural knowledge into the analytical process. In this Brown Bag she will present how cultural ideology is being used to understand how the rhetoric of group leaders influences the likelihood of their constituents to engage in violent or radicalized behavior, and how violent intent modeling can benefit from understanding that process.

  12. Shear mechanical properties of the spleen: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2012-05-01

    This paper aims at providing the first shear mechanical properties of spleen tissue. Rheometric tests on porcine splenic tissues were performed in the linear and nonlinear regime, revealing a weak frequency dependence of the dynamic moduli in linear regime and a distinct strain-hardening effect in nonlinear regime. These behaviours are typical of soft tissues such as kidney and liver, with however a less pronounced strain-hardening for the spleen. An analytical model based on power laws is then proposed to describe the general shear viscoelastic behaviour of the spleen. PMID:22498291

  13. Analytical model of ionospheric convection at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Kim, V. P.; Shubin, V. N.; Khegai, V. V.

    An analytical model of plasma convection in the subauroral ionosphere is developed, assuming that the electric shielding of the inner magnetosphere is controlled by polarization of the hot ion zone situated behind the inner boundary of the plasma sheet. It is shown that, at subauroral latitudes at night, the plasma drifts eastward, while during the day it shifts westward. Thus, in the predmidnight sector, the direction of convection in the subauroral ionosphere is opposite to that of auroral convection. In general, the electric field, with a strength of 10 mV/m, has a meridional direction.

  14. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  15. An analytical model of accretion onto white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, N.; Hernanz, M.

    2013-05-01

    The analytical model of Frank et al. (2002) has been used to investigate the structure of the accretion stream onto white dwarfs (WD). In particular, the post-shock region (temperature, density and gas velocity distributions) and X-ray spectrum emitted by this region. We have obtained the temperature, density and gas velocity distributions of the emission region for different masses of white dwarfs and at different positions in the shock coordinate. Also, we calculated the emitted spectrum for different WD masses and at different positions of the shock with the principal objective of study the accretion at different points of the emission region.

  16. Analytical modeling of turbine wakes in yawed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Increasing wind energy production has become a unanimous plan for virtually all the developed countries. In addition to constructing new wind farms, this goal can be achieved by making wind farms more efficient. Control strategies in wind farms, such as manipulating the yaw angle of the turbines, have the potential to make wind farms more efficient. Costly numerical simulations or measurements cannot be, however, employed to assess the viability of this strategy in the numerous different scenarios happening in real wind farms. In this study, we aim to develop an inexpensive and simple analytical model that is able for the first time to predict the whole wake of a yawed turbine with an acceptable accuracy. The proposed analytical model is built upon the simplified version of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Apart from the ability of the model to predict wake flows in yawed conditions, it can provide a better understanding of turbine wakes in this complex situation. For example, it can give valuable insights on how the wake deflection varies by changing turbine and incoming flow characteristics, such as the thrust coefficient of the turbine or the ambient turbulence.

  17. An Analytical Model for the Radio-Frequency Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-09-01

    An analytical model for the planar radio frequency (RF) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed based on the applied RF voltage as the boundary condition. In a first step, the individual sheath voltages and the self-bias are calculated using a cubic-charge voltage relation. In the second step, a single integro-differential equation is derived to describe the ion flow velocity in the sheath under all conditions of collisionality. Central to the model is the screening function that describes the screening of the ion density by the mean electron density in the sheath. Numerical integration of the sheath equation is straight forward. However, for the collisionless as well as the collisional case explicit, simple, and precise analytical approximations can be found. Drift velocities, densities, fields, currents, and charge-voltage relations are calculated. Further, the Child-Langmuir laws for both cases of collisonality are derived. These solutions are in very good agreement with experimental data from the literature based on laser electric field measurements, the Brinkmann sheath model, and PIC simulations. The technique works well also for other waveforms, e.g. the electrical asymmetry effect or tailored pulse waveforms.

  18. Experimental, numerical and analytical models of mantle starting plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulliette, D. L.; Loper, D. E.

    1995-12-01

    The results of a combined experimental, numerical and analytical investigation of starting thermal plumes are described, to obtain a better perspective on plumes within the Earth's mantle. Thermal plumes were generated experimentally in a tank of corn syrup by means of an electrical heater. Viscosity ratios of 400, 30 000, and 10 8 were generated by varying the temperature of the tank. Plumes for the smaller ratios had the traditional 'balloon-on-astring' shape, but that at the highest ratio had a novel morphology. The plume heads in the first two cases were observed to rise at roughly a constant speed, in contrast to most previous studies which found the plume heads to accelerate. Loss of buoyancy from the plume head owing to heat loss is believed to be responsible for this difference. Starting plumes were simulated numerically using an axisymmetric, finite-element code to solve the Boussinesq equations at finite Prandtl numbers. The constant rise speed observed experimentally was confirmed by the numerical simulation for the viscosity ratios of 400 and 30 000, but numerical instability prevented simulation of the case with a viscosity ratio of 10 8. There was very good agreement between the experimental and numerical rise speeds. An analytical model was developed which reduces to previous models in limiting cases. This parameterization gives better agreement with the experimental and numerical results than does any previous model.

  19. Analytic modeling of antibody versus nanocell delivery of photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Samkoe, Kimberley; Zheng, Lei Zak; Rai, Prakash; Mai, Zhiming; Verma, Sarika; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-02-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors is challenging, and the issues that govern this can be distilled down into parameters which allow computational modeling. In this paper, the basic rate equations and diffusion kernel for the time and space modeling of delivery are developed, along with an analytical solution to this equation. The model is then used to compare delivery of Avastin antibody relative to delivery encapsulated in a nanocell delivery vehicle. The key factors are the plasma clearance or excretion rates, and the binding, or not, as it transports into the tumor tissue. A reduction in the plasma clearance rate inherently increases available delivery over time, and additionally the reduction in binding from antibody to nanocell allows higher penetration into the tumor at the longer circulation times.

  20. Urban stormwater management planning with analytical probabilistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.J.

    2000-07-01

    Understanding how to properly manage urban stormwater is a critical concern to civil and environmental engineers the world over. Mismanagement of stormwater and urban runoff results in flooding, erosion, and water quality problems. In an effort to develop better management techniques, engineers have come to rely on computer simulation and advanced mathematical modeling techniques to help plan and predict water system performance. This important book outlines a new method that uses probability tools to model how stormwater behaves and interacts in a combined- or single-system municipal water system. Complete with sample problems and case studies illustrating how concepts really work, the book presents a cost-effective, easy-to-master approach to analytical modeling of stormwater management systems.

  1. Semi-analytical model of cosmic ray electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascenko, A.; Spanier, F.

    2011-07-01

    We present a numerical extension to the analytical propagation model introduced in Hein and Spanier (2008) to describe the leptonic population in the galactic disc. The model is used to derive a possible identification of the components that contribute to the leptonic cosmic ray spectrum, as measured by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS, with an emphasis on secondary e+-e- production in collisions of cosmic ray particles with ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We find that besides secondaries, an additional source symmetric in e+ and e- production is needed to explain both the PAMELA anomaly and the Fermi bump, assuming a power-law primary electron spectrum. Our model also allows us to derive constraints for some properties of the ISM.

  2. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  3. A Mechanistic Stochastic Ricker Model: Analytical and Numerical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadrich, Tamar; Katriel, Guy

    The Ricker model is one of the simplest and most widely-used ecological models displaying complex nonlinear dynamics. We study a discrete-time population model, which is derived from simple assumptions concerning individual organisms’ behavior, using the “site-based” approach, developed by Brännström, Broomhead, Johansson and Sumpter. In the large-population limit the model converges to the Ricker model, and can thus be considered a mechanistic version of the Ricker model, derived from basic ecological principles, and taking into account the demographic stochasticity inherent to finite populations. We employ several analytical and precise numerical methods to study the model, showing how each approach contributes to understanding the model’s dynamics. Expressing the model as a Markov chain, we employ the concept of quasi-stationary distributions, which are computed numerically, and used to examine the interaction between complex deterministic dynamics and demographic stochasticity, as well as to calculate mean times to extinction. A Gaussian Markov chain approximation is used to obtain quantitative asymptotic approximations for the size of fluctuations of the stochastic model’s time series around the deterministic trajectory, and for the correlations between successive fluctuations. Results of these approximations are compared to results obtained from quasi-stationary distributions and from direct simulations, and are shown to be in good agreement.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    SciTech Connect

    Rochepault, Etienne Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-14

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochepault, Etienne; Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  6. Accurate modeling of switched reluctance machine based on hybrid trained WNN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shoujun Ge, Lefei; Ma, Shaojie; Zhang, Man

    2014-04-15

    According to the strong nonlinear electromagnetic characteristics of switched reluctance machine (SRM), a novel accurate modeling method is proposed based on hybrid trained wavelet neural network (WNN) which combines improved genetic algorithm (GA) with gradient descent (GD) method to train the network. In the novel method, WNN is trained by GD method based on the initial weights obtained per improved GA optimization, and the global parallel searching capability of stochastic algorithm and local convergence speed of deterministic algorithm are combined to enhance the training accuracy, stability and speed. Based on the measured electromagnetic characteristics of a 3-phase 12/8-pole SRM, the nonlinear simulation model is built by hybrid trained WNN in Matlab. The phase current and mechanical characteristics from simulation under different working conditions meet well with those from experiments, which indicates the accuracy of the model for dynamic and static performance evaluation of SRM and verifies the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method.

  7. Accurate, efficient, and (iso)geometrically flexible collocation methods for phase-field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Hector; Reali, Alessandro; Sangalli, Giancarlo

    2014-04-01

    We propose new collocation methods for phase-field models. Our algorithms are based on isogeometric analysis, a new technology that makes use of functions from computational geometry, such as, for example, Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS). NURBS exhibit excellent approximability and controllable global smoothness, and can represent exactly most geometries encapsulated in Computer Aided Design (CAD) models. These attributes permitted us to derive accurate, efficient, and geometrically flexible collocation methods for phase-field models. The performance of our method is demonstrated by several numerical examples of phase separation modeled by the Cahn-Hilliard equation. We feel that our method successfully combines the geometrical flexibility of finite elements with the accuracy and simplicity of pseudo-spectral collocation methods, and is a viable alternative to classical collocation methods.

  8. Analytical solutions for extended surface electrochemical fin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassenti, Brice N.; Nelson, George J.; DeGostin, Matthew B.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2014-11-01

    Exact solutions were obtained for variations in the potential and the current for three axisymmetric geometries, with positive, negative and zero curvatures, which simulate current transport in fuel cell electrodes. These solutions can be used to assess the influence of geometry on performance for three dimensional electrode microstructures. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrode was selected as a test case for these studies. From the exact solutions, simulations of current flow and potential drop for one dimensional networks in SOFC electrodes were performed. Numerical tests demonstrated that surfaces with positive curvature have greater current flow for the same potential drop due to higher current losses through the lateral surface area. The study also showed that zero curvature solutions will be sufficiently accurate for positive or negative curvature geometries for moderate radius changes, but differ significantly from positive or negative curvature solutions for more extreme radius changes. Analytical solutions indicate fundamental differences in geometry and its influence on current flow. Based on the results of the simulations, an approximate solution, based on one non-dimensional parameter, was developed for estimating the effects of extreme changes in cross-section area.

  9. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  10. An accurate and computationally efficient model for membrane-type circular-symmetric micro-hotplates.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Falconi, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, the design of high-performance micro-hotplates would require a large number of simulations because of the existence of many important design parameters as well as the possibly crucial effects of both spread and drift. However, the computational cost of FEM simulations, which are the only available tool for accurately predicting the temperature in micro-hotplates, is very high. As a result, micro-hotplate designers generally have no effective simulation-tools for the optimization. In order to circumvent these issues, here, we propose a model for practical circular-symmetric micro-hot-plates which takes advantage of modified Bessel functions, computationally efficient matrix-approach for considering the relevant boundary conditions, Taylor linearization for modeling the Joule heating and radiation losses, and external-region-segmentation strategy in order to accurately take into account radiation losses in the entire micro-hotplate. The proposed model is almost as accurate as FEM simulations and two to three orders of magnitude more computationally efficient (e.g., 45 s versus more than 8 h). The residual errors, which are mainly associated to the undesired heating in the electrical contacts, are small (e.g., few degrees Celsius for an 800 °C operating temperature) and, for important analyses, almost constant. Therefore, we also introduce a computationally-easy single-FEM-compensation strategy in order to reduce the residual errors to about 1 °C. As illustrative examples of the power of our approach, we report the systematic investigation of a spread in the membrane thermal conductivity and of combined variations of both ambient and bulk temperatures. Our model enables a much faster characterization of micro-hotplates and, thus, a much more effective optimization prior to fabrication. PMID:24763214

  11. An Accurate and Computationally Efficient Model for Membrane-Type Circular-Symmetric Micro-Hotplates

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Usman; Falconi, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, the design of high-performance micro-hotplates would require a large number of simulations because of the existence of many important design parameters as well as the possibly crucial effects of both spread and drift. However, the computational cost of FEM simulations, which are the only available tool for accurately predicting the temperature in micro-hotplates, is very high. As a result, micro-hotplate designers generally have no effective simulation-tools for the optimization. In order to circumvent these issues, here, we propose a model for practical circular-symmetric micro-hot-plates which takes advantage of modified Bessel functions, computationally efficient matrix-approach for considering the relevant boundary conditions, Taylor linearization for modeling the Joule heating and radiation losses, and external-region-segmentation strategy in order to accurately take into account radiation losses in the entire micro-hotplate. The proposed model is almost as accurate as FEM simulations and two to three orders of magnitude more computationally efficient (e.g., 45 s versus more than 8 h). The residual errors, which are mainly associated to the undesired heating in the electrical contacts, are small (e.g., few degrees Celsius for an 800 °C operating temperature) and, for important analyses, almost constant. Therefore, we also introduce a computationally-easy single-FEM-compensation strategy in order to reduce the residual errors to about 1 °C. As illustrative examples of the power of our approach, we report the systematic investigation of a spread in the membrane thermal conductivity and of combined variations of both ambient and bulk temperatures. Our model enables a much faster characterization of micro-hotplates and, thus, a much more effective optimization prior to fabrication. PMID:24763214

  12. A Method for Accurate in silico modeling of Ultrasound Transducer Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Drake A.; Walker, William F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to improve the in silico modeling of ultrasound transducer arrays. While current simulation tools accurately predict the theoretical element spatio-temporal pressure response, transducers do not always behave as theorized. In practice, using the probe's physical dimensions and published specifications in silico, often results in unsatisfactory agreement between simulation and experiment. We describe a general optimization procedure used to maximize the correlation between the observed and simulated spatio-temporal response of a pulsed single element in a commercial ultrasound probe. A linear systems approach is employed to model element angular sensitivity, lens effects, and diffraction phenomena. A numerical deconvolution method is described to characterize the intrinsic electro-mechanical impulse response of the element. Once the response of the element and optimal element characteristics are known, prediction of the pressure response for arbitrary apertures and excitation signals is performed through direct convolution using available tools. We achieve a correlation of 0.846 between the experimental emitted waveform and simulated waveform when using the probe's physical specifications in silico. A far superior correlation of 0.988 is achieved when using the optimized in silico model. Electronic noise appears to be the main effect preventing the realization of higher correlation coefficients. More accurate in silico modeling will improve the evaluation and design of ultrasound transducers as well as aid in the development of sophisticated beamforming strategies. PMID:19041997

  13. Embedded Analytical Solutions Improve Accuracy in Convolution-Based Particle Tracking Models using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starn, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Particle tracking often is used to generate particle-age distributions that are used as impulse-response functions in convolution. A typical application is to produce groundwater solute breakthrough curves (BTC) at endpoint receptors such as pumping wells or streams. The commonly used semi-analytical particle-tracking algorithm based on the assumption of linear velocity gradients between opposing cell faces is computationally very fast when used in combination with finite-difference models. However, large gradients near pumping wells in regional-scale groundwater-flow models often are not well represented because of cell-size limitations. This leads to inaccurate velocity fields, especially at weak sinks. Accurate analytical solutions for velocity near a pumping well are available, and various boundary conditions can be imposed using image-well theory. Python can be used to embed these solutions into existing semi-analytical particle-tracking codes, thereby maintaining the integrity and quality-assurance of the existing code. Python (and associated scientific computational packages NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib) is an effective tool because of its wide ranging capability. Python text processing allows complex and database-like manipulation of model input and output files, including binary and HDF5 files. High-level functions in the language include ODE solvers to solve first-order particle-location ODEs, Gaussian kernel density estimation to compute smooth particle-age distributions, and convolution. The highly vectorized nature of NumPy arrays and functions minimizes the need for computationally expensive loops. A modular Python code base has been developed to compute BTCs using embedded analytical solutions at pumping wells based on an existing well-documented finite-difference groundwater-flow simulation code (MODFLOW) and a semi-analytical particle-tracking code (MODPATH). The Python code base is tested by comparing BTCs with highly discretized synthetic steady

  14. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    PubMed

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity. PMID:27530803

  15. Towards more accurate numerical modeling of impedance based high frequency harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2014-03-01

    The application of smart materials in various fields of engineering has recently become increasingly popular. For instance, the high frequency based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing smart piezoelectric materials is found to be versatile in structural health monitoring (SHM). Thus far, considerable efforts have been made to study and improve the technique. Various theoretical models of the EMI technique have been proposed in an attempt to better understand its behavior. So far, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled field finite element (FE) model has proved to be the most accurate. However, large discrepancies between the results of the FE model and experimental tests, especially in terms of the slope and magnitude of the admittance signatures, continue to exist and are yet to be resolved. This paper presents a series of parametric studies using the 3D coupled field finite element method (FEM) on all properties of materials involved in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structure interaction of the EMI technique, to investigate their effect on the admittance signatures acquired. FE model updating is then performed by adjusting the parameters to match the experimental results. One of the main reasons for the lower accuracy, especially in terms of magnitude and slope, of previous FE models is the difficulty in determining the damping related coefficients and the stiffness of the bonding layer. In this study, using the hysteretic damping model in place of Rayleigh damping, which is used by most researchers in this field, and updated bonding stiffness, an improved and more accurate FE model is achieved. The results of this paper are expected to be useful for future study of the subject area in terms of research and application, such as modeling, design and optimization.

  16. Analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Jichang; Garrett, Frederick, Jr.; Hoffman, Eric; Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    A 6 DOF analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle is derived. The derivation is based on wind-tunnel model data valid in the altitude-Mach flight envelope centered at 15,000 ft altitude and 0.6 Mach number with Mach range between 0.3 and 0.9. The analytical models of the aerodynamics coefficients are nonlinear functions of alpha with all control variable and other states fixed. Interpolation is required between the parameterized nonlinear functions. The lift and pitching moment coefficients have unsteady flow parts due to the time range of change of angle-of-attack (alpha dot). The analytical models are plotted and compared with their corresponding wind-tunnel data. Piloted simulated maneuvers of the wind-tunnel model are used to evaluate the analytical model. The maneuvers considered are pitch-ups, 360 degree loaded and unloaded rolls, turn reversals, split S's, and level turns. The evaluation finds that (1) the analytical model is a good representation at Mach 0.6, (2) the longitudinal part is good for the Mach range 0.3 to 0.9, and (3) the lateral part is good for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 0.9. The computer simulations show that the storage requirement of the analytical model is about one tenth that of the wind-tunnel model and it runs twice as fast.

  17. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Endreny, Theodore A.; Nowak, David J.

    2013-09-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat storage based on semiempirical functions and generates spatially distributed estimates based on inputs of topography, land cover, and the weather data measured at a reference site. The model assumes that for all grids under the same mesoscale climate, grid air temperature and humidity are modified by local variation in absorbed solar radiation and the partitioning of sensible and latent heat. The model uses a reference grid site for time series meteorological data and the air temperature and humidity of any other grid can be obtained by solving the heat flux network equations. PASATH was coupled with the USDA iTree-Hydro water balance model to obtain evapotranspiration terms and run from 20 to 29 August 2010 at a 360 m by 360 m grid scale and hourly time step across a 285 km2 watershed including the urban area of Syracuse, NY. PASATH predictions were tested at nine urban weather stations representing variability in urban topography and land cover. The PASATH model predictive efficiency R2 ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 for air temperature and 0.77 to 0.97 for dew point temperature. PASATH is expected to have broad applications on environmental and ecological models.

  18. An analytically tractable model for community ecology with many species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, Benjamin; Fisher, Charles; Mehta, Pankaj; Pankaj Mehta Biophysics Theory Group Team

    A fundamental problem in community ecology is to understand how ecological processes such as selection, drift, and immigration yield observed patterns in species composition and diversity. Here, we present an analytically tractable, presence-absence (PA) model for community assembly and use it to ask how ecological traits such as the strength of competition, diversity in competition, and stochasticity affect species composition in a community. In our PA model, we treat species as stochastic binary variables that can either be present or absent in a community: species can immigrate into the community from a regional species pool and can go extinct due to competition and stochasticity. Despite its simplicity, the PA model reproduces the qualitative features of more complicated models of community assembly. In agreement with recent work on large, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, the PA model exhibits distinct ecological behaviors organized around a special (``critical'') point corresponding to Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity. Our results suggest that the concepts of ``phases'' and phase diagrams can provide a powerful framework for thinking about community ecology and that the PA model captures the essential ecological dynamics of community assembly. Pm was supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems and a Sloan Research Fellowship.

  19. Stochastic analytical modeling of the biodegradation of steady plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarlenga, A.; Fiori, A.

    2014-02-01

    We present a stochastic analytical framework to assess the contaminant concentration of a steady plume undergoing biodegradation. The method is focused on heterogeneous formations, and it embeds both fringe and core degradation. The Lagrangian concentration approach of Fiori (2001) was employed, which is suited for describing the interplay between the large scale advection caused by heterogeneity and the local dispersion processes. The principal scope of the model is to provide a relatively simple tool for a quick assessment of the contamination level in aquifers, as function of a few relevant, physically based dimensionless parameters. The solution of the analytical model is relatively simple and generalizes previous approaches developed for homogeneous formations. It is found that heterogeneity generally enhances mixing and degradation; in fact, the plume shear and distortion operated by the complex, heterogeneous velocity field facilitates local dispersion in diluting the contaminant and mixing it with the electron acceptor. The decay of the electron donor concentration, and so the plume length, is proportional to the transverse pore-scale dispersivity, which is indeed the parameter ruling mixing and hence degradation. While the theoretical plume length is controlled by the fringe processes, the core degradation may determine a significant decay of concentration along the mean flow direction, thus affecting the length of the plume. The method is applied to the crude oil contamination event at the Bemijdi site, Minnesota (USA).

  20. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  1. A Three Level Analytic Model for Alkali Vapor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed considering the steady-state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and first excited {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 W/cm{sup 2}. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed and the overlap of pump and resonator modes, approaching the quantum efficiency of 0.95-0.98, depending on alkali atom. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast relative to stimulated emission. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. Application of the model and comparisons to recent laser demonstrations is presented.

  2. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available. PMID:24472756

  3. Characterization of uniform scanning proton beams with analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demez, Nebi

    Tissue equivalent phantoms have an important place in radiation therapy planning and delivery. They have been manufactured for use in conventional radiotherapy. Their tissue equivalency for proton beams is currently in active investigation. The Bragg-Kleeman rule was used to calculate water equivalent thickness (WET) for available tissue equivalent phantoms from CIRS (Norfolk, VA, USA). WET's of those phantoms were also measured using proton beams at Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI). WET measurements and calculations are in good agreement within ˜1% accuracy except for high Z phantoms. Proton beams were also characterized with an analytical proton dose calculation model, Proton Loss Model (PLM) [26], to investigate protons interactions in water and those phantoms. Depth-dose and lateral dose profiles of protons in water and in those phantoms were calculated, measured, and compared. Water Equivalent Spreadness (WES) was also investigated for those phantoms using the formula for scattering power ratio. Because WES is independent of incident energy of protons, it is possible to estimate spreadness of protons in different media by just knowing WES. Measurements are usually taken for configuration of the treatment planning system (TPS). This study attempted to achieve commissioning data for uniform scanning proton planning with analytical methods, PLM, which have been verified with published measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Depth doses and lateral profiles calculated by PLM were compared with measurements via the gamma analysis method. While gamma analysis shows that depth doses are in >90% agreement with measured depth doses, the agreement falls to <80% for some lateral profiles. PLM data were imported into the TPS (PLM-TPS). PLM-TPS was tested with different patient cases. The PLM-TPS treatment plans for 5 prostate cases show acceptable agreement. The Planning Treatment Volume (PTV) coverage was 100 % with PLM-TPS except for one case in

  4. Strong field coherent control of molecular torsions—Analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwell, Benjamin A.; Ramakrishna, S.; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-08-14

    We introduce analytical models of torsional alignment by moderately intense laser pulses that are applicable to the limiting cases of the torsional barrier heights. Using these models, we explore in detail the role that the laser intensity and pulse duration play in coherent torsional dynamics, addressing both experimental and theoretical concerns. Our results suggest strategies for minimizing the risk of off-resonant ionization, noting the qualitative differences between the case of torsional alignment subject to a field-free torsional barrier and that of torsional alignment of a barrier-less system (equivalent to a 2D rigid rotor). We also investigate several interesting torsional phenomena, including the onset of impulsive alignment of torsions, field-driven oscillations in quantum number space, and the disappearance of an alignment upper bound observed for a rigid rotor in the impulsive torsional alignment limit.

  5. Streaming instability of slime mold amoebae: An analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfer, Thomas; Maini, Philip K.

    1997-08-01

    During the aggregation of amoebae of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium, the interaction of chemical waves of the signaling molecule cAMP with cAMP-directed cell movement causes the breakup of a uniform cell layer into branching patterns of cell streams. Recent numerical and experimental investigations emphasize the pivotal role of the cell-density dependence of the chemical wave speed for the occurrence of the streaming instability. A simple, analytically tractable, model of Dictyostelium aggregation is developed to test this idea. The interaction of cAMP waves with cAMP-directed cell movement is studied in the form of coupled dynamics of wave front geometries and cell density. Comparing the resulting explicit instability criterion and dispersion relation for cell streaming with the previous findings of model simulations and numerical stability analyses, a unifying interpretation of the streaming instability as a cAMP wave-driven chemotactic instability is proposed.

  6. Modeling superhelical DNA: recent analytical and dynamic approaches.

    PubMed

    Schlick, T

    1995-04-01

    During the past year, a variety of diverse and complementary approaches have been presented for modeling superhelical DNA, offering new physical and biological insights into fundamental functional processes of DNA. Analytical approaches have probed deeper into the effects of entropy and thermal fluctuations on DNA structure and on various topological constraints induced by DNA-binding proteins. In tandem, new kinetic approaches--by molecular, Langevin and Brownian dynamics, as well as extensions of elastic-rod theory--have begun to offer dynamic information associated with supercoiling. Such dynamic approaches, along with other equilibrium studies, are refining the basic elastic-rod and polymer framework and incorporating more realistic treatments of salt and sequence-specific features. These collective advances in modeling large DNA molecules, in concert with technological innovations, are pointing to an exciting interplay between theory and experiment on the horizon. PMID:7648328

  7. Strong field coherent control of molecular torsions--Analytical models.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Benjamin A; Ramakrishna, S; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-08-14

    We introduce analytical models of torsional alignment by moderately intense laser pulses that are applicable to the limiting cases of the torsional barrier heights. Using these models, we explore in detail the role that the laser intensity and pulse duration play in coherent torsional dynamics, addressing both experimental and theoretical concerns. Our results suggest strategies for minimizing the risk of off-resonant ionization, noting the qualitative differences between the case of torsional alignment subject to a field-free torsional barrier and that of torsional alignment of a barrier-less system (equivalent to a 2D rigid rotor). We also investigate several interesting torsional phenomena, including the onset of impulsive alignment of torsions, field-driven oscillations in quantum number space, and the disappearance of an alignment upper bound observed for a rigid rotor in the impulsive torsional alignment limit. PMID:26277138

  8. Model for analytical calculation of nuclear photoabsorption at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütt, M.-Th.; Milstein, A. I.; Schumacher, M.

    1997-02-01

    The universal curve {σ}/{A} of nuclear photoabsorption is investigated within a Fermi gas model of nuclear matter. An energy range from pion threshold up to 400 MeV is considered. The interactions between nucleon, pion, Δ-isobar and photon are considered in the non-relativistic approximation with corrections of the order {1}/{M} taken into account with respect to proton mass. Analytical expressions are obtained, in which the influence of nuclear correlations and two-nucleon contributions is studied explicitly. The contributions of real and virtual pions are found to be sufficient to obtain agreement with experimental data in this energy range. An extension of the model calculation to nucleon knock-out reactions is discussed.

  9. Analytical modeling requirements for tilting proprotor aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Proprotor and cantilever wing aeroelastic behavior is applied to a gimballed rotor and a hingeless rotor to develop an analytical model for prediction of tilting proprotor aircraft dynamics. Particular attention is given to: the influence of coupled flap/lag bending modes; the influence of rotor blade torsion degrees of freedom on proprotor dynamics; and, to a constant coefficient approximation representing the dynamics in nonaxial flow through the rotor. The following are also examined: the number of blade bending and torsion modes required; the influence of the rotor aerodynamic model; the influence of the blade trim bending deflection; the importance of the rotor rotational speed degree of freedom; and the effect of the wing aerodynamic forces. The origin of the significant influence of the blade pitch motion on the proprotor dynamics is discussed.

  10. Double Cluster Heads Model for Secure and Accurate Data Fusion in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun-Song; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Secure and accurate data fusion is an important issue in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and has been extensively researched in the literature. In this paper, by combining clustering techniques, reputation and trust systems, and data fusion algorithms, we propose a novel cluster-based data fusion model called Double Cluster Heads Model (DCHM) for secure and accurate data fusion in WSNs. Different from traditional clustering models in WSNs, two cluster heads are selected after clustering for each cluster based on the reputation and trust system and they perform data fusion independently of each other. Then, the results are sent to the base station where the dissimilarity coefficient is computed. If the dissimilarity coefficient of the two data fusion results exceeds the threshold preset by the users, the cluster heads will be added to blacklist, and the cluster heads must be reelected by the sensor nodes in a cluster. Meanwhile, feedback is sent from the base station to the reputation and trust system, which can help us to identify and delete the compromised sensor nodes in time. Through a series of extensive simulations, we found that the DCHM performed very well in data fusion security and accuracy. PMID:25608211

  11. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Fully Automated Generation of Accurate Digital Surface Models with Sub-Meter Resolution from Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfeil, J.; Hirschmüller, H.; Piltz, B.; Börner, A.; Suppa, M.

    2012-07-01

    Modern pixel-wise image matching algorithms like Semi-Global Matching (SGM) are able to compute high resolution digital surface models from airborne and spaceborne stereo imagery. Although image matching itself can be performed automatically, there are prerequisites, like high geometric accuracy, which are essential for ensuring the high quality of resulting surface models. Especially for line cameras, these prerequisites currently require laborious manual interaction using standard tools, which is a growing problem due to continually increasing demand for such surface models. The tedious work includes partly or fully manual selection of tie- and/or ground control points for ensuring the required accuracy of the relative orientation of images for stereo matching. It also includes masking of large water areas that seriously reduce the quality of the results. Furthermore, a good estimate of the depth range is required, since accurate estimates can seriously reduce the processing time for stereo matching. In this paper an approach is presented that allows performing all these steps fully automated. It includes very robust and precise tie point selection, enabling the accurate calculation of the images' relative orientation via bundle adjustment. It is also shown how water masking and elevation range estimation can be performed automatically on the base of freely available SRTM data. Extensive tests with a large number of different satellite images from QuickBird and WorldView are presented as proof of the robustness and reliability of the proposed method.

  13. Analytical model for macromolecular partitioning during yeast cell division

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymmetric cell division, whereby a parent cell generates two sibling cells with unequal content and thereby distinct fates, is central to cell differentiation, organism development and ageing. Unequal partitioning of the macromolecular content of the parent cell — which includes proteins, DNA, RNA, large proteinaceous assemblies and organelles — can be achieved by both passive (e.g. diffusion, localized retention sites) and active (e.g. motor-driven transport) processes operating in the presence of external polarity cues, internal asymmetries, spontaneous symmetry breaking, or stochastic effects. However, the quantitative contribution of different processes to the partitioning of macromolecular content is difficult to evaluate. Results Here we developed an analytical model that allows rapid quantitative assessment of partitioning as a function of various parameters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model exposes quantitative degeneracies among the physical parameters that govern macromolecular partitioning, and reveals regions of the solution space where diffusion is sufficient to drive asymmetric partitioning and regions where asymmetric partitioning can only be achieved through additional processes such as motor-driven transport. Application of the model to different macromolecular assemblies suggests that partitioning of protein aggregates and episomes, but not prions, is diffusion-limited in yeast, consistent with previous reports. Conclusions In contrast to computationally intensive stochastic simulations of particular scenarios, our analytical model provides an efficient and comprehensive overview of partitioning as a function of global and macromolecule-specific parameters. Identification of quantitative degeneracies among these parameters highlights the importance of their careful measurement for a given macromolecular species in order to understand the dominant processes responsible for its observed partitioning. PMID

  14. Analytically tractable model for community ecology with many species.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Benjamin; Fisher, Charles K; Mehta, Pankaj

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental problem in community ecology is understanding how ecological processes such as selection, drift, and immigration give rise to observed patterns in species composition and diversity. Here, we analyze a recently introduced, analytically tractable, presence-absence (PA) model for community assembly, and we use it to ask how ecological traits such as the strength of competition, the amount of diversity, and demographic and environmental stochasticity affect species composition in a community. In the PA model, species are treated as stochastic binary variables that can either be present or absent in a community: species can immigrate into the community from a regional species pool and can go extinct due to competition and stochasticity. Building upon previous work, we show that, despite its simplicity, the PA model reproduces the qualitative features of more complicated models of community assembly. In agreement with recent studies of large, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, the PA model exhibits distinct ecological behaviors organized around a special ("critical") point corresponding to Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity. These results suggest that the concepts of ecological "phases" and phase diagrams can provide a powerful framework for thinking about community ecology, and that the PA model captures the essential ecological dynamics of community assembly. PMID:27627348

  15. Cumulative atomic multipole moments complement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate electrostatic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of several atomic charge models based on different definitions has been analyzed using cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMM). This formalism can generate higher atomic moments starting from any atomic charges, while preserving the corresponding molecular moments. The atomic charge contribution to the higher molecular moments, as well as to the electrostatic potentials, has been examined for CO and HCN molecules at several different levels of theory. The results clearly show that the electrostatic potential obtained from CAMM expansion is convergent up to R-5 term for all atomic charge models used. This illustrates that higher atomic moments can be used to supplement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate description of electrostatic properties.

  16. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull

    PubMed Central

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E. H.; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  17. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull.

    PubMed

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E H; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  18. An accurate and comprehensive model of thin fluid flows with inertia on curved substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A. J.; Li, Zhenquan

    2006-04-01

    Consider the three-dimensional flow of a viscous Newtonian fluid upon a curved two-dimensional substrate when the fluid film is thin, as occurs in many draining, coating and biological flows. We derive a comprehensive model of the dynamics of the film, the model being expressed in terms of the film thickness eta and the average lateral velocity bar{bm u}. Centre manifold theory assures us that the model accurately and systematically includes the effects of the curvature of substrate, gravitational body force, fluid inertia and dissipation. The model resolves wavelike phenomena in the dynamics of viscous fluid flows over arbitrarily curved substrates such as cylinders, tubes and spheres. We briefly illustrate its use in simulating drop formation on cylindrical fibres, wave transitions, three-dimensional instabilities, Faraday waves, viscous hydraulic jumps, flow vortices in a compound channel and flow down and up a step. These models are the most complete models for thin-film flow of a Newtonian fluid; many other thin-film models can be obtained by different restrictions and truncations of the model derived here.

  19. An accurate numerical solution to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecca, Guglielmo; Siviglia, Annunziato; Blom, Astrid

    2016-07-01

    We present an accurate numerical approximation to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in one space dimension. Our solution procedure originates from the fully-unsteady matrix-vector formulation developed in [54]. The principal part of the problem is solved by an explicit Finite Volume upwind method of the path-conservative type, by which all the variables are updated simultaneously in a coupled fashion. The solution to the principal part is embedded into a splitting procedure for the treatment of frictional source terms. The numerical scheme is extended to second-order accuracy and includes a bookkeeping procedure for handling the evolution of size stratification in the substrate. We develop a concept of balancedness for the vertical mass flux between the substrate and active layer under bed degradation, which prevents the occurrence of non-physical oscillations in the grainsize distribution of the substrate. We suitably modify the numerical scheme to respect this principle. We finally verify the accuracy in our solution to the equations, and its ability to reproduce one-dimensional morphodynamics due to streamwise and vertical sorting, using three test cases. In detail, (i) we empirically assess the balancedness of vertical mass fluxes under degradation; (ii) we study the convergence to the analytical linearised solution for the propagation of infinitesimal-amplitude waves [54], which is here employed for the first time to assess a mixed-sediment model; (iii) we reproduce Ribberink's E8-E9 flume experiment [46].

  20. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  1. Validation of an Accurate Three-Dimensional Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1997-01-01

    The helical slow-wave circuit embodies a helical coil of rectangular tape supported in a metal barrel by dielectric support rods. Although the helix slow-wave circuit remains the mainstay of the traveling-wave tube (TWT) industry because of its exceptionally wide bandwidth, a full helical circuit, without significant dimensional approximations, has not been successfully modeled until now. Numerous attempts have been made to analyze the helical slow-wave circuit so that the performance could be accurately predicted without actually building it, but because of its complex geometry, many geometrical approximations became necessary rendering the previous models inaccurate. In the course of this research it has been demonstrated that using the simulation code, MAFIA, the helical structure can be modeled with actual tape width and thickness, dielectric support rod geometry and materials. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MAFIA model, the cold-test parameters including dispersion, on-axis interaction impedance and attenuation have been calculated for several helical TWT slow-wave circuits with a variety of support rod geometries including rectangular and T-shaped rods, as well as various support rod materials including isotropic, anisotropic and partially metal coated dielectrics. Compared with experimentally measured results, the agreement is excellent. With the accuracy of the MAFIA helical model validated, the code was used to investigate several conventional geometric approximations in an attempt to obtain the most computationally efficient model. Several simplifications were made to a standard model including replacing the helical tape with filaments, and replacing rectangular support rods with shapes conforming to the cylindrical coordinate system with effective permittivity. The approximate models are compared with the standard model in terms of cold-test characteristics and computational time. The model was also used to determine the sensitivity of various

  2. A macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Lerman, K; Galstyan, A; Martinoli, A; Ijspeert, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al. [Autonomous Robots, 11, 149-171]. The robots' task is to pull sticks out of their holes, and it can be successfully achieved only through the collaboration of two robots. There is no explicit communication or coordination between the robots. Unlike microscopic simulations (sensor-based or using a probabilistic numerical model), in which computational time scales with the robot group size, the macroscopic model is computationally efficient, because its solutions are independent of robot group size. Analysis reproduces several qualitative conclusions of Ijspeert et al.: namely, the different dynamical regimes for different values of the ratio of robots to sticks, the existence of optimal control parameters that maximize system performance as a function of group size, and the transition from superlinear to sublinear performance as the number of robots is increased. PMID:11911788

  3. A semi-analytic dynamical friction model for cored galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petts, J. A.; Read, J. I.; Gualandris, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a dynamical friction model based on Chandrasekhar's formula that reproduces the fast inspiral and stalling experienced by satellites orbiting galaxies with a large constant density core. We show that the fast inspiral phase does not owe to resonance. Rather, it owes to the background velocity distribution function for the constant density core being dissimilar from the usually-assumed Maxwellian distribution. Using the correct background velocity distribution function and the semi-analytic model from Petts et al. (2015), we are able to correctly reproduce the infall rate in both cored and cusped potentials. However, in the case of large cores, our model is no longer able to correctly capture core-stalling. We show that this stalling owes to the tidal radius of the satellite approaching the size of the core. By switching off dynamical friction when rt(r) = r (where rt is the tidal radius at the satellite's position) we arrive at a model which reproduces the N-body results remarkably well. Since the tidal radius can be very large for constant density background distributions, our model recovers the result that stalling can occur for Ms/Menc ≪ 1, where Ms and Menc are the mass of the satellite and the enclosed galaxy mass, respectively. Finally, we include the contribution to dynamical friction that comes from stars moving faster than the satellite. This next-to-leading order effect becomes the dominant driver of inspiral near the core region, prior to stalling.

  4. Analytical Modeling of Variable Density Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Brown, T.; Cruit, Wendy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique foam/Multilayer Insulation (MLI) combination concept for orbital cryogenic storage was experimentally evaluated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB). The MLI was designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days and included several unique features such as: a variable layer density and larger but fewer perforations for venting during ascent to orbit. Test results with liquid hydrogen indicated that the MLI weight or heat leak is reduced by about half in comparison with standard MLI. The focus of this paper is on analytical modeling of the Variable Density MLI (VD-MLI) on-orbit performance (i.e. vacuum/low pressure environment). The foam/VD-MLI combination model is considered to have five segments. The first segment represents the optional foam layer. The second, third, and fourth segments represent three MLI segments with different layer densities. The last segment is considered to be a shroud that surrounds the last MLI layer. Two approaches are considered. In the first approach, the variable density MLI is modeled layer by layer while in the second approach, a semi-empirical model is applied. Both models account for thermal radiation between shields, gas conduction, and solid conduction through the layer separator materials.

  5. Fuzzy modeling of analytical redundancy for sensor failure detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T.M.; Chou, H.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Failure detection and isolation (FDI) in dynamic systems may be accomplished by testing the consistency of the system via analytically redundant relations. The redundant relation is basically a mathematical model relating system inputs and dissimilar sensor outputs from which information is extracted and subsequently examined for the presence of failure signatures. Performance of the approach is often jeopardized by inherent modeling error and noise interference. To mitigate such effects, techniques such as Kalman filtering, auto-regression-moving-average (ARMA) modeling in conjunction with probability tests are often employed. These conventional techniques treat the stochastic nature of uncertainties in a deterministic manner to generate best-estimated model and sensor outputs by minimizing uncertainties. In this paper, the authors present a different approach by treating the effect of uncertainties with fuzzy numbers. Coefficients in redundant relations derived from first-principle physical models are considered as fuzzy parameters and on-line updated according to system behaviors. Failure detection is accomplished by examining the possibility that a sensor signal occurred in an estimated fuzzy domain. To facilitate failure isolation, individual FDI monitors are designed for each interested sensor.

  6. Star formation in Herschel's Monsters versus semi-analytic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Calura, F.; Pozzi, F.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; De Lucia, G.; Fontanot, F.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Menci, N.; Monaco, P.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a direct comparison between the observed star formation rate functions (SFRFs) and the state-of-the-art predictions of semi-analytic models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution. We use the PACS Evolutionary Probe Survey and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data sets in the COSMOS and GOODS-South fields, combined with broad-band photometry from UV to sub-mm, to obtain total (IR+UV) instantaneous star formation rates (SFRs) for individual Herschel galaxies up to z ˜ 4, subtracted of possible active galactic nucleus (AGN) contamination. The comparison with model predictions shows that SAMs broadly reproduce the observed SFRFs up to z ˜ 2, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, all the models seem to underpredict the bright end of the SFRF at z ≳ 2. The cause of this underprediction could lie in an improper modelling of several model ingredients, like too strong (AGN or stellar) feedback in the brighter objects or too low fallback of gas, caused by weak feedback and outflows at earlier epochs.

  7. Model choice considerations and information integration using analytical hierarchy process

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R; Hemez, Francois M; Booker, Jane M; Ross, Timothy J.

    2010-10-15

    Using the theory of information-gap for decision-making under severe uncertainty, it has been shown that model output compared to experimental data contains irrevocable trade-offs between fidelity-to-data, robustness-to-uncertainty and confidence-in-prediction. We illustrate a strategy for information integration by gathering and aggregating all available data, knowledge, theory, experience, similar applications. Such integration of information becomes important when the physics is difficult to model, when observational data are sparse or difficult to measure, or both. To aggregate the available information, we take an inference perspective. Models are not rejected, nor wasted, but can be integrated into a final result. We show an example of information integration using Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), integrating theory, simulation output and experimental data. We used expert elicitation to determine weights for two models and two experimental data sets, by forming pair-wise comparisons between model output and experimental data. In this way we transform epistemic and/or statistical strength from one field of study into another branch of physical application. The price to pay for utilizing all available knowledge is that inferences drawn for the integrated information must be accounted for and the costs can be considerable. Focusing on inferences and inference uncertainty (IU) is one way to understand complex information.

  8. Calibration of Semi-analytic Models of Galaxy Formation Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Andrés N.; Cora, Sofía A.; Padilla, Nelson D.; Domínguez, Mariano J.; Vega-Martínez, Cristian A.; Tecce, Tomás E.; Orsi, Álvaro; Yaryura, Yamila; García Lambas, Diego; Gargiulo, Ignacio D.; Muñoz Arancibia, Alejandra M.

    2015-03-01

    We present a fast and accurate method to select an optimal set of parameters in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution (SAMs). Our approach compares the results of a model against a set of observables applying a stochastic technique called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a self-learning algorithm for localizing regions of maximum likelihood in multidimensional spaces that outperforms traditional sampling methods in terms of computational cost. We apply the PSO technique to the SAG semi-analytic model combined with merger trees extracted from a standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter N-body simulation. The calibration is performed using a combination of observed galaxy properties as constraints, including the local stellar mass function and the black hole to bulge mass relation. We test the ability of the PSO algorithm to find the best set of free parameters of the model by comparing the results with those obtained using a MCMC exploration. Both methods find the same maximum likelihood region, however, the PSO method requires one order of magnitude fewer evaluations. This new approach allows a fast estimation of the best-fitting parameter set in multidimensional spaces, providing a practical tool to test the consequences of including other astrophysical processes in SAMs.

  9. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies. PMID:25502920

  10. Analytical Perturbative Treatment of Multiterminal Nonequilibrium Anderson Impurity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2015-03-01

    We investigate analytically the nonequilibrium Anderson impurity model connecting with multiterminal leads. Within the validity of the second-order perturbation regarding the interaction strength, the full dependence on frequency and bias voltage of the nonequilibrium self-energy and spectral function is determined for a generic multiterminal setting where the current preservation has been an issue. Our analytical perturbative treatment respects the current conservation as well as the spectral sum rule, and it encompasses Fermi-liquid and non-Fermi liquid behaviors, showing that increasing finite-bias voltage leads to a crossover from the Kondo resonance to the Coulomb blockade phenomena. Analysis on two-terminal and multiterminal settings shows that finite-bias voltage does not split the Kondo resonance in this order; no specific structure due to multiple leads emerges in the spectral function. Overall bias dependence is quite similar to finite-temperature effect, which could be understood by help of the Ward identity and the limit of N >> 1 terminals. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26400382, MEXT, Japan).

  11. Analytical Modeling of Shale Hydraulic Fracturing and Gas Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2012-12-01

    Shale gas is abundant all over the world. Due to its extremely low permeability, extensive stimulation of a shale reservoir is always required for its economic production. Hydraulic fracturing has been the primary method of shale reservoir stimulation. Consequently the design and optimization of a hydraulic fracturing treatment plays a vital role insuring job success and economic production. Due to the many variables involved and the lack of a simple yet robust tool based on fundamental physics, horizontal well placement and fracturing job designs have to certain degree been a guessing game built on previous trial and error experience. This paper presents a method for hydraulic fracturing design and optimization in these environments. The growth of a complex hydraulic fracture network (HFN) during a fracturing job is equivalently represented by a wiremesh fracturing model (WFM) constructed on the basis of fracture mechanics and mass balance. The model also simulates proppant transport and placement during HFN growth. Results of WFM simulations can then be used as the input into a wiremesh production model (WPM) constructed based on WFM. WPM represents gas flow through the wiremesh HFN by an elliptic flow and the flow of gas in shale matrix by a novel analytical solution accounting for contributions from both free and adsorbed gases stored in the pore space. WPM simulation is validated by testing against numerical simulations using a commercially available reservoir production simulator. Due to the analytical nature of WFM and WPM, both hydraulic fracturing and gas production simulations run very fast on a regular personal computer and are suitable for hydraulic fracturing job design and optimization. A case study is presented to demonstrate how a non-optimized hydraulic fracturing job might have been optimized using WFM and WPM simulations.Fig. 1. Ellipsoidal representation of (a) stimulated reservoir and (b) hydraulic fracture network created by hydraulic

  12. Hydrogeologic role of geologic structures. Part 2: analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, Russell L.; Williams, Roy E.; Ralston, Dale R.

    1994-04-01

    This paper is the second of two papers that address the influence of geologic structures on ground water flow at various scales in fractured rocks. The ultimate purpose of this research is to investigate the feasibility of grouting preferentially permeable zones as a strategy to minimize the production of acid mine drainage in underground hard rock mines in which the major permeability is structure and fracture controlled. The aim of grouting is to reduce permeability around mined-out openings, to minimize the rate of inflow of ground water into such openings via the structurally controlled preferentially permeable pathways. A series of hydraulic stress tests were conducted to help characterize the role of geologic structures in controlling the ground water flow system in the vicinity of the Bunker Hill Mine in north Idaho. The results of these tests indicate that most of the ground water that flows from the underground drillholes used for hydraulic stress testing is derived from a few discrete, structurally produced fracture zones that are more or less connected through smaller-scale fractures. Four types of analytical models are considered as a means of analyzing the results of multiple drillhole hydraulic stress tests, as follows: cross-hole equivalent porous media; double-porosity equivalent porous media; a solution to flow in and around a single vertical fracture; leaky equivalent porous media, partial penetration. The estimation of hydraulic coefficients in complex fractured rock environments involves the combined application of a number of deterministic analytical models. The models to be used are selected dependent on the location of the drawdown observations relative to the water-producing zone and the length of the test. The result of the tests can be related to the permeability hierarchy discussed in our first paper.

  13. Analytic model and frequency characteristics of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Hao-hua; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Song, Hui-min; Zhang, Zhi-bo; Jia, Min

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a novel analytic model of a plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA), considering both the heat transfer effect and the inertia of the throat gas. Both the whole cycle characteristics and the repetitive working process of PSJA can be predicted with this model. The frequency characteristics of a PSJA with 87 mm3 volume and different orifice diameters are investigated based on the analytic model combined with experiments. In the repetitive working mode, the actuator works initially in the transitional stage with 20 cycles and then in the dynamic balanced stage. During the transitional stage, major performance parameters of PSJA experience stepped growth, while during the dynamic balanced stage, these parameters are characterized by periodic variation. With a constant discharge energy of 6.9 mJ, there exists a saturated frequency of 4 kHz/6 kHz for an orifice diameter of 1 mm/1.5 mm, at which the time-averaged total pressure of the pulsed jet reaches a maximum. Between 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm, a larger orifice diameter leads to a higher saturated frequency due to the reduced jet duration time. As the actuation frequency increases, both the time-averaged cavity temperature and the peak jet velocity initially increase and then remain almost unchanged at 1600 K and 280 m/s, respectively. Besides, with increasing frequency, the mechanical energy incorporated in single pulsed jet, the expelled mass per pulse, and the time-averaged density in the cavity, decline in a stair stepping way, which is caused by the intermittent decrease of refresh stage duration in one period.

  14. Analytic model for coaxial helicity injection in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R. H.

    2011-12-15

    Using a partial differential equation for the time evolution of the mean-field poloidal magnetic flux that incorporates resistivity {eta} and hyper-resistivity {Lambda} terms, an exact analytic solution is obtained for steady-state coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in force-free large aspect ratio tokamaks. The analytic mean-field Ohm's law model allows for calculation of the tokamak CHI current drive efficiency and the plasma inductances at arbitrary levels of magnetic fluctuations, or dynamo activity. The results of the mean-field model suggest that CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is only possible in tokamaks when the size of the effective current drive boundary layer, {delta}{identical_to}({Lambda}/{eta}){sup 1/2}, becomes greater than half the size of the plasma, {delta}>a/2, with a the plasma minor radius. The electron thermal diffusivity due to magnetic fluctuation induced transport is obtained from the expression {chi}{sub e}={Lambda}/{mu}{sub 0}d{sub e}{sup 2}, with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space and d{sub e} the electron skin depth, which for typical tokamak fusion plasma parameters is on the order of a millimeter. Thus, the ratio of the energy confinement time to the resistive diffusion time in a tokamak plasma driven by steady-state CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is shown to be constrained by the relation {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {eta}}<(d{sub e}/a){sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -6}. The mean-field model suggests that steady-state CHI can be viewed most simply as a boundary layer of stochastically wandering magnetic field lines.

  15. Turtle utricle dynamic behavior using a combined anatomically accurate model and experimentally measured hair bundle stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J.L.; Grant, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomically correct turtle utricle geometry was incorporated into two finite element models. The geometrically accurate model included appropriately shaped macular surface and otoconial layer, compact gel and column filament (or shear) layer thicknesses and thickness distributions. The first model included a shear layer where the effects of hair bundle stiffness was included as part of the shear layer modulus. This solid model’s undamped natural frequency was matched to an experimentally measured value. This frequency match established a realistic value of the effective shear layer Young’s modulus of 16 Pascals. We feel this is the most accurate prediction of this shear layer modulus and fits with other estimates (Kondrachuk, 2001b). The second model incorporated only beam elements in the shear layer to represent hair cell bundle stiffness. The beam element stiffness’s were further distributed to represent their location on the neuroepithelial surface. Experimentally measured striola hair cell bundles mean stiffness values were used in the striolar region and the mean extrastriola hair cell bundles stiffness values were used in this region. The results from this second model indicated that hair cell bundle stiffness contributes approximately 40% to the overall stiffness of the shear layer– hair cell bundle complex. This analysis shows that high mass saccules, in general, achieve high gain at the sacrifice of frequency bandwidth. We propose the mechanism by which this can be achieved is through increase the otoconial layer mass. The theoretical difference in gain (deflection per acceleration) is shown for saccules with large otoconial layer mass relative to saccules and utricles with small otoconial layer mass. Also discussed is the necessity of these high mass saccules to increase their overall system shear layer stiffness. Undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes for these sensors are shown. PMID:25445820

  16. Analytical Modeling of Squeeze Film Damping in Dual Axis Torsion Microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeenfard, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, problem of squeeze film damping in dual axis torsion microactuators is modeled and closed form expressions are provided for damping torques around tilting axes of the actuator. The Reynolds equation which governs the pressure distribution underneath the actuator is linearized. The resulting equation is then solved analytically. The obtained pressure distribution is used to calculate the normalized damping torques around tilting axes of the actuator. Dependence of the damping torques on the design parameters of the dual axis torsion actuator is studied. It is observed that with proper selection of the actuator's aspect ratio, damping torque along one of the tilting directions can be eliminated. It is shown that when the tilting angles of the actuator are small, squeeze film damping would act like a linear viscous damping. The results of this paper can be used for accurate dynamical modeling and control of torsion dual axis microactuators.

  17. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the ’phase to 3D coordinates transformation’ are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  18. Accurately modeling Gaussian beam propagation in the context of Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Winblad, Aidan; Bixler, Joel N.; Elpers, Gabriel; Zollars, Byron; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely considered to be the gold standard for studying the propagation of light in turbid media. However, traditional Monte Carlo methods fail to account for diffraction because they treat light as a particle. This results in converging beams focusing to a point instead of a diffraction limited spot, greatly effecting the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations near the focal plane. Here, we present a technique capable of simulating a focusing beam in accordance to the rules of Gaussian optics, resulting in a diffraction limited focal spot. This technique can be easily implemented into any traditional Monte Carlo simulation allowing existing models to be converted to include accurate focusing geometries with minimal effort. We will present results for a focusing beam in a layered tissue model, demonstrating that for different scenarios the region of highest intensity, thus the greatest heating, can change from the surface to the focus. The ability to simulate accurate focusing geometries will greatly enhance the usefulness of Monte Carlo for countless applications, including studying laser tissue interactions in medical applications and light propagation through turbid media.

  19. An accurate parameterization of the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds for climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1998-09-01

    An accurate parameterization is presented for the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds. For the single-scattering calculations, a composite scheme is developed for randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals by comparing results from Mie theory, anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), the geometric optics method (GOM), and the finite-difference time domain technique. This scheme employs a linear combination of single-scattering properties from the Mie theory, ADT, and GOM, which is accurate for a wide range of size parameters. Following the approach of Q. Fu, the extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the cloud ice water content and generalized effective size (D{sub ge}). The present parameterization of the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds is validated by examining the bulk radiative properties for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Compared with reference results, the typical relative error in emissivity due to the parameterization is {approximately}2.2%. The accuracy of this parameterization guarantees its reliability in applications to climate models. The present parameterization complements the scheme for the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds developed by Q. Fu for use in numerical models.

  20. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ajay; Matias, Ricardo; Veloso, António P.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1) elevation and 2) abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3) upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4) internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual’s anthropometry. We compared the model to “gold standard” bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models. PMID:26734761

  1. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements.

    PubMed

    Seth, Ajay; Matias, Ricardo; Veloso, António P; Delp, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1) elevation and 2) abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3) upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4) internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual's anthropometry. We compared the model to "gold standard" bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2 mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models. PMID:26734761

  2. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  3. Error-analysis and comparison to analytical models of numerical waveforms produced by the NRAR Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinder, Ian; Buonanno, Alessandra; Boyle, Michael; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Healy, James; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Nagar, Alessandro; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Pan, Yi; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Pürrer, Michael; Reisswig, Christian; Scheel, Mark A.; Schnetter, Erik; Sperhake, Ulrich; Szilágyi, Bela; Tichy, Wolfgang; Wardell, Barry; Zenginoğlu, Anıl; Alic, Daniela; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Bode, Tanja; Brügmann, Bernd; Buchman, Luisa T.; Campanelli, Manuela; Chu, Tony; Damour, Thibault; Grigsby, Jason D.; Hannam, Mark; Haas, Roland; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Husa, Sascha; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Laguna, Pablo; London, Lionel; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Lousto, Carlos O.; Marronetti, Pedro; Matzner, Richard A.; Mösta, Philipp; Mroué, Abdul; Müller, Doreen; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nerozzi, Andrea; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pollney, Denis; Reifenberger, George; Rezzolla, Luciano; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Taracchini, Andrea; Taylor, Nicholas W.; Teukolsky, Saul A.; Thierfelder, Marcus; Witek, Helvi; Zlochower, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    The Numerical-Relativity-Analytical-Relativity (NRAR) collaboration is a joint effort between members of the numerical relativity, analytical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The goal of the NRAR collaboration is to produce numerical-relativity simulations of compact binaries and use them to develop accurate analytical templates for the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration to use in detecting gravitational-wave signals and extracting astrophysical information from them. We describe the results of the first stage of the NRAR project, which focused on producing an initial set of numerical waveforms from binary black holes with moderate mass ratios and spins, as well as one non-spinning binary configuration which has a mass ratio of 10. All of the numerical waveforms are analysed in a uniform and consistent manner, with numerical errors evaluated using an analysis code created by members of the NRAR collaboration. We compare previously-calibrated, non-precessing analytical waveforms, notably the effective-one-body (EOB) and phenomenological template families, to the newly-produced numerical waveforms. We find that when the binary's total mass is ˜100-200M⊙, current EOB and phenomenological models of spinning, non-precessing binary waveforms have overlaps above 99% (for advanced LIGO) with all of the non-precessing-binary numerical waveforms with mass ratios ⩽4, when maximizing over binary parameters. This implies that the loss of event rate due to modelling error is below 3%. Moreover, the non-spinning EOB waveforms previously calibrated to five non-spinning waveforms with mass ratio smaller than 6 have overlaps above 99.7% with the numerical waveform with a mass ratio of 10, without even maximizing on the binary parameters.

  4. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    PubMed

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%. PMID:26292335

  5. Achieving accurate nuetron-multiplicity analysis of metals and oxides with weighted point model equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Geist, W. H.; Krick, M. S.; Mayo, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity counting is a technique for the rapid, nondestructive measurement of plutonium mass in pure and impure materials. This technique is very powerful because it uses the measured coincidence count rates to determine the sample mass without requiring a set of representative standards for calibration. Interpreting measured singles, doubles, and triples count rates using the three-parameter standard point model accurately determines plutonium mass, neutron multiplication, and the ratio of ({alpha},n) to spontaneous-fission neutrons (alpha) for oxides of moderate mass. However, underlying standard point model assumptions - including constant neutron energy and constant multiplication throughout the sample - cause significant biases for the mass, multiplication, and alpha in measurements of metal and large, dense oxides.

  6. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  7. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAxwell's equations by the Finite Integration Algorithm (MAFIA). Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveLing-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making It possible, for the first time, to design complete TWT via computer simulation.

  8. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  9. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Numerical Relativity Waveforms from Binary Black Hole Coalescences Using Surrogate Models.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott E; Galley, Chad R; Szilágyi, Béla; Scheel, Mark A; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A

    2015-09-18

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. Using reduced order modeling techniques, we construct an accurate surrogate model, which is evaluated in a millisecond to a second, for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios in [1, 10] and durations corresponding to about 15 orbits before merger. We assess the model's uncertainty and show that our modeling strategy predicts NR waveforms not used for the surrogate's training with errors nearly as small as the numerical error of the NR code. Our model includes all spherical-harmonic _{-2}Y_{ℓm} waveform modes resolved by the NR code up to ℓ=8. We compare our surrogate model to effective one body waveforms from 50M_{⊙} to 300M_{⊙} for advanced LIGO detectors and find that the surrogate is always more faithful (by at least an order of magnitude in most cases). PMID:26430979

  10. Construction of feasible and accurate kinetic models of metabolism: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models are essential to quantitatively understand and predict the behaviour of metabolic networks. Detailed and thermodynamically feasible kinetic models of metabolism are inherently difficult to formulate and fit. They have a large number of heterogeneous parameters, are non-linear and have complex interactions. Many powerful fitting strategies are ruled out by the intractability of the likelihood function. Here, we have developed a computational framework capable of fitting feasible and accurate kinetic models using Approximate Bayesian Computation. This framework readily supports advanced modelling features such as model selection and model-based experimental design. We illustrate this approach on the tightly-regulated mammalian methionine cycle. Sampling from the posterior distribution, the proposed framework generated thermodynamically feasible parameter samples that converged on the true values, and displayed remarkable prediction accuracy in several validation tests. Furthermore, a posteriori analysis of the parameter distributions enabled appraisal of the systems properties of the network (e.g., control structure) and key metabolic regulations. Finally, the framework was used to predict missing allosteric interactions. PMID:27417285

  11. An Accurate Model for Biomolecular Helices and Its Application to Helix Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lincong; Qiao, Hui; Cao, Chen; Xu, Shutan; Zou, Shuxue

    2015-01-01

    Helices are the most abundant secondary structural elements in proteins and the structural forms assumed by double stranded DNAs (dsDNA). Though the mathematical expression for a helical curve is simple, none of the previous models for the biomolecular helices in either proteins or DNAs use a genuine helical curve, likely because of the complexity of fitting backbone atoms to helical curves. In this paper we model a helix as a series of different but all bona fide helical curves; each one best fits the coordinates of four consecutive backbone Cα atoms for a protein or P atoms for a DNA molecule. An implementation of the model demonstrates that it is more accurate than the previous ones for the description of the deviation of a helix from a standard helical curve. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model makes it possible to correlate deviations with structural and functional significance. When applied to helix visualization, the ribbon diagrams generated by the model are less choppy or have smaller side chain detachment than those by the previous visualization programs that typically model a helix as a series of low-degree splines. PMID:26126117

  12. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Shia, R. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations are an essential component of energy budget calculations in climate models. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of 2-stream approximations in operational climate models. This simplification introduces errors of the order of 10% in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) fluxes [Randles et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT simulations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those (few) optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Here, we extend the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis model for Radiative Transfer (UPCART), 2-stream models (such as those used in climate applications) and line-by-line RT models are performed, in order for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the TOA for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and solar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiative forcing estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases as compared to an exact line-by-line RT model. The model is comparable in speeds to 2-stream models, potentially rendering UPCART useful for operational General Circulation Models (GCMs). The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further

  13. Analytical Modelling Of Milling For Tool Design And Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, M.; Devillez, A.; Dudzinski, D.

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents an efficient analytical model which allows to simulate a large panel of milling operations. A geometrical description of common end mills and of their engagement in the workpiece material is proposed. The internal radius of the rounded part of the tool envelope is used to define the considered type of mill. The cutting edge position is described for a constant lead helix and for a constant local helix angle. A thermomechanical approach of oblique cutting is applied to predict forces acting on the tool and these results are compared with experimental data obtained from milling tests on a 42CrMo4 steel for three classical types of mills. The influence of some tool's geometrical parameters on predicted cutting forces is presented in order to propose optimisation criteria for design and selection of cutting tools.

  14. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region, using the adiabatic auroral arc model. With certain simplifying assumptions, new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g., cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters are found. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. Various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) are given which can be studied with existing data sets.

  15. An analytical model of joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates Joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. Joule heating and thermal deflections are a major source of noise in such sensors. This work uses analytical and numerical techniques to characterise the Joule heating in 4-layer piezoresistive microcantilevers made of silicon and silicon dioxide substrates but with the same U-shaped silicon piezoresistor. A theoretical model for predicting the temperature generated due to Joule heating is developed. The commercial finite element software ANSYS Multiphysics was used to study the effect of electrical potential on temperature and deflection produced in the cantilevers. The effect of piezoresistor width on Joule heating is also studied. Results show that Joule heating strongly depends on the applied potential and width of piezoresistor and that a silicon substrate cantilever has better thermal characteristics than a silicon dioxide cantilever. PMID:22163433

  16. An Analytical Model of Joule Heating in Piezoresistive Microcantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates Joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. Joule heating and thermal deflections are a major source of noise in such sensors. This work uses analytical and numerical techniques to characterise the Joule heating in 4-layer piezoresistive microcantilevers made of silicon and silicon dioxide substrates but with the same U-shaped silicon piezoresistor. A theoretical model for predicting the temperature generated due to Joule heating is developed. The commercial finite element software ANSYS Multiphysics was used to study the effect of electrical potential on temperature and deflection produced in the cantilevers. The effect of piezoresistor width on Joule heating is also studied. Results show that Joule heating strongly depends on the applied potential and width of piezoresistor and that a silicon substrate cantilever has better thermal characteristics than a silicon dioxide cantilever. PMID:22163433

  17. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region, using the adiabatic auroral arc model. With certain simplifying assumptions, new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g., cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters are found. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. Various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) are given which can be studied with existing data sets.

  18. Analytical Deriving of the Field Capacity through Soil Bundle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, E.; Viola, F.; Antinoro, C.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of field capacity as soil hydraulic parameter is widely used in many hydrological applications. Althought its recurring usage, its definition is not univocal. Traditionally, field capacity has been related to the amount of water that remains in the soil after the excess water has drained away and the water downward movement experiences a significant decresase. Quantifying the drainage of excess of water may be vague and several definitions, often subjective, have been proposed. These definitions are based on fixed thresholds either of time, pressure, or flux to which the field capacity condition is associated. The flux-based definition identifies the field capacity as the soil moisture value corresponding to an arbitrary fixed threshold of free drainage flux. Recently, many works have investigated the flux-based definition by varying either the drainage threshold, the geometry setting and mainly the description of the drainage flux. Most of these methods are based on the simulation of the flux through a porous medium by using the Darcy's law or Richard's equation. Using the above-mentioned flux-based definition, in this work we propose an alternative analytical approach for deriving the field capacity based on a bundle-of-tubes model. The pore space of a porous medium is conceptualized as a bundle of capillary tubes of given length of different radii, derived from a known distribution. The drainage from a single capillary tube is given by the analytical solution of the differential equation describing the water height evolution within the capillary tube. This equation is based on the Poiseuille's law and describes the drainage flux with time as a function of tube radius. The drainage process is then integrated for any portion of soil taking into account the tube radius distribution which in turns depends on the soil type. This methodology allows to analytically derive the dynamics of drainage water flux for any soil type and consequently to define the

  19. An analytical phase-space model for tidal caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Robyn E.; Helmi, Amina

    2013-10-01

    The class of tidal features around galaxies known as `shells' or `umbrellas' comprises debris that has arisen from high-mass-ratio mergers with low-impact parameter; the nearly radial orbits of the debris give rise to a unique morphology, a universal density profile and a tight correlation between positions and velocities of the material. As such they are accessible to analytical treatment, and can provide a relatively clean system for probing the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. In this work, we present a simple analytical model that describes the density profile, phase-space distribution, and geometry of a shell and whose parameters are directly related to physical characteristics of the interacting galaxies. The model makes three assumptions: the orbit of the interacting galaxies is radial, the potential of the host galaxy at the shell radius is spherical and the satellite galaxy's initial velocity distribution is Maxwellian. We quantify the error introduced by the first two assumptions and show that selecting shells by their appearance on the sky is a sufficient basis to assume that these simplifications are valid. We further demonstrate that (1) given only an image of a shell, the radial gravitational force at the shell edge and the phase-space density of the satellite are jointly constrained, (2) combining the image with measurements of either point line-of-sight velocities or integrated-light spectra will yield an independent estimate of the gravitational force at a shell and (3) an independent measurement of this force is obtained for each shell observed around a given galaxy, potentially enabling a determination of the galactic mass distribution.

  20. Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Andrew H.; Ha, Don-Hyung; Robinson, Richard D.; Ding, Xiaoyue

    2014-10-28

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.81}S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ∼8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field.

  1. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  2. Are Quasi-Steady-State Approximated Models Suitable for Quantifying Intrinsic Noise Accurately?

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Dola; Kar, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Large gene regulatory networks (GRN) are often modeled with quasi-steady-state approximation (QSSA) to reduce the huge computational time required for intrinsic noise quantification using Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). However, the question still remains whether the stochastic QSSA model measures the intrinsic noise as accurately as the SSA performed for a detailed mechanistic model or not? To address this issue, we have constructed mechanistic and QSSA models for few frequently observed GRNs exhibiting switching behavior and performed stochastic simulations with them. Our results strongly suggest that the performance of a stochastic QSSA model in comparison to SSA performed for a mechanistic model critically relies on the absolute values of the mRNA and protein half-lives involved in the corresponding GRN. The extent of accuracy level achieved by the stochastic QSSA model calculations will depend on the level of bursting frequency generated due to the absolute value of the half-life of either mRNA or protein or for both the species. For the GRNs considered, the stochastic QSSA quantifies the intrinsic noise at the protein level with greater accuracy and for larger combinations of half-life values of mRNA and protein, whereas in case of mRNA the satisfactory accuracy level can only be reached for limited combinations of absolute values of half-lives. Further, we have clearly demonstrated that the abundance levels of mRNA and protein hardly matter for such comparison between QSSA and mechanistic models. Based on our findings, we conclude that QSSA model can be a good choice for evaluating intrinsic noise for other GRNs as well, provided we make a rational choice based on experimental half-life values available in literature. PMID:26327626

  3. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  4. Distributed-Channel Bipolar Device: Experimentation, Analytical Modeling and Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fenglai

    Experimental results and theoretical modeling for four terminal distributed channel bipolar devices (DCBD) are presented. The DCBD device is comprised of an interwoven BJT and MOSFET. The device may be characterized as a MOSFET with a bipolar transistor source distributed under the MOSFET channel. Alternatively, the device may be represented as a BJT where a MOSFET channel provides the current collection function. The physical layout of the device is that of a n-channel MOSFET placed above a p-Si epitaxial base region which was grown on an n^+-Si substrate emitter. Distributed electronic behavior exhibits itself through self-biasing influences of the channel-collected current on the channel-base junction bias. For appropriate biasing, the MOSFET channel divides itself into two regions exhibiting forward active and saturation BJT behavior. Both experimental results and theoretical modeling are provided. Experimental results for "large area" rectangular gate, circular gate and trapezoidal gate DCBD are reported. The experimental results exhibit the transconductance threshold voltage, beta fall off and transconductance fall-off features reported previously by others. A "large area" trapezoidal gate structure is incorporated to illustrate the gate area influences on the electrical characteristics and to provide a model sensitive structure for evaluating the validity of the theory developed in the dissertation. An analytical model based on conventional MOSFET and bipolar theories is developed. The analytical model is applied to the large gate area devices (example: 0.127 mm rectangular gate length) and smaller dimensional gate devices down to 0.9 micron rectangular gate length. The theoretical results show good agreement with the large gate area experimental results. Application examples are provided. The use of the base current invariant transconductance threshold voltage as a reference voltage is discussed. Comparison of the transconductance threshold voltage

  5. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  6. Analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator with permanent magnet fluxbiasing is presented. An AMCD consists of a spinning annular rim which is suspended by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic spin motor. The actuator is treated as a lumped-parameter electromechanical system in the development of the model.

  7. Continuum descriptions of membranes and their interaction with proteins: Towards chemically accurate models.

    PubMed

    Argudo, David; Bethel, Neville P; Marcoline, Frank V; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Biological membranes deform in response to resident proteins leading to a coupling between membrane shape and protein localization. Additionally, the membrane influences the function of membrane proteins. Here we review contributions to this field from continuum elastic membrane models focusing on the class of models that couple the protein to the membrane. While it has been argued that continuum models cannot reproduce the distortions observed in fully-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest that this failure can be overcome by using chemically accurate representations of the protein. We outline our recent advances along these lines with our hybrid continuum-atomistic model, and we show the model is in excellent agreement with fully-atomistic simulations of the nhTMEM16 lipid scramblase. We believe that the speed and accuracy of continuum-atomistic methodologies will make it possible to simulate large scale, slow biological processes, such as membrane morphological changes, that are currently beyond the scope of other computational approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26853937

  8. A Simple and Accurate Model to Predict Responses to Multi-electrode Stimulation in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Maturana, Matias I.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Hadjinicolaou, Alex E.; Garrett, David J.; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Kameneva, Tatiana; Grayden, David B.; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Meffin, Hamish

    2016-01-01

    Implantable electrode arrays are widely used in therapeutic stimulation of the nervous system (e.g. cochlear, retinal, and cortical implants). Currently, most neural prostheses use serial stimulation (i.e. one electrode at a time) despite this severely limiting the repertoire of stimuli that can be applied. Methods to reliably predict the outcome of multi-electrode stimulation have not been available. Here, we demonstrate that a linear-nonlinear model accurately predicts neural responses to arbitrary patterns of stimulation using in vitro recordings from single retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) stimulated with a subretinal multi-electrode array. In the model, the stimulus is projected onto a low-dimensional subspace and then undergoes a nonlinear transformation to produce an estimate of spiking probability. The low-dimensional subspace is estimated using principal components analysis, which gives the neuron’s electrical receptive field (ERF), i.e. the electrodes to which the neuron is most sensitive. Our model suggests that stimulation proportional to the ERF yields a higher efficacy given a fixed amount of power when compared to equal amplitude stimulation on up to three electrodes. We find that the model captures the responses of all the cells recorded in the study, suggesting that it will generalize to most cell types in the retina. The model is computationally efficient to evaluate and, therefore, appropriate for future real-time applications including stimulation strategies that make use of recorded neural activity to improve the stimulation strategy. PMID:27035143

  9. Hybridization modeling of oligonucleotide SNP arrays for accurate DNA copy number estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Kelian; Ding, Qi; Cui, Yuehua; Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Elston, Robert C.; Qian, Minping; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2009-01-01

    Affymetrix SNP arrays have been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype calling and DNA copy number variation inference. Although numerous methods have achieved high accuracy in these fields, most studies have paid little attention to the modeling of hybridization of probes to off-target allele sequences, which can affect the accuracy greatly. In this study, we address this issue and demonstrate that hybridization with mismatch nucleotides (HWMMN) occurs in all SNP probe-sets and has a critical effect on the estimation of allelic concentrations (ACs). We study sequence binding through binding free energy and then binding affinity, and develop a probe intensity composite representation (PICR) model. The PICR model allows the estimation of ACs at a given SNP through statistical regression. Furthermore, we demonstrate with cell-line data of known true copy numbers that the PICR model can achieve reasonable accuracy in copy number estimation at a single SNP locus, by using the ratio of the estimated AC of each sample to that of the reference sample, and can reveal subtle genotype structure of SNPs at abnormal loci. We also demonstrate with HapMap data that the PICR model yields accurate SNP genotype calls consistently across samples, laboratories and even across array platforms. PMID:19586935

  10. A Simple and Accurate Model to Predict Responses to Multi-electrode Stimulation in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Matias I; Apollo, Nicholas V; Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Garrett, David J; Cloherty, Shaun L; Kameneva, Tatiana; Grayden, David B; Ibbotson, Michael R; Meffin, Hamish

    2016-04-01

    Implantable electrode arrays are widely used in therapeutic stimulation of the nervous system (e.g. cochlear, retinal, and cortical implants). Currently, most neural prostheses use serial stimulation (i.e. one electrode at a time) despite this severely limiting the repertoire of stimuli that can be applied. Methods to reliably predict the outcome of multi-electrode stimulation have not been available. Here, we demonstrate that a linear-nonlinear model accurately predicts neural responses to arbitrary patterns of stimulation using in vitro recordings from single retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) stimulated with a subretinal multi-electrode array. In the model, the stimulus is projected onto a low-dimensional subspace and then undergoes a nonlinear transformation to produce an estimate of spiking probability. The low-dimensional subspace is estimated using principal components analysis, which gives the neuron's electrical receptive field (ERF), i.e. the electrodes to which the neuron is most sensitive. Our model suggests that stimulation proportional to the ERF yields a higher efficacy given a fixed amount of power when compared to equal amplitude stimulation on up to three electrodes. We find that the model captures the responses of all the cells recorded in the study, suggesting that it will generalize to most cell types in the retina. The model is computationally efficient to evaluate and, therefore, appropriate for future real-time applications including stimulation strategies that make use of recorded neural activity to improve the stimulation strategy. PMID:27035143

  11. Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.I.

    1997-12-31

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

  12. Machine learning and cosmological simulations - I. Semi-analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil M.; Turk, Matthew J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new exploratory framework to model galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical Universe by using machine learning (ML). Our motivations are two-fold: (1) presenting a new, promising technique to study galaxy formation, and (2) quantitatively analysing the extent of the influence of dark matter halo properties on galaxies in the backdrop of semi-analytical models (SAMs). We use the influential Millennium Simulation and the corresponding Munich SAM to train and test various sophisticated ML algorithms (k-Nearest Neighbors, decision trees, random forests, and extremely randomized trees). By using only essential dark matter halo physical properties for haloes of M > 1012 M⊙ and a partial merger tree, our model predicts the hot gas mass, cold gas mass, bulge mass, total stellar mass, black hole mass and cooling radius at z = 0 for each central galaxy in a dark matter halo for the Millennium run. Our results provide a unique and powerful phenomenological framework to explore the galaxy-halo connection that is built upon SAMs and demonstrably place ML as a promising and a computationally efficient tool to study small-scale structure formation.

  13. More on analytic bootstrap for O( N) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Parijat; Kaviraj, Apratim; Sen, Kallol

    2016-06-01

    This note is an extension of a recent work on the analytical bootstrapping of O( N) models. An additonal feature of the O( N) model is that the OPE contains trace and antisymmetric operators apart from the symmetric-traceless objects appearing in the OPE of the singlet sector. This in addition to the stress tensor ( T μν ) and the ϕ i ϕ i scalar, we also have other minimal twist operators as the spin-1 current J μ and the symmetric-traceless scalar in the case of O( N). We determine the effect of these additional objects on the anomalous dimensions of the corresponding trace, symmetric-traceless and antisymmetric operators in the large spin sector of the O( N) model, in the limit when the spin is much larger than the twist. As an observation, we also verified that the leading order results for the large spin sector from the ɛ-expansion are an exact match with our n = 0 case. A plausible holographic setup for the special case when N = 2 is also mentioned which mimics the calculation in the CFT.

  14. Simple analytical model of evapotranspiration in the presence of roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Hough, L. A.; Castaing, Jean-Christophe; Frétigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation of water out of a soil involves complicated and well-debated mechanisms. When plant roots are added into the soil, water transfer between the soil and the outside environment is even more complicated. Indeed, plants provide an additional process of water transfer. Water is pumped by the roots, channeled to the leaf surface, and released into the surrounding air by a process called transpiration. Prediction of the evapotranspiration of water over time in the presence of roots helps keep track of the amount of water that remains in the soil. Using a controlled visual setup of a two-dimensional model soil consisting of monodisperse glass beads, we perform experiments on actual roots grown under different relative humidity conditions. We record the total water mass loss in the medium and the position of the evaporating front that forms within the medium. We then develop a simple analytical model that predicts the position of the evaporating front as a function of time as well as the total amount of water that is lost from the medium due to the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. The model is based on fundamental principles of evaporation fluxes and includes empirical assumptions on the quantity of open stomata in the leaves, where water transpiration occurs. Comparison between the model and experimental results shows excellent prediction of the position of the evaporating front as well as the total mass loss from evapotranspiration in the presence of roots. The model also provides a way to predict the lifetime of a plant.

  15. Do Ecological Niche Models Accurately Identify Climatic Determinants of Species Ranges?

    PubMed

    Searcy, Christopher A; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Defining species' niches is central to understanding their distributions and is thus fundamental to basic ecology and climate change projections. Ecological niche models (ENMs) are a key component of making accurate projections and include descriptions of the niche in terms of both response curves and rankings of variable importance. In this study, we evaluate Maxent's ranking of environmental variables based on their importance in delimiting species' range boundaries by asking whether these same variables also govern annual recruitment based on long-term demographic studies. We found that Maxent-based assessments of variable importance in setting range boundaries in the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense; CTS) correlate very well with how important those variables are in governing ongoing recruitment of CTS at the population level. This strong correlation suggests that Maxent's ranking of variable importance captures biologically realistic assessments of factors governing population persistence. However, this result holds only when Maxent models are built using best-practice procedures and variables are ranked based on permutation importance. Our study highlights the need for building high-quality niche models and provides encouraging evidence that when such models are built, they can reflect important aspects of a species' ecology. PMID:27028071

  16. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  17. Efficient and Accurate Explicit Integration Algorithms with Application to Viscoplastic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.

    1994-01-01

    Several explicit integration algorithms with self-adative time integration strategies are developed and investigated for efficiency and accuracy. These algorithms involve the Runge-Kutta second order, the lower Runge-Kutta method of orders one and two, and the exponential integration method. The algorithms are applied to viscoplastic models put forth by Freed and Verrilli and Bodner and Partom for thermal/mechanical loadings (including tensile, relaxation, and cyclic loadings). The large amount of computations performed showed that, for comparable accuracy, the efficiency of an integration algorithm depends significantly on the type of application (loading). However, in general, for the aforementioned loadings and viscoplastic models, the exponential integration algorithm with the proposed self-adaptive time integration strategy worked more (or comparably) efficiently and accurately than the other integration algorithms. Using this strategy for integrating viscoplastic models may lead to considerable savings in computer time (better efficiency) without adversely affecting the accuracy of the results. This conclusion should encourage the utilization of viscoplastic models in the stress analysis and design of structural components.

  18. An accurate and efficient Lagrangian sub-grid model for multi-particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Mazzitelli, Irene; Lanotte, Alessandra S.

    2014-11-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve the dispersion of particle in turbulent flows. Despite recent theoretical progresses in the understanding of particle dynamics in simple turbulent flows, complex geometries often call for numerical approaches based on eulerian Large Eddy Simulation (LES). One important issue related to the Lagrangian integration of tracers in under-resolved velocity fields is connected to the lack of spatial correlations at unresolved scales. Here we propose a computationally efficient Lagrangian model for the sub-grid velocity of tracers dispersed in statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows. The model incorporates the multi-scale nature of turbulent temporal and spatial correlations that are essential to correctly reproduce the dynamics of multi-particle dispersion. The new model is able to describe the Lagrangian temporal and spatial correlations in clouds of particles. In particular we show that pairs and tetrads dispersion compare well with results from Direct Numerical Simulations of statistically isotropic and homogeneous 3d turbulence. This model may offer an accurate and efficient way to describe multi-particle dispersion in under resolved turbulent velocity fields such as the one employed in eulerian LES. This work is part of the research programmes FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). We acknowledge support from the EU COST Action MP0806.

  19. Modeling methodology for the accurate and prompt prediction of symptomatic events in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; Risco-Martín, José L; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of symptomatic crises in chronic diseases allows to take decisions before the symptoms occur, such as the intake of drugs to avoid the symptoms or the activation of medical alarms. The prediction horizon is in this case an important parameter in order to fulfill the pharmacokinetics of medications, or the time response of medical services. This paper presents a study about the prediction limits of a chronic disease with symptomatic crises: the migraine. For that purpose, this work develops a methodology to build predictive migraine models and to improve these predictions beyond the limits of the initial models. The maximum prediction horizon is analyzed, and its dependency on the selected features is studied. A strategy for model selection is proposed to tackle the trade off between conservative but robust predictive models, with respect to less accurate predictions with higher horizons. The obtained results show a prediction horizon close to 40min, which is in the time range of the drug pharmacokinetics. Experiments have been performed in a realistic scenario where input data have been acquired in an ambulatory clinical study by the deployment of a non-intrusive Wireless Body Sensor Network. Our results provide an effective methodology for the selection of the future horizon in the development of prediction algorithms for diseases experiencing symptomatic crises. PMID:27260782

  20. Enabling analytical and Modeling Tools for Enhanced Disease Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn K. Manley

    2003-04-01

    Early detection, identification, and warning are essential to minimize casualties from a biological attack. For covert attacks, sick people are likely to provide the first indication of an attack. An enhanced medical surveillance system that synthesizes distributed health indicator information and rapidly analyzes the information can dramatically increase the number of lives saved. Current surveillance methods to detect both biological attacks and natural outbreaks are hindered by factors such as distributed ownership of information, incompatible data storage and analysis programs, and patient privacy concerns. Moreover, because data are not widely shared, few data mining algorithms have been tested on and applied to diverse health indicator data. This project addressed both integration of multiple data sources and development and integration of analytical tools for rapid detection of disease outbreaks. As a first prototype, we developed an application to query and display distributed patient records. This application incorporated need-to-know access control and incorporated data from standard commercial databases. We developed and tested two different algorithms for outbreak recognition. The first is a pattern recognition technique that searches for space-time data clusters that may signal a disease outbreak. The second is a genetic algorithm to design and train neural networks (GANN) that we applied toward disease forecasting. We tested these algorithms against influenza, respiratory illness, and Dengue Fever data. Through this LDRD in combination with other internal funding, we delivered a distributed simulation capability to synthesize disparate information and models for earlier recognition and improved decision-making in the event of a biological attack. The architecture incorporates user feedback and control so that a user's decision inputs can impact the scenario outcome as well as integrated security and role-based access-control for communicating between

  1. A General Pairwise Interaction Model Provides an Accurate Description of In Vivo Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Santolini, Marc; Mora, Thierry; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF) binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM), a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting TFBSs beyond

  2. Application of thin plate splines for accurate regional ionosphere modeling with multi-GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krypiak-Gregorczyk, Anna; Wielgosz, Pawel; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-derived regional ionosphere models are widely used in both precise positioning, ionosphere and space weather studies. However, their accuracy is often not sufficient to support precise positioning, RTK in particular. In this paper, we presented new approach that uses solely carrier phase multi-GNSS observables and thin plate splines (TPS) for accurate ionospheric TEC modeling. TPS is a closed solution of a variational problem minimizing both the sum of squared second derivatives of a smoothing function and the deviation between data points and this function. This approach is used in UWM-rt1 regional ionosphere model developed at UWM in Olsztyn. The model allows for providing ionospheric TEC maps with high spatial and temporal resolutions - 0.2x0.2 degrees and 2.5 minutes, respectively. For TEC estimation, EPN and EUPOS reference station data is used. The maps are available with delay of 15-60 minutes. In this paper we compare the performance of UWM-rt1 model with IGS global and CODE regional ionosphere maps during ionospheric storm that took place on March 17th, 2015. During this storm, the TEC level over Europe doubled comparing to earlier quiet days. The performance of the UWM-rt1 model was validated by (a) comparison to reference double-differenced ionospheric corrections over selected baselines, and (b) analysis of post-fit residuals to calibrated carrier phase geometry-free observational arcs at selected test stations. The results show a very good performance of UWM-rt1 model. The obtained post-fit residuals in case of UWM maps are lower by one order of magnitude comparing to IGS maps. The accuracy of UWM-rt1 -derived TEC maps is estimated at 0.5 TECU. This may be directly translated to the user positioning domain.

  3. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: New Thermodynamic Measurements and Model Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin; Qafoku, Odeta; Xia, Yuanxian; Wang, Zheming; MacLean, Graham

    2003-03-27

    Developing accurate thermodynamic models for predicting the chemistry of the high-level waste tanks at Hanford is an extremely daunting challenge in electrolyte and radionuclide chemistry. These challenges stem from the extremely high ionic strength of the tank waste supernatants, presence of chelating agents in selected tanks, wide temperature range in processing conditions and the presence of important actinide species in multiple oxidation states. This presentation summarizes progress made to date in developing accurate models for these tank waste solutions, how these data are being used at Hanford and the important challenges that remain. New thermodynamic measurements on Sr and actinide complexation with specific chelating agents (EDTA, HEDTA and gluconate) will also be presented.

  4. SMARTIES: Spheroids Modelled Accurately with a Robust T-matrix Implementation for Electromagnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    SMARTIES calculates the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. This suite of MATLAB codes provides a fully documented implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. Included are scripts that cover a range of scattering problems relevant to nanophotonics and plasmonics, including calculation of far-field scattering and absorption cross-sections for fixed incidence orientation, orientation-averaged cross-sections and scattering matrix, surface-field calculations as well as near-fields, wavelength-dependent near-field and far-field properties, and access to lower-level functions implementing the T-matrix calculations, including the T-matrix elements which may be calculated more accurately than with competing codes.

  5. Accurate calculation of conductive conductances in complex geometries for spacecrafts thermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmendia, Iñaki; Anglada, Eva; Vallejo, Haritz; Seco, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    The thermal subsystem of spacecrafts and payloads is always designed with the help of Thermal Mathematical Models. In the case of the Thermal Lumped Parameter (TLP) method, the non-linear system of equations that is created is solved to calculate the temperature distribution and the heat power that goes between nodes. The accuracy of the results depends largely on the appropriate calculation of the conductive and radiative conductances. Several established methods for the determination of conductive conductances exist but they present some limitations for complex geometries. Two new methods are proposed in this paper to calculate accurately these conductive conductances: The Extended Far Field method and the Mid-Section method. Both are based on a finite element calculation but while the Extended Far Field method uses the calculation of node mean temperatures, the Mid-Section method is based on assuming specific temperature values. They are compared with traditionally used methods showing the advantages of these two new methods.

  6. A fast and accurate PCA based radiative transfer model: Extension to the broadband shortwave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Natraj, Vijay; Spurr, Robert; Shia, Run-Lie; Crisp, David; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate radiative transfer (RT) calculations are necessary for many earth-atmosphere applications, from remote sensing retrieval to climate modeling. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based spectral binning method has been shown to provide an order of magnitude increase in computational speed while maintaining an overall accuracy of 0.01% (compared to line-by-line calculations) over narrow spectral bands. In this paper, we have extended the PCA method for RT calculations over the entire shortwave region of the spectrum from 0.3 to 3 microns. The region is divided into 33 spectral fields covering all major gas absorption regimes. We find that the RT performance runtimes are shorter by factors between 10 and 100, while root mean square errors are of order 0.01%.

  7. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy. PMID:27230942

  8. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  9. Parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulation framework incorporating accurate models of adsorbate lateral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jens; D’Avezac, Mayeul; Hetherington, James; Stamatakis, Michail

    2013-12-14

    Ab initio kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been successfully applied for over two decades to elucidate the underlying physico-chemical phenomena on the surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts. These simulations necessitate detailed knowledge of the kinetics of elementary reactions constituting the reaction mechanism, and the energetics of the species participating in the chemistry. The information about the energetics is encoded in the formation energies of gas and surface-bound species, and the lateral interactions between adsorbates on the catalytic surface, which can be modeled at different levels of detail. The majority of previous works accounted for only pairwise-additive first nearest-neighbor interactions. More recently, cluster-expansion Hamiltonians incorporating long-range interactions and many-body terms have been used for detailed estimations of catalytic rate [C. Wu, D. J. Schmidt, C. Wolverton, and W. F. Schneider, J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. In view of the increasing interest in accurate predictions of catalytic performance, there is a need for general-purpose KMC approaches incorporating detailed cluster expansion models for the adlayer energetics. We have addressed this need by building on the previously introduced graph-theoretical KMC framework, and we have developed Zacros, a FORTRAN2003 KMC package for simulating catalytic chemistries. To tackle the high computational cost in the presence of long-range interactions we introduce parallelization with OpenMP. We further benchmark our framework by simulating a KMC analogue of the NO oxidation system established by Schneider and co-workers [J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. We show that taking into account only first nearest-neighbor interactions may lead to large errors in the prediction of the catalytic rate, whereas for accurate estimates thereof, one needs to include long-range terms in the cluster expansion.

  10. A semi-analytical model for the approximation of plasmonic bands in arrays of metal wires in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Spittel, Ron; Bartelt, Harmut; Schmidt, Markus A

    2014-05-19

    We present a highly efficient semi-analytical and straightforward-to-implement model for the determination of plasmonic band edges of metallic nanowire arrays inside photonic crystal fibers. The model relies on the approximation of the hexagonal unit cell by a circle and using particular boundary conditions, showing an accurate agreement with finite element simulations. The model reduces simulation time by a factor of 100, thus representing an efficient tool for structure design. It further allows the calculation of all relevant modes in the system by slight changes of the entries in a 4 × 4 matrix. PMID:24921296

  11. The S-model: A highly accurate MOST model for CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satter, J. H.

    1986-09-01

    A new MOST model which combines simplicity and a logical structure with a high accuracy of only 0.5-4.5% is presented. The model is suited for enhancement and depletion devices with either large or small dimensions. It includes the effects of scattering and carrier-velocity saturation as well as the influence of the intrinsic source and drain series resistance. The decrease of the drain current due to substrate bias is incorporated too. The model is in the first place intended for digital purposes. All necessary quantities are calculated in a straightforward manner without iteration. An almost entirely new way of determining the parameters is described and a new cluster parameter is introduced, which is responsible for the high accuracy of the model. The total number of parameters is 7. A still simpler β expression is derived, which is suitable for only one value of the substrate bias and contains only three parameters, while maintaining the accuracy. The way in which the parameters are determined is readily suited for automatic measurement. A simple linear regression procedure programmed in the computer, which controls the measurements, produces the parameter values.

  12. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-07-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricité de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. New analytic solutions for modeling vertical gravity gradient anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern processing of satellite altimetry for use in marine gravimetry involves computing the along-track slopes of observed sea-surface heights, projecting them into east-west and north-south deflection of the vertical grids, and using Laplace's equation to algebraically obtain a grid of the vertical gravity gradient (VGG). The VGG grid is then integrated via overlapping, flat Earth Fourier transforms to yield a free-air anomaly grid. Because of this integration and associated edge effects, the VGG grid retains more short-wavelength information (e.g., fracture zone and seamount signatures) that is of particular importance for plate tectonic investigations. While modeling of gravity anomalies over arbitrary bodies has long been a standard undertaking, similar modeling of VGG anomalies over oceanic features is not commonplace yet. Here we derive analytic solutions for VGG anomalies over simple bodies and arbitrary 2-D and 3-D sources. We demonstrate their usability in determining mass excess and deficiency across the Mendocino fracture zone (a 2-D feature) and find the best bulk density estimate for Jasper seamount (a 3-D feature). The methodologies used herein are implemented in the Generic Mapping Tools, available from gmt.soest.hawaii.edu.

  14. Analytic model of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron anisotropy instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Seough, J. J.; Khim, K. K.; Kim, Hyunnam; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Park, Jongsun; Parkh, Sarah; Park, Kyung Sun

    2010-08-15

    In the present paper, the real frequency and growth rate associated with the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability driven by temperature anisotropy are analytically modeled on the basis of conjecture and upon comparison with numerical roots of the dispersion relation. The ions are assumed to have an anisotropic distribution function with Maxwellian parallel distribution. Under such an assumption complex roots of the dispersion relation depend only on two dimensionless parameters, namely, the temperature anisotropy factor A=T{sub perpendiculari}/T{sub ||}i-1, where T{sub perpendiculari} and T{sub ||i} are the perpendicular and parallel ion temperatures, respectively, and the parallel ion beta, {beta}=(8{pi}nT{sub i}/B{sup 2}){sup 1/2}, where n and B are the plasma density and magnetic field intensity, respectively. The ion-cyclotron instability is thus heuristically modeled by complex frequency which is parametrically dependent on A and {beta}. The present result constitutes a useful shortcut research tool that may be employed in a wide variety of applications.

  15. Analytic Modeling of Neural Tissue: I. A Spherical Bidomain.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin L; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-12-01

    Presented here is a model of neural tissue in a conductive medium stimulated by externally injected currents. The tissue is described as a conductively isotropic bidomain, i.e. comprised of intra and extracellular regions that occupy the same space, as well as the membrane that divides them, and the injection currents are described as a pair of source and sink points. The problem is solved in three spatial dimensions and defined in spherical coordinates [Formula: see text]. The system of coupled partial differential equations is solved by recasting the problem to be in terms of the membrane and a monodomain, interpreted as a weighted average of the intra and extracellular domains. The membrane and monodomain are defined by the scalar Helmholtz and Laplace equations, respectively, which are both separable in spherical coordinates. Product solutions are thus assumed and given through certain transcendental functions. From these electrical potentials, analytic expressions for current density are derived and from those fields the magnetic flux density is calculated. Numerical examples are considered wherein the interstitial conductivity is varied, as well as the limiting case of the problem simplifying to two dimensions due to azimuthal independence. Finally, future modeling work is discussed. PMID:27613652

  16. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region using the adiabatic auroral arc model. This model has crucial nonlinearities (connected, for example. with aurorally produced ionization) which have hampered analysis; earlier work has either been linear, which I will show is a poor approximation or, if nonlinear, either numerical or too specialized to study parametric dependencies. With certain simplifying assumptions I find new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g.. cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. This paper gives various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) which can be studied with existing data sets.

  17. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

  18. Random generalized linear model: a highly accurate and interpretable ensemble predictor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ensemble predictors such as the random forest are known to have superior accuracy but their black-box predictions are difficult to interpret. In contrast, a generalized linear model (GLM) is very interpretable especially when forward feature selection is used to construct the model. However, forward feature selection tends to overfit the data and leads to low predictive accuracy. Therefore, it remains an important research goal to combine the advantages of ensemble predictors (high accuracy) with the advantages of forward regression modeling (interpretability). To address this goal several articles have explored GLM based ensemble predictors. Since limited evaluations suggested that these ensemble predictors were less accurate than alternative predictors, they have found little attention in the literature. Results Comprehensive evaluations involving hundreds of genomic data sets, the UCI machine learning benchmark data, and simulations are used to give GLM based ensemble predictors a new and careful look. A novel bootstrap aggregated (bagged) GLM predictor that incorporates several elements of randomness and instability (random subspace method, optional interaction terms, forward variable selection) often outperforms a host of alternative prediction methods including random forests and penalized regression models (ridge regression, elastic net, lasso). This random generalized linear model (RGLM) predictor provides variable importance measures that can be used to define a “thinned” ensemble predictor (involving few features) that retains excellent predictive accuracy. Conclusion RGLM is a state of the art predictor that shares the advantages of a random forest (excellent predictive accuracy, feature importance measures, out-of-bag estimates of accuracy) with those of a forward selected generalized linear model (interpretability). These methods are implemented in the freely available R software package randomGLM. PMID:23323760

  19. Discrete state model and accurate estimation of loop entropy of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jie

    2008-03-28

    Conformational entropy makes important contribution to the stability and folding of RNA molecule, but it is challenging to either measure or compute conformational entropy associated with long loops. We develop optimized discrete k-state models of RNA backbone based on known RNA structures for computing entropy of loops, which are modeled as self-avoiding walks. To estimate entropy of hairpin, bulge, internal loop, and multibranch loop of long length (up to 50), we develop an efficient sampling method based on the sequential Monte Carlo principle. Our method considers excluded volume effect. It is general and can be applied to calculating entropy of loops with longer length and arbitrary complexity. For loops of short length, our results are in good agreement with a recent theoretical model and experimental measurement. For long loops, our estimated entropy of hairpin loops is in excellent agreement with the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model. However, for bulge loops and more complex secondary structures such as internal and multibranch loops, we find that the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model has large errors. Based on estimated entropy, we have developed empirical formulae for accurate calculation of entropy of long loops in different secondary structures. Our study on the effect of asymmetric size of loops suggest that loop entropy of internal loops is largely determined by the total loop length, and is only marginally affected by the asymmetric size of the two loops. Our finding suggests that the significant asymmetric effects of loop length in internal loops measured by experiments are likely to be partially enthalpic. Our method can be applied to develop improved energy parameters important for studying RNA stability and folding, and for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. The discrete model and the program used to calculate loop entropy can be downloaded at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/resources/RNA.html. PMID:18376982

  20. A Bayesian approach to the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation: methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu; Mo, H. J.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2011-09-01

    We believe that a wide range of physical processes conspire to shape the observed galaxy population, but we remain unsure of their detailed interactions. The semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation uses multidimensional parametrizations of the physical processes of galaxy formation and provides a tool to constrain these underlying physical interactions. Because of the high dimensionality, the parametric problem of galaxy formation may be profitably tackled with a Bayesian-inference-based approach, which allows one to constrain theory with data in a statistically rigorous way. In this paper, we develop a SAM in the framework of Bayesian inference. We show that, with a parallel implementation of an advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, it is now possible to rigorously sample the posterior distribution of the high-dimensional parameter space of typical SAMs. As an example, we characterize galaxy formation in the current Λ cold dark matter cosmology using the stellar mass function of galaxies as an observational constraint. We find that the posterior probability distribution is both topologically complex and degenerate in some important model parameters, suggesting that thorough explorations of the parameter space are needed to understand the models. We also demonstrate that because of the model degeneracy, adopting a narrow prior strongly restricts the model. Therefore, the inferences based on SAMs are conditional to the model adopted. Using synthetic data to mimic systematic errors in the stellar mass function, we demonstrate that an accurate observational error model is essential to meaningful inference.

  1. Analytical Solutions for Rumor Spreading Dynamical Model in a Social Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahpour, R.; Chakouvari, S.; Askari, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, Laplace Adomian decomposition method is utilized for evaluating of spreading model of rumor. Firstly, a succinct review is constructed on the subject of using analytical methods such as Adomian decomposion method, Variational iteration method and Homotopy Analysis method for epidemic models and biomathematics. In continue a spreading model of rumor with consideration of forgetting mechanism is assumed and subsequently LADM is exerted for solving of it. By means of the aforementioned method, a general solution is achieved for this problem which can be readily employed for assessing of rumor model without exerting any computer program. In addition, obtained consequences for this problem are discussed for different cases and parameters. Furthermore, it is shown the method is so straightforward and fruitful for analyzing equations which have complicated terms same as rumor model. By employing numerical methods, it is revealed LADM is so powerful and accurate for eliciting solutions of this model. Eventually, it is concluded that this method is so appropriate for this problem and it can provide researchers a very powerful vehicle for scrutinizing rumor models in diverse kinds of social networks such as Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, LinkedIn and Tuitor.

  2. A stochastic model of kinetochore–microtubule attachment accurately describes fission yeast chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Guillaume; Courtheoux, Thibault; Reyes, Céline

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, erroneous attachments of spindle microtubules to kinetochores are frequent in early mitosis. Most are corrected before anaphase onset by a mechanism involving the protein kinase Aurora B, which destabilizes kinetochore microtubules (ktMTs) in the absence of tension between sister chromatids. In this paper, we describe a minimal mathematical model of fission yeast chromosome segregation based on the stochastic attachment and detachment of ktMTs. The model accurately reproduces the timing of correct chromosome biorientation and segregation seen in fission yeast. Prevention of attachment defects requires both appropriate kinetochore orientation and an Aurora B–like activity. The model also reproduces abnormal chromosome segregation behavior (caused by, for example, inhibition of Aurora B). It predicts that, in metaphase, merotelic attachment is prevented by a kinetochore orientation effect and corrected by an Aurora B–like activity, whereas in anaphase, it is corrected through unbalanced forces applied to the kinetochore. These unbalanced forces are sufficient to prevent aneuploidy. PMID:22412019

  3. Computationally efficient and accurate enantioselectivity modeling by clusters of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wijma, Hein J; Marrink, Siewert J; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-07-28

    Computational approaches could decrease the need for the laborious high-throughput experimental screening that is often required to improve enzymes by mutagenesis. Here, we report that using multiple short molecular dynamics (MD) simulations makes it possible to accurately model enantioselectivity for large numbers of enzyme-substrate combinations at low computational costs. We chose four different haloalkane dehalogenases as model systems because of the availability of a large set of experimental data on the enantioselective conversion of 45 different substrates. To model the enantioselectivity, we quantified the frequency of occurrence of catalytically productive conformations (near attack conformations) for pairs of enantiomers during MD simulations. We found that the angle of nucleophilic attack that leads to carbon-halogen bond cleavage was a critical variable that limited the occurrence of productive conformations; enantiomers for which this angle reached values close to 180° were preferentially converted. A cluster of 20-40 very short (10 ps) MD simulations allowed adequate conformational sampling and resulted in much better agreement to experimental enantioselectivities than single long MD simulations (22 ns), while the computational costs were 50-100 fold lower. With single long MD simulations, the dynamics of enzyme-substrate complexes remained confined to a conformational subspace that rarely changed significantly, whereas with multiple short MD simulations a larger diversity of conformations of enzyme-substrate complexes was observed. PMID:24916632

  4. Accurate models for P-gp drug recognition induced from a cancer cell line cytotoxicity screen.

    PubMed

    Levatić, Jurica; Ćurak, Jasna; Kralj, Marijeta; Šmuc, Tomislav; Osmak, Maja; Supek, Fran

    2013-07-25

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1) is a promiscuous drug efflux pump of substantial pharmacological importance. Taking advantage of large-scale cytotoxicity screening data involving 60 cancer cell lines, we correlated the differential biological activities of ∼13,000 compounds against cellular P-gp levels. We created a large set of 934 high-confidence P-gp substrates or nonsubstrates by enforcing agreement with an orthogonal criterion involving P-gp overexpressing ADR-RES cells. A support vector machine (SVM) was 86.7% accurate in discriminating P-gp substrates on independent test data, exceeding previous models. Two molecular features had an overarching influence: nearly all P-gp substrates were large (>35 atoms including H) and dense (specific volume of <7.3 Å(3)/atom) molecules. Seven other descriptors and 24 molecular fragments ("effluxophores") were found enriched in the (non)substrates and incorporated into interpretable rule-based models. Biological experiments on an independent P-gp overexpressing cell line, the vincristine-resistant VK2, allowed us to reclassify six compounds previously annotated as substrates, validating our method's predictive ability. Models are freely available at http://pgp.biozyne.com . PMID:23772653

  5. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1991-01-01

    Some of the many analytical models in human-computer interface design that are currently being developed are described. The usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design is evaluated. Can the use of analytical models be recommended to interface designers? The answer, based on the empirical research summarized here, is: not at this time. There are too many unanswered questions concerning the validity of models and their ability to meet the practical needs of design organizations.

  6. Accurate state estimation from uncertain data and models: an application of data assimilation to mathematical models of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Data assimilation refers to methods for updating the state vector (initial condition) of a complex spatiotemporal model (such as a numerical weather model) by combining new observations with one or more prior forecasts. We consider the potential feasibility of this approach for making short-term (60-day) forecasts of the growth and spread of a malignant brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) in individual patient cases, where the observations are synthetic magnetic resonance images of a hypothetical tumor. Results We apply a modern state estimation algorithm (the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter), previously developed for numerical weather prediction, to two different mathematical models of glioblastoma, taking into account likely errors in model parameters and measurement uncertainties in magnetic resonance imaging. The filter can accurately shadow the growth of a representative synthetic tumor for 360 days (six 60-day forecast/update cycles) in the presence of a moderate degree of systematic model error and measurement noise. Conclusions The mathematical methodology described here may prove useful for other modeling efforts in biology and oncology. An accurate forecast system for glioblastoma may prove useful in clinical settings for treatment planning and patient counseling. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Anthony Almudevar, Tomas Radivoyevitch, and Kristin Swanson (nominated by Georg Luebeck). PMID:22185645

  7. Model Misspecification and Invariance Testing Using Confirmatory Factor Analytic Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Brian F.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analytic procedures are routinely implemented to provide evidence of measurement invariance. Current lines of research focus on the accuracy of common analytic steps used in confirmatory factor analysis for invariance testing. However, the few studies that have examined this procedure have done so with perfectly or near…

  8. Accurate mathematical models to describe the lactation curve of Lacaune dairy sheep under intensive management.

    PubMed

    Elvira, L; Hernandez, F; Cuesta, P; Cano, S; Gonzalez-Martin, J-V; Astiz, S

    2013-06-01

    Although the intensive production system of Lacaune dairy sheep is the only profitable method for producers outside of the French Roquefort area, little is known about this type of systems. This study evaluated yield records of 3677 Lacaune sheep under intensive management between 2005 and 2010 in order to describe the lactation curve of this breed and to investigate the suitability of different mathematical functions for modeling this curve. A total of 7873 complete lactations during a 40-week lactation period corresponding to 201 281 pieces of weekly yield data were used. First, five mathematical functions were evaluated on the basis of the residual mean square, determination coefficient, Durbin Watson and Runs Test values. The two better models were found to be Pollott Additive and fractional polynomial (FP). In the second part of the study, the milk yield, peak of milk yield, day of peak and persistency of the lactations were calculated with Pollot Additive and FP models and compared with the real data. The results indicate that both models gave an extremely accurate fit to Lacaune lactation curves in order to predict milk yields (P = 0.871), with the FP model being the best choice to provide a good fit to an extensive amount of real data and applicable on farm without specific statistical software. On the other hand, the interpretation of the parameters of the Pollott Additive function helps to understand the biology of the udder of the Lacaune sheep. The characteristics of the Lacaune lactation curve and milk yield are affected by lactation number and length. The lactation curves obtained in the present study allow the early identification of ewes with low milk yield potential, which will help to optimize farm profitability. PMID:23257242

  9. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  10. A semi-analytical model for semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Johnson, S. R.; Yu, S.-Q.; Wu, S.-N.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2011-12-01

    A semi-analytical model is constructed for single- and multi-junction solar cells. This model incorporates the key performance aspects of practical devices, including nonradiative recombination, photon recycling within a given junction, spontaneous emission coupling between junctions, and non-step-like absorptance and emittance with below-bandgap tail absorption. Four typical planar structures with the combinations of a smooth/textured top surface and an absorbing/reflecting substrate (or backside surface) are investigated, through which the extracted power and four types of fundamental loss mechanisms, transmission, thermalization, spatial-relaxation, and recombination loss are analyzed for both single- and multi-junction solar cells. The below-bandgap tail absorption increases the short-circuit current but decreases the output and open-circuit voltage. Using a straightforward formulism this model provides the initial design parameters and the achievable efficiencies for both single- and multiple-junction solar cells over a wide range of material quality. The achievable efficiency limits calculated using the best reported materials and AM1.5 G one sun for GaAs and Si single-junction solar cells are, respectively, 27.4 and 21.1% for semiconductor slabs with a flat surface and a non-reflecting index-matched absorbing substrate, and 30.8 and 26.4% for semiconductor slabs with a textured surface and an ideal 100% reflecting backside surface. Two important design rules for both single- and multi-junction solar cells are established: i) the optimal junction thickness decreases and the optimal bandgap energy increases when nonradiative recombination increases; and ii) the optimal junction thickness increases and the optimal bandgap energy decreases for higher solar concentrations.

  11. Analytical model for out-of-field dose in photon craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J; Jalbout, Wassim; Howell, Rebecca M; Khater, Nabil; Geara, Fady; Homann, Kenneth; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prediction of late effects after radiotherapy in organs outside a treatment field requires accurate estimations of out-of-field dose. However, out-of-field dose is not calculated accurately by commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to develop and test an analytical model for out-of-field dose during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) from photon beams produced by a linear accelerator. Materials & Methods In two separate evaluations of the model, we measured absorbed dose for a 6-MV CSI using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed throughout an anthropomorphic phantom and fit the measured data to an analytical model of absorbed dose versus distance outside of the composite field edge. These measurements were performed in two separate clinics—The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) and the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC)—using the same phantom but different linear accelerators and TPSs commissioned for patient treatments. The measurement at AUBMC also included in-field locations. Measured dose values were compared to those predicted by TPSs and parameters were fit to the model in each setting. Results In each clinic, 95% of the measured data were contained within a factor of 0.2 and one root mean square deviation of the model-based values. The root mean square deviations of the mathematical model were 0.91 cGy/Gy and 1.67 cGy/Gy in the MD Anderson and AUBMC clinics, respectively. The TPS predictions agreed poorly with measurements in regions of sharp dose gradient, e.g., near the field edge. At distances greater than 1 cm from the field edge, the TPS underestimated the dose by an average of 14% ± 24% and 44% ± 19% in the MD Anderson and AUBMC clinics, respectively. The in-field measured dose values of the measurement at AUBMC matched the dose values calculated by the TPS to within 2%. Conclusions Dose algorithms in TPSs systematically underestimated the actual out

  12. Analytical model for out-of-field dose in photon craniospinal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Jalbout, Wassim; Howell, Rebecca M.; Khater, Nabil; Geara, Fady; Homann, Kenneth; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2013-11-01

    The prediction of late effects after radiotherapy in organs outside a treatment field requires accurate estimations of out-of-field dose. However, out-of-field dose is not calculated accurately by commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to develop and test an analytical model for out-of-field dose during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) from photon beams produced by a linear accelerator. In two separate evaluations of the model, we measured absorbed dose for a 6 MV CSI using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed throughout an anthropomorphic phantom and fit the measured data to an analytical model of absorbed dose versus distance outside of the composite field edge. These measurements were performed in two separate clinics—the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) and the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC)—using the same phantom but different linear accelerators and TPSs commissioned for patient treatments. The measurement at AUBMC also included in-field locations. Measured dose values were compared to those predicted by TPSs and parameters were fit to the model in each setting. In each clinic, 95% of the measured data were contained within a factor of 0.2 and one root mean square deviation of the model-based values. The root mean square deviations of the mathematical model were 0.91 cGy Gy-1 and 1.67 cGy Gy-1 in the MD Anderson and AUBMC clinics, respectively. The TPS predictions agreed poorly with measurements in regions of sharp dose gradient, e.g., near the field edge. At distances greater than 1 cm from the field edge, the TPS underestimated the dose by an average of 14% ± 24% and 44% ± 19% in the MD Anderson and AUBMC clinics, respectively. The in-field measured dose values of the measurement at AUBMC matched the dose values calculated by the TPS to within 2%. Dose algorithms in TPSs systematically underestimated the actual out-of-field dose. Therefore, it is important to use an

  13. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  14. Global climate modeling of Saturn's atmosphere: fast and accurate radiative transfer and exploration of seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, A.; Sylvestre, M.; Fouchet, T.; Millour, E.; Wordsworth, R.; Leconte, J.; Forget, F.

    2013-10-01

    Recent observations of Saturn’s stratospheric thermal structure and composition revealed new phenomena: an equatorial oscillation in temperature, reminiscent of the Earth's Quasi-Biennal Oscillation ; strong meridional contrasts of hydrocarbons ; a warm “beacon” associated with the powerful 2010 storm. Those signatures cannot be reproduced by 1D photochemical and radiative models and suggest that atmospheric dynamics plays a key role. This motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) for Saturn, based on the LMDz hydrodynamical core, to explore the circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity in Saturn's atmosphere. In order to closely reproduce Saturn's radiative forcing, a particular emphasis was put in obtaining fast and accurate radiative transfer calculations. Our radiative model uses correlated-k distributions and spectral discretization tailored for Saturn's atmosphere. We include internal heat flux, ring shadowing and aerosols. We will report on the sensitivity of the model to spectral discretization, spectroscopic databases, and aerosol scenarios (varying particle sizes, opacities and vertical structures). We will also discuss the radiative effect of the ring shadowing on Saturn's atmosphere. We will present a comparison of temperature fields obtained with this new radiative equilibrium model to that inferred from Cassini/CIRS observations. In the troposphere, our model reproduces the observed temperature knee caused by heating at the top of the tropospheric aerosol layer. In the lower stratosphere (20mbar modeled temperature is 5-10K too low compared to measurements. This suggests that processes other than radiative heating/cooling by trace

  15. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  16. Analytical model for minority games with evolutionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç; Llebot, Josep E.; Hernández, Germán A.

    2010-06-01

    In a recent work [D. Campos, J.E. Llebot, V. Méndez, Theor. Popul. Biol. 74 (2009) 16] we have introduced a biological version of the Evolutionary Minority Game that tries to reproduce the intraspecific competition for limited resources in an ecosystem. In comparison with the complex decision-making mechanisms used in standard Minority Games, only two extremely simple strategies ( juveniles and adults) are accessible to the agents. Complexity is introduced instead through an evolutionary learning rule that allows younger agents to learn taking better decisions. We find that this game shows many of the typical properties found for Evolutionary Minority Games, like self-segregation behavior or the existence of an oscillation phase for a certain range of the parameter values. However, an analytical treatment becomes much easier in our case, taking advantage of the simple strategies considered. Using a model consisting of a simple dynamical system, the phase diagram of the game (which differentiates three phases: adults crowd, juveniles crowd and oscillations) is reproduced.

  17. An analytical model of eddy current ferrite-core probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Bowler, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model of an axisymmetric eddy current probe with a cylindrical ferrite core above a layered conductive half-space is developed. Initially we consider the magnetic vector potential of a circular filament coaxial with a ferrite core over a layered conducting half-space. The principle of superposition is then used to derive close-form expressions for both the electromagnetic field and the impedance of a coil from the filament field. Rather than locating the probe in infinite space, it is confined coaxially within a circularly cylindrical boundary on which the vector potential field is zero. The radius of this artificial boundary is large in order to ensure that does not interfere substantially with the field near the probe. By using a truncated region in this way, the vector potential in the probe region can be expanded as a series rather than an integral form. Thus the solution of the problem amounts to finding the expansion coeefficients in the series. The numerical predictions of probe impedance have been compared with experimental data showing good agreement.

  18. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  19. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, H; Thon, A; Dey, T; Khanin, V; Rodnyi, P

    2016-06-21

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom. PMID:27245232

  20. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, H.; Thon, A.; Dey, T.; Khanin, V.; Rodnyi, P.

    2016-06-01

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom.

  1. Analytical model for force prediction when machining metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Snahungshu

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) offer several thermo-mechanical advantages over standard materials and alloys which make them better candidates in different applications. Their light weight, high stiffness, and strength have attracted several industries such as automotive, aerospace, and defence for their wide range of products. However, the wide spread application of Meal Matrix Composites is still a challenge for industry. The hard and abrasive nature of the reinforcement particles is responsible for rapid tool wear and high machining costs. Fracture and debonding of the abrasive reinforcement particles are the considerable damage modes that directly influence the tool performance. It is very important to find highly effective way to machine MMCs. So, it is important to predict forces when machining Metal Matrix Composites because this will help to choose perfect tools for machining and ultimately save both money and time. This research presents an analytical force model for predicting the forces generated during machining of Metal Matrix Composites. In estimating the generated forces, several aspects of cutting mechanics were considered including: shearing force, ploughing force, and particle fracture force. Chip formation force was obtained by classical orthogonal metal cutting mechanics and the Johnson-Cook Equation. The ploughing force was formulated while the fracture force was calculated from the slip line field theory and the Griffith theory of failure. The predicted results were compared with previously measured data. The results showed very good agreement between the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured cutting forces.

  2. An analytical study of various telecomminication networks using markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, M.; Jayamani, E.; Ezhumalai, P.

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this paper is to examine issues relating to the performance of various Telecommunication networks, and applied queuing theory for better design and improved efficiency. Firstly, giving an analytical study of queues deals with quantifying the phenomenon of waiting lines using representative measures of performances, such as average queue length (on average number of customers in the queue), average waiting time in queue (on average time to wait) and average facility utilization (proportion of time the service facility is in use). In the second, using Matlab simulator, summarizes the finding of the investigations, from which and where we obtain results and describing methodology for a) compare the waiting time and average number of messages in the queue in M/M/1 and M/M/2 queues b) Compare the performance of M/M/1 and M/D/1 queues and study the effect of increasing the number of servers on the blocking probability M/M/k/k queue model.

  3. An analytical model of axial compressor off-design performance

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, T.R.; Horlock, J.H. . Whittle Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is presented of the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. It is based on an analytical solution, valid for small perturbations in operating conditions from the design point, and provides an insight into the effects of choices made during the compressor design process on performance and off-design stage matching. It is shown that the mean design value of stage loading coefficient ([psi] = [Delta]h[sub 0]/U[sup 2]) has a dominant effect on off-design performance, whereas the stage-wise distribution of stage loading coefficient and the design value of flow coefficient have little influence. The powerful effects of variable stator vanes on stage-matching are also demonstrated and these results are shown to agree well with previous work. The slope of the working line of a gas turbine engine, overlaid on overall compressor characteristics, is shown to have a strong effect on the off-design stage-matching through the compressor. The model is also used to analyze design changes to the compressor geometry and to show how errors in estimates of annulus blockage, decided during the design process, have less effect on compressor performance than has previously been thought.

  4. Accurate modeling of cache replacement policies in a Data-Grid.

    SciTech Connect

    Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2003-01-23

    Caching techniques have been used to improve the performance gap of storage hierarchies in computing systems. In data intensive applications that access large data files over wide area network environment, such as a data grid,caching mechanism can significantly improve the data access performance under appropriate workloads. In a data grid, it is envisioned that local disk storage resources retain or cache the data files being used by local application. Under a workload of shared access and high locality of reference, the performance of the caching techniques depends heavily on the replacement policies being used. A replacement policy effectively determines which set of objects must be evicted when space is needed. Unlike cache replacement policies in virtual memory paging or database buffering, developing an optimal replacement policy for data grids is complicated by the fact that the file objects being cached have varying sizes and varying transfer and processing costs that vary with time. We present an accurate model for evaluating various replacement policies and propose a new replacement algorithm referred to as ''Least Cost Beneficial based on K backward references (LCB-K).'' Using this modeling technique, we compare LCB-K with various replacement policies such as Least Frequently Used (LFU), Least Recently Used (LRU), Greedy DualSize (GDS), etc., using synthetic and actual workload of accesses to and from tertiary storage systems. The results obtained show that (LCB-K) and (GDS) are the most cost effective cache replacement policies for storage resource management in data grids.

  5. An Approach to More Accurate Model Systems for Purple Acid Phosphatases (PAPs).

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Bosch, Simone; Comba, Peter; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hanson, Graeme R; Mereacre, Valeriu; Noble, Christopher J; Powell, Annie K; Schenk, Gerhard; Wadepohl, Hubert

    2015-08-01

    The active site of mammalian purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) have a dinuclear iron site in two accessible oxidation states (Fe(III)2 and Fe(III)Fe(II)), and the heterovalent is the active form, involved in the regulation of phosphate and phosphorylated metabolite levels in a wide range of organisms. Therefore, two sites with different coordination geometries to stabilize the heterovalent active form and, in addition, with hydrogen bond donors to enable the fixation of the substrate and release of the product, are believed to be required for catalytically competent model systems. Two ligands and their dinuclear iron complexes have been studied in detail. The solid-state structures and properties, studied by X-ray crystallography, magnetism, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the solution structural and electronic properties, investigated by mass spectrometry, electronic, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopies and electrochemistry, are discussed in detail in order to understand the structures and relative stabilities in solution. In particular, with one of the ligands, a heterovalent Fe(III)Fe(II) species has been produced by chemical oxidation of the Fe(II)2 precursor. The phosphatase reactivities of the complexes, in particular, also of the heterovalent complex, are reported. These studies include pH-dependent as well as substrate concentration dependent studies, leading to pH profiles, catalytic efficiencies and turnover numbers, and indicate that the heterovalent diiron complex discussed here is an accurate PAP model system. PMID:26196255

  6. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  7. Analysis of structural dynamic data from Skylab. Volume 2: Skylab analytical and test model data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demchak, L.; Harcrow, H.

    1976-01-01

    The orbital configuration test modal data, analytical test correlation modal data, and analytical flight configuration modal data are presented. Tables showing the generalized mass contributions (GMCs) for each of the thirty tests modes are given along with the two dimensional mode shape plots and tables of GMCs for the test correlated analytical modes. The two dimensional mode shape plots for the analytical modes and uncoupled and coupled modes of the orbital flight configuration at three development phases of the model are included.

  8. TH-C-BRD-02: Analytical Modeling and Dose Calculation Method for Asymmetric Proton Pencil Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelover, E; Wang, D; Hill, P; Flynn, R; Hyer, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A dynamic collimation system (DCS), which consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades driven by linear motors has been proposed to decrease the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The DCS reduces lateral penumbra by intercepting the proton pencil beam near the lateral boundary of the target in the beam's eye view. The resultant trimmed pencil beams are asymmetric and laterally shifted, and therefore existing pencil beam dose calculation algorithms are not capable of trimmed beam dose calculations. This work develops a method to model and compute dose from trimmed pencil beams when using the DCS. Methods: MCNPX simulations were used to determine the dose distributions expected from various trimmer configurations using the DCS. Using these data, the lateral distribution for individual beamlets was modeled with a 2D asymmetric Gaussian function. The integral depth dose (IDD) of each configuration was also modeled by combining the IDD of an untrimmed pencil beam with a linear correction factor. The convolution of these two terms, along with the Highland approximation to account for lateral growth of the beam along the depth direction, allows a trimmed pencil beam dose distribution to be analytically generated. The algorithm was validated by computing dose for a single energy layer 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment field, defined by the trimmers, using both the proposed method and MCNPX beamlets. Results: The Gaussian modeled asymmetric lateral profiles along the principal axes match the MCNPX data very well (R{sup 2}≥0.95 at the depth of the Bragg peak). For the 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment plan created with both the modeled and MCNPX pencil beams, the passing rate of the 3D gamma test was 98% using a standard threshold of 3%/3 mm. Conclusion: An analytical method capable of accurately computing asymmetric pencil beam dose when using the DCS has been developed.

  9. Analytical model of rotor wake aerodynamics in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saberi, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The model and the computer program developed provides the velocity, location, and circulation of the tip vortices of a two-blade helicopter in and out of the ground effect. Comparison of the theoretical results with some experimental measurements for the location of the wake indicate that there is excellent accuracy in the vicinity of the rotor and fair amount of accuracy far from it. Having the location of the wake at all times enables us to compute the history of the velocity and the location of any point in the flow. The main goal of out study, induced velocity at the rotor, can also be calculated in addition to stream lines and streak lines. Since the wake location close to the rotor is known more accurately than at other places, the calculated induced velocity over the disc should be a good estimate of the real induced velocity, with the exception of the blade location, because each blade was replaced only by a vortex line. Because no experimental measurements of the wake close to the ground were available to us, quantitative evaluation of the theoretical wake was not possible. But qualitatively we have been able to show excellent agreement. Comparison of flow visualization with out results has indicated the location of the ground vortex is estimated excellently. Also the flow field in hover is well represented.

  10. Analytical model of impact disruption of satellites and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliwa-Kopystyński, J.; Włodarczyk, I.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    A model of impact disruption of the bodies with sizes from the laboratory scale to that of an order of 100 km is developed. On the lowermost end of the target size the model is based on the numerous laboratory data related to the mass-velocity distribution of the impact produced fragments. On the minor-planets scale the model is supported by the data related to the largest observed craters on small icy satellites and on some asteroids (Leliwa-Kopystynski, J., Burchell, M.J., Lowen, D. [2008]. Icarus 195, 817-826). The model takes into account the target disruption and the dispersion of the impact produced fragments against the intermolecular forces acting on the surfaces of the contacts of the fragments and against self-gravitation of the target. The head-on collisions of non-rotating and non-porous targets and impactors are considered. The impactor delivers kinetic energy but its mass is neglected in comparison to mass of the target. For this simple case the analytical formulae for specific disruption energy as well as for specific energy of formation of the largest craters are found. They depend on a set of parameters. Of these the most important (i.e. with the greatest influence on the final result) are three rather weakly known parameters. They are: (i) The exponent γ in the distribution function of the fragments. (ii) The characteristic velocity v0 that appears in the velocity distribution of the ejected fragments. (iii) The exponent β in the mass-velocity distribution. The influence of the choice of the numerical values of these parameters on the final results has been studied. Another group of parameters contains the relevant material data. They are: (a) The energy σ of breaking of the intermolecular bonds of the target material per unit of the fragment surface and (b) the density ρ of the target. According to our calculations the transition between the strength regime and the gravitational regime is in the range of the target radius from ∼0.4 km to

  11. An accurate parameterization of the radiative properties of water clouds suitable for use in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.X.; Stamnes, K. )

    1993-04-01

    A new parameterization of the radiative Properties of water clouds is presented. Cloud optical properties for valent radius throughout the solar and both solar and terrestrial spectra and for cloud equivalent radii in the range 2.5-60 [mu]m are calculated from Mie theory. It is found that cloud optical properties depend mainly on equivalent radius throughout the solar and terrestrial spectrum and are insensitive to the details of the droplet size distribution, such as shape, skewness, width, and modality (single or bimodal). This suggests that in cloud models, aimed at predicting the evolution of cloud microphysics with climate change, it is sufficient to determine the third and the second moments of the size distribution (the ratio of which determines the equivalent radius). It also implies that measurements of the cloud liquid water content and the extinction coefficient are sufficient to determine cloud optical properties experimentally (i.e., measuring the complete droplet size distribution is not required). Based on the detailed calculations, the optical properties are parameterized as a function of cloud liquid water path and equivalent cloud droplet radius by using a nonlinear least-square fitting. The parameterization is performed separately for the range of radii 2.5-12 [mu]m, 12-30,[mu]m, and 30-60 [mu]m. Cloud heating and cooling rates are computed from this parameterization by using a comprehensive radiation model. Comparison with similar results obtained from exact Mie scattering calculations shows that this parameterization yields very accurate results and that it is several thousand times faster. This parameterization separates the dependence of cloud optical properties on droplet size and liquid water content, and is suitable for inclusion into climate models. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. An analytical model of hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions on electrodes partially covered with a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Lund, Peter D

    2016-05-11

    Our previous theoretical study on the performance limits of the platinum (Pt) nanoparticle catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) had shown that the mass transport losses at a partially catalyst-covered planar electrode are independent of the catalyst loading. This suggests that the two-dimensional (2D) numerical model used could be simplified to a one-dimensional (1D) model to provide an easier but equally accurate description of the operation of these HER electrodes. In this article, we derive an analytical 1D model and show that it indeed gives results that are practically identical to the 2D numerical simulations. We discuss the general principles of the model and how it can be used to extend the applicability of existing electrochemical models of planar electrodes to low catalyst loadings suitable for operating photoelectrochemical devices under unconcentrated sunlight. Since the mass transport losses of the HER are often very sensitive to the H2 concentration, we also discuss the limiting current density of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and how it is not necessarily independent of the reaction kinetics. The results give insight into the interplay of kinetic and mass-transport limitations at HER/HOR electrodes with implications for the design of kinetic experiments and the optimization of catalyst loadings in the photoelectrochemical cells. PMID:27137703

  13. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  14. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Strongly Rotating Rarefied Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev; Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal gas separation processes effect separation by utilizing the difference in the mole fraction in a high speed rotating cylinder caused by the difference in molecular mass, and consequently the centrifugal force density. These have been widely used in isotope separation because chemical separation methods cannot be used to separate isotopes of the same chemical species. More recently, centrifugal separation has also been explored for the separation of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. The efficiency of separation is critically dependent on the secondary flow generated due to temperature gradients at the cylinder wall or due to inserts, and it is important to formulate accurate models for this secondary flow. The widely used Onsager model for secondary flow is restricted to very long cylinders where the length is large compared to the diameter, the limit of high stratification parameter, where the gas is restricted to a thin layer near the wall of the cylinder, and it assumes that there is no mass difference in the two species while calculating the secondary flow. There are two objectives of the present analysis of the rarefied gas flow in a rotating cylinder. The first is to remove the restriction of high stratification parameter, and to generalize the solutions to low rotation speeds where the stratification parameter may be O(1), and to apply for dissimilar gases considering the difference in molecular mass of the two species. Secondly, we would like to compare the predictions with molecular simulations based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows, in order to quantify the errors resulting from the approximations at different aspect ratios, Reynolds number and stratification parameter.

  15. Design Protocols and Analytical Strategies that Incorporate Structural Reliability Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and intermetallic materials (e.g., single crystal nickel aluminide) are high performance materials that exhibit attractive mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. These materials are critically important in advancing certain performance aspects of gas turbine engines. From an aerospace engineer's perspective the new generation of ceramic composites and intermetallics offers a significant potential for raising the thrust/weight ratio and reducing NO(x) emissions of gas turbine engines. These aspects have increased interest in utilizing these materials in the hot sections of turbine engines. However, as these materials evolve and their performance characteristics improve a persistent need exists for state-of-the-art analytical methods that predict the response of components fabricated from CMC and intermetallic material systems. This need provided the motivation for the technology developed under this research effort. Continuous ceramic fiber composites exhibit an increase in work of fracture, which allows for "graceful" rather than catastrophic failure. When loaded in the fiber direction, these composites retain substantial strength capacity beyond the initiation of transverse matrix cracking despite the fact that neither of its constituents would exhibit such behavior if tested alone. As additional load is applied beyond first matrix cracking, the matrix tends to break in a series of cracks bridged by the ceramic fibers. Any additional load is born increasingly by the fibers until the ultimate strength of the composite is reached. Thus modeling efforts supported under this research effort have focused on predicting this sort of behavior. For single crystal intermetallics the issues that motivated the technology development involved questions relating to material behavior and component design. Thus the research effort supported by this grant had to determine the statistical nature and source of fracture in a high strength, Ni

  16. Design Protocols and Analytical Strategies that Incorporate Structural Reliability Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and intermetallic materials (e.g., single crystal nickel aluminide) are high performance materials that exhibit attractive mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties. These materials are critically important in advancing certain performance aspects of gas turbine engines. From an aerospace engineers perspective the new generation of ceramic composites and intermetallics offers a significant potential for raising the thrust/weight ratio and reducing NO(sub x) emissions of gas turbine engines. These aspects have increased interest in utilizing these materials in the hot sections of turbine engines. However, as these materials evolve and their performance characteristics improve a persistent need exists for state-of-the-art analytical methods that predict the response of components fabricated from CMC and intermetallic material systems. This need provided the motivation for the technology developed under this research effort. Continuous ceramic fiber composites exhibit an increase in work of fracture, which allows for 'graceful' rather than catastrophic failure. When loaded in the fiber direction these composites retain substantial strength capacity beyond the initiation of transverse matrix cracking despite the fact that neither of its constituents would exhibit such behavior if tested alone. As additional load is applied beyond first matrix cracking, the matrix tends to break in a series of cracks bridged by the ceramic fibers. Any additional load is born increasingly by the fibers until the ultimate strength of the composite is reached. Thus modeling efforts supported under this research effort have focused on predicting this sort of behavior. For single crystal intermetallics the issues that motivated the technology development involved questions relating to material behavior and component design. Thus the research effort supported by this grant had to determine the statistical nature and source of fracture in a high strength, Ni

  17. An analytical model for the amplitude of lee waves forming on the boundary layer inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachsperger, Johannes; Serafin, Stefano; Stiperski, Ivana; Grubišić, Vanda

    2016-04-01

    Lee waves are horizontally propagating gravity waves with a typical wavelength of 5-15 km that may be generated when stratified flow is lifted over a mountain. A frequently observed type of such waves is that of interfacial lee waves. Those develop, similar to surface waves on a free water surface, when the upstream flow features a density discontinuity. Such conditions are often present for example at the capping inversion in boundary layer flow. The dynamics of interfacial lee waves can be described concisely with linear interfacial gravity wave theory. However, while this theoretical framework accurately describes the wavelength, it fails to properly predict the amplitude of lee waves. It is well known that large amplitude lee waves may lead to low-level turbulence, which poses a potential hazard for aviation. Therefore, this property of interfacial lee waves deserves further attention. In this study, we develop a simple analytical model for the amplitude of lee waves forming on the boundary layer inversion. This model is based on the energetics of two-layer flow. We obtain an expression for the wave amplitude by equating the energy loss across an internal jump with the energy radiation through lee waves. The verification of the result with water tank experiments of density-stratified two-layer flow over two-dimensional topography from the HYDRALAB campaign shows good agreement between theory and observations. This new analytical model may be useful in determining potential hazards of interfacial lee waves with negligible computational cost as compared to numerical weather prediction models.

  18. Stable, accurate and efficient computation of normal modes for horizontal stratified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-08-01

    We propose an adaptive root-determining strategy that is very useful when dealing with trapped modes or Stoneley modes whose energies become very insignificant on the free surface in the presence of low-velocity layers or fluid layers in the model. Loss of modes in these cases or inaccuracy in the calculation of these modes may then be easily avoided. Built upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficients, the concept of `family of secular functions' that we herein call `adaptive mode observers' is thus naturally introduced to implement this strategy, the underlying idea of which has been distinctly noted for the first time and may be generalized to other applications such as free oscillations or applied to other methods in use when these cases are encountered. Additionally, we have made further improvements upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method; mode observers associated with only the free surface and low-velocity layers (and the fluid/solid interface if the model contains fluid layers) are adequate to guarantee no loss and high precision at the same time of any physically existent modes without excessive calculations. Finally, the conventional definition of the fundamental mode is reconsidered, which is entailed in the cases under study. Some computational aspects are remarked on. With the additional help afforded by our superior root-searching scheme and the possibility of speeding calculation using a less number of layers aided by the concept of `turning point', our algorithm is remarkably efficient as well as stable and accurate and can be used as a powerful tool for widely related applications.

  19. Stable, accurate and efficient computation of normal modes for horizontal stratified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an adaptive root-determining strategy that is very useful when dealing with trapped modes or Stoneley modes whose energies become very insignificant on the free surface in the presence of low-velocity layers or fluid layers in the model. Loss of modes in these cases or inaccuracy in the calculation of these modes may then be easily avoided. Built upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficients, the concept of "family of secular functions" that we herein call "adaptive mode observers", is thus naturally introduced to implement this strategy, the underlying idea of which has been distinctly noted for the first time and may be generalized to other applications such as free oscillations or applied to other methods in use when these cases are encountered. Additionally, we have made further improvements upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method; mode observers associated with only the free surface and low-velocity layers (and the fluid/solid interface if the model contains fluid layers) are adequate to guarantee no loss and high precision at the same time of any physically existent modes without excessive calculations. Finally, the conventional definition of the fundamental mode is reconsidered, which is entailed in the cases under study. Some computational aspects are remarked on. With the additional help afforded by our superior root-searching scheme and the possibility of speeding calculation using a less number of layers aided by the concept of "turning point", our algorithm is remarkably efficient as well as stable and accurate and can be used as a powerful tool for widely related applications.

  20. Analytic modeling and experimental validation of intumescent behavior of charring heatshield materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Gerald Wayne

    Intumescing heatshield materials have been shown to provide significant thermal protection for missile system environments. The design and use of these materials requires the analytic understanding of a considerable level of thermodynamic phenomena occurring on the surface as well as in-depth. These phenomena can include in-depth thermochemical decomposition, pyrolysis gas generation and mass transfer, thermophysical property change, thermochemical and mechanical ablation, intumescence or conduction path growth, and boundary layer modification due to pyrolysis gas injection or surface reactions. Existing numerical design codes do not specifically address the thermodynamic effects of intumescent behavior. The purpose of this research was to significantly enhance the current state of the art for modeling thermochemically decomposing heatshield materials through the addition of intumescent behavior effects to the Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation Program (CMA). Additional efforts were devoted to the design of experiments to specifically quantify the intumescence phenomena. The intumescence material properties were primarily developed utilizing the low shear thermal testing performed at the Wright-Patterson Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory. Transient radiography of in-depth thermochemical decomposition and intumescence as well as embedded thermocouples were utilized quantifying properties of the various reacting regions within the material. The resulting intumescence model was applied and validated for a low shear hypersonic high altitude environment generated at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Hot Gas Test. The validated analytic model was then applied to the high shear convective heating environments generated at the Holloman High Speed Test Track at Holloman Air Force. This test environment provided an evaluation of the analytic model applicability for high shear environments. These results

  1. Accurate calculation and modeling of the adiabatic connection in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, A. M.; Coriani, S.; Helgaker, T.

    2010-04-01

    AC. When parametrized in terms of the same input data, the AC-CI model offers improved performance over the corresponding AC-D model, which is shown to be the lowest-order contribution to the AC-CI model. The utility of the accurately calculated AC curves for the analysis of standard density functionals is demonstrated for the BLYP exchange-correlation functional and the interaction-strength-interpolation (ISI) model AC integrand. From the results of this analysis, we investigate the performance of our proposed two-parameter AC-D and AC-CI models when a simple density functional for the AC at infinite interaction strength is employed in place of information at the fully interacting point. The resulting two-parameter correlation functionals offer a qualitatively correct behavior of the AC integrand with much improved accuracy over previous attempts. The AC integrands in the present work are recommended as a basis for further work, generating functionals that avoid spurious error cancellations between exchange and correlation energies and give good accuracy for the range of densities and types of correlation contained in the systems studied here.

  2. Towards more accurate wind and solar power prediction by improving NWP model physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrea; Köhler, Carmen; von Schumann, Jonas; Ritter, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    nighttime to well mixed conditions during the day presents a big challenge to NWP models. Fast decrease and successive increase in hub-height wind speed after sunrise, and the formation of nocturnal low level jets will be discussed. For PV, the life cycle of low stratus clouds and fog is crucial. Capturing these processes correctly depends on the accurate simulation of diffusion or vertical momentum transport and the interaction with other atmospheric and soil processes within the numerical weather model. Results from Single Column Model simulations and 3d case studies will be presented. Emphasis is placed on wind forecasts; however, some references to highlights concerning the PV-developments will also be given. *) ORKA: Optimierung von Ensembleprognosen regenerativer Einspeisung für den Kürzestfristbereich am Anwendungsbeispiel der Netzsicherheitsrechnungen **) EWeLiNE: Erstellung innovativer Wetter- und Leistungsprognosemodelle für die Netzintegration wetterabhängiger Energieträger, www.projekt-eweline.de

  3. Prediction of chirality- and size-dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes based on an accurate molecular mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Mirnezhad, M.; Sahmani, S.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular mechanics theory has been widely used to investigate the mechanical properties of nanostructures analytically. However, there is a limited number of research in which molecular mechanics model is utilized to predict the elastic properties of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In the current study, the mechanical properties of chiral single-walled BNNTs are predicted analytically based on an accurate molecular mechanics model. For this purpose, based upon the density functional theory (DFT) within the framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the exchange correlation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof is adopted to evaluate force constants used in the molecular mechanics model. Afterwards, based on the principle of molecular mechanics, explicit expressions are given to calculate surface Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the single-walled BNNTs for different values of tube diameter and types of chirality. Moreover, the values of surface Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and bending stiffness of boron nitride sheets are obtained via the DFT as byproducts. The results predicted by the present model are in reasonable agreement with those reported by other models in the literature.

  4. Toward accurate tooth segmentation from computed tomography images using a hybrid level set model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yangzhou; Zhao, Qunfei; Xia, Zeyang E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Hu, Ying; Xiong, Jing E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Zhang, Jianwei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: A three-dimensional (3D) model of the teeth provides important information for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Tooth segmentation is an essential step in generating the 3D digital model from computed tomography (CT) images. The aim of this study is to develop an accurate and efficient tooth segmentation method from CT images. Methods: The 3D dental CT volumetric images are segmented slice by slice in a two-dimensional (2D) transverse plane. The 2D segmentation is composed of a manual initialization step and an automatic slice by slice segmentation step. In the manual initialization step, the user manually picks a starting slice and selects a seed point for each tooth in this slice. In the automatic slice segmentation step, a developed hybrid level set model is applied to segment tooth contours from each slice. Tooth contour propagation strategy is employed to initialize the level set function automatically. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of two subjects were used to tune the parameters. Images of 16 additional subjects were used to validate the performance of the method. Volume overlap metrics and surface distance metrics were adopted to assess the segmentation accuracy quantitatively. The volume overlap metrics were volume difference (VD, mm{sup 3}) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, %). The surface distance metrics were average symmetric surface distance (ASSD, mm), RMS (root mean square) symmetric surface distance (RMSSSD, mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD, mm). Computation time was recorded to assess the efficiency. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with two state-of-the-art methods. Results: For the tested CBCT images, the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the incisor were 38.16 ± 12.94 mm{sup 3}, 88.82 ± 2.14%, 0.29 ± 0.03 mm, 0.32 ± 0.08 mm, and 1.25 ± 0.58 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the canine were 49.12 ± 9.33 mm{sup 3}, 91.57 ± 0.82%, 0.27 ± 0.02 mm, 0

  5. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A.; Divers, Stephen G.; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G.; Baca, Arthur M.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital SequencingTM is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient’s cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  6. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Zill, Oliver A; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A; Divers, Stephen G; Hoon, Dave S B; Kopetz, E Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G; Baca, Arthur M; Kermani, Bahram G; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital Sequencing™ is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient's cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  7. Towards accurate kinetic modeling of prompt NO formation in hydrocarbon flames via the NCN pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Jeffrey A.; Fleming, James W.

    2008-08-15

    A basic kinetic mechanism that can predict the appropriate prompt-NO precursor NCN, as shown by experiment, with relative accuracy while still producing postflame NO results that can be calculated as accurately as or more accurately than through the former HCN pathway is presented for the first time. The basic NCN submechanism should be a starting point for future NCN kinetic and prompt NO formation refinement.

  8. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  9. Analytical model for electromagnetic cascades in rotating electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    Electromagnetic cascades attract a lot of attention as an important quantum electrodynamics effect that will reveal itself in various electromagnetic field configurations at ultrahigh intensities. We study cascade dynamics in rotating electric field analytically and numerically. The kinetic equations for the electron-positron plasma and gamma-quanta are formulated. The scaling laws are derived and analyzed. For the cascades arising far above the threshold the dependence of the cascade parameters on the field frequency is derived. The spectra of high-energy cascade particles are calculated. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  10. Generalized model of electromigration with 1:1 (analyte:selector) complexation stoichiometry: part I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Müllerová, Ludmila; Dvořák, Martin; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    The model of electromigration of a multivalent weak acidic/basic/amphoteric analyte that undergoes complexation with a mixture of selectors is introduced. The model provides an extension of the series of models starting with the single-selector model without dissociation by Wren and Rowe in 1992, continuing with the monovalent weak analyte/single-selector model by Rawjee, Williams and Vigh in 1993 and that by Lelièvre in 1994, and ending with the multi-selector overall model without dissociation developed by our group in 2008. The new multivalent analyte multi-selector model shows that the effective mobility of the analyte obeys the original Wren and Row's formula. The overall complexation constant, mobility of the free analyte and mobility of complex can be measured and used in a standard way. The mathematical expressions for the overall parameters are provided. We further demonstrate mathematically that the pH dependent parameters for weak analytes can be simply used as an input into the multi-selector overall model and, in reverse, the multi-selector overall parameters can serve as an input into the pH-dependent models for the weak analytes. These findings can greatly simplify the rationale method development in analytical electrophoresis, specifically enantioseparations. PMID:25637010

  11. Analytical modelling of monolayer graphene-based ion-sensitive FET to pH changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Karimi Feiz Abadi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Meisam; Hashim, Amin; Che harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2013-04-01

    Graphene has attracted great interest because of unique properties such as high sensitivity, high mobility, and biocompatibility. It is also known as a superior candidate for pH sensing. Graphene-based ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) is currently getting much attention as a novel material with organic nature and ionic liquid gate that is intrinsically sensitive to pH changes. pH is an important factor in enzyme stabilities which can affect the enzymatic reaction and broaden the number of enzyme applications. More accurate and consistent results of enzymes must be optimized to realize their full potential as catalysts accordingly. In this paper, a monolayer graphene-based ISFET pH sensor is studied by simulating its electrical measurement of buffer solutions for different pH values. Electrical detection model of each pH value is suggested by conductance modelling of monolayer graphene. Hydrogen ion (H+) concentration as a function of carrier concentration is proposed, and the control parameter ( Ƥ) is defined based on the electro-active ions absorbed by the surface of the graphene with different pH values. Finally, the proposed new analytical model is compared with experimental data and shows good overall agreement.

  12. An Analytical Model for Vertical Profiles in Submarine Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolla Pittaluga, M.; Imran, J.

    2011-12-01

    Turbidity currents are the primary agents carrying sediments from the continental shelf to the deep-sea. They are the counterpart of fluvial currents in the deep-sea environment and are responsible for the shaping of submarine channels. Due to the unpredictability of events and to their ability to destroy installed monitoring instruments, only a few attempts to directly measure the properties of turbidity currents in submarine channels has proved to be successful (Xu et al., 2004; Xu, 2010). Consequently the vast majority of the studies concerning the vertical structure of turbidity currents were either laboratory experiments or numerical models. In spite of the relevance of the problem, related to the consequences of flow field on sedimentary deposits, at present an ongoing debate still exist on similarities and differences between submarine and fluvial channels related in particular to the orientation of the helical flow in channel bends. Here we expand on the above ideas and develop an analytical theory for flow and suspended sediment transport in submarine channels able to describe vertical profiles of both flow field and suspendend sediment concentration. The turbulence closure needed to account for density stratification is adapted from the model of Mellor and Yamada (1982). Solutions are found for both straight and constant curvature channels. In the latter case, in order to evaluate the secondary flow induced by curvature, we take advantage of the fact that the ratio of flow depth to radius of curvature is typically small in the field, which leads to a solution of the governing equations through an appropriate asymptotic expansion. Steady fully developed flow conditions in a bend of constant width are considered. Results for longitudinal velocity and concentration profiles in straight channels are then compared with experimental observations of Sequeiros et al. (2010) providing good agreement. We also expect to find under which values of the controlling

  13. A Hydro-mechanical Model and Analytical Solutions for Geomechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-05-15

    We present a hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow in greater detail. The simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy’s law. Two parts were coupled using the standard linear poroelasticity. Analytical solutions for pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario. The model predicts the temporal and spatial variation of pressure field and effects of permeability and elastic modulus of formation on the fluid pressure distribution.

  14. Modelling a flows in supply chain with analytical models: Case of a chemical industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhida, Khalid; Azougagh, Yassine; Elfezazi, Said

    2016-02-01

    This study is interested on the modelling of the logistics flows in a supply chain composed on a production sites and a logistics platform. The contribution of this research is to develop an analytical model (integrated linear programming model), based on a case study of a real company operating in the phosphate field, considering a various constraints in this supply chain to resolve the planning problems for a better decision-making. The objectives of this model is to determine and define the optimal quantities of different products to route, to and from the various entities in the supply chain studied.

  15. An analytic model of neutron ambient dose equivalent and equivalent dose for proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Fontenot, Jonas D; Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-01-01

    Stray neutrons generated in passively scattered proton therapy are of concern because they increase the risk that a patient will develop a second cancer. Several investigations characterized stray neutrons in proton therapy using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations, but capabilities of analytical methods to predict neutron exposures are less well developed. The goal of this study was to develop a new analytical model to calculate neutron ambient dose equivalent in air and equivalent dose in phantom based on Monte Carlo modeling of a passively scattered proton therapy unit. The accuracy of the new analytical model is superior to a previous analytical model and comparable to the accuracy of typical Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Predictions from the new analytical model agreed reasonably well with corresponding values predicted by a Monte Carlo code using an anthropomorphic phantom. PMID:21076197

  16. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  17. Analytical subthreshold modeling of dual material gate engineered nano-scale junctionless surrounding gate MOSFET considering ECPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Sudhansu Mohan; Baral, Biswajit; De, Debashis; Sarkar, Angsuman

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model of dual material junctionless surrounding gate MOSFET (DMJLSRG MOSFET). The expressions of potential and Electric Field of the gate engineered MOSFET structure have been obtained by solving the 2-D Poisson's equation in subthreshold regime using a parabolic potential approximation considering effective conduction path effect (ECPE). The developed potential model accurately predicts the perceivable step function in the potential profile, responsible for effective screening of the drain potential variation in order to reduce DIBL and threshold voltage roll-off. In this work, effectiveness of dual material gate engineered (DM) design for junctionless MOSFET was scrutinized by comparing the results with a single material gate junctionless surrounding gate MOSFET (SMJLSRG MOSFET) of same dimension. From the developed potential model, a simple and accurate analytical expression of threshold voltage is also derived. Results reveal that DMJLSRG devices offer superior performance as compared to SMJLSRG devices. An improvement of hot-carrier effects (HCEs) and a reduction of short-channel effects (SCEs) have been demonstrated for gate-engineered DMJLDG device over the corresponding conventional (SMJLDG) device. The proposed model can be used as a basic design guideline for gate-engineered junctionless surrounding gate MOSFETs.

  18. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-21

    dose difference within 1.7%. The maximum relative difference of output factors was within 0.5%. Over 98.5% passing rate was achieved in 3D gamma-index tests with 2%/2 mm criteria in both an IMRT prostate patient case and a head-and-neck case. These results demonstrated the efficacy of our model in terms of accurately representing a reference phase-space file. We have also tested the efficiency gain of our source model over our previously developed phase-space-let file source model. The overall efficiency of dose calculation was found to be improved by ~1.3-2.2 times in water and patient cases using our analytical model. PMID:26418216

  19. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-01

    dose difference within 1.7%. The maximum relative difference of output factors was within 0.5%. Over 98.5% passing rate was achieved in 3D gamma-index tests with 2%/2 mm criteria in both an IMRT prostate patient case and a head-and-neck case. These results demonstrated the efficacy of our model in terms of accurately representing a reference phase-space file. We have also tested the efficiency gain of our source model over our previously developed phase-space-let file source model. The overall efficiency of dose calculation was found to be improved by ~1.3-2.2 times in water and patient cases using our analytical model.

  20. An analytical model for simulating two-dimensional multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liang, Ching-Ping; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Li, Loretta Y.

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving arbitrary number of species in groundwater system is considered to predict the two-dimensional plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived through the sequential application of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transform to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are compared with the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the analytical solutions are robust, accurate and useful for simulation or screening tools to assess plume behaviors of decaying contaminants.

  1. A model for analytical performance prediction of hypervapotron

    SciTech Connect

    Baxi, C.B.; Falter, H.

    1992-07-01

    A hypervapotron is a water-cooled device which combines the advantages of finned surfaces with the large heat transfer rates possible during boiling heat transfer. Hypervapotrons have been used as beam dumps in the past and plans are under way to use them for divertor cooling in the Joint European Torus (JET). Experiments at JET have shows that a surface heat flux of 25 MW/m{sup 2} can be achieved in hypervapotrons. This performance makes such a device very attractive for cooling of divertor of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper presents an analytical method to predict the thermal performance of the hypervapotrons. Preliminary results show an excellent agreement between experimental results and analytical prediction over a wide range of flow velocities, pressures, subcooling temperatures and heat fluxes. This paper also presents the predicted performance of hypervapotron made of materials other than copper. After further development and verification, the analytical method could be used for optimizing designs and performance prediction.

  2. Is scintillometer measurement accurate enough for evaluating remote sensing based energy balance ET models?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three evapotranspiration (ET) measurement/retrieval techniques used in this study, lysimeter, scintillometer and remote sensing vary in their level of complexity, accuracy, resolution and applicability. The lysimeter with its point measurement is the most accurate and direct method to measure ET...

  3. A simple analytical aerodynamic model of Langley Winged-Cone Aerospace Plane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1994-01-01

    A simple three DOF analytical aerodynamic model of the Langley Winged-Coned Aerospace Plane concept is presented in a form suitable for simulation, trajectory optimization, and guidance and control studies. The analytical model is especially suitable for methods based on variational calculus. Analytical expressions are presented for lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and angles of attack up to +/- 20 deg. This analytical model has break points at Mach numbers of 1.0, 1.4, 4.0, and 6.0. Across these Mach number break points, the lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are made continuous but their derivatives are not. There are no break points in angle of attack. The effect of control surface deflection is not considered. The present analytical model compares well with the APAS calculations and wind tunnel test data for most angles of attack and Mach numbers.

  4. Simplified analytical model for open-phase operating mode of thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashev, M. G.; Novikov, M. A.; Panfilov, D. I.; Rashitov, P. A.; Fedorova, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an approach to the development of a simplified analytical model for the analysis of electromagnetic processes of a thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator with an individual phase-controlled thyristor switch is considered. The analytical expressions for the calculation of electrical parameters in symmetrical and open-phase operating mode are obtained. With a concrete example, the verification of the developed analytical model is carried out. It is accomplished by means of comparison between current and voltage calculation results when the thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator is in an open-phase operating mode with the simulation results in the MatLab software environment. Adequacy check of the obtained analytical model is carried out by comparison between the analytical calculation and experimental data received from the actual physical model.

  5. Analytical models of steady-state plumes undergoing sequential first-order degradation.

    PubMed

    Burnell, Daniel K; Mercer, James W; Sims, Lawrence S

    2012-01-01

    An exact, closed-form analytical solution is derived for one-dimensional (1D), coupled, steady-state advection-dispersion equations with sequential first-order degradation of three dissolved species in groundwater. Dimensionless and mathematical analyses are used to examine the sensitivity of longitudinal dispersivity in the parent and daughter analytical solutions. The results indicate that the relative error decreases to less than 15% for the 1D advection-dominated and advection-dispersion analytical solutions of the parent and daughter when the Damköhler number of the parent decreases to less than 1 (slow degradation rate) and the Peclet number increases to greater than 6 (advection-dominated). To estimate first-order daughter product rate constants in advection-dominated zones, 1D, two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) steady-state analytical solutions with zero longitudinal dispersivity are also derived for three first-order sequentially degrading compounds. The closed form of these exact analytical solutions has the advantage of having (1) no numerical integration or evaluation of complex-valued error function arguments, (2) computational efficiency compared to problems with long times to reach steady state, and (3) minimal effort for incorporation into spreadsheets. These multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate results for 1D steady-state, applications with longitudinal dispersion. Although BIOCHLOR is inaccurate in multidimensional applications with longitudinal dispersion, these multidimensional multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate steady-state results when the longitudinal dispersion is zero. As an application, the 1D advection-dominated analytical solution is applied to estimate field-scale rate constants of 0.81, 0.74, and 0.69/year for trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, respectively, at the Harris Palm Bay, FL, CERCLA site. PMID:21883193

  6. An analytical model for particulate deposition on vertical heat transfer surfaces in a boiling environment

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Rider, J.L.; Waldman, L.A.

    1993-10-01

    A frequent problem in heat exchange equipment is the deposition of particulates entrained in the working fluid onto heat transfer surfaces. These deposits increase the overall heat transfer resistance and can significantly degrade the performance of the heat exchanger. Accurate prediction of the deposition rate is necessary to ensure that the design and specified operating conditions of the heat exchanger adequately address the effects of this deposit layer. Although the deposition process has been studied in considerable detail, much of the work has focused on investigating individual aspects of the deposition process. This paper consolidates this previous research into a mechanistically based analytical prediction model for particulate deposition from a boiling liquid onto vertical heat transfer surfaces. Consistent with the well known Kern-Seaton approach, the model postulates net particulate accumulation to depend on the relative contributions of deposition and reentrainment processes. Mechanisms for deposition include boiling, momentum, and diffusion effects. Reentrainment is presumed to occur via an intermittent erosion process, with the energy for particle removal being supplied by turbulent flow instabilities. The contributions of these individual mechanisms are integrated to obtain a single equation for the deposit thickness versus time. The validity of the resulting model is demonstrated by comparison with data published in the open literature. Model estimates show good agreement with data obtained over a range of thermal-hydraulic conditions in both flow and pool boiling environments. The utility of the model in performing parametric studies (e.g. to determine the effect of flow velocity on net deposition) is also demonstrated. The initial success of the model suggests that it could prove useful in establishing a range of heat exchanger. operating conditions to minimize deposition.

  7. An analytical model for studying the structural effects and optimization of a capacitive tactile sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guanhao; Wang, Yancheng; Mei, Deqing; Xi, Kailun; Chen, Zichen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to study the structural effects of a capacitive tactile sensor array on its capacitance changes and sensitivities. The tactile sensor array has 8  ×  8 sensor units, and each unit utilizes the truncated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pyramid array structure as the dielectric layer to enhance the sensing performance. To predict the capacitance changes of the sensor unit, it is simplified into a two-layered structure: upper polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and bottom truncated PDMS pyramid array. The upper PET is modeled by a displacement field function, while each of the truncated pyramids is analyzed to obtain its stress-strain relation. Using the Ritz method, the displacement field functions are solved. The deformation of the upper electrodes and the capacitance changes of the sensor unit can then be calculated. Using the developed model, the structural effects of the truncated PDMS pyramid array and the PDMS bump on the capacitance changes and sensitivities are studied. To achieve the largest capacitance changes, the dimensions have been optimized for the sensor unit. To verify the developed model, we have fabricated the sensor array, and the average sensitivities of the sensor unit to the x-, y-, and z-axes force are 0.49, 0.50, and 0.32% mN-1, respectively, while the model predicted values are 0.54, 0.54, and 0.35% mN-1. Results demonstrate that the developed model can accurately predict the sensing performance of the sensor array and could be utilized for structural optimization.

  8. Transcriptional Bursting in Gene Expression: Analytical Results for General Stochastic Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Singh, Abhyudai; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression in individual cells is highly variable and sporadic, often resulting in the synthesis of mRNAs and proteins in bursts. Such bursting has important consequences for cell-fate decisions in diverse processes ranging from HIV-1 viral infections to stem-cell differentiation. It is generally assumed that bursts are geometrically distributed and that they arrive according to a Poisson process. On the other hand, recent single-cell experiments provide evidence for complex burst arrival processes, highlighting the need for analysis of more general stochastic models. To address this issue, we invoke a mapping between general stochastic models of gene expression and systems studied in queueing theory to derive exact analytical expressions for the moments associated with mRNA/protein steady-state distributions. These results are then used to derive noise signatures, i.e. explicit conditions based entirely on experimentally measurable quantities, that determine if the burst distributions deviate from the geometric distribution or if burst arrival deviates from a Poisson process. For non-Poisson arrivals, we develop approaches for accurate estimation of burst parameters. The proposed approaches can lead to new insights into transcriptional bursting based on measurements of steady-state mRNA/protein distributions. PMID:26474290

  9. Spatial Analytic Hierarchy Process Model for Flood Forecasting: An Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Matori, Abd; Umar Lawal, Dano; Yusof, Khamaruzaman Wan; Hashim, Mustafa Ahmad; Balogun, Abdul-Lateef

    2014-06-01

    Various flood influencing factors such as rainfall, geology, slope gradient, land use, soil type, drainage density, temperature etc. are generally considered for flood hazard assessment. However, lack of appropriate handling/integration of data from different sources is a challenge that can make any spatial forecasting difficult and inaccurate. Availability of accurate flood maps and thorough understanding of the subsurface conditions can adequately enhance flood disasters management. This study presents an approach that attempts to provide a solution to this drawback by combining Geographic Information System (GIS)-based Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) model as spatial forecasting tools. In achieving the set objectives, spatial forecasting of flood susceptible zones in the study area was made. A total number of five set of criteria/factors believed to be influencing flood generation in the study area were selected. Priority weights were assigned to each criterion/factor based on Saaty's nine point scale of preference and weights were further normalized through the AHP. The model was integrated into a GIS system in order to produce a flood forecasting map.

  10. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  11. Making the most of your prognostic factors: presenting a more accurate survival model for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Knorr, K L; Hilsenbeck, S G; Wenger, C R; Pounds, G; Oldaker, T; Vendely, P; Pandian, M R; Harrington, D; Clark, G M

    1992-01-01

    Determining an appropriate level of adjuvant therapy is one of the most difficult facets of treating breast cancer patients. Although the myriad of prognostic factors aid in this decision, often they give conflicting reports of a patient's prognosis. What we need is a survival model which can properly utilize the information contained in these factors and give an accurate, reliable account of the patient's probability of recurrence. We also need a method of evaluating these models' predictive ability instead of simply measuring goodness-of-fit, as is currently done. Often, prognostic factors are broken into two categories such as positive or negative. But this dichotomization may hide valuable prognostic information. We investigated whether continuous representations of factors, including standard transformations--logarithmic, square root, categorical, and smoothers--might more accurately estimate the underlying relationship between each factor and survival. We chose the logistic regression model, a special case of the commonly used Cox model, to test our hypothesis. The model containing continuous transformed factors fit the data more closely than the model containing the traditional dichotomized factors. In order to appropriately evaluate these models, we introduce three predictive validity statistics--the Calibration score, the Overall Calibration score, and the Brier score--designed to assess the model's accuracy and reliability. These standardized scores showed the transformed factors predicted three year survival accurately and reliably. The scores can also be used to assess models or compare across studies. PMID:1391991

  12. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  13. IT vendor selection model by using structural equation model & analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Sarit; Dominic, P. D. D.

    2012-11-01

    Selecting and evaluating the right vendors is imperative for an organization's global marketplace competitiveness. Improper selection and evaluation of potential vendors can dwarf an organization's supply chain performance. Numerous studies have demonstrated that firms consider multiple criteria when selecting key vendors. This research intends to develop a new hybrid model for vendor selection process with better decision making. The new proposed model provides a suitable tool for assisting decision makers and managers to make the right decisions and select the most suitable vendor. This paper proposes a Hybrid model based on Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for long-term strategic vendor selection problems. The five steps framework of the model has been designed after the thorough literature study. The proposed hybrid model will be applied using a real life case study to assess its effectiveness. In addition, What-if analysis technique will be used for model validation purpose.

  14. Unique signature of bivalent analyte surface plasmon resonance model: A model governed by non-linear differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam; Wang, Xuewen; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin; Uren, Aykut

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a biophysical technique for the quantitative analysis of bimolecular interactions. Correct identification of the binding model is crucial for the interpretation of SPR data. Bivalent SPR model is governed by non-linear differential equations, which, in general, have no analytical solutions. Therefore, an analytical based approach cannot be employed in order to identify this particular model. There exists a unique signature in the bivalent analyte model, existence of an `optimal analyte concentration', which can distinguish this model from other biphasic models. The unambiguous identification and related analysis of the bivalent analyte model is demonstrated by using theoretical simulations and experimentally measured SPR sensorgrams. Experimental SPR sensorgrams were measured by using Biacore T200 instrument available in Biacore Molecular Interaction Shared Resource facility, supported by NIH Grant P30CA51008, at Georgetown University.

  15. Analytical models of optical response in one-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2015-09-01

    The quantum mechanical description of the optical properties of crystalline materials typically requires extensive numerical computation. Including excitonic and non-perturbative field effects adds to the complexity. In one dimension, however, the analysis simplifies and optical spectra can be computed exactly. In this paper, we apply the Wannier exciton formalism to derive analytical expressions for the optical response in four cases of increasing complexity. Thus, we start from free carriers and, in turn, switch on electrostatic fields and electron-hole attraction and, finally, analyze the combined influence of these effects. In addition, the optical response of impurity-localized excitons is discussed.

  16. Factors Affecting Higher Order Thinking Skills of Students: A Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budsankom, Prayoonsri; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Damrongpanit, Suntorapot; Chuensirimongkol, Jariya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop and identify the validity of factors affecting higher order thinking skills (HOTS) of students. The thinking skills can be divided into three types: analytical, critical, and creative thinking. This analysis is done by applying the meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) based on a database of…

  17. An Analytic Hierarchy Process for School Quality and Inspection: Model Development and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Qubaisi, Amal; Badri, Masood; Mohaidat, Jihad; Al Dhaheri, Hamad; Yang, Guang; Al Rashedi, Asma; Greer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytic hierarchy planning-based framework to establish criteria weights and to develop a school performance system commonly called school inspections. Design/methodology/approach: The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model uses pairwise comparisons and a measurement scale to generate the…

  18. Analytic model approach to the inversion of scattering data. [to obtain ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Klenk, K. F.

    1977-01-01

    An analytic model approach is applied to several simple atmospheric inversion problems. This method gives a sharp determination of aerosol size distribution parameters. It is shown that this analytic approach, together with ground level point sampling data measurements, can be used to infer information on the tropospheric ozone profile.

  19. Promoting Active Learning by Practicing the "Self-Assembly" of Model Analytical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algar, W. Russ; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2010-01-01

    In our upper-year instrumental analytical chemistry course, we have developed "cut-and-paste" exercises where students "build" models of analytical instruments from individual schematic images of components. These exercises encourage active learning by students. Instead of trying to memorize diagrams, students are required to think deeply about…

  20. Dike emplacement in layered media: analytical, numerical and analogous models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivalta, E.; Dahm, T.

    2003-04-01

    Strong heterogeneities are very common in volcanic areas, and are recognized to have a great influence on the stress field generated by magma intrusions. Layering, represented by strong discontinuities in the elastic parameters, is able to significantly concentrate and enhance stress. For instance, at Moho depth where elastic and viscoelastic parameters change, or beneath volcanic edifices, that are made up by a stiff basaltic basement covered by softer materials produced by repetitive activity. Numerical and (semi)analytical studies have shown how layering influences the shape of the intrusion and the surrounding stress field. However, it is important to quantify how layering influences the propagation of the dikes, in order to understand the physics controlling the dynamic of the interaction between the dike and the elastic parameters of the medium. The stress intensity factor is a measure of the tendency of the dike to break new rock and to propagate, and is therefore an useful parameter to analyse the migration process. It has been calculated with both semianalytic and numerical procedures and has been plotted as a function of the depth in relation to different rigidity contrasts. The stress intensity factor is found to increase when the dike is embedded in the stiffer medium and propagates towards a softer one, and to decrease in the opposite situation. This may produce stops, pauses or accelerations in the migration process that may be mirrored in the seismicity recorded during injection events. Additionally to analytical and numerical studies, analogue experiments have been conducted to verify the theoretical findings.

  1. Evaluation of Analytical Modeling Functions for the Phonation Onset Process.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Simon; Kniesburges, Stefan; Ziethe, Anke; Schützenberger, Anne; Döllinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The human voice originates from oscillations of the vocal folds in the larynx. The duration of the voice onset (VO), called the voice onset time (VOT), is currently under investigation as a clinical indicator for correct laryngeal functionality. Different analytical approaches for computing the VOT based on endoscopic imaging were compared to determine the most reliable method to quantify automatically the transient vocal fold oscillations during VO. Transnasal endoscopic imaging in combination with a high-speed camera (8000 fps) was applied to visualize the phonation onset process. Two different definitions of VO interval were investigated. Six analytical functions were tested that approximate the envelope of the filtered or unfiltered glottal area waveform (GAW) during phonation onset. A total of 126 recordings from nine healthy males and 210 recordings from 15 healthy females were evaluated. Three criteria were analyzed to determine the most appropriate computation approach: (1) reliability of the fit function for a correct approximation of VO; (2) consistency represented by the standard deviation of VOT; and (3) accuracy of the approximation of VO. The results suggest the computation of VOT by a fourth-order polynomial approximation in the interval between 32.2 and 67.8% of the saturation amplitude of the filtered GAW. PMID:27066108

  2. Evaluation of Analytical Modeling Functions for the Phonation Onset Process

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Simon; Kniesburges, Stefan; Ziethe, Anke; Schützenberger, Anne; Döllinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The human voice originates from oscillations of the vocal folds in the larynx. The duration of the voice onset (VO), called the voice onset time (VOT), is currently under investigation as a clinical indicator for correct laryngeal functionality. Different analytical approaches for computing the VOT based on endoscopic imaging were compared to determine the most reliable method to quantify automatically the transient vocal fold oscillations during VO. Transnasal endoscopic imaging in combination with a high-speed camera (8000 fps) was applied to visualize the phonation onset process. Two different definitions of VO interval were investigated. Six analytical functions were tested that approximate the envelope of the filtered or unfiltered glottal area waveform (GAW) during phonation onset. A total of 126 recordings from nine healthy males and 210 recordings from 15 healthy females were evaluated. Three criteria were analyzed to determine the most appropriate computation approach: (1) reliability of the fit function for a correct approximation of VO; (2) consistency represented by the standard deviation of VOT; and (3) accuracy of the approximation of VO. The results suggest the computation of VOT by a fourth-order polynomial approximation in the interval between 32.2 and 67.8% of the saturation amplitude of the filtered GAW. PMID:27066108

  3. Analytical model for quantization on strained and unstrained bulk nMOSFET and its impact on quasi-ballistic current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, M.; Clerc, R.; Ghibaudo, G.; Boeuf, F.; Skotnicki, T.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a fully analytical model for the evaluation of quasi-ballistic transport in advanced bulk nMOS devices. Starting from the Lundstrom approach, an original analytical evaluation of energy levels advantageously replaces numerical time-consuming Poisson-Schrödinger simulations or usual analytical single subband approximations. This model allows an accurate estimation of quantum mechanical effects and their impact on quasi-ballistic performances. Based on an improved Airy method, it accounts for the non-linearity of the depletion potential, the wave function oxide penetration and a generalized concept of effective field. As it relies on subband structure, it can easily be extended to biaxially strained devices provided that the band modifications are known. Interest of strained channels is confirmed even on the base of ballistic or quasi-ballistic hypothesis. This model has been used for the evaluation of the "ballisticity" along the ITRS roadmap, showing for next generation devices a quasi-ballistic current slightly higher than that predicted with the usual drift diffusion and saturation velocity equations. However, as already reported, MOS devices still operate far from their ballistic limit down to HP45 nm node.

  4. Design Evaluation of Wind Turbine Spline Couplings Using an Analytical Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Wallen, R.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.; Lambert, S.

    2015-02-01

    Articulated splines are commonly used in the planetary stage of wind turbine gearboxes for transmitting the driving torque and improving load sharing. Direct measurement of spline loads and performance is extremely challenging because of limited accessibility. This paper presents an analytical model for the analysis of articulated spline coupling designs. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, this analytical model quickly yields insights into relationships between the spline design parameters and resulting loads; bending, contact, and shear stresses; and safety factors considering various heat treatment methods. Comparisons of this analytical model against previously published computational approaches are also presented.

  5. An analytical model for predicting LNAPL distribution and recovery from multi-layered soils.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaehak; Charbeneau, Randall J

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for estimating the distribution and recovery of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL) in heterogeneous aquifers. Various scenarios of LNAPL recovery may be simulated using LDRM for LNAPL recovery systems such as skimmer wells, water-enhanced wells, air-enhanced wells, and trenches from heterogeneous aquifers. LDRM uses multiple horizontal soil layers to model a heterogeneous aquifer. Up to three soil layers may be configured with unique soil properties for each layer. Simulation results suggest that LNAPL distribution and its recovery volume are highly affected by soil properties. In sandy soils LNAPL can be highly mobile and the recovery efficiency can be high. In contrast, even at high LNAPL saturations, LNAPL mobility is typically low in fine-grained soils. This characteristic of LNAPL with respect to soil texture has to be carefully accounted for in the model to better predict the recovery of LNAPL from heterogeneous soils. The impact of vertical hydraulic gradient in fine grain zone was assessed. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the formation LNAPL volume can be significantly affected by a downward vertical hydraulic gradient if the magnitude is near a critical amount (=ρr-1). Sensitivity of input parameters with respect to LNAPL formation in soils and LNAPL recovery volume were identified through a sensitivity analysis. The performance of LDRM on predicting the distribution and recovery of LNAP was reasonably accurate for a short-term analysis as demonstrated in a case study. However, further validation is needed to ascertain the model's performance in long-term simulations. PMID:24262305

  6. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  7. Improving a complex finite-difference ground water flow model through the use of an analytic element screening model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Anderson, M.P.; Kelson, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.

  8. Analytic Expressions for the BCDMEM Model of Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Pitt, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a Fourier Transformation technique that enables one to derive closed-form expressions of performance measures (e.g., hit and false alarm rates) of simulation-based models of recognition memory. Application of the technique is demonstrated using the bind cue decide model of episodic memory (BCDMEM; Dennis & Humphreys, 2001). In addition to reducing the time required to test the model, which for models like BCDMEM can be excessive, asymptotic expressions of the measures reveal heretofore unknown properties of the model, such as model predictions being dependent on vector length. PMID:18516213

  9. Inferring an analytical model from Cassini-CIRS data to predict Saturn's Rings temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altobelli, N.; Lopez Paz, D.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.; Brooks, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    's response. We consider this aspect by performing tests on the available data set using a Neural Network (NN) based technique. We show that indeed, the measurements performed in the past years are sufficient to predict the behavior of the ring temperature, as accurate predictions can be obtained by 'training' the NN only with a (well-chosen) fraction of the measurements taken. In a second step, we propose a general parameterized analytical description of the ring temperature for different radial distances. We show that the B and A ring can, from a thermal response point of view, be modeled as a surface parameterized by its albedo, emissivity and thermal relaxation time, combined with a function quantifying the anisotropy of the perceived temperature by an observer, itself most likely linked to the 'granularity' of the surface that translates into shadowing. We then discuss the quality of our fits and their implications for the ring physical properties, and we use our analytical model to predict future temperature measurements of the rings as planned for the coming years of the Cassini mission.

  10. An analytical model for the celestial distribution of polarized light, accounting for polarization singularities, wavelength and atmospheric turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Jun; Fan, Zhiguo; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2016-06-01

    We present a computationally inexpensive analytical model for simulating celestial polarization patterns in variable conditions. We combine both the singularity theory of Berry et al (2004 New J. Phys. 6 162) and the intensity model of Perez et al (1993 Sol. Energy 50 235–245) such that our single model describes three key sets of data: (1) the overhead distribution of the degree of polarization as well as the existence of neutral points in the sky; (2) the change in sky polarization as a function of the turbidity of the atmosphere; and (3) sky polarization patterns as a function of wavelength, calculated in this work from the ultra-violet to the near infra-red. To verify the performance of our model we generate accurate reference data using a numerical radiative transfer model and statistical comparisons between these two methods demonstrate no significant difference in almost all situations. The development of our analytical model provides a novel method for efficiently calculating the overhead skylight polarization pattern. This provides a new tool of particular relevance for our understanding of animals that use the celestial polarization pattern as a source of visual information.

  11. Accurate cortical tissue classification on MRI by modeling cortical folding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Caldairou, Benoit; Hwang, Ji-Wook; Mansi, Tommaso; Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Accurate tissue classification is a crucial prerequisite to MRI morphometry. Automated methods based on intensity histograms constructed from the entire volume are challenged by regional intensity variations due to local radiofrequency artifacts as well as disparities in tissue composition, laminar architecture and folding patterns. Current work proposes a novel anatomy-driven method in which parcels conforming cortical folding were regionally extracted from the brain. Each parcel is subsequently classified using nonparametric mean shift clustering. Evaluation was carried out on manually labeled images from two datasets acquired at 3.0 Tesla (n = 15) and 1.5 Tesla (n = 20). In both datasets, we observed high tissue classification accuracy of the proposed method (Dice index >97.6% at 3.0 Tesla, and >89.2% at 1.5 Tesla). Moreover, our method consistently outperformed state-of-the-art classification routines available in SPM8 and FSL-FAST, as well as a recently proposed local classifier that partitions the brain into cubes. Contour-based analyses localized more accurate white matter-gray matter (GM) interface classification of the proposed framework compared to the other algorithms, particularly in central and occipital cortices that generally display bright GM due to their highly degree of myelination. Excellent accuracy was maintained, even in the absence of correction for intensity inhomogeneity. The presented anatomy-driven local classification algorithm may significantly improve cortical boundary definition, with possible benefits for morphometric inference and biomarker discovery. PMID:26037453

  12. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate-incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A

    2014-10-01

    Commensurate-incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs-Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton-graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton-carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas-solid and solid-solid system. PMID:25296827

  13. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate–incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate–incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs–Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton–graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton–carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas–solid and solid–solid system.

  14. Surface electron density models for accurate ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) is a valuable methodology to study the interaction of atomic particles with metal surfaces. This method, in which the effect of low-energy electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations is treated within the local density friction approximation (LDFA) [Juaristi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 116102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.116102], can provide an accurate description of both e-h pair and phonon excitations. In practice, its applicability becomes a complicated task in those situations of substantial surface atoms displacements because the LDFA requires the knowledge at each integration step of the bare surface electron density. In this work, we propose three different methods of calculating on-the-fly the electron density of the distorted surface and we discuss their suitability under typical surface distortions. The investigated methods are used in AIMDEF simulations for three illustrative adsorption cases, namely, dissociated H2 on Pd(100), N on Ag(111), and N2 on Fe(110). Our AIMDEF calculations performed with the three approaches highlight the importance of going beyond the frozen surface density to accurately describe the energy released into e-h pair excitations in case of large surface atom displacements.

  15. Process models: analytical tools for managing industrial energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Balzer, C; Sparrow, F T

    1980-01-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy systems is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for managing industrial energy systems.

  16. Simple analytic QCD model with perturbative QCD behavior at high momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Carlos; Espinosa, Olivier; Cvetic, Gorazd; Martinez, Hector E.

    2010-10-01

    Analytic QCD models are those where the QCD running coupling has the physically correct analytic behavior, i.e., no Landau singularities in the Euclidean regime. We present a simple analytic QCD model in which the discontinuity function of the running coupling at high momentum scales is the same as in perturbative QCD (just like in the analytic QCD model of Shirkov and Solovtsov), but at low scales it is replaced by a delta function which parametrizes the unknown behavior there. We require that the running coupling agree to a high degree with the perturbative coupling at high energies, which reduces the number of free parameters of the model from four to one. The remaining parameter is fixed by requiring the reproduction of the correct value of the semihadronic tau decay ratio.

  17. An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force displacement model for granular-flow simulations: Displacement-driven formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Vu-Quoc, Loc

    2007-07-01

    We present in this paper the displacement-driven version of a tangential force-displacement (TFD) model that accounts for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, L. Lesburg, X. Zhang. An accurate tangential force-displacement model for granular-flow simulations: contacting spheres with plastic deformation, force-driven formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 196(1) (2004) 298-326], is consistent with the elasto-plastic frictional normal force-displacement (NFD) model presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, X. Zhang. An elasto-plastic contact force-displacement model in the normal direction: displacement-driven version, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A 455 (1991) 4013-4044]. Both the NFD model and the present TFD model are based on the concept of additive decomposition of the radius of contact area into an elastic part and a plastic part. The effect of permanent indentation after impact is represented by a correction to the radius of curvature. The effect of material softening due to plastic flow is represented by a correction to the elastic moduli. The proposed TFD model is accurate, and is validated against nonlinear finite element analyses involving plastic flows in both the loading and unloading conditions. The proposed consistent displacement-driven, elasto-plastic NFD and TFD models are designed for implementation in computer codes using the discrete-element method (DEM) for granular-flow simulations. The model is shown to be accurate and is validated against nonlinear elasto-plastic finite-element analysis.

  18. Two-Phase Fluid Leakage through Faults Using a Multi-Scale Analytical-Numerical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow through faults must be considered in many applications including geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), deep storage of hazardous waste, groundwater contamination, and petroleum engineering. In the case of CO2 storage, the presence of faults is of concern, because they can act as leakage pathways. Therefore, modeling tools that can accurately and efficiently quantify fluid leakage through faults in basin-scale models are necessary. In basin-scale models, the flow around and through faults is a local-scale process and this local-scale variation is important when determining leakage rates. We present a multi-scale modeling approach based on embedding local-scale analytical solutions within basin-scale numerical models. At the local scale, steady-state analytical solutions that represent fluid flow in the vicinity of leaky faults, including any vertical flow effects, are derived. Using both numerical simulations and analytical solutions, an empirical model representing fault properties, permeabilities and widths, is also developed. The combination of this empirical fault model and the analytical solutions captures the local-scale effects of leakage through faults. The local-scale model is used within a multi-scale modeling framework to determine the flow in and around faults and the associated local-scale pressure and saturation corrections that are applied to the coarse model. Here, a fault is viewed as a 2-D surface on one side of a coarse-scale grid block. The corrections relate local-scale pressure and saturation at the fault to coarse-scale pressures and saturations in numerical grid blocks. The corrections are used to determine the vertical and lateral flow in the fault and horizontal flows perpendicular and parallel to the fault in the grid block. At every coarse-scale time step, the local-scale fault model is implemented using the coarse-scale information from the previous time step. The resulting leakage rates and pressure and saturation

  19. Semi-analytic models for the CANDELS survey: comparison of predictions for intrinsic galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Croton, Darren; Porter, Lauren; Primack, Joel; Moody, Chris; Behroozi, Peter S.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng; Finlator, Kristian; Castellano, Marco; Sommariva, Veronica E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2014-11-10

    We compare the predictions of three independently developed semi-analytic galaxy formation models (SAMs) that are being used to aid in the interpretation of results from the CANDELS survey. These models are each applied to the same set of halo merger trees extracted from the 'Bolshoi' high-resolution cosmological N-body simulation and are carefully tuned to match the local galaxy stellar mass function using the powerful method of Bayesian Inference coupled with Markov Chain Monte Carlo or by hand. The comparisons reveal that in spite of the significantly different parameterizations for star formation and feedback processes, the three models yield qualitatively similar predictions for the assembly histories of galaxy stellar mass and star formation over cosmic time. Comparing SAM predictions with existing estimates of the stellar mass function from z = 0-8, we show that the SAMs generally require strong outflows to suppress star formation in low-mass halos to match the present-day stellar mass function, as is the present common wisdom. However, all of the models considered produce predictions for the star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities of low-mass galaxies that are inconsistent with existing data. The predictions for metallicity-stellar mass relations and their evolution clearly diverge between the models. We suggest that large differences in the metallicity relations and small differences in the stellar mass assembly histories of model galaxies stem from different assumptions for the outflow mass-loading factor produced by feedback. Importantly, while more accurate observational measurements for stellar mass, SFR and metallicity of galaxies at 1 < z < 5 will discriminate between models, the discrepancies between the constrained models and existing data of these observables have already revealed challenging problems in understanding star formation and its feedback in galaxy formation. The three sets of models are being used to construct catalogs of mock

  20. Device and material characterization and analytic modeling of amorphous silicon thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Holly Claudia

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) are now well-established as switching elements for a variety of applications in the lucrative electronics market, such as active matrix liquid crystal displays, two-dimensional imagers, and position-sensitive radiation detectors. These applications necessitate the development of accurate characterization and simulation tools. The main goal of this work is the development of a semi- empirical, analytical model for the DC and AC operation of an amorphous silicon TFT for use in a manufacturing facility to improve yield and maintain process control. The model is physically-based, in order that the parameters scale with gate length and can be easily related back to the material and device properties. To accomplish this, extensive experimental data and 2D simulations are used to observe and quantify non- crystalline effects in the TFTs. In particular, due to the disorder in the amorphous network, localized energy states exist throughout the band gap and affect all regimes of TFT operation. These localized states trap most of the free charge, causing a gate-bias-dependent field effect mobility above threshold, a power-law dependence of the current on gate bias below threshold, very low leakage currents, and severe frequency dispersion of the TFT gate capacitance. Additional investigations of TFT instabilities reveal the importance of changes in the density of states and/or back channel conduction due to bias and thermal stress. In the above threshold regime, the model is similar to the crystalline MOSFET model, considering the drift component of free charge. This approach uses the field effect mobility to take into account the trap states and must utilize the correct definition of threshold voltage. In the below threshold regime, the density of deep states is taken into account. The leakage current is modeled empirically, and the parameters are temperature dependent to 150oC. The capacitance of the TFT can be