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1

Nebulizer calibration using lithium chloride: an accurate, reproducible and user-friendly method.  

PubMed

Conventional gravimetric (weight loss) calibration of jet nebulizers overestimates their aerosol output by up to 80% due to unaccounted evaporative loss. We examined two methods of measuring true aerosol output from jet nebulizers. A new adaptation of a widely available clinical assay for lithium (determined by flame photometry, LiCl method) was compared to an existing electrochemical method based on fluoride detection (NaF method). The agreement between the two methods and the repeatability of each method were examined. Ten Mefar jet nebulizers were studied using a Mefar MK3 inhalation dosimeter. There was no significant difference between the two methods (p=0.76) with mean aerosol output of the 10 nebulizers being 7.40 mg x s(-1) (SD 1.06; range 5.86-9.36 mg x s(-1)) for the NaF method and 7.27 mg x s(-1) (SD 0.82; range 5.52-8.26 mg x s(-1)) for the LiCl method. The LiCl method had a coefficient of repeatability of 13 mg x s(-1) compared with 3.7 mg x s(-1) for the NaF method. The LiCl method accurately measured true aerosol output and was considerably easier to use. It was also more repeatable, and hence more precise, than the NaF method. Because the LiCl method uses an assay that is routinely available from hospital biochemistry laboratories, it is easy to use and, thus, can readily be adopted by busy respiratory function departments. PMID:9623700

Ward, R J; Reid, D W; Leonard, R F; Johns, D P; Walters, E H

1998-04-01

2

AUREA: an open-source software system for accurate and user-friendly identification of relative expression molecular signatures  

PubMed Central

Background Public databases such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus contain extensive and exponentially increasing amounts of high-throughput data that can be applied to molecular phenotype characterization. Collectively, these data can be analyzed for such purposes as disease diagnosis or phenotype classification. One family of algorithms that has proven useful for disease classification is based on relative expression analysis and includes the Top-Scoring Pair (TSP), k-Top-Scoring Pairs (k-TSP), Top-Scoring Triplet (TST) and Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC) algorithms. These relative expression analysis algorithms hold significant advantages for identifying interpretable molecular signatures for disease classification, and have been implemented previously on a variety of computational platforms with varying degrees of usability. To increase the user-base and maximize the utility of these methods, we developed the program AUREA (Adaptive Unified Relative Expression Analyzer)—a cross-platform tool that has a consistent application programming interface (API), an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI), fast running times and automated parameter discovery. Results Herein, we describe AUREA, an efficient, cohesive, and user-friendly open-source software system that comprises a suite of methods for relative expression analysis. AUREA incorporates existing methods, while extending their capabilities and bringing uniformity to their interfaces. We demonstrate that combining these algorithms and adaptively tuning parameters on the training sets makes these algorithms more consistent in their performance and demonstrate the effectiveness of our adaptive parameter tuner by comparing accuracy across diverse datasets. Conclusions We have integrated several relative expression analysis algorithms and provided a unified interface for their implementation while making data acquisition, parameter fixing, data merging, and results analysis ‘point-and-click’ simple. The unified interface and the adaptive parameter tuning of AUREA provide an effective framework in which to investigate the massive amounts of publically available data by both ‘in silico’ and ‘bench’ scientists. AUREA can be found at http://price.systemsbiology.net/AUREA/.

2013-01-01

3

Microarray ? US: a user-friendly graphical interface to Bioconductor tools that enables accurate microarray data analysis and expedites comprehensive functional analysis of microarray results  

PubMed Central

Background Microarray data analysis presents a significant challenge to researchers who are unable to use the powerful Bioconductor and its numerous tools due to their lack of knowledge of R language. Among the few existing software programs that offer a graphic user interface to Bioconductor packages, none have implemented a comprehensive strategy to address the accuracy and reliability issue of microarray data analysis due to the well known probe design problems associated with many widely used microarray chips. There is also a lack of tools that would expedite the functional analysis of microarray results. Findings We present Microarray ? US, an R-based graphical user interface that implements over a dozen popular Bioconductor packages to offer researchers a streamlined workflow for routine differential microarray expression data analysis without the need to learn R language. In order to enable a more accurate analysis and interpretation of microarray data, we incorporated the latest custom probe re-definition and re-annotation for Affymetrix and Illumina chips. A versatile microarray results output utility tool was also implemented for easy and fast generation of input files for over 20 of the most widely used functional analysis software programs. Conclusion Coupled with a well-designed user interface, Microarray ? US leverages cutting edge Bioconductor packages for researchers with no knowledge in R language. It also enables a more reliable and accurate microarray data analysis and expedites downstream functional analysis of microarray results.

2012-01-01

4

FACOPT: a user friendly FACility layout OPTimization system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The facility layout problem is a well-researched one. However, few effective and user friendly approaches have been proposed. Since it is an NP hard problem, various optimization approaches for small problems and heuristic approaches for the larger problems have been proposed. For the most part the more effective algorithms are not user friendly. On the other hand, user-friendly methods have

Jaydeep Balakrishnan; Chun-Hung Cheng; Kam-fai Wong

2003-01-01

5

User-Friendly Interface to the Roth Relational Database.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Friendly Interface to a Relational Algebra Database System was created on the Universal Relation concept. This concept allows the user to relate to the total database as a single relation. The user inputs a query using attributes of the single relation....

D. W. VanKirk

1983-01-01

6

A User-Friendly Statistical Package for Microcomputers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A package of user-friendly data-analysis and tutorial routines was developed for the Apple II microcomputer. The programs are concerned with common topics found in introductory statistics texts. Formal evaluations were obtained from Baylor University psychology students and statistics faculty.

Bradley S. Wilson; Roger E. Kirk

1985-01-01

7

ALABAMA CROPMAN: A USER FRIENDLY INTERFACE FOR CROP PRODUCTION SIMULATIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The impact of cropping and tillage systems on agriculture production is very complicated, making it very difficult to predict the economic and environmental consequences of changes in agronomic practices. To better understand the potential consequences of agriculture practices, a user-friendly comp...

8

A user friendly interface for microwave tomography enhanced GPR surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are nowadays widely used in civil applications among which structural monitoring is one of the most critical issues due to its importance in terms of risks prevents and cost effective management of the structure itself. Despite GPR systems are assessed devices, there is a continuous interest towards their optimization, which involves both hardware and software aspects, with the common final goal to achieve accurate and highly informative images while keeping as low as possible difficulties and times involved in on field surveys. As far as data processing is concerned, one of the key aims is the development of imaging approaches capable of providing images easily interpretable by not expert users while keeping feasible the requirements in terms of computational resources. To satisfy this request or at least improve the reconstruction capabilities of data processing tools actually available in commercial GPR systems, microwave tomographic approaches based on the Born approximation have been developed and tested in several practical conditions, such as civil and archeological investigations, sub-service monitoring, security surveys and so on [1-3]. However, the adoption of these approaches is subjected to the involvement of expert workers, which have to be capable of properly managing the gathered data and their processing, which involves the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In order to overcome this drawback, aim of this contribution is to present an end-user friendly software interface that makes possible a simple management of the microwave tomographic approaches. In particular, the proposed interface allows us to upload both synthetic and experimental data sets saved in .txt, .dt and .dt1 formats, to perform all the steps needed to obtain tomographic images and to display raw-radargrams, intermediate and final results. By means of the interface, the users can apply time gating, back-ground removal or both to extract from the gathered data the meaningful signal, they can process the full set of the gathered A-scans or select a their portion as well as they can choose to account for an arbitrary time window inside that adopted during the measurement stage. Finally, the interface allows us to perform the imaging according to two different tomographic approaches, both modeling the scattering phenomenon according to the Born approximation and looking for cylindrical objects of arbitrary cross section (2D geometry) probed by an incident field polarized along the invariance axis (scalar case). One approach is based on the assumption that the scattering phenomenon arises in a homogeneous medium, while the second one accounts for the presence of a flat air-medium interface. REFERENCES [1] F. Soldovieri, J. Hugenschmidt, R. Persico and G. Leone, "A linear inverse scattering algorithm for realistic GPR applications, Near Surf. Geophys., vol. 5, pp.29-42, 2007. [2] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, E. Utsi, "Microwave tomography for processing of GPR data at Ballachulish, J. Geophys. and Eng., vol.7, pp.164-173, 2010. [3] I. Catapano, L. Crocco R. Di Napoli, F. Soldovieri, A. Brancaccio, F. Pesando, A. Aiello, "Microwave tomography enhanced GPR surveys in Centaur's Domus, Regio VI of Pompeii, Italy", J. Geophys. Eng., vol.9, S92-S99, 2012.

Catapano, Ilaria; Affinito, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco

2013-04-01

9

MADANALYSIS 5, a user-friendly framework for collider phenomenology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present MADANALYSIS 5, a new framework for phenomenological investigations at particle colliders. Based on a C++ kernel, this program allows us to efficiently perform, in a straightforward and user-friendly fashion, sophisticated physics analyses of event files such as those generated by a large class of Monte Carlo event generators. MADANALYSIS 5 comes with two modes of running. The first one, easier to handle, uses the strengths of a powerful PYTHON interface in order to implement physics analyses by means of a set of intuitive commands. The second one requires one to implement the analyses in the C++ programming language, directly within the core of the analysis framework. This opens unlimited possibilities concerning the level of complexity which can be reached, being only limited by the programming skills and the originality of the user.

Conte, Eric; Fuks, Benjamin; Serret, Guillaume

2013-01-01

10

A new user-friendly visual environment for breast MRI data analysis.  

PubMed

In this paper a novel, user friendly visual environment for Breast MRI Data Analysis is presented (BreDAn). Given planar MRI images before and after IV contrast medium injection, BreDAn generates kinematic graphs, color maps of signal increase and decrease and finally detects high risk breast areas. The advantage of BreDAn, which has been validated and tested successfully, is the automation of the radiodiagnostic process in an accurate and reliable manner. It can potentially facilitate radiologists' workload. PMID:23414601

Antonios, Danelakis; Dimitrios, Verganelakis A; Theoharis, Theoharis

2013-02-13

11

Structural Link Analysis from User Profiles and Friends Networks: A Feature Construction Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the problems of predicting, classifying, and annotating friends relations in friends networks, based upon network structure and user profile data. First, we document a data model for the blog service LiveJournal, and define a set of machine learning problems such as predicting existing links and estimating inter-pair distance. Next, we explain how the problem of classifying a user

William H. Hsu; Joseph Lancaster; Martin S. R. Paradesi; Tim Weninger

12

Senior-friendly technologies: interaction design for senior users  

Microsoft Academic Search

The elderly represent a valid group of users who can potentially benefit greatly from engaging with technology, such as healthcare systems or playing digital games. Yet, less attention has been given to the significance of senior citizens as technology users, as compared to the common younger population. In an effort to fill in the gap, this workshop aims to investigate

Henry Been-Lirn Duh; Ellen Yi-Luen Do; Mark Billinghurst; Francis K. H. Quek; Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen

2010-01-01

13

Database driven user friendly web application using Ajax  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Given a set of dierent existing systems, a single web application has been constructed. Acting as a replacement for the systems the web application has been built up as a multiple page Ajax enabled web application. Using Ajax as technique to enhance the usability along with performance criterion such as response time for end users. The web application follows

David Jonsson

14

The Trick Is a "User-Friendly" System: Approaches of the Georgetown University Library Information System  

PubMed Central

To successfully develop end user software, the trick is to design a user-friendly system that is non threatening to novices. The philosophy of designing the Library Information System (LIS) at the Georgetown University Medical Center was to emphasize easy access, clean screen displays and a “push button” approach to using the system. The LIS system is briefly described covering the background, planning and implementing phases as well as user reaction and system training. It has been operational over three years and has been enthusiastically received by users.

Broering, Naomi C.

1984-01-01

15

Evaluating Digital Libraries: A User-Friendly Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide provides practical advice on the use of evaluation techniques in assessing digital libraries. Users will be able to design, implement, and report better evaluations within the context of developing, operating, and/or using digital libraries. Topics include the five basic steps in conducting an evaluation, types of evaluations, planning, survey methods, interviews and focus groups, observations, experiments, and reporting evaluation results. Each chapter discusses the evaluation technique, provides a case study, and offers references and additional tools. The guide is written in an informal, easy-reading style intended to encourage users to make evaluation a routine aspect of their work with digital libraries. The guide is also intended to build confidence in the evaluation process. A downloadable, printable version is provided.

Reeves, Thomas

16

Evaluating Websites for Older Adults: Adherence to "Senior-Friendly" Guidelines and End-User Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Older adults in the US are the fastest-growing demographic, and also the largest-growing group of internet users. The aim of this research was to evaluate websites designed for older adults in terms of (1) how well they adhere to "senior-friendly" guidelines and (2) overall ease of use and satisfaction. In Experiment I, 40 websites designed for…

Hart, T. A.; Chaparro, B. S.; Halcomb, C. G.

2008-01-01

17

Evaluating Websites for Older Adults: Adherence to "Senior-Friendly" Guidelines and End-User Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults in the US are the fastest-growing demographic, and also the largest-growing group of internet users. The aim of this research was to evaluate websites designed for older adults in terms of (1) how well they adhere to "senior-friendly" guidelines and (2) overall ease of use and satisfaction. In Experiment I, 40 websites designed for…

Hart, T. A.; Chaparro, B. S.; Halcomb, C. G.

2008-01-01

18

USER-FRIENDLY SCREENING MODEL FOR POINT-SOURCE IMPACT ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

A user-friendly air quality simulation screening model coded in FORTRAN is described and sample use is shown for point source impact assessment. The model was developed and tested on a personal computer and can be run interactively on a mainframe. Any of five dispersion technique...

19

GIS-IManSys, A User-Friendly Computer Based Water Management Software Package  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impacts of growth of global population changes in economic environment have more pronounced effects on Middle East and North Africa countries. User friendly hydrological computer software packages have proven to be helpful tools in managing precious water resources. Watershed models have been successfully used to perform complex analyses and to make informed predictions concerning consequences of proposed actions. They

A. Fares

2009-01-01

20

Towards a user-friendly brain–computer interface: Initial tests in ALS and PLS patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivePatients usually require long-term training for effective EEG-based brain–computer interface (BCI) control due to fatigue caused by the demands for focused attention during prolonged BCI operation. We intended to develop a user-friendly BCI requiring minimal training and less mental load.

Ou Bai; Peter Lin; Dandan Huang; Ding-Yu Fei; Mary Kay Floeter

2010-01-01

21

A user-friendly marketing decision support system for the product line design using evolutionary algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

A marketing decision support system (MDSS) is presented. It has a user-friendly and easy to learn menu driven interface. Its purpose is to assist a marketing manager in designing a line of substitute products. Optimal product line design is a very important marketing decision. The MDSS uses three different optimization criteria. It examines different scenarios using the “What if analysis”.

Georgia Alexouda

2005-01-01

22

Snagger: A user-friendly program for incorporating additional information for tagSNP selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There has been considerable effort focused on developing efficient programs for tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many of these programs do not account for potential reduced genomic coverage resulting from genotyping failures nor do they preferentially select SNPs based on functionality, which may be more likely to be biologically important. RESULTS: We have developed a user-friendly and efficient software program,

Christopher K. Edlund; Won H. Lee; Dalin Li; David J. Van Den Berg; David V. Conti

2008-01-01

23

Building a user-friendly data dictionary system in ORACLE  

SciTech Connect

For some time now developers of software systems have recognized the need to capture information about the system and to build a framework for retrieving this information so that it can be easily accessible to end users. Current trends, such as the Information Research Dictionary System (IRDS) standard, IBM's Repository, and a growing interest in Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools in the US and the Integrated Project Support Environment dictionary tools that capture information critical to the development and maintenance of a system throughout its life cycle. This paper describes the development of a menu-driven system dictionary in ORACLE for a design prototype system currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It addresses integration of ORACLE's data dictionary tables with the system dictionary, and possible avenues of future research regarding the design and implementation of an IRDS. 3 refs.

Loftis, J.P.; Friggle, W.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1989-01-01

24

eMODIS: A User-Friendly Data Source  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is generating a suite of products called 'eMODIS' based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS). With a more frequent repeat cycle than Landsat and higher spatial resolutions than the Advanced Very High Resolution Spectroradiometer (AVHRR), MODIS is well suited for vegetation studies. For operational monitoring, however, the benefits of MODIS are counteracted by usability issues with the standard map projection, file format, composite interval, high-latitude 'bow-tie' effects, and production latency. eMODIS responds to a community-specific need for alternatively packaged MODIS data, addressing each of these factors for real-time monitoring and historical trend analysis. eMODIS processes calibrated radiance data (level-1B) acquired by the MODIS sensors on the EOS Terra and Aqua satellites by combining MODIS Land Science Collection 5 Atmospherically Corrected Surface Reflectance production code and USGS EROS MODIS Direct Broadcast System (DBS) software to create surface reflectance and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products. eMODIS is produced over the continental United States and over Alaska extending into Canada to cover the Yukon River Basin. The 250-meter (m), 500-m, and 1,000-m products are delivered in Geostationary Earth Orbit Tagged Image File Format (Geo- TIFF) and composited in 7-day intervals. eMODIS composites are projected to non-Sinusoidal mapping grids that best suit the geography in their areas of application (see eMODIS Product Description below). For eMODIS products generated over the continental United States (eMODIS CONUS), the Terra (from 2000) and Aqua (from 2002) records are available and continue through present time. eMODIS CONUS also is generated in an expedited process that delivers a 7-day rolling composite, created daily with the most recent 7 days of acquisition, to users monitoring real-time vegetation conditions. eMODIS Alaska is not part of expedited processing, but does cover the Terra mission life (2000-present). A simple file transfer protocol (FTP) distribution site currently is enabled on the Internet for direct download of eMODIS products (ftp://emodisftp.cr.usgs.gov/eMODIS), with plans to expand into an interactive portal environment.

Jenkerson, Calli; Maiersperger, Thomas; Schmidt, Gail

2010-01-01

25

Alkahest NuclearBLAST : a user-friendly BLAST management and analysis system  

PubMed Central

Background - Sequencing of EST and BAC end datasets is no longer limited to large research groups. Drops in per-base pricing have made high throughput sequencing accessible to individual investigators. However, there are few options available which provide a free and user-friendly solution to the BLAST result storage and data mining needs of biologists. Results - Here we describe NuclearBLAST, a batch BLAST analysis, storage and management system designed for the biologist. It is a wrapper for NCBI BLAST which provides a user-friendly web interface which includes a request wizard and the ability to view and mine the results. All BLAST results are stored in a MySQL database which allows for more advanced data-mining through supplied command-line utilities or direct database access. NuclearBLAST can be installed on a single machine or clustered amongst a number of machines to improve analysis throughput. NuclearBLAST provides a platform which eases data-mining of multiple BLAST results. With the supplied scripts, the program can export data into a spreadsheet-friendly format, automatically assign Gene Ontology terms to sequences and provide bi-directional best hits between two datasets. Users with SQL experience can use the database to ask even more complex questions and extract any subset of data they require. Conclusion - This tool provides a user-friendly interface for requesting, viewing and mining of BLAST results which makes the management and data-mining of large sets of BLAST analyses tractable to biologists.

Diener, Stephen E; Houfek, Thomas D; Kalat, Sam E; Windham, DE; Burke, Mark; Opperman, Charles; Dean, Ralph A

2005-01-01

26

The open agent society as a platform for the user-friendly information society  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thematic priority of the European Union’s Framework V research and development programme was the creation of a user-friendly information society which met the needs of citizens and enterprises. In practice, though, for example in the case of on-line digital music, the needs of citizens and enterprises may be in conflict. This paper proposes to leverage the appearance of ‘intelligence’

Jeremy Pitt

2005-01-01

27

Final Report for "User Friendly Steering and Diagnostics for Modleing Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerators"  

SciTech Connect

The goal accomplished in thisproject was to improve the Synergia code by improving the integration of the Impact space charge algorithms into Synergia and improving the graphical user interface for analyzing results. We accomplished five tasks along these lines: (i) a refactoring of the Impact space charge algorithm to make it more accessible by other codes, (ii) development of the Forthon interface between Impact and Python, (iii) implementation of a Python-MPI interface to allow parallel space charge calculation, (iv) a new user-friendly interface for analyzing Synergia results, and (v) a toolkit for doing parallel analysis of Synergia results.

Peter Stoltz, Douglas R Dechow, Scott Kruger, Brian Granger

2007-10-15

28

SLIMS--a user-friendly sample operations and inventory management system for genotyping labs  

PubMed Central

Summary: We present the Sample-based Laboratory Information Management System (SLIMS), a powerful and user-friendly open source web application that provides all members of a laboratory with an interface to view, edit and create sample information. SLIMS aims to simplify common laboratory tasks with tools such as a user-friendly shopping cart for subjects, samples and containers that easily generates reports, shareable lists and plate designs for genotyping. Further key features include customizable data views, database change-logging and dynamically filled pre-formatted reports. Along with being feature-rich, SLIMS' power comes from being able to handle longitudinal data from multiple time-points and biological sources. This type of data is increasingly common from studies searching for susceptibility genes for common complex diseases that collect thousands of samples generating millions of genotypes and overwhelming amounts of data. LIMSs provide an efficient way to deal with this data while increasing accessibility and reducing laboratory errors; however, professional LIMS are often too costly to be practical. SLIMS gives labs a feasible alternative that is easily accessible, user-centrically designed and feature-rich. To facilitate system customization, and utilization for other groups, manuals have been written for users and developers. Availability: Documentation, source code and manuals are available at http://genapha.icapture.ubc.ca/SLIMS/index.jsp. SLIMS was developed using Java 1.6.0, JSPs, Hibernate 3.3.1.GA, DB2 and mySQL, Apache Tomcat 6.0.18, NetBeans IDE 6.5, Jasper Reports 3.5.1 and JasperSoft's iReport 3.5.1. Contact: denise.daley@hli.ubc.ca

Van Rossum, Thea; Tripp, Ben; Daley, Denise

2010-01-01

29

FastDart : a fast, accurate and friendly version of DART code.  

SciTech Connect

A new enhanced, visual version of DART code is presented. DART is a mechanistic model based code, developed for the performance calculation and assessment of aluminum dispersion fuel. Major issues of this new version are the development of a new, time saving calculation routine, able to be run on PC, a friendly visual input interface and a plotting facility. This version, available for silicide and U-Mo fuels,adds to the classical accuracy of DART models for fuel performance prediction, a faster execution and visual interfaces. It is part of a collaboration agreement between ANL and CNEA in the area of Low Enriched Uranium Advanced Fuels, held by the Implementation Arrangement for Technical Exchange and Cooperation in the Area of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy.

Rest, J.; Taboada, H.

2000-11-08

30

Bioprocess Control in Microscale: Scalable Fermentations in Disposable and User-Friendly Microfluidic Systems  

PubMed Central

Background The efficiency of biotechnological production processes depends on selecting the best performing microbial strain and the optimal cultivation conditions. Thus, many experiments have to be conducted, which conflicts with the demand to speed up drug development processes. Consequently, there is a great need for high-throughput devices that allow rapid and reliable bioprocess development. This need is addressed, for example, by the fiber-optic online-monitoring system BioLector which utilizes the wells of shaken microtiter plates (MTPs) as small-scale fermenters. To further improve the application of MTPs as microbioreactors, in this paper, the BioLector technology is combined with microfluidic bioprocess control in MTPs. To realize a user-friendly system for routine laboratory work, disposable microfluidic MTPs are utilized which are actuated by a user-friendly pneumatic hardware. Results This novel microfermentation system was tested in pH-controlled batch as well as in fed-batch fermentations of Escherichia coli. The pH-value in the culture broth could be kept in a narrow dead band of 0.03 around the pH-setpoint, by pneumatically dosing ammonia solution and phosphoric acid to each culture well. Furthermore, fed-batch cultivations with linear and exponential feeding of 500 g/L glucose solution were conducted. Finally, the scale-up potential of the microscale fermentations was evaluated by comparing the obtained results to that of fully controlled fermentations in a 2 L laboratory-scale fermenter (working volume of 1 L). The scale-up was realized by keeping the volumetric mass transfer coefficient kLa constant at a value of 460 1/h. The same growth behavior of the E. coli cultures could be observed on both scales. Conclusion In microfluidic MTPs, pH-controlled batch as well as fed-batch fermentations were successfully performed. The liquid dosing as well as the biomass growth kinetics of the process-controlled fermentations agreed well both in the microscale and laboratory scale. In conclusion, a user-friendly and disposable microfluidic system could be established which allows scaleable, fully controlled and fully monitored fermentations in working volumes below 1 milliliter.

2010-01-01

31

Ganga: User-friendly Grid job submission and management tool for LHC and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ganga has been widely used for several years in ATLAS, LHCb and a handful of other communities. Ganga provides a simple yet powerful interface for submitting and managing jobs to a variety of computing backends. The tool helps users configuring applications and keeping track of their work. With the major release of version 5 in summer 2008, Ganga's main user-friendly features have been strengthened. Examples include a new configuration interface, enhanced support for job collections, bulk operations and easier access to subjobs. In addition to the traditional batch and Grid backends such as Condor, LSF, PBS, gLite/EDG a point-to-point job execution via ssh on remote machines is now supported. Ganga is used as an interactive job submission interface for end-users, and also as a job submission component for higher-level tools. For example GangaRobot is used to perform automated, end-to-end testing of distributed data analysis. Ganga comes with an extensive test suite covering more than 350 test cases. The development model involves all active developers in the release management shifts which is an important and novel approach for the distributed software collaborations. Ganga 5 is a mature, stable and widely-used tool with long-term support from the HEP community.

Vanderster, D. C.; Brochu, F.; Cowan, G.; Egede, U.; Elmsheuser, J.; Gaidoz, B.; Harrison, K.; Lee, H. C.; Liko, D.; Maier, A.; Mo?cicki, J. T.; Muraru, A.; Pajchel, K.; Reece, W.; Samset, B.; Slater, M.; Soroko, A.; Tan, C. L.; Williams, M.

2010-04-01

32

Teaching hydrological modeling with a user-friendly catchment-runoff-model software package  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer models, and especially conceptual models, are frequently used for catchment hydrology studies. Teaching hydrological modeling, however, is challenging as students, when learning to apply computer models, have both to understand general model concepts and to be able to use particular computer programs. Here we present a new version of the HBV model. This software provides a user-friendly version which is especially useful for education. Different functionalities like an automatic calibration using a genetic algorithm or a Monte Carlo approach as well as the possibility to perform batch runs with predefined model parameters make the software also interesting for teaching in more advanced classes and research projects. Different teaching goals related to hydrological modeling are discussed and a series of exercises is suggested to reach these goals.

Seibert, J.; Vis, M. J. P.

2012-05-01

33

Teaching hydrological modeling with a user-friendly catchment-runoff-model software package  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer models, especially conceptual models, are frequently used for catchment hydrology studies. Teaching hydrological modeling, however, is challenging, since students have to both understand general model concepts and be able to use particular computer programs when learning to apply computer models. Here we present a new version of the HBV (Hydrologiska Byrĺns Vattenavdelning) model. This software provides a user-friendly version that is especially useful for education. Different functionalities, such as an automatic calibration using a genetic algorithm or a Monte Carlo approach, as well as the possibility to perform batch runs with predefined model parameters make the software interesting especially for teaching in more advanced classes and research projects. Different teaching goals related to hydrological modeling are discussed and a series of exercises is suggested to reach these goals.

Seibert, J.; Vis, M. J. P.

2012-09-01

34

A User-friendly 3D Yield Function for Steel Sheets and Its Application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 6th-order polynomial type 3D yield function, which has a high flexibility of describing anisotropic behavior of steel sheets is proposed. A user-friendly scheme of material parameter identification for the model, where only limited experimental data of r-values and yield stresses in three directions (r0,r45,r90 and ?0,?45,?90) plus equi-biaxial yield stress (?x = ?y = ?b) are needed, is presented. The accuracy of this yield function is verified by comparing the numerical predictions with the corresponding experimental data on planar anisotropy of r-values and flow stress directionality, as well as the shape of yield loci, on several types of steel sheets (high r-value IF steel and high strength steel sheets of 440-980 MPa TS levels). The advantage of this model is demonstrated by showing a numerical simulation of hole-expansion test.

Yoshida, Fusahito; Tamura, Shohei; Uemori, Takeshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi

2011-08-01

35

QualitySNPng: a user-friendly SNP detection and visualization tool.  

PubMed

QualitySNPng is a new software tool for the detection and interactive visualization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). It uses a haplotype-based strategy to identify reliable SNPs; it is optimized for the analysis of current RNA-seq data; but it can also be used on genomic DNA sequences derived from next-generation sequencing experiments. QualitySNPng does not require a sequenced reference genome and delivers reliable SNPs for di- as well as polyploid species. The tool features a user-friendly interface, multiple filtering options to handle typical sequencing errors, support for SAM and ACE files and interactive visualization. QualitySNPng produces high-quality SNP information that can be used directly in genotyping by sequencing approaches for application in QTL and genome-wide association mapping as well as to populate SNP arrays. The software can be used as a stand-alone application with a graphical user interface or as part of a pipeline system like Galaxy. Versions for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, as well as the source code, are available from http://www.bioinformatics.nl/QualitySNPng. PMID:23632165

Nijveen, Harm; van Kaauwen, Martijn; Esselink, Danny G; Hoegen, Brechtje; Vosman, Ben

2013-04-30

36

PuffinPlot: A versatile, user-friendly program for paleomagnetic analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PuffinPlot is a user-friendly desktop application for analysis of paleomagnetic data, offering a unique combination of features. It runs on several operating systems, including Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux; supports both discrete and long core data; and facilitates analysis of very weakly magnetic samples. As well as interactive graphical operation, PuffinPlot offers batch analysis for large volumes of data, and a Python scripting interface for programmatic control of its features. Available data displays include demagnetization/intensity, Zijderveld, equal-area (for sample, site, and suite level demagnetization data, and for magnetic susceptibility anisotropy data), a demagnetization data table, and a natural remanent magnetization intensity histogram. Analysis types include principal component analysis, Fisherian statistics, and great-circle path intersections. The results of calculations can be exported as CSV (comma-separated value) files; graphs can be printed, and can also be saved as publication-quality vector files in SVG or PDF format. PuffinPlot is free, and the program, user manual, and fully documented source code may be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/puffinplot/.

Lurcock, P. C.; Wilson, G. S.

2012-06-01

37

A user-friendly software to easily count Anopheles egg batches  

PubMed Central

Background Studies on malaria vector ecology and development/evaluation of vector control strategies often require measures of mosquito life history traits. Assessing the fecundity of malaria vectors can be carried out by counting eggs laid by Anopheles females. However, manually counting the eggs is time consuming, tedious, and error prone. Methods In this paper we present a newly developed software for high precision automatic egg counting. The software written in the Java programming language proposes a user-friendly interface and a complete online manual. It allows the inspection of results by the operator and includes proper tools for manual corrections. The user can in fact correct any details on the acquired results by a mouse click. Time saving is significant and errors due to loss of concentration are avoided. Results The software was tested over 16 randomly chosen images from 2 different experiments. The results show that the proposed automatic method produces results that are close to the ground truth. Conclusions The proposed approaches demonstrated a very high level of robustness. The adoption of the proposed software package will save many hours of labor to the bench scientist. The software needs no particular configuration and is freely available for download on: http://w3.ualg.pt/?hshah/eggcounter/.

2012-01-01

38

DRAC: a user-friendly computer code for modeling transient thermohydraulic phenomena in solar-receiver tubing  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to familiarize potential users with the capabilities of DRAC (Dynamic Receiver Analysis Code). DRAC is the first in a series of user friendly driver programs for the more general code, TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer). DRAC is a relatively easy-to-use code which permits the user to model both transient and steady-state thermohydraulic phenomena in solar receiver tubing. Users may specify arbitrary, time-dependent, incident heat flux profiles and/or flow rate changes and DRAC will calculate the resulting transient excursions in tube wall temperature and fluid properties. Radiative and convective losses are accounted for and the user may model any receiver fluid (compressible or incompressible) for which thermodynamic data exists. A description of the DRAC code, a comprehensive set of steady-state validation calculations, and detailed user instructions are presented.

Winters, W.S.

1983-01-01

39

MSDB: a user-friendly program for reporting distribution and building databases of microsatellites from genome sequences.  

PubMed

Microsatellite Search and Building Database (MSDB) is a new Perl program providing a user-friendly interface for identification and building databases of microsatellites from complete genome sequences. The general aims of MSDB are to use the database to store the information of microsatellites and to facilitate the management, classification, and statistics of microsatellites. A user-friendly interface facilitates the treatment of large datasets. The program is powerful in finding various types of pure, compound, and complex microsatellites from sequences as well as generating a detailed statistical report in worksheet format. MSDB also contains other two subprograms: SWR, which is used to export microsatellites from the database to meet user's requirements, and SWP, which is used to automatically invoke R to draw a sliding window plot for displaying the distribution of density or frequency of identified microsatellites. MSDB is freely available under the GNU General Public license for Windows and Linux from the following website: http://msdb.biosv.com/. PMID:23144492

Du, Lianming; Li, Yuzhi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

2012-11-09

40

Accurate GPS Time-Linked data Acquisition System (ATLAS II) user's manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Accurate Time-Linked data Acquisition System (ATLAS II) is a small, lightweight, time-synchronized, robust data acquisition system that is capable of acquiring simultaneous long-term time-series data from both a wind turbine rotor and ground-based instrumentation. This document is a user's manual for the ATLAS II hardware and software. It describes the hardware and software components of ATLAS II, and explains how to install and execute the software.

Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan (PrimeCore Systems Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2004-02-01

41

Snagger: A user-friendly program for incorporating additional information for tagSNP selection  

PubMed Central

Background There has been considerable effort focused on developing efficient programs for tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many of these programs do not account for potential reduced genomic coverage resulting from genotyping failures nor do they preferentially select SNPs based on functionality, which may be more likely to be biologically important. Results We have developed a user-friendly and efficient software program, Snagger, as an extension to the existing open-source software, Haploview, which uses pairwise r2 linkage disequilibrium between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to select tagSNPs. Snagger distinguishes itself from existing SNP selection algorithms, including Tagger, by providing user options that allow for: (1) prioritization of tagSNPs based on certain characteristics, including platform-specific design scores, functionality (i.e., coding status), and chromosomal position, (2) efficient selection of SNPs across multiple populations, (3) selection of tagSNPs outside defined genomic regions to improve coverage and genotyping success, and (4) picking of surrogate tagSNPs that serve as backups for tagSNPs whose failure would result in a significant loss of data. Using HapMap genotype data from ten ENCODE regions and design scores for the Illumina platform, we show similar coverage and design score distribution and fewer total tagSNPs selected by Snagger compared to the web server Tagger. Conclusion Snagger improves upon current available tagSNP software packages by providing a means for researchers to select tagSNPs that reliably capture genetic variation across multiple populations while accounting for significant genotyping failure risk and prioritizing on SNP-specific characteristics.

Edlund, Christopher K; Lee, Won H; Li, Dalin; Van Den Berg, David J; Conti, David V

2008-01-01

42

Status of PRIMA for the VLTI or the quest for user-friendly fringe tracking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Phase Referenced Imaging and Micro Arcsecond Astrometry (PRIMA) facility for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), is being installed and tested in the observatory of Paranal. Most of the tests have been concentrated on the characterization of the Fringe Sensor Unit (FSU) and on the automation of the fringe tracking in preparation of dual-field observations. The status of the facility, an analysis of the FSU performance and the first attempts towards dual-field observations will be presented in this paper. In the FSU, the phase information is spatially encoded into four independent combined beams (ABCD) and the group delay comes from their spectral dispersion over 5 spectral channels covering the K-band. During fringe tracking the state machine of the optical path difference controller is driven by the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) derived from the 4 ABCD measurements. We will describe the strategy used to define SNR thresholds depending on the star magnitude for automatically detecting and locking the fringes. Further, the SNR as well as the phase delay measurements are affected by differential effects occurring between the four beams. We will shortly discuss the contributions of these effects on the measured phase and SNR noises. We will also assess the sensitivity of the group delay linearity to various instrumental parameters and discuss the corresponding calibration procedures. Finally we will describe how these calibrations and detection thresholds are being automated to make PRIMA as much as possible a user-friendly and efficient facility.

Schmid, C.; Abuter, R.; Ménardi, S.; Andolfato, L.; Delplancke, F.; Derie, F.; di Lieto, N.; Frahm, R.; Gitton, Ph.; Gomes, N.; Haguenauer, P.; Lévęque, S.; Morel, S.; Müller, A.; Phan Duc, T.; Pozna, E.; Sahlmann, J.; Schuhler, N.; van Belle, G.

2010-07-01

43

A user-friendly model for spray drying to aid pharmaceutical product development.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to develop a user-friendly model for spray drying that can aid in the development of a pharmaceutical product, by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach. To achieve this, a spray dryer model was developed in commercial and open source spreadsheet software. The output of the model was first fitted to the experimental output of a Büchi B-290 spray dryer and subsequently validated. The predicted outlet temperatures of the spray dryer model matched the experimental values very well over the entire range of spray dryer settings that were tested. Finally, the model was applied to produce glassy sugars by spray drying, an often used excipient in formulations of biopharmaceuticals. For the production of glassy sugars, the model was extended to predict the relative humidity at the outlet, which is not measured in the spray dryer by default. This extended model was then successfully used to predict whether specific settings were suitable for producing glassy trehalose and inulin by spray drying. In conclusion, a spray dryer model was developed that is able to predict the output parameters of the spray drying process. The model can aid the development of spray dried pharmaceutical products by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach. PMID:24040240

Grasmeijer, Niels; de Waard, Hans; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

2013-09-09

44

Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for user-friendly detection of Cu2+ on a paper platform.  

PubMed

The development of a user-friendly sensing platform for the detection of Cu(2+) in water is necessary as there are wide concerns due to the substantial impact of Cu(2+) on human health, environmental monitoring, and so on. Motivated by this, we report a fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs)-based sensor for the detection of Cu(2+). These water-soluble AgNCs, as a new class of fluorescent probes, were synthesized by using azobenzene modified poly(acrylic acid) (MPAA) as templates. Their fluorescence can be quenched in the presence of Cu(2+), which enables the label-free detection of Cu(2+) in real water samples. Furthermore, such AgNCs can be integrated onto cellulose filter paper and used as fluorescent indicators for Cu(2+). The fluorescence quenching can be observed by the naked eye under UV light. It should be noted that this AgNCs-based paper assay performs successfully in barrelled drinking water and river water samples. Therefore, it opens up new avenues to the development of robust clusters-based sensing platforms. PMID:22489282

Liu, Xiaojuan; Zong, Chenghua; Lu, Lehui

2012-04-10

45

Developing user-friendly habitat suitability tools from regional stream fish survey data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We developed user-friendly fish habitat suitability tools (plots) for fishery managers in Michigan; these tools are based on driving habitat variables and fish population estimates for several hundred stream sites throughout the state. We generated contour plots to show patterns in fish biomass for over 60 common species (and for 120 species grouped at the family level) in relation to axes of catchment area and low-flow yield (90% exceedance flow divided by catchment area) and also in relation to axes of mean and weekly range of July temperatures. The plots showed distinct patterns in fish habitat suitability at each level of biological organization studied and were useful for quantitatively comparing river sites. We demonstrate how these plots can be used to support stream management, and we provide examples pertaining to resource assessment, trout stocking, angling regulations, chemical reclamation of marginal trout streams, indicator species, instream flow protection, and habitat restoration. These straightforward and effective tools are electronically available so that managers can easily access and incorporate them into decision protocols and presentations.

Zorn, T. G.; Seelbach, P.; Wiley, M. J.

2011-01-01

46

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07

47

Conceptual design for a user-friendly adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a conceptual design for a general-purpose adaptive optics system, usable with all Cassegrain facility instruments on the 3 meter Shane telescope at the University of California`s Lick Observatory located on Mt. Hamilton near San Jose, California. The overall design goal for this system is to take the sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics technology out of the demonstration stage and to build a user-friendly astronomical tool. The emphasis will be on ease of calibration, improved stability and operational simplicity in order to allow the system to be run routinely by observatory staff. A prototype adaptive optics system and a 20 watt sodium-layer laser guide star system have already been built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use at Lick Observatory. The design presented in this paper is for a next- generation adaptive optics system that extends the capabilities of the prototype system into the visible with more degrees of freedom. When coupled with a laser guide star system that is upgraded to a power matching the new adaptive optics system, the combined system will produce diffraction-limited images for near-IR cameras. Atmospheric correction at wavelengths of 0.6-1 mm will significantly increase the throughput of the most heavily used facility instrument at Lick, the Kast Spectrograph, and will allow it to operate with smaller slit widths and deeper limiting magnitudes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

Bissinger, H.D.; Olivier, S.; Max, C.

1996-03-08

48

The ‘User’: Friend, foe or fetish?: A critical exploration of user involvement in health and social care  

Microsoft Academic Search

User Involvement’ has become the new mantra in Public Services with professionals constantly being reminded that ‘user knows best’. The pur pose of this paper is to ask where the preoccupation with ‘the User’ comes from and to pose some questions about what ‘User Involvement’ actually means. Within our paper we see three issues as central within this. The first

Stephen Cowden; Gurnam Singh

2007-01-01

49

A user-friendly alternative to formaldehyde-based DNA silver-staining method on polyacrylamide gels.  

PubMed

We have developed a practical, cost-effective and user-friendly protocol to meet the needs of nucleic acids research, particularly in respect of DNA detection on polyacrylamide gels. In this method, the most commonly used alkaline formaldehyde developer in DNA silver stain, which does harm to operator, is first replaced by glucose in alkaline borate buffer. In addition, the effects of six reducing sugars on the quality of DNA visualization were investigated. Consequently, the optimal protocol using glucose takes about 45 min to complete all the procedures, with a detection limit of 5 pg of single DNA band on polyacrylamide gels, was developed. The results indicate that this user-friendly and economic protocol could be a good choice for routine use in DNA visualization on polyacrylamide gels. PMID:20564269

He, Hong-Zhang; Cong, Wei-Tao; Jiang, Cheng-Xi; Pu, Jie; You, Wei-Jing; Gao, Hong-Chang; Zhu, Zhong-Xin; Jin, Li-Tai; Li, Xiao-Kun

2010-07-01

50

[The GDS-8; a short, client- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale for nursing homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n=410), the Mini Mental State Examination (n=410) and a diagnostic interview (SCAN; n=333),

D. L. Gerritsen; K. Jongenelis; A. M. Pot; A. T. F. Beekman; A. M. Eissese; H. Kluiter; M. W. Ribbe

2007-01-01

51

Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is\\u000aespecially suitable for nursing home patients.\\u000aMethods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS\\u000a(nĽ410), the Mini Mental State Examination (nĽ410) and a diagnostic interview (SCAN; nĽ333), were collected by\\u000atrained

K. Jongenelis; D. L. Gerritsen; A. M. Pot; A. T. F. Beekman; H. Kluiter; M. W. Ribbe

2007-01-01

52

Rapid, effective and user-friendly immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma using a personal flow cytometer  

PubMed Central

Background Widespread use of flow cytometry for immunophenotyping in clinical veterinary medicine is limited by cost and requirement for considerable laboratory space, staff time, and expertise. The Guava EasyCyte Plus (Guava Technologies, Hayward, CA, US) is the first, personal, bench-top flow cytometer designed to address these limitations. Objective The aim of this study was to adapt the immunohistochemical protocol used for immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma to the personal flow cytometer for rapid, effective and user-friendly application to the diagnosis and prognosis of canine lymphoma and to demonstrate its practicality for widespread veterinary application. Performance of the personal flow cytometer for immunophenotyping T and B lymphocytes in blood and lymph nodes from normal dogs and dogs with lymphoproliferative disease, was assessed using only two monoclonal antibodies (against CD3 and CD21), and by comparison with analysis using two conventional flow cytometers. Methods 26 dogs with lymphoproliferative disease (23 with lymphoma, 3 with lymphocytic leukaemia) were studied along with 15 controls (2 non-lymphoma lymph nodes and 13 non-leukemic bloods. Lymphocytes were immunostained with fluorescent-labeled, monoclonal antibodies against CD3 and CD21. To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discrimination between T and B cell immunophenotypes, T and B cell counts for half the samples (14 blood and 11 lymph node) were also determined using the same method and conventional flow cytometers (FACSCalibur, Cyan Dako). To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discriminating between leukocyte types, lymphocyte differential counts were determined for 21 blood samples and compared with those from automated hematology analyzers (CELL-DYN 3500, n=11 and ADVIA 2120, n=10). Quality and sub-cellular distribution of immunostaining was assessed using fluorescence microscopy. Results The protocol for immunophenotyping took 2 to 3 hours to complete from the point of receipt of sample to reporting of immunophenotype. The personal flow cytometer differential lymphocyte counts correlated highly (n=20; r=0.97, p<0.0001) with those of automated haematology analyzers. The personal flow cytometer counts consistently, but mildly, underestimated the percentages of lymphocytes in the samples (mean bias of -5.3%.). The personal flow cytometer immunophenotype counts were indistinguishable from those of conventional flow cytometers for both peripheral blood samples (n=13; r=0.95; p<0.0001; bias of -1.1%) and lymph node aspirates (n=11,r=0.98; p<0.001; bias of 1%). All but one leukemic and one lymphomatous lymph node sample, out of 26 samples of dogs with lymphoproliferative disease analyzed, could be immunophenotyped as either B or T cells. Conclusions We conclude that use of only 2 monoclonal antibodies is sufficient for immunophenotyping most cases of canine lymphoma by flow cytometry and enables rapid immunophenotyping. The personal flow cytometer may be as effectively used for immunophenotyping canine lymphoma as conventional flow cytometers. However, the personal flow cytometer is more accessible and user-friendly, and requires lower sample volumes.

2013-01-01

53

Rapid, effective and user-friendly immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma using a personal flow cytometer.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Widespread use of flow cytometry for immunophenotyping in clinical veterinary medicine is limited by cost and requirement for considerable laboratory space, staff time, and expertise. The Guava EasyCyte Plus (Guava Technologies, Hayward, CA, US) is the first, personal, bench-top flow cytometer designed to address these limitations. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to adapt the immunohistochemical protocol used for immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma to the personal flow cytometer for rapid, effective and user-friendly application to the diagnosis and prognosis of canine lymphoma and to demonstrate its practicality for widespread veterinary application. Performance of the personal flow cytometer for immunophenotyping T and B lymphocytes in blood and lymph nodes from normal dogs and dogs with lymphoproliferative disease, was assessed using only two monoclonal antibodies (against CD3 and CD21), and by comparison with analysis using two conventional flow cytometers. METHODS: 26 dogs with lymphoproliferative disease (23 with lymphoma, 3 with lymphocytic leukaemia) were studied along with 15 controls (2 non-lymphoma lymph nodes and 13 non-leukemic bloods. Lymphocytes were immunostained with fluorescent-labeled, monoclonal antibodies against CD3 and CD21. To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discrimination between T and B cell immunophenotypes, T and B cell counts for half the samples (14 blood and 11 lymph node) were also determined using the same method and conventional flow cytometers (FACSCalibur, Cyan Dako). To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discriminating between leukocyte types, lymphocyte differential counts were determined for 21 blood samples and compared with those from automated hematology analyzers (CELL-DYN 3500, n=11 and ADVIA 2120, n=10). Quality and sub-cellular distribution of immunostaining was assessed using fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: The protocol for immunophenotyping took 2 to 3 hours to complete from the point of receipt of sample to reporting of immunophenotype. The personal flow cytometer differential lymphocyte counts correlated highly (n=20; r=0.97, p<0.0001) with those of automated haematology analyzers. The personal flow cytometer counts consistently, but mildly, underestimated the percentages of lymphocytes in the samples (mean bias of -5.3%.). The personal flow cytometer immunophenotype counts were indistinguishable from those of conventional flow cytometers for both peripheral blood samples (n=13; r=0.95; p<0.0001; bias of -1.1%) and lymph node aspirates (n=11,r=0.98; p<0.001; bias of 1%). All but one leukemic and one lymphomatous lymph node sample, out of 26 samples of dogs with lymphoproliferative disease analyzed, could be immunophenotyped as either B or T cells. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that use of only 2 monoclonal antibodies is sufficient for immunophenotyping most cases of canine lymphoma by flow cytometry and enables rapid immunophenotyping. The personal flow cytometer may be as effectively used for immunophenotyping canine lymphoma as conventional flow cytometers. However, the personal flow cytometer is more accessible and user-friendly, and requires lower sample volumes. PMID:23547828

Papakonstantinou, Stratos; Berzina, Inese; Lawlor, Amanda; J O Neill, Emma; J O Brien, Peter

2013-04-01

54

Implementation and application of an interactive user-friendly validation software for RADIANCE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RADIANCE extracts CT dose parameters from dose sheets using optical character recognition and stores the data in a relational database. To facilitate validation of RADIANCE's performance, a simple user interface was initially implemented and about 300 records were evaluated. Here, we extend this interface to achieve a wider variety of functions and perform a larger-scale validation. The validator uses some data from the RADIANCE database to prepopulate quality-testing fields, such as correspondence between calculated and reported total dose-length product. The interface also displays relevant parameters from the DICOM headers. A total of 5,098 dose sheets were used to test the performance accuracy of RADIANCE in dose data extraction. Several search criteria were implemented. All records were searchable by accession number, study date, or dose parameters beyond chosen thresholds. Validated records were searchable according to additional criteria from validation inputs. An error rate of 0.303% was demonstrated in the validation. Dose monitoring is increasingly important and RADIANCE provides an open-source solution with a high level of accuracy. The RADIANCE validator has been updated to enable users to test the integrity of their installation and verify that their dose monitoring is accurate and effective.

Sundaram, Anand; Boonn, William W.; Kim, Woojin; Cook, Tessa S.

2012-02-01

55

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Regulations. A User-Friendly Reference Document for RCRA Subtitle C Permit Writers and Permittees. Version One.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this document is to consolidate and streamline the TSDF regulatory requirements into a helpful reference tool that features a user-friendly format, including references to EPA FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions), letters, memoranda, and gui...

2012-01-01

56

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Regulations. A User-Friendly Reference Document for RCRA Subtitle C Permit Writers and Permittees. Version 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this document is to consolidate and streamline the TSDF regulatory requirements into a helpful reference tool that features a user-friendly format, including references to EPA FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions), letters, memoranda, and gui...

2012-01-01

57

PDB Editor: a user-friendly Java-based Protein Data Bank file editor with a GUI.  

PubMed

The Protein Data Bank file format is the format most widely used by protein crystallographers and biologists to disseminate and manipulate protein structures. Despite this, there are few user-friendly software packages available to efficiently edit and extract raw information from PDB files. This limitation often leads to many protein crystallographers wasting significant time manually editing PDB files. PDB Editor, written in Java Swing GUI, allows the user to selectively search, select, extract and edit information in parallel. Furthermore, the program is a stand-alone application written in Java which frees users from the hassles associated with platform/operating system-dependent installation and usage. PDB Editor can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pdbeditorjl/. PMID:19307724

Lee, Jonas; Kim, Sung Hou

2009-03-19

58

EPIPOI: A user-friendly analytical tool for the extraction and visualization of temporal parameters from epidemiological time series  

PubMed Central

Background There is an increasing need for processing and understanding relevant information generated by the systematic collection of public health data over time. However, the analysis of those time series usually requires advanced modeling techniques, which are not necessarily mastered by staff, technicians and researchers working on public health and epidemiology. Here a user-friendly tool, EPIPOI, is presented that facilitates the exploration and extraction of parameters describing trends, seasonality and anomalies that characterize epidemiological processes. It also enables the inspection of those parameters across geographic regions. Although the visual exploration and extraction of relevant parameters from time series data is crucial in epidemiological research, until now it had been largely restricted to specialists. Methods EPIPOI is freely available software developed in Matlab (The Mathworks Inc) that runs both on PC and Mac computers. Its friendly interface guides users intuitively through useful comparative analyses including the comparison of spatial patterns in temporal parameters. Results EPIPOI is able to handle complex analyses in an accessible way. A prototype has already been used to assist researchers in a variety of contexts from didactic use in public health workshops to the main analytical tool in published research. Conclusions EPIPOI can assist public health officials and students to explore time series data using a broad range of sophisticated analytical and visualization tools. It also provides an analytical environment where even advanced users can benefit by enabling a higher degree of control over model assumptions, such as those associated with detecting disease outbreaks and pandemics.

2012-01-01

59

The Clinical Ethnographic Interview: A user-friendly guide to the cultural formulation of distress and help seeking  

PubMed Central

Transcultural nursing, psychiatry, and medical anthropology have theorized that practitioners and researchers need more flexible instruments to gather culturally relevant illness experience, meaning, and help seeking. The state of the science is sufficiently developed to allow standardized yet ethnographically sound protocols for assessment. However, vigorous calls for culturally adapted assessment models have yielded little real change in routine practice. This paper describes the conversion of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV, Appendix I Outline for Cultural Formulation into a user-friendly Clinical Ethnographic Interview (CEI), and provides clinical examples of its use in a sample of highly distressed Japanese women.

Arnault, Denise Saint; Shimabukuro, Shizuka

2013-01-01

60

Wordom: a user-friendly program for the analysis of molecular structures, trajectories, and free energy surfaces.  

PubMed

Wordom is a versatile, user-friendly, and efficient program for manipulation and analysis of molecular structures and dynamics. The following new analysis modules have been added since the publication of the original Wordom paper in 2007: assignment of secondary structure, calculation of solvent accessible surfaces, elastic network model, motion cross correlations, protein structure network, shortest intra-molecular and inter-molecular communication paths, kinetic grouping analysis, and calculation of mincut-based free energy profiles. In addition, an interface with the Python scripting language has been built and the overall performance and user accessibility enhanced. The source code of Wordom (in the C programming language) as well as documentation for usage and further development are available as an open source package under the GNU General Purpose License from http://wordom.sf.net. PMID:21387345

Seeber, Michele; Felline, Angelo; Raimondi, Francesco; Muff, Stefanie; Friedman, Ran; Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo; Fanelli, Francesca

2010-11-29

61

Influences on user acceptance: informing the design of eco-friendly in-car interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to design in-car interfaces in a user-centered way it is necessary to understand users' experiences (UX). Therefore it is beneficial to gain early insight on the user acceptance (UA) of the system under development as a part of a holistic understanding of UX in the car. This paper describes a pre-study on the influence of drivers' characteristics (such

David Wilfinger; Alexander Meschtscherjakov; Martin Murer; Manfred Tscheligi

2010-01-01

62

Building a User Friendly Service Dashboard: Automatic and Non-intrusive Chaining between Widgets  

Microsoft Academic Search

End-users self service and end-users as co-developers are two main characteristics of Web 2.0 paradigm. They will harness the great potential of the Internet of services. However, today's service exposure tools and service composition tools are too complex to be used by ordinary end-users. They are based on technologies such as REST, WSDL, and SOAP which are hardly understandable by

Nassim Laga; Emmanuel Bertin; Noël Crespi

2009-01-01

63

Tweeting the friendly skies : Investigating information exchange among Twitter users about airlines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to investigate airline users' microblog postings pertaining to their travel-related information exchange so as to assess their wants, preferences and feedback about airline products and services. Examining such real-time information exchange is important as users rely on this for various purposes such as seeking help and evaluating the airline services before purchasing.

Nirupama Dharmavaram Sreenivasan; Chei Sian Lee; Dion Hoe-Lian Goh

2012-01-01

64

Re-Imagining Archival Display: Creating User-Friendly Finding Aids  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines how finding aids are structured and delivered, considering alternative approaches. It suggests that single-level displays, those that present a single component of a multilevel description to users at a time, have the potential to transform the delivery and display of collection information while improving the user

Daines, J. Gordon, III; Nimer, Cory L.

2011-01-01

65

Tweeting the Friendly Skies: Investigating Information Exchange among Twitter Users about Airlines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate airline users' microblog postings pertaining to their travel-related information exchange so as to assess their wants, preferences and feedback about airline products and services. Examining such real-time information exchange is important as users rely on this for various purposes such as…

Sreenivasan, Nirupama Dharmavaram; Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian

2012-01-01

66

User-Friendly Data Servers for Climate Studies at the Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center (APDRC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The APDRC was recently established within the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) at the University of Hawaii. The APDRC mission is to increase understanding of climate variability in the Asia-Pacific region by developing the computational, data-management, and networking infrastructure necessary to make data resources readily accessible and usable by researchers, and by undertaking data-intensive research activities that will both advance knowledge and lead to improvements in data preparation and data products. A focus of recent activity is the implementation of user-friendly data servers. The APDRC is currently running a Live Access Server (LAS) developed at NOAA/PMEL to provide access to and visualization of gridded climate products via the web. The LAS also allows users to download the selected data subsets in various formats (such as binary, netCDF and ASCII). Most of the datasets served by the LAS are also served through our OPeNDAP server (formerly DODS), which allows users to directly access the data using their desktop client tools (e.g. GrADS, Matlab and Ferret). In addition, the APDRC is running an OPeNDAP Catalog/Aggregation Server (CAS) developed by Unidata at UCAR to serve climate data and products such as model output and satellite-derived products. These products are often large (> 2 GB) and are therefore stored as multiple files (stored separately in time or in parameters). The CAS remedies the inconvenience of multiple files and allows access to the whole dataset (or any subset that cuts across the multiple files) via a single request command from any DODS enabled client software. Once the aggregation of files is configured at the server (CAS), the process of aggregation is transparent to the user. The user only needs to know a single URL for the entire dataset, which is, in fact, stored as multiple files. CAS even allows aggregation of files on different systems and at different locations. Currently, the APDRC is serving NCEP, ECMWF, SODA, WOCE-Satellite, TMI, GPI and GSSTF products through the CAS. The APDRC is also running an EPIC server developed by PMEL/NOAA. EPIC is a web-based, data search and display system suited for in situ (station versus gridded) data. The process of locating and selecting individual station data from large collections (millions of profiles or time series, etc.) of in situ data is a major challenge. Serving in situ data on the Internet faces two problems: the irregularity of data formats; and the large quantity of data files. To solve the first problem, we have converted the in situ data into netCDF data format. The second problem was solved by using the EPIC server, which allows users to easily subset the files using a friendly graphical interface. Furthermore, we enhanced the capability of EPIC and configured OPeNDAP into EPIC to serve the numerous in situ data files and to export them to users through two different options: 1) an OPeNDAP pointer file of user-selected data files; and 2) a data package that includes meta-information (e.g., location, time, cruise no, etc.), a local pointer file, and the data files that the user selected. Option 1) is for those who do not want to download the selected data but want to use their own application software (such as GrADS, Matlab and Ferret) for access and analysis; option 2) is for users who want to store the data on their own system (e.g. laptops before going for a cruise) for subsequent analysis. Currently, WOCE CTD and bottle data, the WOCE current meter data, and some Argo float data are being served on the EPIC server.

Yuan, G.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Merrill, R.; Waseda, T.; Mitsudera, H.; Hacker, P.

2002-12-01

67

A user-friendly, graphical interface for the Monte Carlo neutron optics code MCLIB  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a prototype of a new user interface for the Monte Carlo neutron optics simulation program MCLIB. At this point in its development the interface allows the user to define an instrument as a set of predefined instrument elements. The user can specify the intrinsic parameters of each element, its position and orientation. The interface then writes output to the MCLIB package and starts the simulation. The present prototype is an early development stage of a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations package that will serve as a tool for the design, optimization and assessment of performance of new neutron scattering instruments. It will be an important tool for understanding the efficacy of new source designs in meeting the needs of these instruments.

Thelliez, T.; Daemen, L.; Hjelm, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Seeger, P.A. [Seeger (Phil A.), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1995-12-01

68

MINErosion 3: A user friendly hillslope model for predicting erosion from steep post-mining landscapes in Central Queensland, Australia.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Open-cut coal mining in Central Queensland involves the breaking up of overburden that overlies the coal seams using explosives, followed by removal with draglines which results in the formation of extensive overburden spoil-piles with steep slopes at the angle of repose (approximately 75 % or 37o). These spoil-piles are found in long multiple rows, with heights of up to 60 or 70 m above the original landscapes. They are generally highly saline and dispersive and hence highly erosive. Legislation requires that these spoil-piles be rehabilitated into a stable self sustaining ecosystem with no off-site pollution. The first stage in the rehabilitation of these landscapes is the lowering of slopes to create a landscape that is stable against geotechnical failure and erosion. This is followed by revegetation generally with grasses as pioneer vegetation to further reduce erosion and a mixture of native shrubs and trees. Minimizing erosion and excessive on-site discharges of sediment into the working areas may result in the temporary cessation of mining operation with significant financial consequences, while off site discharges may breach the mining lease conditions. The average cost of rehabilitation is around 22,000 per ha. With more than 50,000 ha of such spoil-piles in Queensland at present, the total cost of rehabilitation facing the industry is very high. Most of this comprised the cost of reshaping the landscape, largely associated with the amount of material movement necessary to achieve the desired landscape. Since soil and spoil-piles vary greatly in their erodibilities, a reliable and accurate method is required to determine a cost effective combination of slope length, slope gradient and vegetation that will result in acceptable rates of erosion. A user friendly hillslope computer package MINErosion 3, was developed to predict potential erosion to select suitable combinations of landscape design parameters (slope gradient, slope length and vegetation cover) that will result in acceptable rates of erosion. Slope length and gradient can then be used by the mining companies as inputs into their landscape design software to cost effectively construct suitable landscapes that will meet the required erosion criteria. MINErosion 3 itself is a cost effective package as it used laboratory derived parameters as inputs and predicts both the field annual average soil loss under the prevailing climatic conditions (using RUSLE) as well as the potential erosion from individual storms with known recurrent intervals (using MUSLE). MINErosion 3 is very simple and easy to use and the data requirements are small. A database of 34 soils and spoils from Central Queensland are imbeded in the model. This paper discusses the approach adopted for this model, its features and validation against data collected using large field rainfall simulators as well as field runoff plots ranging from 20 to 120 m long at different slope gradients from 10 to 75 %. The agreement between predicted (Y1) and measured (X1) annual average soil loss is good with a regression equation of Y1 = 0.8 X1 + 0.005 and an R2 = 0.70; while predicted (Y2) and measured (X2) rainstorm erosion events have a regression of Y2 = 0.867 X2 with an R2 of 0.68.

So, Hwat-Bing; Khalifa, Ashraf; Carroll, Chris; Yu, Bofu

2010-05-01

69

User-friendly minimization technology of three-dimensional crosstalk in three-dimensional liquid crystal display televisions with active shutter glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a new three-dimensional (3-D) crosstalk minimization method for the active shutter glasses-type 3-D liquid crystal displays (LCD) television (TV). The crosstalk was reduced from 43% to 10% on average with the proposed technology. Furthermore, we propose a user-friendly method to reduce the 3-D crosstalk without any measurement equipment, which enables consumers to make their TVs crosstalk free. It is found that the results of the proposed crosstalk minimization method and user-friendly method are matched well. Thus, 3-D TV consumers can easily minimize the 3-D crosstalk with their eyes only.

Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Jong-Man; Cho, Youngmin; Jung, Yongsik; Lee, Seung-Woo

2012-10-01

70

SP-Designer: a user-friendly program for designing species-specific primer pairs from DNA sequence alignments.  

PubMed

SP-Designer is an open-source program providing a user-friendly tool for the design of specific PCR primer pairs from a DNA sequence alignment containing sequences from various taxa. SP-Designer selects PCR primer pairs for the amplification of DNA from a target species on the basis of several criteria: (i) primer specificity, as assessed by interspecific sequence polymorphism in the annealing regions, (ii) the biochemical characteristics of the primers and (iii) the intended PCR conditions. SP-Designer generates tables, detailing the primer pair and PCR characteristics, and a FASTA file locating the primer sequences in the original sequence alignment. SP-Designer is Windows-compatible and freely available from http://www2.sophia.inra.fr/urih/sophia_mart/sp_designer/info_sp_designer.php. PMID:23634845

Villard, Pierre; Malausa, Thibaut

2013-05-02

71

MASDET-A fast and user-friendly multiplatform software for mass determination by dark-field electron microscopy.  

PubMed

Electron microscopy has been used to measure the mass of biological nanoparticles since the early 60s, and is the only way to obtain the mass of large structures or parameters such as the mass-per-length of filaments. The ability of this method to sort heterogeneous samples both in terms of mass and shape promises to make it a key tool for proteomics down to the single cell level. A new multiplatform software package, MASDET, that can be run under MATLAB or as a standalone program is described. Based on a user-friendly graphical interface MASDET streamlines mass evaluation and greatly increases the speed of required optimisation procedures. Importantly, the immediate application of Monte-Carlo simulations to describe multiple scattering is possible, allowing the mass analysis of thicker samples and the generation of mass thickness maps. PMID:19041401

Krzyzánek, Vladislav; Müller, Shirley A; Engel, Andreas; Reichelt, Rudolf

2008-11-12

72

The automatic control telelab: a user-friendly interface for distance learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a remote laboratory of automatic control is presented. The main target of this laboratory is to allow students to easily interact with a set of physical processes through the Internet. The student will be able to run experiments, change control parameters, and analyze the results remotely. The automatic control telelab (ACT) allows the user to design his\\/her

Marco Casini; Domenico Prattichizzo; Antonio Vicino

2003-01-01

73

UCTM: A user friendly configurable trigger, scaler and delay module for nuclear and particle physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A configurable trigger scaler and delay NIM module has been designed to equip nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes. It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. The design, performances and typical applications are presented.

Bourrion, O.; Boyer, B.; Derome, L.

2011-02-01

74

User-friendly interfaces for control of crystallographic experiments at CHESS  

SciTech Connect

In designing a system to collect high quality diffraction data in an efficient manner, both hardware and software must be considered. This work focuses on the data collection software used at CHESS, the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron source, with emphasis on the interface between the user and the experimental components. For each type of detector used at CHESS, there is a graphical user interface (GUI) enabling the user to easily set up and run an experiment. For the CCD detector from Area Detector Systems Corp., this is a commercial product from ADSC, customized for CHESS. For the Princeton CCD detectors, a GUI has recently been developed to streamline communication between the user and the TV6 program which controls the detector. For Fuji imaging plates, a new GUI controls operation of the oscillation camera, including the imaging plate carousel; scanning of plates is done using the software provided by Fuji. Although these GUI's are not identical, they have numerous similarities, making it easier for users to learn operation of a new detector. They also incorporate error-checking to avoid problems such as overwriting data files or collecting data with no x-rays. Common to experiments with all detectors is a GUI used for operations such as alignment of the optical table on which the oscillation camera is mounted. Integral to a good data collection system is the capability to process diffraction images, for evaluation of crystal quality, determination of data collection strategy, screening of potential derivatives, and so forth. The mccview graphical front-end has been developed to conveniently initiate processing programs, including preliminary routines (correct, getbeam), main analysis routines (xdisp, denzo, scalepack), and the strategy routine m.simulate.

Szebenyi, D. M. E.; Deacon, A.; Ealick, S. E.; LaIuppa, J. M.; Thiel, D. J. [MacCHESS, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

1997-07-01

75

User-friendly software for vector analysis of the magnetization of long sediment cores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New software is described that is designed for easy visualization and treatment of stepwise demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization measured along sediment cores with pass-through magnetometers. The software displays demagnetization diagrams (Zijderveld plots) at successive horizons for any depth interval selected by the user. Paleomagnetic directions are automatically calculated using principal component analysis, with an anchored or a free origin. The demagnetization steps to be considered for the diagram visualization and paleodirection calculations are selected by the user. Maximum angular deviation angles and median destruction fields are also calculated. All the results are stored in a single data sheet, which can be easily exported. Demagnetization diagrams can be printed and copied. This Microsoft Excel software can be used by PC or Macintosh microcomputers.

Mazaud, A.

2005-12-01

76

Brainstorm: A User-Friendly Application for MEG/EEG Analysis  

PubMed Central

Brainstorm is a collaborative open-source application dedicated to magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) data visualization and processing, with an emphasis on cortical source estimation techniques and their integration with anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The primary objective of the software is to connect MEG/EEG neuroscience investigators with both the best-established and cutting-edge methods through a simple and intuitive graphical user interface (GUI).

Tadel, Francois; Baillet, Sylvain; Mosher, John C.; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Leahy, Richard M.

2011-01-01

77

A user-friendly SSVEP-based brain-computer interface using a time-domain classifier.  

PubMed

We introduce a user-friendly steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system. Single-channel EEG is recorded using a low-noise dry electrode. Compared to traditional gel-based multi-sensor EEG systems, a dry sensor proves to be more convenient, comfortable and cost effective. A hardware system was built that displays four LED light panels flashing at different frequencies and synchronizes with EEG acquisition. The visual stimuli have been carefully designed such that potential risk to photosensitive people is minimized. We describe a novel stimulus-locked inter-trace correlation (SLIC) method for SSVEP classification using EEG time-locked to stimulus onsets. We studied how the performance of the algorithm is affected by different selection of parameters. Using the SLIC method, the average light detection rate is 75.8% with very low error rates (an 8.4% false positive rate and a 1.3% misclassification rate). Compared to a traditional frequency-domain-based method, the SLIC method is more robust (resulting in less annoyance to the users) and is also suitable for irregular stimulus patterns. PMID:20332551

Luo, An; Sullivan, Thomas J

2010-03-23

78

A user-friendly SSVEP-based brain-computer interface using a time-domain classifier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a user-friendly steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system. Single-channel EEG is recorded using a low-noise dry electrode. Compared to traditional gel-based multi-sensor EEG systems, a dry sensor proves to be more convenient, comfortable and cost effective. A hardware system was built that displays four LED light panels flashing at different frequencies and synchronizes with EEG acquisition. The visual stimuli have been carefully designed such that potential risk to photosensitive people is minimized. We describe a novel stimulus-locked inter-trace correlation (SLIC) method for SSVEP classification using EEG time-locked to stimulus onsets. We studied how the performance of the algorithm is affected by different selection of parameters. Using the SLIC method, the average light detection rate is 75.8% with very low error rates (an 8.4% false positive rate and a 1.3% misclassification rate). Compared to a traditional frequency-domain-based method, the SLIC method is more robust (resulting in less annoyance to the users) and is also suitable for irregular stimulus patterns.

Luo, An; Sullivan, Thomas J.

2010-04-01

79

Octopus, a fast and user-friendly tomographic reconstruction package developed in LabView®  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new software package called Octopus was developed for tomographic reconstruction of parallel beam projection data and fan beam data. It was written entirely in LabView®. It has a full graphical user interface and a high level of automation while allowing every processing step to be manually controlled. Octopus displays some unique features such as dual-energy tomography for element-sensitive investigations. Most importantly it features distributed reconstruction over a network using a server-client architecture with negligible network delays reducing reconstruction times almost proportionally to the number of clients. Octopus runs independently in a Windows® environment.

Dierick, M.; Masschaele, B.; Van Hoorebeke, L.

2004-07-01

80

A user friendly method to isolate and single spore the fungi Magnaporthe oryzae and Magnaporthe grisea obtained from diseased field samples  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent for a wide range of plant diseases including diseases of rice, wheat, rye grass, turfgrass and pearl millet. A simple robust procedure for fungal isolation is not publicly available. In the present study, a user friendly method was developed to iso...

81

CO2calc: A User Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A user-friendly, stand-alone application for the calculation of carbonate system parameters was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey Florida Shelf Ecosystems Response to Climate Change Project in response to its Ocean Acidification Task. The applicatio...

J. A. Kleypas L. L. Robbins M. E. Hansen S. C. Meylan

2010-01-01

82

Development of a user-friendly delivery method for the fungus Metarhizium anisopliac to control the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A user-friendly method to deliver Metarhizium spores to honey bee colonies for control of Varroa mites was developed and tested. Patty blend formulations protected the fungal spores at brood nest temperatures and served as an improved delivery system of the fungus to bee hives. Field trials conducte...

83

ALSoD: A user-friendly online bioinformatics tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genetics.  

PubMed

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the commonest adult onset motor neuron disease, with a peak age of onset in the seventh decade. With advances in genetic technology, there is an enormous increase in the volume of genetic data produced, and a corresponding need for storage, analysis, and interpretation, particularly as our understanding of the relationships between genotype and phenotype mature. Here, we present a system to enable this in the form of the ALS Online Database (ALSoD at http://alsod.iop.kcl.ac.uk), a freely available database that has been transformed from a single gene storage facility recording mutations in the SOD1 gene to a multigene ALS bioinformatics repository and analytical instrument combining genotype, phenotype, and geographical information with associated analysis tools. These include a comparison tool to evaluate genes side by side or jointly with user configurable features, a pathogenicity prediction tool using a combination of computational approaches to distinguish variants with nonfunctional characteristics from disease-associated mutations with more dangerous consequences, and a credibility tool to enable ALS researchers to objectively assess the evidence for gene causation in ALS. Furthermore, integration of external tools, systems for feedback, annotation by users, and two-way links to collaborators hosting complementary databases further enhance the functionality of ALSoD. PMID:22753137

Abel, Olubunmi; Powell, John F; Andersen, Peter M; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

2012-07-16

84

SpectraClassifier 1.0: a user friendly, automated MRS-based classifier-development system  

PubMed Central

Background SpectraClassifier (SC) is a Java solution for designing and implementing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)-based classifiers. The main goal of SC is to allow users with minimum background knowledge of multivariate statistics to perform a fully automated pattern recognition analysis. SC incorporates feature selection (greedy stepwise approach, either forward or backward), and feature extraction (PCA). Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is the method of choice for classification. Classifier evaluation is performed through various methods: display of the confusion matrix of the training and testing datasets; K-fold cross-validation, leave-one-out and bootstrapping as well as Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. Results SC is composed of the following modules: Classifier design, Data exploration, Data visualisation, Classifier evaluation, Reports, and Classifier history. It is able to read low resolution in-vivo MRS (single-voxel and multi-voxel) and high resolution tissue MRS (HRMAS), processed with existing tools (jMRUI, INTERPRET, 3DiCSI or TopSpin). In addition, to facilitate exchanging data between applications, a standard format capable of storing all the information needed for a dataset was developed. Each functionality of SC has been specifically validated with real data with the purpose of bug-testing and methods validation. Data from the INTERPRET project was used. Conclusions SC is a user-friendly software designed to fulfil the needs of potential users in the MRS community. It accepts all kinds of pre-processed MRS data types and classifies them semi-automatically, allowing spectroscopists to concentrate on interpretation of results with the use of its visualisation tools.

2010-01-01

85

Improving DOE-2's RESYS routine: User defined functions to provide more accurate part load energy use and humidity predictions  

SciTech Connect

In hourly energy simulations, it is important to properly predict the performance of air conditioning systems over a range of full and part load operating conditions. An important component of these calculations is to properly consider the performance of the cycling air conditioner and how it interacts with the building. This paper presents improved approaches to properly account for the part load performance of residential and light commercial air conditioning systems in DOE-2. First, more accurate correlations are given to predict the degradation of system efficiency at part load conditions. In addition, a user-defined function for RESYS is developed that provides improved predictions of air conditioner sensible and latent capacity at part load conditions. The user function also provides more accurate predictions of space humidity by adding ''lumped'' moisture capacitance into the calculations. The improved cooling coil model and the addition of moisture capacitance predicts humidity swings that are more representative of the performance observed in real buildings.

Henderson, Hugh I.; Parker, Danny; Huang, Yu J.

2000-08-04

86

Inferring population history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach to approximate Bayesian computation  

PubMed Central

Summary: Genetic data obtained on population samples convey information about their evolutionary history. Inference methods can extract part of this information but they require sophisticated statistical techniques that have been made available to the biologist community (through computer programs) only for simple and standard situations typically involving a small number of samples. We propose here a computer program (DIY ABC) for inference based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), in which scenarios can be customized by the user to fit many complex situations involving any number of populations and samples. Such scenarios involve any combination of population divergences, admixtures and population size changes. DIY ABC can be used to compare competing scenarios, estimate parameters for one or more scenarios and compute bias and precision measures for a given scenario and known values of parameters (the current version applies to unlinked microsatellite data). This article describes key methods used in the program and provides its main features. The analysis of one simulated and one real dataset, both with complex evolutionary scenarios, illustrates the main possibilities of DIY ABC. Availability: The software DIY ABC is freely available at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc. Contact: j.cornuet@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are also available at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc

Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Santos, Filipe; Beaumont, Mark A.; Robert, Christian P.; Marin, Jean-Michel; Balding, David J.; Guillemaud, Thomas; Estoup, Arnaud

2008-01-01

87

User-friendly and versatile software for analysis of protein hydrophobicity.  

PubMed

We have developed a simple and flexible program to analyze regional hydrophobicity of a protein from its amino acid (aa) sequence. This program runs as a Microsoft Excel document into which aa sequence can be copied from any Windows-compatible or Macintosh word processor. The program returns the hydrophobicity index of each aa residue and other analyses that can be used to predict transmembrane domains, amphiphilic alpha helices and putative antigenic epitopes in a protein using established algorithms. The program can also be easily modified to test user-defined algorithms and to accommodate non-conventional aa residues or ambiguities in the aa sequence. Simple modification of the program allows direct use of nucleic acid sequence information for various analyses. Graphic visualization of the results is readily achieved using the graphics function of Microsoft Excel. Alternatively, the data can be imported into other graphics software for preparation of publication-quality figures. By running as a document in Microsoft Excel, which can be found in virtually all personal computers, this program provides easy access even to the computer novice. PMID:9714886

Han, B; Tashjian, A H

1998-08-01

88

A collaborative filtering algorithm and evaluation metric that accurately model the user experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative Filtering (CF) systems have been researched for over a decade as a tool to deal with information overload. At the heart of these systems are the algorithms which generate the predictions and recommendations.In this article we empirically demonstrate that two of the most acclaimed CF recommendation algorithms have flaws that result in a dramatically unacceptable user experience.In response, we

Matthew R. McLaughlin; Jonathan L. Herlocker

2004-01-01

89

Keyboard user verification: toward an accurate, efficient, and ecologically valid algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes new measures of individual differences in typing behaviour which provide a means of accurately verifying the identity of the typist. A first study examined the efficacy of a multivariate measure of inter-key latencies and a probabilistic discriminator statistic in conjunction with an individual filtering system which eliminates occasional disfluent keystrokes. The results indicate that, under optimum conditions

Renee Napier; William Laverty; Doug Mahar; Ron Henderson; Michael Hiron; Michael Wagner

1995-01-01

90

Towards automatic recommendation of friend lists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facebook access-control lists, called friend lists, are difficult to create manually. Previous work on automating these lists has used friend details entered by the user. Our approach automates them by merging virtual friend cliques using certain heuristics that determine if two virtual friend cliques correspond to a single actual friend clique. A small user study found that our lists were

Kelli Bacon; Prasun Dewan

2009-01-01

91

User friendly line CAPTCHAs  

Microsoft Academic Search

CAPTCHAs or reverse Turing tests are real-time assessments used by programs (or computers) to tell humans and machines apart. This is achieved by assigning and assessing hard AI problems that could only be solved easily by human but not by machines. Applications of such assessments range from stopping spammers from automatically filling online forms to preventing hackers from performing dictionary

A. K. B. Karunathilake; B. M. D. Balasuriya; R. G. Ragel

2009-01-01

92

User friendly joystick  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A joystick control device having a lower U-shaped bracket, an upper U-shaped bracket, a handle attached to the upper U-shaped bracket, with the upper U-shaped bracket connected to the lower U-shaped bracket by a compliant joint allowing six degrees of freedom for the joystick. The compliant joint consists of at least one cable segment affixed between the lower U-shaped bracket and the upper U-shaped bracket. At least one input device is located between the lower U-shaped bracket and the upper U-shaped bracket.

Eklund, Wayne D.; Kerley, James J.

1992-05-01

93

CrossSearch, a user-friendly search engine for detecting chemically cross-linked peptides in conjugated proteins.  

PubMed

Chemical cross-linking and high resolution MS have been integrated successfully to capture protein interactions and provide low resolution structural data for proteins that are refractive to analyses by NMR or crystallography. Despite the versatility of these combined techniques, the array of products that is generated from the cross-linking and proteolytic digestion of proteins is immense and generally requires the use of labeling strategies and/or data base search algorithms to distinguish actual cross-linked peptides from the many side products of cross-linking. Most strategies reported to date have focused on the analysis of small cross-linked protein complexes (<60 kDa) because the number of potential forms of covalently modified peptides increases dramatically with the number of peptides generated from the digestion of such complexes. We report herein the development of a user-friendly search engine, CrossSearch, that provides the foundation for an overarching strategy to detect cross-linked peptides from the digests of large (>or=170-kDa) cross-linked proteins, i.e. conjugates. Our strategy combines the use of a low excess of cross-linker, data base searching, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to experimentally minimize and theoretically cull the side products of cross-linking. Using this strategy, the (alpha beta gamma delta)(4) phosphorylase kinase model complex was cross-linked to form with high specificity a 170-kDa betagamma conjugate in which we identified residues involved in the intramolecular cross-linking of the 125-kDa beta subunit between its regulatory N terminus and its C terminus. This finding provides an explanation for previously published homodimeric two-hybrid interactions of the beta subunit and suggests a dynamic structural role for the regulatory N terminus of that subunit. The results offer proof of concept for the CrossSearch strategy for analyzing conjugates and are the first to reveal a tertiary structural element of either homologous alpha or beta regulatory subunit of phosphorylase kinase. PMID:18281724

Nadeau, Owen W; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Paschall, Justin E; Artigues, Antonio; Sage, Jessica; Villar, Maria T; Carlson, Gerald M

2008-02-16

94

A user-friendly application for the extraction of kubios hrv output to an optimal format for statistical analysis - biomed 2011.  

PubMed

The aim of the present manuscript is to present a user-friendly and flexible platform for transforming Kubios HRV output files to an .xls-file format, used by MS Excel. The program utilizes either native or bundled Java and is platform-independent and mobile. This means that it can run without being installed on a computer. It also has an option of continuous transferring of data indicating that it can run in the background while Kubios produces output files. The program checks for changes in the file structure and automatically updates the .xls- output file. PMID:21525593

Johnsen Lind, Andreas; Helge Johnsen, Bjorn; Hill, Labarron K; Sollers Iii, John J; Thayer, Julian F

2011-01-01

95

A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Community-Friendly Health Recovery Program (CHRP) Among High-Risk Drug Users in Treatment.  

PubMed

Existing evidence-based HIV risk reduction interventions have not been designed for implementation within clinical settings, such as methadone maintenance programs, where many high-risk drug users seek treatment services. We therefore systematically developed an adapted, significantly shortened, version of a comprehensive evidence-based intervention called the Community-friendly Health Recovery Program (CHRP) which has demonstrated preliminary evidence of efficacy in a feasibility/acceptability study already published. In a randomized controlled trial reported here, we tested the efficacy of the CHRP intervention among high-risk drug users newly enrolled in drug treatment at an inner-city methadone maintenance program. The CHRP intervention produced improvements in drug risk reduction knowledge as well as demonstrated sex- and drug-risk reduction skills. Support was found for the IMB model of health behavior change. Implications for future intervention research and practice are considered. PMID:23835735

Copenhaver, Michael M; Lee, I-Ching; Baldwin, Patrick

2013-11-01

96

New User-Friendly Approach to Obtain an Eisenberg Plot and Its Use as a Practical Tool in Protein Sequence Analysis  

PubMed Central

The Eisenberg plot or hydrophobic moment plot methodology is one of the most frequently used methods of bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is more and more recognized as a helpful tool in Life Sciences in general, and recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins are promising in this respect. In this study a bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins was used to obtain an Eisenberg plot. The validity of the Heliquest generated hydrophobic moment plot was checked and exemplified. This study indicates that the Eisenberg plot methodology can be transferred to another hydrophobicity scale and renders a user-friendly approach which can be utilized in routine checks in protein–lipid interaction and in protein and peptide lipid binding characterization studies. A combined approach seems to be advantageous and results in a powerful tool in the search of helical lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides. The strength and limitations of the Eisenberg plot approach itself are discussed as well. The presented approach not only leads to a better understanding of the nature of the protein–lipid interactions but also provides a user-friendly tool for the search of lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides.

Keller, Rob C.A.

2011-01-01

97

New user-friendly approach to obtain an eisenberg plot and its use as a practical tool in protein sequence analysis.  

PubMed

The Eisenberg plot or hydrophobic moment plot methodology is one of the most frequently used methods of bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is more and more recognized as a helpful tool in Life Sciences in general, and recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins are promising in this respect. In this study a bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins was used to obtain an Eisenberg plot. The validity of the Heliquest generated hydrophobic moment plot was checked and exemplified. This study indicates that the Eisenberg plot methodology can be transferred to another hydrophobicity scale and renders a user-friendly approach which can be utilized in routine checks in protein-lipid interaction and in protein and peptide lipid binding characterization studies. A combined approach seems to be advantageous and results in a powerful tool in the search of helical lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides. The strength and limitations of the Eisenberg plot approach itself are discussed as well. The presented approach not only leads to a better understanding of the nature of the protein-lipid interactions but also provides a user-friendly tool for the search of lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides. PMID:22016610

Keller, Rob C A

2011-08-30

98

DIPRA: A user-friendly program to model multi-element diffusion in olivine with applications to timescales of magmatic processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract Modeling the diffusion of elements in olivine from volcanic rocks has recently become one of the most useful techniques to determine the timescales of the processes that occur in magma reservoirs before eruptions. However, many potential <span class="hlt">users</span> are not versed in the numerical methods needed to solve the diffusion equation for timescale determinations. Here we present DIPRA (Diffusion Process Analysis), a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> computer tool that models easily and intuitively the olivine chemical zoning by performing an automatic, visual, and quick fit to the natural profiles. The code is developed under a finite difference scheme and allows simultaneous modeling of diffusion of Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Ca. DIPRA accounts for most variables that affect the diffusivity, including temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, major element composition, and anisotropy. Initial and boundary conditions can be done as complex as desired, including changing boundary composition with time. Such versatility allows modeling the large variety of scenarios that are characteristic of volcanic systems. We also have implemented a methodology to estimate objectively the uncertainties of the timescales from the uncertainties of the data and temperature. We expect that our application will increase the number and quality of timescale determinations from crystal zoning studies. It may be also useful as a teaching resource for higher education courses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Girona, TáRsilo; Costa, Fidel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2688269"> <span id="translatedtitle">EpiGRAPH: <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> software for statistical analysis and prediction of (epi)genomic data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The EpiGRAPH web service enables biologists to uncover hidden associations in vertebrate genome and epigenome datasets. <span class="hlt">Users</span> can upload sets of genomic regions and EpiGRAPH will test multiple attributes (including DNA sequence, chromatin structure, epigenetic modifications and evolutionary conservation) for enrichment or depletion among these regions. Furthermore, EpiGRAPH learns to predictively identify similar genomic regions. This paper demonstrates EpiGRAPH's practical utility in a case study on monoallelic gene expression and describes its novel approach to reproducible bioinformatic analysis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bock, Christoph; Halachev, Konstantin; Buch, Joachim; Lengauer, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA486153"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expandable Grids: A <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface Visualization Technique and a Policy Semantics to Support Fast, <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Security and Privacy Policy Authoring.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis addresses the problem of designing <span class="hlt">user</span> interfaces to support creating, editing, and viewing security and privacy policies. Policies are declarations of who may access what under which conditions. Creating, editing, and viewing in a word, auth...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. W. Reeder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1240617"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping health in the Great Lakes areas of concern: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> tool for policy and decision makers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of the physical environment as a determinant of health is a major concern reported by the general public as well as by many policymakers. However, it remains one of the health determinants for which few available measures or indicators are readily available. This lack of data is compounded by the fact that evidence for direct cause-and-effect relationships in the literature is often equivocal, leading to feelings of uncertainty among the lay public and often leading to indecision among policymakers. In this article we examine one aspect of the physical environment--water pollution in the Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs)--and its potential impacts on a wide range of (plausible) human health outcomes. Essentially, the International Joint Commission, the international agency that oversees Great Lakes water quality and related issues, worked with Health Canada to produce a report for each of the 17 AOCs on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes, outlining a long list of health outcomes and the potential relationships these might have with environmental exposures known or suspected to exist in the Great Lakes basin. These reports are based solely on secondary health data and a thorough review of the environmental epidemiologic literature. The use of these reports by local health policymakers as well as by public health officials in the AOCs was limited, however, by the presentation of vast amounts of data in a series of tables with various outcome measures. The reports were therefore not used widely by the audience for whom they were intended. In this paper we report the results of an undertaking designed to reduce the data and present them in a more policy-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> manner, using a geographic information system. We do not attempt to answer directly questions related to cause and effect vis-ŕ-vis the relationships between environment and health in the Great Lakes; rather, this work is a hypothesis-generating exercise that will help sharpen the focus of research into this increasingly important area of public health concern.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elliott, S J; Eyles, J; DeLuca, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11744500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping health in the Great Lakes areas of concern: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> tool for policy and decision makers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of the physical environment as a determinant of health is a major concern reported by the general public as well as by many policymakers. However, it remains one of the health determinants for which few available measures or indicators are readily available. This lack of data is compounded by the fact that evidence for direct cause-and-effect relationships in the literature is often equivocal, leading to feelings of uncertainty among the lay public and often leading to indecision among policymakers. In this article we examine one aspect of the physical environment--water pollution in the Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs)--and its potential impacts on a wide range of (plausible) human health outcomes. Essentially, the International Joint Commission, the international agency that oversees Great Lakes water quality and related issues, worked with Health Canada to produce a report for each of the 17 AOCs on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes, outlining a long list of health outcomes and the potential relationships these might have with environmental exposures known or suspected to exist in the Great Lakes basin. These reports are based solely on secondary health data and a thorough review of the environmental epidemiologic literature. The use of these reports by local health policymakers as well as by public health officials in the AOCs was limited, however, by the presentation of vast amounts of data in a series of tables with various outcome measures. The reports were therefore not used widely by the audience for whom they were intended. In this paper we report the results of an undertaking designed to reduce the data and present them in a more policy-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> manner, using a geographic information system. We do not attempt to answer directly questions related to cause and effect vis-ŕ-vis the relationships between environment and health in the Great Lakes; rather, this work is a hypothesis-generating exercise that will help sharpen the focus of research into this increasingly important area of public health concern. PMID:11744500</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elliott, S J; Eyles, J; DeLuca, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3205864"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ProteoRed MIAPE web toolkit: A <span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> Framework to Connect and Share Proteomics Standards*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of the HUPO-PSI's (Proteomics Standards Initiative) standard data formats and MIAPE (Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment) guidelines should improve proteomics data sharing within the scientific community. Proteomics journals have encouraged the use of these standards and guidelines to improve the quality of experimental reporting and ease the evaluation and publication of manuscripts. However, there is an evident lack of bioinformatics tools specifically designed to create and edit standard file formats and reports, or embed them within proteomics workflows. In this article, we describe a new web-based software suite (The ProteoRed MIAPE web toolkit) that performs several complementary roles related to proteomic data standards. First, it can verify that the reports fulfill the minimum information requirements of the corresponding MIAPE modules, highlighting inconsistencies or missing information. Second, the toolkit can convert several XML-based data standards directly into human readable MIAPE reports stored within the ProteoRed MIAPE repository. Finally, it can also perform the reverse operation, allowing <span class="hlt">users</span> to export from MIAPE reports into XML files for computational processing, data sharing, or public database submission. The toolkit is thus the first application capable of automatically linking the PSI's MIAPE modules with the corresponding XML data exchange standards, enabling bidirectional conversions. This toolkit is freely available at http://www.proteored.org/MIAPE/.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Medina-Aunon, J. Alberto; Martinez-Bartolome, Salvador; Lopez-Garcia, Miguel A.; Salazar, Emilio; Navajas, Rosana; Jones, Andrew R.; Paradela, Alberto; Albar, Juan P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.compassionatefriends.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compassionate <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... IL Save the Date! The Compassionate <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: Providing Grief Support After the Death of a Child "The Compassionate <span class="hlt">Friends</span> is about transforming the pain of grief into the elixir of hope. It takes people ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18769157"> <span id="translatedtitle">A compilation of <span class="hlt">accurate</span> structural parameters for KDP and DKDP, and a <span class="hlt">users</span>' guide to their crystal structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> fractional coordinates, (harmonic) thermal parameters and lattice parameters are presented for KDP (KH2PO4) at 293 K, Tc + 5 K and Tc - 20 K, and for ?95% deuterated DKDP (KD2PO4) at 293 K, Tc + 5 K and Tc - 10 K; and also for KDP and DKDP at 16.5 kbar (at 293 K). The fractional coordinates and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Nelmes; Z. Tun; W. F. Kuhs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2401330"> <span id="translatedtitle">CrossSearch, a <span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> Search Engine for Detecting Chemically Cross-linked Peptides in Conjugated Proteins*S?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chemical cross-linking and high resolution MS have been integrated successfully to capture protein interactions and provide low resolution structural data for proteins that are refractive to analyses by NMR or crystallography. Despite the versatility of these combined techniques, the array of products that is generated from the cross-linking and proteolytic digestion of proteins is immense and generally requires the use of labeling strategies and/or data base search algorithms to distinguish actual cross-linked peptides from the many side products of cross-linking. Most strategies reported to date have focused on the analysis of small cross-linked protein complexes (<60 kDa) because the number of potential forms of covalently modified peptides increases dramatically with the number of peptides generated from the digestion of such complexes. We report herein the development of a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> search engine, CrossSearch, that provides the foundation for an overarching strategy to detect cross-linked peptides from the digests of large (?170-kDa) cross-linked proteins, i.e. conjugates. Our strategy combines the use of a low excess of cross-linker, data base searching, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to experimentally minimize and theoretically cull the side products of cross-linking. Using this strategy, the (????)4 phosphorylase kinase model complex was cross-linked to form with high specificity a 170-kDa ?? conjugate in which we identified residues involved in the intramolecular cross-linking of the 125-kDa ? subunit between its regulatory N terminus and its C terminus. This finding provides an explanation for previously published homodimeric two-hybrid interactions of the ? subunit and suggests a dynamic structural role for the regulatory N terminus of that subunit. The results offer proof of concept for the CrossSearch strategy for analyzing conjugates and are the first to reveal a tertiary structural element of either homologous ? or ? regulatory subunit of phosphorylase kinase.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nadeau, Owen W.; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Paschall, Justin E.; Artigues, Antonio; Sage, Jessica; Villar, Maria T.; Carlson, Gerald M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20512613"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> delivery method for the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae to control the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> method to deliver Metarhizium spores to honey bee colonies for control of Varroa mites was developed and tested. Patty blend formulations protected the fungal spores at brood nest temperatures and served as an improved delivery system of the fungus to bee hives. Field trials conducted in 2006 in Texas using freshly harvested spores indicated that patty blend formulations of 10 g of conidia per hive (applied twice) significantly reduced the numbers of mites per adult bee, mites in sealed brood cells, and residual mites at the end of the 47-day experimental period. Colony development in terms of adult bee populations and brood production also improved. Field trials conducted in 2007 in Florida using less virulent spores produced mixed results. Patty blends of 10 g of conidia per hive (applied twice) were less successful in significantly reducing the number of mites per adult bee. However, hive survivorship and colony strength were improved, and the numbers of residual mites were significantly reduced at the end of the 42-day experimental period. The overall results from 2003 to 2008 field trials indicated that it was critical to have fungal spores with good germination, pathogenicity and virulence. We determined that fungal spores (1 × 10(10) viable spores per gram) with 98% germination and high pathogenicity (95% mite mortality at day 7) provided successful control of mite populations in established honey bee colonies at 10 g of conidia per hive (applied twice). Overall, microbial control of Varroa mite with M. anisopliae is feasible and could be a useful component of an integrated pest management program. PMID:20512613</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanga, Lambert H B; Adamczyk, John; Patt, Joseph; Gracia, Carlos; Cascino, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Beer&pg=6&id=EJ783443"> <span id="translatedtitle">For Professors, "<span class="hlt">Friending</span>" Can Be Fraught</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|People connect on Facebook by asking to "<span class="hlt">friend</span>" one another. A typical <span class="hlt">user</span> lists at least 100 such connections, while newbies are informed, "You don't have any <span class="hlt">friends</span> yet." A humbling statement. It might make one want to find some. But <span class="hlt">friending</span> students can be even dicier than befriending them. In the real world, casual professors may ask…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lipka, Sara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48676779"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mixed-Initiative <span class="hlt">Friend</span>-List Creation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a <span class="hlt">Friend</span> lists group contacts in a social networking site that are to be treated equally in some respect. We have developed\\u000a a new approach for recommending <span class="hlt">friend</span> lists, which can then be manually edited and merged by the <span class="hlt">user</span> to create the final\\u000a lists. Our approach finds both large networks of <span class="hlt">friends</span> and smaller <span class="hlt">friend</span> groups within this network by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kelli Bacon; Prasun Dewan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://onguardonline.gov/media/game-0003-friend-finder"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friend</span> Finder</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Friend</span> Finder (Game) Email Embed Grab this Game <Embed>: <object width='640' height='480'><param name='movie' value='http://www.onguardonline.gov/flash/socialnetworking_loader.swf'></param><param name='wmode' value=' ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6046803"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friend</span> recommendation according to appearances on photos</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unlike the questionnaire based <span class="hlt">friend</span> recommendation scheme used in Social Network Service (SNS) websites nowadays (e.g. online dating sites, online matchmaking sites), we focus on the fact that most of the online <span class="hlt">users</span> may be interested in the strang- ers whose appearances are somehow attractive according to their own preferences. In this paper, we present a <span class="hlt">friend</span> recommenda- tion system</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhipeng Wu; Shuqiang Jiang; Qingming Huang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962661"> <span id="translatedtitle">Franklin: <span class="hlt">User</span> Experiences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin <span class="hlt">user</span> experiences from <span class="hlt">friendly</span> early <span class="hlt">user</span> period to production period. Selected successful <span class="hlt">user</span> stories along with top issues affecting <span class="hlt">user</span> experiences are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22245546"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamo: a flexible, <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> development tool for subtomogram averaging of cryo-EM data in high-performance computing environments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dynamo is a new software package for subtomogram averaging of cryo Electron Tomography (cryo-ET) data with three main goals: first, Dynamo allows <span class="hlt">user</span>-transparent adaptation to a variety of high-performance computing platforms such as GPUs or CPU clusters. Second, Dynamo implements <span class="hlt">user</span>-friendliness through GUI interfaces and scripting resources. Third, Dynamo offers <span class="hlt">user</span>-flexibility through a plugin API. Besides the alignment and averaging procedures, Dynamo includes native tools for visualization and analysis of results and data, as well as support for third party visualization software, such as Chimera UCSF or EMAN2. As a demonstration of these functionalities, we studied bacterial flagellar motors and showed automatically detected classes with absent and present C-rings. Subtomogram averaging is a common task in current cryo-ET pipelines, which requires extensive computational resources and follows a well-established workflow. However, due to the data diversity, many existing packages offer slight variations of the same algorithm to improve results. One of the main purposes behind Dynamo is to provide explicit tools to allow the <span class="hlt">user</span> the insertion of custom designed procedures - or plugins - to replace or complement the native algorithms in the different steps of the processing pipeline for subtomogram averaging without the burden of handling parallelization. Custom scripts that implement new approaches devised by the <span class="hlt">user</span> are integrated into the Dynamo data management system, so that they can be controlled by the GUI or the scripting capacities. Dynamo executables do not require licenses for third party commercial software. Sources, executables and documentation are freely distributed on http://www.dynamo-em.org. PMID:22245546</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castańo-Díez, Daniel; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Arheit, Marcel; Stahlberg, Henning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20086267"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design and implementation of a secure and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> broker platform supporting the end-to-end provisioning of e-homecare services.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We designed a broker platform for e-homecare services using web service technology. The broker allows efficient data communication and guarantees quality requirements such as security, availability and cost-efficiency by dynamic selection of services, minimizing <span class="hlt">user</span> interactions and simplifying authentication through a single <span class="hlt">user</span> sign-on. A prototype was implemented, with several e-homecare services (alarm, telemonitoring, audio diary and video-chat). It was evaluated by patients with diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The patients found that the start-up time and overhead imposed by the platform was satisfactory. Having all e-homecare services integrated into a single application, which required only one login, resulted in a high quality of experience for the patients. PMID:20086267</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Hoecke, Sofie; Steurbaut, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; De Turck, Filip; Dhoedt, Bart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1859590"> <span id="translatedtitle">Buddy tracking - efficient proximity detection among mobile <span class="hlt">friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract: Global positioning systems (GPS) and mobile phone networks are making it possible to track individual <span class="hlt">users</span> with an increasing accuracy. It is natural to ask whether this information can be used to maintain social networks. In such a network each <span class="hlt">user</span> wishes to be informed whenever one of a list of other <span class="hlt">users</span>, called the <span class="hlt">user’s</span> <span class="hlt">friends</span>, appears in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alon Efrat; Arnon Amir; J. Myllymaki; L. Palaniappan; K. Wampler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3261318"> <span id="translatedtitle">Introduction of the TEAM-HF Costing Tool: A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Spreadsheet Program to Estimate Costs of Providing Patient-Centered Interventions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Patient-centered health care interventions, such as heart failure disease management programs, are under increasing pressure to demonstrate good value. Variability in costing methods and assumptions in economic evaluations of such interventions limit the comparability of cost estimates across studies. Valid cost estimation is critical to conducting economic evaluations and for program budgeting and reimbursement negotiations. Methods and Results Using sound economic principles, we developed the Tools for Economic Analysis of Patient Management Interventions in Heart Failure (TEAM-HF) Costing Tool, a spreadsheet program that can be used by researchers or health care managers to systematically generate cost estimates for economic evaluations and to inform budgetary decisions. The tool guides <span class="hlt">users</span> on data collection and cost assignment for associated personnel, facilities, equipment, supplies, patient incentives, miscellaneous items, and start-up activities. The tool generates estimates of total program costs, cost per patient, and cost per week and presents results using both standardized and customized unit costs for side-by-side comparisons. Results from pilot testing indicated that the tool was well-formatted, easy to use, and followed a logical order. Cost estimates of a 12-week exercise training program in patients with heart failure were generated with the costing tool and were found to be consistent with estimates published in a recent study. Conclusions The TEAM-HF Costing Tool could prove to be a valuable resource for researchers and health care managers to generate comprehensive cost estimates of patient-centered interventions in heart failure or other conditions for conducting high-quality economic evaluations and making well-informed health care management decisions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reed, Shelby D.; Li, Yanhong; Kamble, Shital; Polsky, Daniel; Graham, Felicia L.; Bowers, Margaret T.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Paul, Sara; Schulman, Kevin A.; Whellan, David J.; Riegel, Barbara J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4702784"> <span id="translatedtitle">Make new <span class="hlt">friends</span>, but keep the old: recommending people on social networking sites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper studies people recommendations designed to help <span class="hlt">users</span> find known, offline contacts and discover new <span class="hlt">friends</span> on social networking sites. We evaluated four recommender algorithms in an enterprise social networking site using a personalized survey of 500 <span class="hlt">users</span> and a field study of 3,000 <span class="hlt">users</span>. We found all algorithms effective in expanding <span class="hlt">users</span>' <span class="hlt">friend</span> lists. Algorithms based on social</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jilin Chen; Werner Geyer; Casey Dugan; Michael J. Muller; Ido Guy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4782575"> <span id="translatedtitle">Buddy tracking - efficient proximity detection among mobile <span class="hlt">friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global positioning systems (GPS) and mobile phone networks are making it possible to track individual <span class="hlt">users</span> with an increasing accuracy. It is natural to ask whether this information can be used to maintain social networks. In such a network each <span class="hlt">user</span> wishes to be informed whenever one of a list of other <span class="hlt">users</span>, called the <span class="hlt">user</span>'s <span class="hlt">friends</span>, appears in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnon Amir; Alon Efrat; Jussi Myllymaki; Lingeshwaran Palaniappan; Kevin Wampler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37861524"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span>, real <span class="hlt">friends</span> and fifth columnists</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose – Strives to illuminate the types of relationships many libraries have with <span class="hlt">friends</span>' organizations and to illustrate what makes a good relationship between the two organizations. While many libraries have had successful experiences with such groups, not all relationships have a happy ending. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Uses real-life examples to illustrate various ways <span class="hlt">friends</span>' groups have, and have not, been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glen E. Holt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alz.org/living_with_alzheimers_families_and_friends.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Families and <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... chapter Join our online community Helping <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Family Part of living well with Alzheimerâ??s is adjusting to your â??new normalâ?ť and helping family and <span class="hlt">friends</span> do the same. Knowing what to ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=microwave&pg=7&id=EJ510024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microwave Fun: <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Recipe Cards.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This article explains how a 12-year-old boy with profound mental retardation and autistic behaviors, living in a group home, was taught to follow number- and color-coded directions so that he could independently cook his own meals in a microwave oven. The article covers materials used, the skills taught, adaptations for classroom use, and safety…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bergstrom, Tom; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=microwaves&pg=7&id=EJ510024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microwave Fun: <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Recipe Cards.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article explains how a 12-year-old boy with profound mental retardation and autistic behaviors, living in a group home, was taught to follow number- and color-coded directions so that he could independently cook his own meals in a microwave oven. The article covers materials used, the skills taught, adaptations for classroom use, and safety…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bergstrom, Tom; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=facebook+AND+privacy&id=EJ865992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Students' Facebook "<span class="hlt">Friends</span>": Public and Private Spheres</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Friendship is highly significant during the university years. Facebook, widely used by students, is designed to facilitate communication with different groups of "<span class="hlt">friends</span>". This exploratory study involved interviewing a sample of student <span class="hlt">users</span> of Facebook: it focuses on the extent to which older adults, especially parents, are accepted as…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">West, Anne; Lewis, Jane; Currie, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51065503"> <span id="translatedtitle">Secure <span class="hlt">friend</span> discovery in mobile social networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mobile social networks extend social networks in the cyberspace into the real world by allowing mobile <span class="hlt">users</span> to discover and interact with existing and potential <span class="hlt">friends</span> who happen to be in their physical vicinity. Despite their promise to enable many exciting applications, serious security and privacy concerns have hindered wide adoption of these networks. To address these concerns, in this</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei Dong; Vacha Dave; Lili Qiu; Yin Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1028570"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cyber <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Fire</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cyber <span class="hlt">friendly</span> fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of <span class="hlt">friendly</span> or neutral forces. Just as with combat <span class="hlt">friendly</span> fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The network is essentially divided into a production component that hosts the web and network services, and a <span class="hlt">user</span> component that hosts thirty employee workstations and other end devices. The organization's network is separated from the Internet by a Cisco ASA network security device that both firewalls and detects intrusions. Business sensitive information is stored in various servers. This includes data comprising thousands of internal documents, such as finance and technical designs, email messages for the organization's employees including the CEO, CFO, and CIO, the organization's source code, and Personally Identifiable client data. Release of any of this information to unauthorized parties would have a significant, detrimental impact on the organization's reputation, which would harm earnings. The valuable information stored in these servers pose obvious points of interest for an adversary. We constructed several scenarios around this environment to support studies in cyber SA and cyber FF that may be run in the test range. We describe mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches. Finally, we discuss possible future research directions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58066979"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hostile Versus <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Takeovers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper analyzes the optimal decision of a raider who can choose between a hostile and a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> takeover. Empirical evidence shows that the transaction costs of a hostile takeover are much higher than those of a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> one. The question therefore arises why a raider should ever wish to engage in a hostile takeover. The central argument of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monika Schnitzer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59234043"> <span id="translatedtitle">True <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, True Selves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">What is it to be or to have a true <span class="hlt">friend</span>? Views on this question within the history of philosophy appear to differ. Aristotle suggests that friendship of the best kind, arguably that which best approximates the notion of true friendship, is a relationship in which <span class="hlt">friends</span> love one another for their own sakes and regard one another as second</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sandra Lynch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22607454"> <span id="translatedtitle">New grower-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> methods for plant pathogen monitoring.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> plant disease diagnoses and rapid detection and identification of plant pathogens are of utmost importance for controlling plant diseases and mitigating the economic losses they incur. Technological advances have increasingly simplified the tools available for the identification of pathogens to the extent that, in some cases, this can be done directly by growers and producers themselves. Commercially available immunoprinting kits and lateral flow devices (LFDs) for detection of selected plant pathogens are among the first tools of what can be considered grower-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> pathogen monitoring methods. Research efforts, spurned on by point-of-care needs in the medical field, are paving the way for the further development of on-the-spot diagnostics and multiplex technologies in plant pathology. Grower-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> methods need to be practical, robust, readily available, and cost-effective. Such methods are not restricted to on-the-spot testing but extend to laboratory services, which are sometimes more practicable for growers, extension agents, regulators, and other <span class="hlt">users</span> of diagnostic tests. PMID:22607454</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Boer, Solke H; López, María M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56966194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Your Facebook deactivated <span class="hlt">friend</span> or a cloaked spy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">With over 750 million active <span class="hlt">users</span>, Facebook is the most famous social networking website. One particular aspect of Facebook widely discussed in the news and heavily researched in academic circles is the privacy of its <span class="hlt">users</span>. In this paper we introduce a zero day privacy loophole in Facebook. We call this the deactivated <span class="hlt">friend</span> attack. The concept of the attack</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shah Mahmood; Yvo Desmedt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AAS...21544204M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires <span class="hlt">accurate</span> multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maddalena, Ronald J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36845920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critique of Bramel and <span class="hlt">Friend</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comments on D. Bramel and R. <span class="hlt">Friend’s</span> reexamination of the Hawthorne studies of industrial workers and on subsequent interpretations of these studies, particularly those by E. Mayo and G. F. Lombard (1943). Bramel and <span class="hlt">Friend’s</span> Marxist perspective is criticized as illogical and based solely on invalid inference. (8 ref)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edwin A. Locke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB93176121"> <span id="translatedtitle">CONSUME <span class="hlt">Users</span> Guide.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">CONSUME is a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> computer program designed for resource managers with some working knowledge of IBM-PC applications. The software predicts the amount of fuel consumption on logged units based on weather data, the amount and fuel moisture of fuel...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. D. Ottmar M. F. Burns J. N. Hall A. D. Hanson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56914145"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photoshop with <span class="hlt">friends</span>: a synchronous learning community for graphic design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photoshop with <span class="hlt">Friends</span> is an online community of learners exchanging just-in-time help on graphic design tasks. The system attempts to provide an interactive, visual, context-aware, and personalized mode of learning. Developed as a Facebook application, Photoshop with <span class="hlt">Friends</span> allows <span class="hlt">users</span> to help each other in live sessions, with built-in screen sharing, recording, and voice chat support. Major design decisions are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juho Kim; Benjamin Malley; Joel Brandt; Mira Dontcheva; Diana Joseph; Krzysztof Z. Gajos; Robert C. Miller</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58978222"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distant <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: Stories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tense families at the breaking point, people trapped inside self-preserving illusions, inhabit the totally convincing stories in this striking debut collection. In the title story, Lex, an aging hippie from Boulder, Colo., shows up too late at the hospital where his best <span class="hlt">friend</span>'s daughter is dying. He typifies Johnson's characters: they fail each other in little things that count tremendously,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greg Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=179300"> <span id="translatedtitle">ENVIRONMENTALLY <span class="hlt">FRIENDLY</span> BIOBASED LUBRICANTS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The search for environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> materials that have the potential to substitute for mineral oil in various industrial applications is currently being considered a top priority research topic in the fuel and energy sector. This emphasis is largely due to the rapid depletion of world fossil f...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sol&pg=6&id=EJ352454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning to Be <span class="hlt">Friends</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An interview with Dr. Sol Gordon, a widely recognized authority on sex education, offers suggestions to parents on helping their handicapped children develop peer relationships, including helping children make <span class="hlt">friends</span>, discussing sexuality with their children, and leading a satisfactory personal and family life. (Author/CB)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Exceptional Parent, 1987</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=The+Case+of+More+Guns+AND+More+Gun+Control&pg=4&id=EJ707603"> <span id="translatedtitle">In Canada: <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Fire</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|One of Canada's more frequently quoted political malapropisms is attributed to Robert Thompson, who sternly reminded his fellow parliamentarians in 1973 that "the Americans are our best <span class="hlt">friends</span>, whether we like it or not." This cross-border friendship is partly expedient, partly geographic, partly genuine, sometimes one-sided, and almost always…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robertson, Heather-jane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60704589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cyber <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Fire</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cyber <span class="hlt">friendly</span> fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frank L. Greitzer; Thomas E. Carroll; Adam D. Roberts</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sitcoms&id=EJ888825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonverbal Communication in "<span class="hlt">Friends</span>"</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This activity uses video clips from a popular sitcom, "<span class="hlt">Friends</span>," to help students grasp the relational, rule-governed, and culture-specific nature of nonverbal communication. It opens students' eyes to nonverbal behaviors that are happening on a daily basis so that they not only master the knowledge but are able to apply it. While other popular…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Yanrong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2385970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why Your <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Have More <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Than You Do</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\\\textless}p{\\\\textgreater}It} is reasonable to suppose that individuals use the number of firends that their <span class="hlt">friends</span> have as one basis for determining whether they, themselves, have an adequate number of <span class="hlt">friends</span>. This article shows that, if individuals compare themselves with their <span class="hlt">friends</span>, it is likely that most of them will feel relatively inadequate. Data on friendship drawn from James Coleman's (1961)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott L. Feld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2041578"> <span id="translatedtitle">PERSPECTIVE: <span class="hlt">User</span> toolkits for innovation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Manufacturers must <span class="hlt">accurately</span> understand <span class="hlt">user</span> needs in order to develop successful products–but the task is becoming steadily more difficult as <span class="hlt">user</span> needs change more rapidly, and as firms increasingly seek to serve “markets of one.” <span class="hlt">User</span> toolkits for innovation allow manufacturers to actually abandon their attempts to understand <span class="hlt">user</span> needs in detail in favor of transferring need-related aspects of product</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric von Hippel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287150"> <span id="translatedtitle">Telephone provides "instant <span class="hlt">friend</span>".</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operation and function of the Dial A <span class="hlt">Friend</span> program in Manila, Philippines, is described. The program aims to provide a <span class="hlt">friend</span> to talk to about your problems. For the neophyte counselor, there is the reward of knowing you have been able to help someone and the confidence boost of being able to have a positive impact. For the caller, there is help for questions ranging from relationships with families or boy and girl <span class="hlt">friends</span>, anxieties, to contraception. All calls are anonymous, and may originate from pay phones or homes when parents are away. Conversations may never have occurred between best <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Confidentiality is assures, particularly from families. The assurance of privacy creates an atmosphere that encourages trust and a comfortable rapport. There can be no ridicule when identity is protected. A major emphasis is on promotion of pregnancy prevention, and on understanding the consequences of pregnancy. There is referral to those already pregnant, and encouragement to tell parents of the situation. Abortion is still illegal in the Philippines, and not recommended as a solution. An AIDS hotline is the referral for sexually transmitted diseases. Callers find that having someone listening to the problems creates a friendship and sense of not being along or of having an abnormal problem. A nonjudgemental manner is used and appreciated by callers. Most of the callers are females (7 out of 10) aged 13-19 years old. Calls come from students in Manila or even from other provinces. The program is advertised in the schools through lectures and in the city by artist's promotions on television, radio, and printed media. There are return calls thanking Dial A Fried for making a difference in their lives. PMID:12287150</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aguilar, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/229373"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> polysilane photoresists</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several novel polysilanes synthesized by the free-radical hydrosilation of oligomeric polyphenylsilane or poly(p-tert- butylphenylsilane) were examined for lithographic behavior. This recently developed route into substituted polysilanes has allowed for the rational design of a variety of polysilanes with a typical chemical properties such as alcohol and aqueous base solubility. Many of the polysilane resists made could be developed in aqueous sodium carbonate and bicarbonate solutions. These materials represent environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> polysilane resists in both their synthesis and processing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beach, J.V.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Waymouth, R.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58882145"> <span id="translatedtitle">Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span>\\/fiends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Just when everyone was becoming comfortable with the pit-falls of email and the Internet along came social networking sites such as MySpace, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter to keep schools in a constant state of anxiety. Teachers are rapidly discovering that etherspace is a jungle where common sense is their only protection and not everyone on Facebook is their <span class="hlt">friend</span>. Anything</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glen Seidel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3535707"> <span id="translatedtitle">BM-Map: an efficient software package for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> allocating multireads of RNA-sequencing data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has become a major tool for biomedical research. A key step in analyzing RNA-seq data is to infer the origin of short reads in the source genome, and for this purpose, many read alignment/mapping software programs have been developed. Usually, the majority of mappable reads can be mapped to one unambiguous genomic location, and these reads are called unique reads. However, a considerable proportion of mappable reads can be aligned to more than one genomic location with the same or similar fidelities, and they are called "multireads". Allocating these multireads is challenging but critical for interpreting RNA-seq data. We recently developed a Bayesian stochastic model that allocates multireads more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> than alternative methods (Ji et al. Biometrics 2011). Results In order to serve a greater biological community, we have implemented this method in a stand-alone, efficient, and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> software package, BM-Map. BM-Map takes SAM (Sequence Alignment/Map), the most popular read alignment format, as the standard input; then based on the Bayesian model, it calculates mapping probabilities of multireads for competing genomic loci; and BM-Map generates the output by adding mapping probabilities to the original SAM file so that <span class="hlt">users</span> can easily perform downstream analyses. The program is available in three common operating systems, Linux, Mac and PC. Moreover, we have built a dedicated website, http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/BM-Map, which includes free downloads, detailed tutorials and illustration examples. Conclusions We have developed a stand-alone, efficient, and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> software package for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> allocating multireads, which is an important addition to our previous methodology paper. We believe that this bioinformatics tool will greatly help RNA-seq and related applications reach their full potential in life science research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21288075"> <span id="translatedtitle">The closer the relationship, the more the interaction on facebook? Investigating the case of Taiwan <span class="hlt">users</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study argues for the necessity of applying offline contexts to social networking site research and the importance of distinguishing the relationship types of <span class="hlt">users</span>' counterparts when studying Facebook <span class="hlt">users</span>' behaviors. In an attempt to examine the relationship among <span class="hlt">users</span>' behaviors, their counterparts' relationship types, and the <span class="hlt">users</span>' perceived acquaintanceships after using Facebook, this study first investigated <span class="hlt">users</span>' frequently used tools when interacting with different types of <span class="hlt">friends</span>. <span class="hlt">Users</span> tended to use less time- and effort-consuming and less privacy-concerned tools with newly acquired <span class="hlt">friends</span>. This study further examined <span class="hlt">users</span>' behaviors in terms of their closeness and intimacy and their perceived acquaintanceships toward four different types of <span class="hlt">friends</span>. The study found that <span class="hlt">users</span> gained more perceived acquaintanceships from less close <span class="hlt">friends</span> with whom <span class="hlt">users</span> have more frequent interaction but less intimate behaviors. As for closer <span class="hlt">friends</span>, <span class="hlt">users</span> tended to use more intimate activities to interact with them. However, these activities did not necessarily occur more frequently than the activities they employed with their less close <span class="hlt">friends</span>. It was found that perceived acquaintanceships with closer <span class="hlt">friends</span> were significantly lower than those with less close <span class="hlt">friends</span>. This implies that Facebook is a mechanism for new <span class="hlt">friends</span>, rather than close <span class="hlt">friends</span>, to become more acquainted. PMID:21288075</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsu, Chiung-Wen Julia; Wang, Ching-Chan; Tai, Yi-Ting</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51118479"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> or Foes: Detecting Dishonest Recommenders in Online Social Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Viral marketing is becoming important due to the popularity of online social networks (OSNs) and the fact that many <span class="hlt">users</span> have integrated OSNs into their daily activities, e.g., they provide recommendations to their <span class="hlt">friends</span> on the products they purchased, or they make decision based on received recommendations. Nevertheless, this also opens door for \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yongkun Li; John C. S. Lui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006IAUJD..16E..24Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Optical Reference Catalogs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for <span class="hlt">user</span> applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zacharias, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fom.library.cornell.edu/"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Friend</span> of Man</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are many ways to understand the anti-slavery movements in the United States during the 19th century, and newspapers are but one of the key primary document types used by historians. Cornell University is fortunate enough to have a near complete run of the "<span class="hlt">Friend</span> of Man" newspaper, which was published between 1836 and 1842. This very intriguing title allows curious visitors to learn about a group of people in central New York interested in "changing America" during this unique period. The paper documents the "regional interconnectedness of reform" throughout the region, with a focus on cities such as Utica, Rochester, Buffalo, Albany and New York City. Visitors to the site can browse through the various issues at their leisure and they can also perform a full-text search.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009svc..book...19F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Environment <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Nanotechnologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The economic, security, military and environmental implications of molecular manufacturing are extreme. Unfortunately, conflicting definitions of nanotechnology and blurry distinctions between significantly different fields have complicated the effort to understand those differences and to develop sensible, effective policy for each. The risks of today's nanoscale technologies cannot be treated the same as the risks of longer-term molecular manufacturing. It is a mistake to put them together in one basket for policy consideration — each is important to address, but they offer different problems and will require far different solutions. As used today, the term nanotechnology usually refers to a broad collection of mostly disconnected fields. Essentially, anything sufficiently small and interesting can be called nanotechnology. Much of it is harmless. For the rest, much of the harm is of familiar and limited quality. Molecular manufacturing, by contrast, will bring unfamiliar risks and new classes of problems. The advanced environment <span class="hlt">friendly</span> nanotechnologies elaborated by Israel Company Polymate Ltd. — International Research Center are illustrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Figovsky, O.; Beilin, D.; Blank, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005EOSTr..86..416."> <span id="translatedtitle">Supporting Members and <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and <span class="hlt">friends</span>. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4264750"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Process of Human-Computer Interaction - A Prototype System in Nostalgic World</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the interactive model considered herein, a <span class="hlt">user</span> can be made to feel that the virtual world exists as tangibly as the real\\u000a world does. Once “<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Process of Human-Computer Interaction” launches, a <span class="hlt">user</span> can wait to see what happens before he\\u000a or she takes action. Even if a <span class="hlt">user</span> does nothing, the program still runs. A PC <span class="hlt">user</span> is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seiko Myojin; Mie Nakatani; Hirokazu Kato; Shogo Nishida</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Informed consent: are researchers <span class="hlt">accurately</span> representing risks and benefits?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Changes in the scope of health research in the last 50 years require evidence to support assumptions about what constitutes harm and benefit to research participants. The aim of this study was to investigate the actual benefits and harm individuals experienced while participating in potentially distressing qualitative research. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes emerged: (i) motivation to participate, (ii) expectations of participation, (iii) sources of harm, (iv) mitigating harm and (v) benefits of participation. Results indicated that all participants benefited through participation in the qualitative research. Most participants also reported varying degrees of distress during the interviews, but did not consider this harmful. In contrast, dissemination of the findings did constitute an unexpected source of potential harm for the participants and researcher. It is concluded that for these participants, distress during qualitative interviewing is not in itself harmful, and that participant information sheets need to reflect the harms and benefits of participation more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> in a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> format. Furthermore, the sensitivity with which research is disseminated needs to be considered as a fundamental protection for participants from unwarranted criticism by third parties. Recommendations include that researchers conducting interviews have specific personal and professional attributes relevant to the participant group, and that transcripts/raw data should not be sent automatically to participants. PMID:22364115</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahern, Kathy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20549448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> nitrogen fertilization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well. PMID:20549448</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaviv, Avi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16512215"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> nitrogen fertilization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well. PMID:16512215</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaviv, Avi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21745427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conceptualizing age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> communities.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the political and policy front, interest has increased in making communities more "age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span>", an ongoing trend since the World Health Organization launched its global Age-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities project. We conceptualize age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> communities by building on the WHO framework and applying an ecological perspective. We thereby aim to make explicit key assumptions of the interplay between the person and the environment to advance research or policy decisions in this area. Ecological premises (e.g., there must be a fit between the older adult and environmental conditions) suggest the need for a holistic and interdisciplinary research approach. Such an approach is needed because age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> domains (the physical environment, housing, the social environment, opportunities for participation, informal and formal community supports and health services, transportation, communication, and information) cannot be treated in isolation from intrapersonal factors, such as age, gender, income, and functional status, and other levels of influence, including the policy environment. PMID:21745427</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menec, Verena H; Means, Robin; Keating, Norah; Parkhurst, Graham; Eales, Jacquie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56918899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Will you be my <span class="hlt">friend</span>?: responses to friendship requests from strangers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A malicious person could access a wealth of one's personal information by being one's '<span class="hlt">friend</span>' on a social networking site. The goal of this research is to understand the extent to which <span class="hlt">users</span> are vulnerable to this tactic. Our experiment examined responses of <span class="hlt">users</span> of a social networking site to a friendship request from a total stranger. Preliminary results indicate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sameer Patil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15072806"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sources of information about MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine): perceived accuracy, importance, and implications for prevention among young adult <span class="hlt">users</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess the perceived accuracy and the importance of various sources of information about MDMA/ecstasy among young adult <span class="hlt">users</span>. A respondent driven sampling plan was used to recruit a community sample of recent ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> (n = 304), aged 18-30, in Ohio, who responded to structured interviews. <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, drug abuse treatment programs, and physicians were perceived to be the most <span class="hlt">accurate</span> sources of information about ecstasy by 45.7, 37.2, and 30.3% of the sample, respectively. <span class="hlt">Friends</span> were considered the most important source of information about ecstasy (40.2%), followed by web sites like DanceSafe (16.2%), and MTV/VH1 television specials (6.9%). About half the sample used the Internet to obtain information about ecstasy, with younger and more educated participants significantly more likely to do so. Educated <span class="hlt">users</span> were also significantly more likely to consider the Internet to be an important source of information. Web sites like DanceSafe were visited by four times as many <span class="hlt">users</span> as government-sponsored web sites. Findings support the development of peer-oriented, network strategies to reach ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> with prevention messages. Efforts to make prevention web sites more attractive should be considered. PMID:15072806</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Falck, Russel S; Carlson, Robert G; Wang, Jichuan; Siegal, Harvey A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47972158"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brain-Based Indices for <span class="hlt">User</span> System Symbiosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a The future generation <span class="hlt">user</span> system interfaces need to be <span class="hlt">user</span>-centric which goes beyond <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> and includes understanding\\u000a and anticipating <span class="hlt">user</span> intentions. We introduce the concept of operator models, their role in implementing <span class="hlt">user</span>-system symbiosis,\\u000a and the usefulness of brain-based indices on for instance effort, vigilance, workload and engagement to continuously update\\u000a the operator model. Currently, the best understood parameters in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jan B. F. van Erp; Marc Grootjen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50712418"> <span id="translatedtitle">Service-Oriented <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface Modeling and Composition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional service-oriented applications mainly focus on machine-to-machine interaction. However, human-machine interaction in applications also plays an important role. A better <span class="hlt">user</span> interface can provide better usability and make the system <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span>. A <span class="hlt">user</span> can be considered a service provider, where the <span class="hlt">user</span> interaction is a workflow as a part of the system workflow and a <span class="hlt">user</span> can place SOA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei-Tek Tsai; Qian Huang; Jay Elston; Yinong Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA484208"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Optical Reference Catalogs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reviews current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) with an emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for <span class="hlt">user</span> applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Zacharias</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CG.....37..775L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tougher: A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> graphical interface for TOUGHREACT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">TOUGHREACT is a powerful simulator for multiphase fluid, heat, and chemical transport, but has a steep learning curve and the creation of the input files is time intensive, particularly for heterogeneous and complex geometries such as those in mining rock pile formations. TOUGHER is an application developed by the acid rock drainage research group of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Utah in order to develop TOUGHREACT models rapidly for two-dimensional problems and to be able to visualize the simulation results in an intuitive way. It also reduces errors when creating complex layered 2D models and makes debugging easier. The software is currently limited to 2D rectangular grids with constant spatial sizes. The application is written in C++ and can be used on any computer with a Windows or Linux operating system. This paper will describe the overall structure of the application and give some examples of how it interfaces with the TOUGHREACT program. In particular, it will be shown how the application can generate a grid system for a rock pile containing several distinct geological layers, how the properties of each layer are set, and how the input sections (ELEM and CONNE) for TOUGHREACT are generated automatically. In addition, visualizing the flow and chemical output files generated by TOUGHREACT for a particular rock pile will be demonstrated. This includes transient vector as well as transient scalar data. At the end of the paper, two case studies, one with a simplified geometry and another with more complex layered rock geometry, will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, You; Niewiadomski, Marcin; Trujillo, Edward; Sunkavalli, Surya Prakash</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE97730590"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> Lidar system based on LabVIEW.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the last two decades. The lidar group in Lund has performed many DIAL measurements with a mobile lidar system which was first described in 1987. This report describes how that system w...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Andersson P. Weibring</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=youtube&pg=6&id=EJ797511"> <span id="translatedtitle">10 Web Tools to Create <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Sites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Surprisingly, many tools exist on the web that can help sites become more inviting and easier to use. By now, many are probably familiar with the free tools offered by Flickr, del.icio.us, or YouTube for embedding images, tags, and videos on webpages. This article presents a comprehensive list of some perhaps lesser-known but equally useful tools…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pretlow, Cassi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=vapor+AND+liquid+AND+equilibrium&id=EJ421973"> <span id="translatedtitle">A "<span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span>" Program for Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Described is a computer software package suitable for teaching and research in the area of multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium. This program, which has a complete database, can accomplish phase-equilibrium calculations using various models and graph the results. (KR)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Da Silva, Francisco A.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://tshwanedje.com/publications/euralex2008-Zulu.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> Dictionaries for Zulu: An Exercise in Complexicography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper the main features of Bantu lexicography are analysed through several case studies of Zulu dictionary features. Examples from both existing dictionaries as well as a forthcoming reference work are used in the analysis, which develops from verbs and nouns, gradually including more word classes, and ending with a detailed study of possessive pronouns. The latter serves as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilles-Maurice de Schryver; Arnett Wilkes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N9332324"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Database for Neptune Planetary Radio Astronomy Observations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data from the Voyager Neptune encounter were cleaned and reformatted in a variety of formats. Most of these formats are new and have been specifically designed to provide easy access and use of the data without the need to ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. R. Evans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47861974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trusted Computing Management Server Making Trusted Computing <span class="hlt">User</span> <span class="hlt">Friendly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Personal Computers (PC) with build in Trusted Computing (TC) technology are already well known and widely distributed. Nearly\\u000a every new business notebook contains now a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) and could be used with increased trust and security\\u000a features in daily application and use scenarios. However in real life the number of notebooks and PCs where the TPM is really</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sönke Sothmann; Sumanta Chaudhuri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22word+AND+expression%22&id=ED461129"> <span id="translatedtitle">Writing <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Documents: A Handbook for FAA Drafters.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Studies show that clearly written documents improve compliance and decrease litigation. Writing that considers the readers' need for clear communication will improve the relationship between the government and the public it serves. This handbook contends that the most important goals are to engage the reader, write clearly, and write in a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plain English Network.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Plasmid+AND+DNA&pg=3&id=EJ417223"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Method for Teaching Restriction Enzyme Mapping.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Presented is a teaching progression that enhances learning through low-cost, manipulative transparencies. Discussed is instruction about restriction enzymes, plasmids, cutting plasmids, plasmid maps, recording data, and mapping restriction sites. Mapping wheels for student use is included. (CW)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ehrman, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10108938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Process mapping: A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> tool for process improvement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Process maps aid administrative process improvement efforts by documenting processes in a rigorous yet understandable way. Icons, graphics, and text support process documentation, analysis, and improvement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carson, M.L.; Levine, L.O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/15032138"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Chemistry Takes Center Stage at ACS Meeting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">These days it seems that what chemistry needs more than anything else is a good p.r. agent. If you ask John or Joan Q. Public about the accomplishments of the chemical industry, chances are they'll mention Love Canal, CFCs destroying the ozone layer, or carcinogens in food. However, if the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C.,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Pool</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5093598"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> Interactive Control Module for safeguards equipment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of a microprocessor-based Interactive Control Module (ICM) to provide inspector interface to Containment and Surveillance equipment is described. This module has the operating procedures stored in system memory and uses a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) with ''Soft Key'' input to guide the Inspector through the setup and review procedures in a prescribed order. A small printer is included to provide a hard-copy record of the setup, review, and diagnostic data. The use of this module should reduce the requirements for special training, minimize record keeping, and enhance inspector use of the equipment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holt, R.C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4761455"> <span id="translatedtitle">MediGRID: Towards a <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> secured grid infrastructure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many scenarios in medical research are predestined for grid computing. Large amounts of data in complex medical image, biosignal and genome processing demand large computing power and data storage. Integration of distributed, heterogeneous data, e.g. correlation between phenotype and genotype data are playing an essential part in life sciences. Sharing of specialized software, data and processing results for collaborative work</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dagmar Krefting; Julian Bart; Kamen Beronov; Olga Dzhimova; Jürgen Falkner; Michael Hartung; Andreas Hoheisel; Tobias A. Knoch; Thomas Lingner; Yassene Mohammed; Kathrin Peter; Erhard Rahm; Ulrich Sax; Dietmar Sommerfeld; Thomas Steinke; Thomas Tolxdorff; Michal Vossberg; Fred Viezens; Anette Weisbecker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993raincreptQ....E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> database for Neptune planetary radio astronomy observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data from the Voyager Neptune encounter were cleaned and reformatted in a variety of formats. Most of these formats are new and have been specifically designed to provide easy access and use of the data without the need to understand esoteric characteristics of the PRA instrument or the Voyager spacecraft. Several data sets were submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS) and have either appeared already on peer reviewed CDROM's or are in the process of being reviewed for inclusion in forthcoming CD-ROM's. Many of the data sets are also available online electronically through computer networks; it is anticipated that as time permits, the PDS will make all the data sets that were a part of this contract available both online and on CD-ROM's.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, David R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57709818"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">User</span> Satisfaction With Instant Messaging: An Empirical Survey Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current article examines <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction with instant messaging in building and maintaining social relationships with <span class="hlt">friends</span>, family members, and others. The research model integrates motivation theory with media capacity theories to explain how the attributes of media capacity (e.g., social presence and media richness) and <span class="hlt">users</span>' intrinsic and extrinsic motivations toward using instant messaging influence <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction. Data were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei Wang; JJ Po-An Hsieh; Baoxiang Song</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57708503"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">User</span> Satisfaction with Instant Messaging: An Empirical Survey Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current paper examines <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction with instant messaging in building and maintaining social relationships with <span class="hlt">friends</span>, family members and others. The research model integrates motivation theory with media capacity theories to explain how the attributes of media capacity (e.g., social presence and media richness) and <span class="hlt">users</span>' intrinsic and extrinsic motivations toward using instant messaging influence <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction. Data was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei Wang; JJ Po-An Hsieh; Baoxiang Song</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35004988"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> manual for the QCA(GUI) package in R</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although performing all available function directly from R's command line is possible, many <span class="hlt">users</span> have expressed their desire for a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> version of the QCA package with menus. Instead of designing the <span class="hlt">user</span> interface from scratch it was a lot easier to use existing code and Rcmdr is the best engineered interface available for R. The QCAGUI package (the companion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian Du?a</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=user+AND+experience&id=EJ954439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on <span class="hlt">User</span> Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span>. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential <span class="hlt">user</span> problems. Sites most frequently had problems…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22user%22&pg=2&id=EJ954439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on <span class="hlt">User</span> Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span>. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential <span class="hlt">user</span> problems. Sites most frequently had problems…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51817507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Approaches for <span class="hlt">user</span> profile Investigation in Orkut Social Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Internet becomes a large and rich repository of information about us as individually. Any thing form <span class="hlt">user</span> profile information to <span class="hlt">friends</span> links the <span class="hlt">user</span> subscribes to are reflection of social interactions as <span class="hlt">user</span> has in real worlds. Social networking has created new ways to communicate and share information. Social networking websites are being used regularly by millions of people, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajni Ranjan Singh; Deepak Singh Tomar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/v730215222236k74.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">un<span class="hlt">Friendly</span>: Multi-party Privacy Risks in Social Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a As the popularity of social networks expands, the information <span class="hlt">users</span> expose to the public has potentially dangerous implications\\u000a for individual privacy. While social networks allow <span class="hlt">users</span> to restrict access to their personal data, there is currently no\\u000a mechanism to enforce privacy concerns over content uploaded by other <span class="hlt">users</span>. As group photos and stories are shared by <span class="hlt">friends</span>\\u000a and family, personal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurt Thomas; Chris Grier; David M. Nicol</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=myopia&pg=4&id=ED067899"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Oriented Product Evaluation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While the educational product development field has expanded tremendously over the last 15 years, there is a paucity of conveniently assembled and readily interpretable information that would enable <span class="hlt">users</span> to make <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and informed evaluations of different, but comparable, instructional products. Minimum types of validation data which should be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alkin, Marvin C.; Wingard, Joseph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED283471.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">"<span class="hlt">Friends</span>" Raping <span class="hlt">Friends</span>. Could It Happen to You?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This publication concerning rape committed by acquaintances and "<span class="hlt">friends</span>" is designed to provide information and support for college students. The early warning signs and how to react to potential "acquaintance" or "date" rape are addressed. Consideration is given to why this type of rape occurs and information is provided on how to avoid date…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hughes, Jean O'Gorman; Sandler, Bernice R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60184537"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radcalc for Windows, <span class="hlt">User`s</span> Manual. Volume 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radcalc for Windows is a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> menu-driven Windows-compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive waste using NRC-accepted methodology. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41474084"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Optical Reference Catalogs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for <span class="hlt">user</span> applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Norbert Zacharias</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.219h2004C"> <span id="translatedtitle">DIRAC: Secure web <span class="hlt">user</span> interface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditionally the interaction between <span class="hlt">users</span> and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert <span class="hlt">users</span> providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical <span class="hlt">User</span> Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main <span class="hlt">user</span> activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a <span class="hlt">user</span> can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the <span class="hlt">user</span> experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface will be presented and discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Casajus Ramo, A.; Sapunov, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2379959"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patients, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and relationship boundaries.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When patient and physician are close <span class="hlt">friends</span>, both professional and personal relationships can suffer. Jointly exploring and setting explicit boundaries can help avoid conflict and maintain these valuable relationships. This is particularly important when the physician practises in a small community where such concurrent relationships are unavoidable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rourke, J. T.; Smith, L. F.; Brown, J. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=too+AND+many+AND+friends&id=EJ762382"> <span id="translatedtitle">Free Our <span class="hlt">Friends</span> in Learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Many secrets can be told by the physical surroundings of library media centers. Whether the center is kid-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> is one of the first obvious tell-tale signs. When a library center has Arthur & D.W., Clifford, Pooh & Eeyore, shells, special rocks, etc. hidden by the circulation center or in the back in boxes, it's time to revolt. The movie Free…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stidham, Sue</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Children+AND+murders&pg=7&id=ED002002"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOME OF MY BEST <span class="hlt">FRIENDS</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">"SOME OF MY BEST <span class="hlt">FRIENDS</span>" IS A PLAY WHICH CONSISTS OF FIVE CHARACTERS--THE SPEAKER, CATHERINE, A PROTESTANT, AMY, A JEW, ANTHONY, AN ITALIAN CATHOLIC, AND PETER, A NEGRO. THE PLAY IS PERFORMED IN A ROUND ACTING AREA RATHER THAN ON A STAGE, AND THERE IS NO SCENERY. THE AUDIENCE SURROUNDS THE ACTING AREA AND PLAYS AN ACTIVE ROLE AS THE SPEAKER TALKS…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">CREAN, ROBERT</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=creative+AND+brainstorming&pg=6&id=EJ531271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kids and Elders: Forever <span class="hlt">Friends</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes "Forever <span class="hlt">Friends</span>," an intergenerational program linking second graders with elderly residents of an independent living facility. Describes monthly sessions involving group and partnership activities; how elders participate in classroom activities, musical programs, creative writing projects, and school field trips; and how classroom…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dallman, Mary Ellen; Power, Sharon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Ad+Hoc%22&pg=3&id=EJ926762"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grading More <span class="hlt">Accurately</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., <span class="hlt">accurate</span>) grading. Next, I present analytical results…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rom, Mark Carl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40298046"> <span id="translatedtitle">Positive, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> animal identification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Positive, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> identification of animals and their products would be very helpful in livestock commerce, prevention of theft and fraud and in tracing animals and products to origin. Food safety, animal health, and prevention of epidemics, would be enhanced by combining identification with location. Identification may be by electronic chips, iris or retinal scans, antibody or DNA analysis. A cross</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Philip Dziuk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/summer06/articles/summer06insidecover.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> of the National Library of Medicine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Current Issue Past Issues <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of the National Library of Medicine Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... Paul G. Rogers Chairman, <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of the National Library of Medicine and former member of the U.S. ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nia.nih.gov/sites/default/files/Alzheimers_Caregiving_Tips_Helping_Family_and_Friends_Understand_Alzheimers_Disease.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Helping Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Understand Alzheimer's Disease</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Helping Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Understand Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s Caregiving Tips When you learn that someone has Alzheimer’s disease, you may wonder when and how to tell your family and <span class="hlt">friends</span>. You ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://acl.ldc.upenn.edu/acl2003/main/pdfs/Klein.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Unlexicalized Parsing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We demonstrate that an unlexicalized PCFG can parse much more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> than previously shown, by making use of simple, linguistically motivated state splits, which break down false independence assumptions latent in a vanilla treebank grammar. Indeed, its performance of 86.36% (LP\\/LR F PCFG models, and surprisingly close to the current state-of-the-art. This result has potential uses beyond establishing a strong</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dan Klein; Christopher D. Manning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acquaintances+AND+friends&pg=5&id=EJ327138"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Resolution of Social Conflict between <span class="hlt">Friends</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Investigates whether third- and fourth-grade children respond differently to conflict with <span class="hlt">friends</span> and acquaintances. Results support the view that conflict between <span class="hlt">friends</span> promotes more social development than conflict between nonfriends. Discussion among <span class="hlt">friends</span> disagreeing on answers to social problems resulted in more mature solutions than…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nelson, Janice; Aboud, Frances E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7260E..68G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from <span class="hlt">user</span>-centered design to evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a <span class="hlt">user</span>-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of <span class="hlt">user</span> expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-<span class="hlt">users</span> or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit <span class="hlt">user</span>'s knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/g773101111201671.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The gay-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> closet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent decades, U.S. popular opinion has become more accepting of homosexuality, a shift apparent in the workplace, where\\u000a gay-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> policies increasingly are in effect. These changes in attitudes and organizational practices have led some scholars\\u000a to question the relevance of the closet for describing the contemporary lives of lesbians and gay men. The authors investigated\\u000a this claim by analyzing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christine L. Williams; Patti A. Giuffre; Kirsten Dellinger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/sc09_046_08_21"> <span id="translatedtitle">Explaining Glaciers, <span class="hlt">Accurately</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">What happens when a geology graduate student and two fourth-grade teachers collaborate on lessons for the classroom? They discover interesting and practical ways to explore geology and other scientific concepts, that's what! Here they share the glacial erosion lessons that grew out of the geologist's frustration at finding glacial erosion labs erroneously showing glaciers eroding by pushing rocks. Their goal was to find a way to show and explain glacial erosion more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> and in a way that elementary age students could understand.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tate, Mari; Faw, Mary; Scott, Nancy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3739296"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifting Innovation to <span class="hlt">Users</span> via Toolkits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the traditional new product development process, manufacturers first explore <span class="hlt">user</span> needs and then develop responsive products. Developing an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> understanding of a <span class="hlt">user</span> need is not simple or fast or cheap, however. As a result, the traditional approach is coming under increasing strain as <span class="hlt">user</span> needs change more rapidly, and as firms increasingly seek to serve \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric A. Von Hippel; Ralph Katz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8816448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crustal Dynamics Intelligent <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface Anthology.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has initiated an Intelligent Data Management (IDM) research effort which has, as one of its components, the development of an Intelligent <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface (IUI). The intent of the IUI is to develop a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. M. Short W. J. Campbell L. H. Roelofs S. L. Wattawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8918754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Central <span class="hlt">User</span> Services System for ERS-1.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Central <span class="hlt">User</span> Services (CUS) system is part of the Earthnet ERS-1 Central Facility (EECF), which is the central node of the ERS-1 ground segment. The CUS assembles a variety of functions dedicated to providing a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> interface between the ERS-1 sys...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Widmer M. Fea S. Delia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://bigwww.epfl.ch/preprints/sage0301p.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friendly</span> \\</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract: Image processing can be taught very effectively by complementing,the basic lectures with computer laboratories where the participants can actively manipulate and process images. This offering can be made,even more,attractive by allowing the students to develop their own,image processing code within a reasonable time frame. After a brief review of existing software package,that can be used for teaching IP, we</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel Sage; Michael Unser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50737321"> <span id="translatedtitle">A survey of <span class="hlt">user</span>-centered design practice in China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper is the first time to report the results of a recent survey of <span class="hlt">user</span>-centered design (UCD) practice in China, conducted in 2007. The survey involved over four hundred respondents who were at the <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> conference or attended other UCD related activities. The survey identified, e.g. practitioners' demographics and experience, the type of organization, the usage frequency of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ronggang Zhou; Shengshan Huang; Xiangang Qin; Jason Huang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993SciAm.269...56I"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper discusses current methods for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.huduser.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle">HUD <span class="hlt">USER</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">HUD <span class="hlt">USER</span> has also updated and expanded its website in late 1997, it offered a detailed guide to HUD's Office of Policy Development and Research and a customization feature that automatically displays information on housing topics of interest to the <span class="hlt">user</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+media&pg=7&id=EJ941194"> <span id="translatedtitle">"<span class="hlt">Friending</span> Facebook?" A Minicourse on the Use of Social Media by Health Professionals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Introduction: Health professionals are working in an era of social technologies that empower <span class="hlt">users</span> to generate content in real time. This article describes a 3-part continuing education minicourse called "<span class="hlt">Friending</span> Facebook?" undertaken at Penn State Hershey Medical Center that aimed to model the functionality of current technologies in health…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George, Daniel R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3444249"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> Don't Let <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Eat Cookies: Effects of Restrictive Eating Norms on Consumption Among <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Social norms are thought to be a strong influence over eating, but this hypothesis has only been experimentally tested with groups of strangers, and correlational studies using actual <span class="hlt">friends</span> lack important controls. We manipulate an eating norm in the laboratory and explore its influence within established friendships. In two studies we randomly assigned groups of three <span class="hlt">friends</span> to a restrictive norm condition, in which two of the <span class="hlt">friends</span> were secretly instructed to restrict their intake of appetizing foods, or a control condition, in which the <span class="hlt">friends</span> were not instructed to restrict their eating. The third <span class="hlt">friend’s</span> consumption was measured while eating with the other two <span class="hlt">friends</span> and while eating alone. In both studies, participants consumed less food when eating with <span class="hlt">friends</span> who had been given restricting instructions compared to those who had not been given those instructions. In Study 2, participants who ate with restricting <span class="hlt">friends</span> also continued to restrict their eating when alone. Experimentally manipulating social norms within established friendships is possible, and these norms can influence consumption in those social groups and carry over into non-social eating situations. These findings may suggest mechanisms through which eating behaviors may spread through social networks, as well as an environmental factor that may be amenable to change.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Howland, Maryhope; Hunger, Jeffrey; Mann, Traci</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19410439"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Youth-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> outpatient care].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ambulatory pediatric and family medicine takes care of adolescent patients, most of whom regularly consult a physician. Consultations with young people involve issues specifically related to their age. Regarding health care systems and physicians, adolescents' expectations vary from those of adults, not so much in terms of the issues discussed but in terms of the priorities that they give to them. Confidential interviews are not always proposed but are highly appreciated, as are certain personal qualities on the part of the caregivers such as honesty, respect, and friendliness. Finally, easy access to care together with the continuity of care are essential. Prevention of risk behaviors by screening and health education is clearly insufficient. This issue could be approached during the consultation through a psychosocial history. This is a good opportunity to discuss sensitive issues that adolescents seldom bring up themselves. More systematic prevention would probably decrease youth morbidity and mortality, which are both closely related to risk behaviors. To meet these expectations and special health care needs, the World Health Organization has developed the concept of youth-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> health services. This concept can be applied in both a specialized adolescence center and a pediatric or family practice. Youth-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> services are still rarely evaluated but seem to bring a clear benefit in terms of patient satisfaction and access to care. PMID:19410439</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mauerhofer, A; Akre, C; Michaud, P-A; Suris, J C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23367324"> <span id="translatedtitle">An automatic and <span class="hlt">user</span>-driven training method for locomotion mode recognition for artificial leg control.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our previously developed locomotion-mode-recognition (LMR) system has provided a great promise to intuitive control of powered artificial legs. However, the lack of fast, practical training methods is a barrier for clinical use of our LMR system for prosthetic legs. This paper aims to design a new, automatic, and <span class="hlt">user</span>-driven training method for practical use of LMR system. In this method, a wearable terrain detection interface based on a portable laser distance sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is applied to detect the terrain change in front of the prosthesis <span class="hlt">user</span>. The mechanical measurement from the prosthetic pylon is used to detect gait phase. These two streams of information are used to automatically identify the transitions among various locomotion modes, switch the prosthesis control mode, and label the training data with movement class and gait phase in real-time. No external device is required in this training system. In addition, the prosthesis <span class="hlt">user</span> without assistance from any other experts can do the whole training procedure. The pilot experimental results on an able-bodied subject have demonstrated that our developed new method is <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>, and can significantly simplify the LMR training system and training procedure without sacrificing the system performance. The novel design paves the way for clinical use of our designed LMR system for powered lower limb prosthesis control. PMID:23367324</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Xiaorong; Wang, Ding; Yang, Qing; Huang, He</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3676647"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Automatic and <span class="hlt">User</span>-Driven Training Method for Locomotion Mode Recognition for Artificial Leg Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our previously developed locomotion-mode-recognition (LMR) system has provided a great promise to intuitive control of powered artificial legs. However, the lack of fast, practical training methods is a barrier for clinical use of our LMR system for prosthetic legs. This paper aims to design a new, automatic, and <span class="hlt">user</span>-driven training method for practical use of LMR system. In this method, a wearable terrain detection interface based on a portable laser distance sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is applied to detect the terrain change in front of the prosthesis <span class="hlt">user</span>. The mechanical measurement from the prosthetic pylon is used to detect gait phase. These two streams of information are used to automatically identify the transitions among various locomotion modes, switch the prosthesis control mode, and label the training data with movement class and gait phase in real-time. No external device is required in this training system. In addition, the prosthesis <span class="hlt">user</span> without assistance from any other experts can do the whole training procedure. The pilot experimental results on an able-bodied subject have demonstrated that our developed new method is <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>, and can significantly simplify the LMR training system and training procedure without sacrificing the system performance. The novel design paves the way for clinical use of our designed LMR system for powered lower limb prosthesis control.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Xiaorong; Wang, Ding; Yang, Qing; Huang, He</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56943538"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finding Strong Groups of <span class="hlt">Friends</span> among <span class="hlt">Friends</span> in Social Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past few years, the rapid growth and the exponential use of social digital media has led to an increase in popularity of social networks and the emergence of social computing. In general, social networks are structures made of social entities (e.g., individuals) that are linked by some specific types of interdependency such as friendship. Most <span class="hlt">users</span> of social</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juan J. Cameron; Carson Kai-Sang Leung; Syed K. Tanbeer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6370441"> <span id="translatedtitle">Approaches for <span class="hlt">user</span> profile Investigation in Orkut Social Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Internet becomes a large and rich repository of information about us as\\u000aindividually. Any thing form <span class="hlt">user</span> profile information to <span class="hlt">friends</span> links the <span class="hlt">user</span>\\u000asubscribes to are reflection of social interactions as <span class="hlt">user</span> has in real worlds.\\u000aSocial networking has created new ways to communicate and share information.\\u000aSocial networking websites are being used regularly by millions of people, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajni Ranjan Singh; Deepak Singh Tomar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57713992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Romantic Partners, <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits, and Casual Acquaintances as Sexual Partners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with “<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits,” as well as with <span class="hlt">friends</span> in general. Young</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wyndol Furman; Laura Shaffer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57715484"> <span id="translatedtitle">Romantic Partners, <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits, and Casual Acquaintances as Sexual Partners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with “<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits,” as well as with <span class="hlt">friends</span> in general. Young</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wyndol Furman; Laura Shaffer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18422409"> <span id="translatedtitle">MySpace and Facebook: applying the uses and gratifications theory to exploring <span class="hlt">friend</span>-networking sites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The increased use of the Internet as a new tool in communication has changed the way people interact. This fact is even more evident in the recent development and use of <span class="hlt">friend</span>-networking sites. However, no research has evaluated these sites and their impact on college students. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate: (a) why people use these <span class="hlt">friend</span>-networking sites, (b) what the characteristics are of the typical college <span class="hlt">user</span>, and (c) what uses and gratifications are met by using these sites. Results indicated that the vast majority of college students are using these <span class="hlt">friend</span>-networking sites for a significant portion of their day for reasons such as making new <span class="hlt">friends</span> and locating old <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Additionally, both men and women of traditional college age are equally engaging in this form of online communication with this result holding true for nearly all ethnic groups. Finally, results showed that many uses and gratifications are met by <span class="hlt">users</span> (e.g., "keeping in touch with <span class="hlt">friends</span>"). Results are discussed in light of the impact that <span class="hlt">friend</span>-networking sites have on communication and social needs of college students. PMID:18422409</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raacke, John; Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3776200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Good Agreements Make Good <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When starting a new collaborative endeavor, it pays to establish upfront how strongly your partner commits to the common goal and what compensation can be expected in case the collaboration is violated. Diverse examples in biological and social contexts have demonstrated the pervasiveness of making prior agreements on posterior compensations, suggesting that this behavior could have been shaped by natural selection. Here, we analyze the evolutionary relevance of such a commitment strategy and relate it to the costly punishment strategy, where no prior agreements are made. We show that when the cost of arranging a commitment deal lies within certain limits, substantial levels of cooperation can be achieved. Moreover, these levels are higher than that achieved by simple costly punishment, especially when one insists on sharing the arrangement cost. Not only do we show that good agreements make good <span class="hlt">friends</span>, agreements based on shared costs result in even better outcomes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Han, The Anh; Pereira, Luis Moniz; Santos, Francisco C.; Lenaerts, Tom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23530548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recommendations from <span class="hlt">friends</span> anytime and anywhere: toward a model of contextual offer and consumption values.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ubiquity and portability of mobile devices provide additional opportunities for information retrieval. People can easily access mobile applications anytime and anywhere when they need to acquire specific context-aware recommendations (contextual offer) from their <span class="hlt">friends</span>. This study, thus, represents an initial attempt to understand <span class="hlt">users</span>' acceptance of a mobile-based social reviews platform, where recommendations from <span class="hlt">friends</span> can be obtained with mobile devices. Based on the consumption value theory, a theoretical model is proposed and empirically examined using survey data from 218 mobile <span class="hlt">users</span>. The findings demonstrate that contextual offers based on <span class="hlt">users</span>' profiles, access time, and geographic positions significantly predict their value perceptions (utilitarian, hedonic, and social), which, in turn, affect their intention to use a mobile social reviews platform. This study is also believed to provide some useful insights to both research and practice. PMID:23530548</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shen, Xiao-Liang; Sun, Yongqiang; Wang, Nan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56917757"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distributed rating prediction in <span class="hlt">user</span> generated content streams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recommender systems predict <span class="hlt">user</span> preferences based on a range of available information. For systems in which <span class="hlt">users</span> generate streams of content (e.g., blogs, periodically-updated newsfeeds), <span class="hlt">users</span> may rate the produced content that they read, and be given <span class="hlt">accurate</span> predictions about future content they are most likely to prefer. We design a distributed mechanism for predicting <span class="hlt">user</span> ratings that avoids the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sibren Isaacman; Stratis Ioannidis; Augustin Chaintreau; Margaret Martonosi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5153019"> <span id="translatedtitle">Keystroke-Based <span class="hlt">User</span> Identification on Smart Phones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Smart phones are now being used to store <span class="hlt">users</span>' identities and sensitive information\\/data. Therefore, it is important to authenti- cate legitimate <span class="hlt">users</span> of a smart phone and to block imposters. In this paper, we demonstrate that keystroke dynamics of a smart phone <span class="hlt">user</span> can be translated into a viable features' set for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">user</span> identifi- cation. To this end, we</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saira Zahid; Muhammad Shahzad; Syed Ali Khayam; Muddassar Farooq</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ipst.org/techpapers/2001/ipst01paper226.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-format Graphical <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface for EMTP-based Programs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of EMTP-based programs in academia and industry has usually been regarded as difficult, in particular by students and new <span class="hlt">users</span>, mainly due to non- <span class="hlt">friendly</span> <span class="hlt">user</span> interfaces. Furthermore, whether there is a graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface (GUI) available, it is not usually compatible with some other EMTP-based programs or electronics more oriented programs such as SPICE. This paper presents</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jesús Calvińo-Fraga; Benedito Donizeti Bonatto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50772073"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> managed trust in social networking - Comparing Facebook, MySpace and Linkedin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Social Networks is the highest growing web-application in terms of <span class="hlt">users</span>. Different surveys show that <span class="hlt">users</span> are most concerned with their privacy in respect to web-based social networks. Anyhow, uses ldquocompeterdquo in the number of ldquofriendsrdquo they can attach to their own profile. This means that the trust relations <span class="hlt">users</span> are using to establish <span class="hlt">friends</span> in the web applications becomes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Sorensen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%3dSocializing&pg=4&id=EJ739417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relations of <span class="hlt">Friends</span>' Activities to Friendship Quality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two studies were conducted to examine age and sex differences in <span class="hlt">friends</span>' activities and relations of participation in these activities to perceived friendship quality. In Study 1, 52 fourth and eighth graders were asked open-ended questions about activities they do with their best <span class="hlt">friends</span>. In Study 2, 105 fourth and eighth graders reported both…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathur, Ravisha; Berndt, Thomas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sex+AND+in+AND+media&pg=6&id=EJ739417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relations of <span class="hlt">Friends</span>' Activities to Friendship Quality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Two studies were conducted to examine age and sex differences in <span class="hlt">friends</span>' activities and relations of participation in these activities to perceived friendship quality. In Study 1, 52 fourth and eighth graders were asked open-ended questions about activities they do with their best <span class="hlt">friends</span>. In Study 2, 105 fourth and eighth graders reported both…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathur, Ravisha; Berndt, Thomas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20875969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced assessment of the wound-healing process by <span class="hlt">accurate</span> multiview tissue classification.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With the widespread use of digital cameras, freehand wound imaging has become common practice in clinical settings. There is however still a demand for a practical tool for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> wound healing assessment, combining dimensional measurements and tissue classification in a single <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> system. We achieved the first part of this objective by computing a 3-D model for wound measurements using uncalibrated vision techniques. We focus here on tissue classification from color and texture region descriptors computed after unsupervised segmentation. Due to perspective distortions, uncontrolled lighting conditions and view points, wound assessments vary significantly between patient examinations. The main contribution of this paper is to overcome this drawback with a multiview strategy for tissue classification, relying on a 3-D model onto which tissue labels are mapped and classification results merged. The experimental classification tests demonstrate that enhanced repeatability and robustness are obtained and that metric assessment is achieved through real area and volume measurements and wound outline extraction. This innovative tool is intended for use not only in therapeutic follow-up in hospitals but also for telemedicine purposes and clinical research, where repeatability and accuracy of wound assessment are critical. PMID:20875969</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wannous, Hazem; Lucas, Yves; Treuillet, Sylvie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10154038"> <span id="translatedtitle">ETPRE <span class="hlt">User`s</span> Manual Version 3.00</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ETPRE is a preprocessor for the Event Progression Analysis Code EVNTRE. It reads an input file of event definitions and writes the lengthy EVNTRE code input files. ETPRE`s advantage is that it eliminates the error-prone task of manually creating or revising these files since their formats are quite elaborate. The <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> format of ETPRE differs from the EVNTRE code format in that questions, branch references, and other event tree components are defined symbolically instead of numerically. When ETPRE is executed, these symbols are converted to their numeric equivalents and written to the output files using formats defined in the EVNTRE Reference Manual. Revisions to event tree models are simplified by allowing the <span class="hlt">user</span> to edit the symbolic format and rerun the preprocessor, since questions, branch references, and other symbols are automatically resequenced to their new values with each execution. ETPRE and EVNTRE have both been incorporated into the SETAC event tree analysis package.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roginski, R.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=35357"> <span id="translatedtitle">RAPID AND <span class="hlt">ACCURATE</span> METHOD FOR ESTIMATING MOLECULAR WEIGHTS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LOW RESOLUTION MASS SPECTRA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An improved method of estimating molecular weights of volatile organic compounds from their mass spectra has been developed and evaluated for accuracy. his technique can be implemented with a <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> expert system on a personal computer. he method is based on a pattern reco...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/9491"> <span id="translatedtitle">ALOG <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual: A Guide to using the spreadsheet-based ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/">Treesearch</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Artificial Log Generator (ALOG) is a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> Microsoft® Excel®-based program that ... Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility. Citation ... Last Modified: July 21, 2013.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60364599"> <span id="translatedtitle">FUSION (Familiar <span class="hlt">User</span>-System Interface OperatioN): A plan for developing a familiar <span class="hlt">user</span>-system interface for the IC fabrication industry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In spite of the best efforts of designers and the power of today's computer workstations, many <span class="hlt">user</span>-system interfaces (USIs) found in IC-fabrication equipment are not very <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>. Hence, for many complex, IC-fabrication machines, extensive training programs, thick <span class="hlt">user</span> manuals, and operator confusion have become a way of life. Since many <span class="hlt">users</span> must interact with several machines or several types of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3424124"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genometa - A Fast and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Classifier for Short Metagenomic Shotgun Reads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Metagenomic studies use high-throughput sequence data to investigate microbial communities in situ. However, considerable challenges remain in the analysis of these data, particularly with regard to speed and reliable analysis of microbial species as opposed to higher level taxa such as phyla. We here present Genometa, a computationally undemanding graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface program that enables identification of bacterial species and gene content from datasets generated by inexpensive high-throughput short read sequencing technologies. Our approach was first verified on two simulated metagenomic short read datasets, detecting 100% and 94% of the bacterial species included with few false positives or false negatives. Subsequent comparative benchmarking analysis against three popular metagenomic algorithms on an Illumina human gut dataset revealed Genometa to attribute the most reads to bacteria at species level (i.e. including all strains of that species) and demonstrate similar or better accuracy than the other programs. Lastly, speed was demonstrated to be many times that of BLAST due to the use of modern short read aligners. Our method is highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> if bacteria in the sample are represented by genomes in the reference sequence but cannot find species absent from the reference. This method is one of the most <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> and resource efficient approaches and is thus feasible for rapidly analysing millions of short reads on a personal computer. Availability The Genometa program, a step by step tutorial and Java source code are freely available from http://genomics1.mh-hannover.de/genometa/ and on http://code.google.com/p/genometa/. This program has been tested on Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP/7.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davenport, Colin F.; Neugebauer, Jens; Beckmann, Nils; Friedrich, Benedikt; Kameri, Burim; Kokott, Svea; Paetow, Malte; Siekmann, Bjorn; Wieding-Drewes, Matthias; Wienhofer, Markus; Wolf, Stefan; Tummler, Burkhard; Ahlers, Volker; Sprengel, Frauke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927906"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genometa--a fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> classifier for short metagenomic shotgun reads.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Metagenomic studies use high-throughput sequence data to investigate microbial communities in situ. However, considerable challenges remain in the analysis of these data, particularly with regard to speed and reliable analysis of microbial species as opposed to higher level taxa such as phyla. We here present Genometa, a computationally undemanding graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface program that enables identification of bacterial species and gene content from datasets generated by inexpensive high-throughput short read sequencing technologies. Our approach was first verified on two simulated metagenomic short read datasets, detecting 100% and 94% of the bacterial species included with few false positives or false negatives. Subsequent comparative benchmarking analysis against three popular metagenomic algorithms on an Illumina human gut dataset revealed Genometa to attribute the most reads to bacteria at species level (i.e. including all strains of that species) and demonstrate similar or better accuracy than the other programs. Lastly, speed was demonstrated to be many times that of BLAST due to the use of modern short read aligners. Our method is highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> if bacteria in the sample are represented by genomes in the reference sequence but cannot find species absent from the reference. This method is one of the most <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> and resource efficient approaches and is thus feasible for rapidly analysing millions of short reads on a personal computer. Availability: The Genometa program, a step by step tutorial and Java source code are freely available from http://genomics1.mh-hannover.de/genometa/ and on http://code.google.com/p/genometa/. This program has been tested on Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP/7. PMID:22927906</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davenport, Colin F; Neugebauer, Jens; Beckmann, Nils; Friedrich, Benedikt; Kameri, Burim; Kokott, Svea; Paetow, Malte; Siekmann, Björn; Wieding-Drewes, Matthias; Wienhöfer, Markus; Wolf, Stefan; Tümmler, Burkhard; Ahlers, Volker; Sprengel, Frauke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14597825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Promoting father-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> healthcare.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fathers are taking a more active role in their children's lives and healthcare; consequently, healthcare providers need to be more aware of and attentive to fathers in clinical encounters. The literature on healthcare provider inclusion of fathers is sparse. The focus has been mainly on exhortations to include fathers, or has documented treatment of fathers as invisible in healthcare settings. While not overtly hostile to fathers, healthcare providers occasionally marginalize or ignore them. The purpose of this article is to help healthcare providers: (1) become aware of and assess their interactions with fathers and (2) be more intentional in their interactions with them. To that end, this article includes a self-assessment of one's practice, including the following components: introductions, body language, eye contact, obtaining/giving information, and beliefs about the role of fathers. Intentional interactions for developing more father-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> healthcare are discussed including both small and large changes, guided by the PLISSIT model. Finally, best practices, challenges, issues, and resources related to father inclusion in healthcare are described. The major issue for providers is to no longer question whether to include fathers, but how. PMID:14597825</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tiedje, Linda Beth; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23350565"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conceptualizing age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> community characteristics in a sample of urban elders: an exploratory factor analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> conceptualization and measurement of age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> community characteristics would help to reduce barriers to documenting the effects on elders of interventions to create such communities. This article contributes to the measurement of age-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> communities through an exploratory factor analysis of items reflecting an existing US Environmental Protection Agency policy framework. From a sample of urban elders (n = 1,376), we identified 6 factors associated with demographic and health characteristics: access to business and leisure, social interaction, access to health care, neighborhood problems, social support, and community engagement. Future research should explore the effects of these factors across contexts and populations. PMID:23350565</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, Richard J; Lehning, Amanda J; Dunkle, Ruth E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7908E..21K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Versatile, high-efficiency tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) instrumentation for end-<span class="hlt">user</span> applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the design principles and performance characteristics of a prototype <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> shear force based Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy system. High numerical aperture reflective optics are utilized to optimize photon delivery and collection, while allowing for interrogation of samples with varying resistivities, thicknesses, and opacities. The integration of tips and tuning forks into manufacturable units is investigated to facilitate simple tip replacement. Finally we discuss methods to mitigate the remaining challenges to the technique becoming routine and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Wolf, David E.; Gurjar, Rajan S.; Lu, Yongfeng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10997892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Norplant: <span class="hlt">users</span>' perspective in Pakistan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Five hundred and eighteen Norplant acceptors (260 ever-<span class="hlt">users</span> and 258 current <span class="hlt">users</span>) were interviewed to assess their perceptions about Norplant. The mean age of the acceptors was 32.6+/-5.7 years (mean +/- SD). The mean parity was 4.3 and many of the <span class="hlt">users</span> (40.2%) were illiterate. The most common reason to choose Norplant was its long duration of action (70.1%) followed by doctor's advice (10.4%) and use by other women (10.1%). Norplant was recommended by family planning workers in 35.3% cases, doctors in 29.2% cases and <span class="hlt">friends</span> in 17.4% cases. Advertisement did not play any role in the women's choice of Norplant. In 77.3% cases, the decision to use Norplant was a joint decision. Only 15% of the <span class="hlt">users</span> had fears/anxieties before insertion. Most of these women (44%) were concerned about possible ill-effects of Norplant on their health rather than efficacy. The social acceptance of Norplant was very high (76%) and more than half of the <span class="hlt">users</span> (52.5%) were satisfied with the method. Among current <span class="hlt">users</span>, 83.9% wanted to continue Norplant for 5 years. Only 39 <span class="hlt">users</span> (15.1%) intended to discontinue. The main reason for discontinuation was menstrual disturbance (69.2%), followed by weight gain (12.7%). The study suggests that long duration of effective action and high social acceptance are likely to make Norplant a popular method among Pakistani women. PMID:10997892</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rehan, N; Inayatullah, A; Chaudhary, I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3163778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Romantic Partners, <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits, and Casual Acquaintances As Sexual Partners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with “<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits” as well as with <span class="hlt">friends</span> in general. Young adults were most likely to engage in sexual behavior with romantic partners, but sexual behavior also often occurred with some type of nonromantic partner. More young adults engaged in some form of sexual behavior with casual acquaintances than with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits. The frequencies of sexual behavior, however, were greater with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits than with <span class="hlt">friends</span> or casual acquaintances. Interview and questionnaire data revealed that <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits were typically <span class="hlt">friends</span>, but not necessarily. Nonsexual activities were also less common with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits than other <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Taken together, the findings illustrate the value of differentiating among different types of nonromantic partners and different levels of sexual behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Furman, Wyndol; Shaffer, Laura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21128155"> <span id="translatedtitle">Romantic partners, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits, and casual acquaintances as sexual partners.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with "<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits," as well as with <span class="hlt">friends</span> in general. Young adults were most likely to engage in sexual behavior with romantic partners, but sexual behavior also often occurred with some type of nonromantic partner. More young adults engaged in some form of sexual behavior with casual acquaintances than with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits. The frequencies of sexual behavior, however, were greater with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits than with <span class="hlt">friends</span> or casual acquaintances. Interview and questionnaire data revealed that <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits were typically <span class="hlt">friends</span>, but not necessarily. Nonsexual activities were also less common with <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits than other <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Taken together, the findings illustrate the value of differentiating among different types of nonromantic partners and different levels of sexual behavior. PMID:21128155</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Furman, Wyndol; Shaffer, Laura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47885494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Towards Detecting Influential <span class="hlt">Users</span> in Social Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a One of online social networks’ best marketing strategies is viral advertisement. The influence of <span class="hlt">users</span> on their <span class="hlt">friends</span> can\\u000a increase or decrease sales, so businesses are interested in finding influential people and encouraging them to create positive\\u000a influence. Models and techniques have been proposed to facilitate finding influential people, however most fail to address\\u000a common online social network problems such</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amir Afrasiabi Rad; Morad Benyoucef</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.huduser.org/portal/"> <span id="translatedtitle">HUD <span class="hlt">User</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">If you're interested in the state of housing, real estate markets, and other related matters, the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) <span class="hlt">User</span> website will warrant a very close examination. Their coherent and easy-to-use homepage features basic links to their quarterly periodicals, data sets, and a tool designed to help <span class="hlt">users</span> find research materials on over a dozen topics, including affordable housing and green design. In the "What's New" area, visitors can look through the most recent edition of "ResearchWorks" (their in house publication) and check out the latest data sets on housing starts, economic development programs, and so on. Perhaps the timeliest item here is the "Guide to Avoiding Foreclosure", which will be useful who wish to avoid additional mortgage problems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.marchofdimes.com/baby/inthenicu_family.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">In the NICU: Your Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... page once in a 24 hour period. Your family and <span class="hlt">friends</span> After your baby's arrival, some family ... Becoming an informed parent Common NICU equipment NICU Family Support® Your gift helps provide comfort and support ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_140391.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span>' Online Photos May Sway Teens' Behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... to photos of risky behavior posted on <span class="hlt">friends</span>' social networking sites, it seems that what teenagers see, teenagers ... methods to examine how teenagers' activities on online social networking sites influence their smoking and alcohol use." The ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.msu.edu/~levinet/Bisson&Levine_2009_FWB.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Negotiating a <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits Relationship</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> with benefits (FWB) refers to “<span class="hlt">friends</span>” who have sex. Study 1 (N = 125) investigated the prevalence of these relationships and why individuals engaged in this relationship. Results indicated\\u000a that 60% of the individuals surveyed have had this type of relationship, that a common concern was that sex might complicate\\u000a friendships by bringing forth unreciprocated desires for romantic commitment, and ironically</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Melissa A. Bisson; Timothy R. Levine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.childfriendlycities.org/pdf/cye_cfc_canada.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Child-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities: Canadian Perspectives1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article highlights a research project entitled, Child-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities and Participatory Planning and Design in Canada. The article describes a graduate course, Child-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities in Canada, which supported the research. Highlighted is a protocol (based on 15 factors) for collecting examples of best practices—including the degree of young people's participation, intended goals of fostering independence, recognition of diverse groups of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rae Bridgman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncri.org.uk/ncriconference/abstract/pdf/pdfs/ncri2006_0507.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aim: To develop pragmatic, <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> follow-up protocols for all scenarios of both Seminomatous and Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell tumours (NSGCT). Methods: We reviewed the available published literature and our own centre's extensive experience with germ cell tumours, producing follow-up guidelines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results: Individualised, pragmatic follow up protocols were produced for Seminoma\\/NSGCT managed by surveillance chemotherapy or radiotherapy. These encompassed the twin aims of follow-up - detecting relapse and monitoring late side effects of treatment. We developed an Excel program that allows the <span class="hlt">user</span> to select the treatment scenario and enter the date of diagnosis, then produces an individualised follow up schedule</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D Gilbert; S Beesley; H Taylor; D Bloomfield; D Dearnaley; R Huddart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/511480"> <span id="translatedtitle">Embodied <span class="hlt">User</span> Interfaces: Towards Invisible <span class="hlt">User</span> Interfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There have been several recent examples of <span class="hlt">user</span> interface techniques in which the <span class="hlt">user</span> uses a computational device by physically manipulating the device. This paper proposes that these form an interesting new paradigm for <span class="hlt">user</span> interface design, Embodied <span class="hlt">User</span> Interfaces. This paper presents and defines this paradigm, and places it in the evolution of <span class="hlt">user</span> interface paradigms leading towards the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenneth P. Fishkin; Thomas P. Moran; Beverly L. Harrison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1386635"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> and neighbors on the Web</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Internet has become a rich and large repository of information about us as individuals. Anything from the links and text on a <span class="hlt">user’s</span> homepage to the mailing lists the <span class="hlt">user</span> subscribes to are reflections of social interactions a <span class="hlt">user</span> has in the real world. In this paper we devise techniques and tools to mine this information in order to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lada A. Adamic; Eytan Adar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22047837"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of the <span class="hlt">friends</span>' network in drug use and violent behaviour among young people in the nightlife recreational context.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Party networks of young people are important for socialization, but can also influence their involvement in risk behaviours. We explored the individual-centred networks (7.360 <span class="hlt">friends</span>) of 1.363 recreational nightlife <span class="hlt">users</span> in 9 European cities in 2006, through 22 <span class="hlt">friend</span> characteristics. As expected, deviant networks are related to violence, smoking, illegal drug use and drunkenness. However, socializing and helping networks are also associated with fighting, smoking, use of illegal drugs--except for cannabis--and getting drunk. Not having a deviant network and not having a helping/socializing network can be protective against smoking, violence and illegal drug use, as well as protecting ex-<span class="hlt">users</span> from relapse. Closeness to <span class="hlt">friends</span> is also a network protective factor. A possible reason why socializing networks are related to fighting, illegal drugs and drunkenness is that these behaviours are somehow desired, adaptive and prosocial in recreational contexts. PMID:22047837</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Calafat, Amador; Kronegger, Luka; Juan, Montse; Duch, Mari Angels; Kosir, Matej</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/friend/family_friend_died.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Somebody in My <span class="hlt">Friend</span>'s Family Died. What Should I Do?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Somebody in My <span class="hlt">Friend</span>'s Family Died. What Should I Do? KidsHealth > Kids > Feelings > My <span class="hlt">Friends</span> > Somebody in My <span class="hlt">Friend</span>'s Family Died. What Should I Do? Print A ... going to be great," thought Kate. Her best <span class="hlt">friend</span>, Sarah, had been absent from school for the ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJMPC..2450022N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social Interest for <span class="hlt">User</span> Selecting Items in Recommender Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recommender systems have developed rapidly and successfully. The system aims to help <span class="hlt">users</span> find relevant items from a potentially overwhelming set of choices. However, most of the existing recommender algorithms focused on the traditional <span class="hlt">user</span>-item similarity computation, other than incorporating the social interests into the recommender systems. As we know, each <span class="hlt">user</span> has their own preference field, they may influence their <span class="hlt">friends</span>' preference in their expert field when considering the social interest on their <span class="hlt">friends</span>' item collecting. In order to model this social interest, in this paper, we proposed a simple method to compute <span class="hlt">users</span>' social interest on the specific items in the recommender systems, and then integrate this social interest with similarity preference. The experimental results on two real-world datasets Epinions and Friendfeed show that this method can significantly improve not only the algorithmic precision-accuracy but also the diversity-accuracy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nie, Da-Cheng; Ding, Ming-Jing; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Ke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/%7Efprovost/Papers/kdd_audience.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Audience selection for on-line brand advertising: privacy-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> social network targeting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes and evaluates privacy-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> methods for extracting quasi-social networks from browser behavior on <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated content sites, for the purpose of finding good audiences for brand advertising (as opposed to click maximizing, for example). Targeting social-network neigh- bors resonates well with advertisers, and on-line browsing behavior data counterintuitively can allow the identification of good audiences anonymously. Besides being one</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foster J. Provost; Brian Dalessandro; Rod Hook; Xiaohan Zhang; Alan Murray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50668689"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">friendly</span> and human-based teleoperation system for humanoid robot using joystick</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper puts forward a teleoperation system to control humanoid robot BHR-02 using joystick, which is convenient and simple for manipulation. This teleoperation system gives a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> and human-based operation interface. And the system provides a switching command method for <span class="hlt">users</span> to choose the part of the robot to operate using the joystick. Moreover the on-line trajectory switching is realized</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuepin Lu; Qiang Huang; Min Li; Xiaoyu Jiang; M. Keerio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.tsfaq.info/cgi-bin/index.cgi"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transsexualism and Gender Transition FAQ for Significant Others, <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, Family, Employers, Coworkers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This FAQ, written by members of the Mid-Michigan FTM (female-to-male) Alliance, offers general information about transsexualism and gender transition, and addresses the common responses and concerns that <span class="hlt">friends</span>, family, and co-workers have about the transgendered person in their lives. An annotated webliography of relevant resources and a bibliography about transsexualism guide <span class="hlt">users</span> to additional information. A text-only version of the entire site is available to facilitate printing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57783803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gender Differences in Delinquent Involvement: An Exploration of the Interactive Effects of <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Bonding and <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Delinquency</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The criminological literature faces a paradox regarding gender, <span class="hlt">friend</span> relationships, and delinquency. Past research shows that while <span class="hlt">friends</span> are an important part of adolescence for both young men and young women, males are more likely to have delinquent <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and male friendships are more likely to cultivate delinquency. Past studies indicate that “girl <span class="hlt">friends</span> are better” for inhibiting delinquency. Beyond</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meredith G. F. Worthen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59064201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lovers and <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: Understanding <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits Relationships and those Involved</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> with benefits relationships (FWBRs) are defined as sexual relationships between two individuals who are <span class="hlt">friends</span>, though they are not emotionally intimate or committed to one another. Little FWBR research has explored who is most likely to become involved in FWBRs and how personality may affect their FWB experiences. With the present study, I examined two aspects of personality that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lydia Kathleen Merriam-Pigg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.siu.edu/~hexmoor/CV/PUBLICATIONS/JOURNALS/JETAI-09/paper-online.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trust-based protocols for regulating online, <span class="hlt">friend-of-a-friend</span> communities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An online community is a group whose members are connected by means of information technologies, typically the Internet rather than face to face. Online communities allow social and cultural barriers to be spanned for communication. Social communities rely on interpersonal trust to regulate cohesion in their communities. After a general discussion, we offer protocols that extend viability of <span class="hlt">friend-of-a-friend</span> framework</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henry Hexmoor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13307736"> <span id="translatedtitle">'Would You Be My <span class="hlt">Friend</span>?' - Creating a Mobile <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Network with 'Hot in the City</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An emerging technology called Near Field Communication (NFC) is used to enable touch between mobile devices. This paper describes how a mobile social media system called 'Hot in the City' (HIC) enables people to make <span class="hlt">friend</span> connections on the spot when they meet each other. We first describe the HIC system, and then explain how the visibility of <span class="hlt">friends</span> is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juha Häikiö; Tuomo Tuikka; Erkki Siira; Vili Törmänen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.toshiba-europe.com/research/crl/stg/pdfs/icphs07_sityaev.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOME ASPECTS OF PROSODY OF <span class="hlt">FRIENDLY</span> FORMAL AND <span class="hlt">FRIENDLY</span> INFORMAL SPEAKING STYLES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current study investigates acoustic correlates associated with <span class="hlt">friendly</span> formal and <span class="hlt">friendly</span> informal speaking styles. A small corpus of speech was recorded by a native speaker of American English. The results revealed that that the most distinctive feature differentiating the two styles is the fundamental frequency. There was also a small difference found in the articulation rate and RMS energy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dmitry Sityaev; Gabriel Webster; Norbert Braunschweiler; Sabine Buchholz; Kate Knill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38725325"> <span id="translatedtitle">Meeting Strangers and <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: How Random Are Social Networks?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a dynamic model of network formation where nodes find other nodes with whom to form links in two ways: some are found uniformly at random, while others are found by searching locally through the current structure of the network (e.g., meeting <span class="hlt">friends</span> of <span class="hlt">friends</span>). This combination of meeting processes results in a spectrum of features exhibited by large</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew O. Jackson; Brian W. Rogers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9852652"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Experience of the Baby <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Hospital initiative].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the study is analyzed and described the initiative called "Initiative Baby <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Hospitals", a program which started in Brazil, 1992. This initiative intends to support, to protect and to promote the breastfeeding as proposed in a meeting in 1990 in Florence, Italy, which was promoted by WHO and UNICEF. The basic goal of this initiative is to mobilize health professionals and hospital or maternity workers for changing their routines and conducts aiming to prevent the early wean. The health establishments are evaluated based on the "ten steps for success of breastfeeding, a group of goals created in the same meeting. In Brazil, the evaluation is coordinated by the Federal Government through the PNIAM (Programa Nacional de Incentivo ao Aleitamento Materno). A baby <span class="hlt">friendly</span> hospital, if approved, receives from the Minister of Health, a Federal Governmental Agency (SUS) a differential payment for childbirth assistance and prenatal accompaniment, 10% and 40%, more respectively. Until 1998 year there were 103 baby <span class="hlt">friendly</span> hospitals in Brazil, with the majority of them located in the northeast area (68.1%). However, taking in accounting the number of 5650 hospitals linked to SUS in the country, less than 2.0% are baby <span class="hlt">friendly</span> hospitals. On the basis of the experience and according with PNIAM data the implementation of the ten steps and the incentive to breastfeeding through baby <span class="hlt">friendly</span> hospitals have resulted in a significant increase of breastfeeding incidence and duration in Brazil. PMID:9852652</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lamounier, J A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/580864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolutionary Reinforcement of <span class="hlt">User</span> Models in an Adaptive Search Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The volume and variety of the Internet information is exponentially grows and therefore causes difficulties for a <span class="hlt">user</span> to obtain information that <span class="hlt">accurately</span> matches of the <span class="hlt">user</span> interested. Several combination techniques are used to achieve the precise goal. This is due, firstly, to the fact that <span class="hlt">users</span> often do not present queries to information retrieval systems that optimally represent the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saeedeh Maleki-dizaji; Zulaiha Ali Othman; Henry O. Nyongesa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13316127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research on Personalized Services for <span class="hlt">Users</span> of Education Resources Net</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to <span class="hlt">users</span> be able to find their own favorite resources quickly and <span class="hlt">accurately</span>, this paper presents a personalized service which recommends resources for <span class="hlt">users</span> at massive education resources net. On the basis of analyzing the characteristics of <span class="hlt">users</span> and resources, this paper discusses the model of resourcepsilas description and userpsilas interest, and the treatment of userpsilas interest drift,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yongjun Jing; Xin Li; Shaochun Zhong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22multiplatform%22&id=ED391472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developing a <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface for the Converged Information Future.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The future of telecommunications is at a very uncertain stage: how will information be delivered, with what hardware, and who will manage delivery and content? One thing is certain: the survival of new communication technologies will depend in part on <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> interfaces. In whatever form services arrive at the house, their interfaces will…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaughan, Misha W.; Hinshaw, M. Joseph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57389047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social Networking and Online Privacy: Facebook <span class="hlt">Users</span>' Perceptions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigates Facebook <span class="hlt">users</span>' perceptions of online privacy, exploring their awareness of privacy issues and how their behaviour is influenced by this awareness, as well as the role of trust in an online social networking environment. A cross-sectional survey design is used. The sample frame is a network of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span>; 285 survey responses were collected giving a response</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deirdre O' Bien; Ann M. Torres</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8394E...4V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> high resolution SAR imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and <span class="hlt">user</span> parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42941919"> <span id="translatedtitle">More <span class="hlt">accurate</span> time from the Heathkit most <span class="hlt">accurate</span> clock</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The addition of an auxiliary circuit to the Heathkit GC-1000 clock is described. The circuit, which consists of two integrated circuits, two resistors, and three capacitors, will supply a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> timing pulse to the computer. The circuit contains two input signals and produces one output; the inputs are multiplexed seven-digit displays (two digits for hour, minute, and second, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. V. Tollefson; R. H. Bloomer Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29009264"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Examination of Maternity Staff Attitudes Towards Implementing Baby <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Health Initiative (BFHI) Accreditation in Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The Baby <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Hospital Initiative (BFHI) influences health care practices and increases the initiation and duration of\\u000a exclusive breastfeeding. Consistent definitions enable the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> monitoring of breastfeeding rates and behaviour. This\\u000a information refines policy and helps reach national breastfeeding targets. Only 21% (66\\/317) of Australian hospitals are BFHI\\u000a accredited. Objective To examine the factors perceived to promote or hinder</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ava Deborah Walsh; Jan Pincombe; Ann Henderson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23386519"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Mother-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> childbirth practices and breastfeeding].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Childbirth, connecting the stages of pregnancy and postpartum, deeply affects maternal motivation with regard to initiating and continuing postnatal breastfeeding and ultimate breastfeeding success. Although promoting breastfeeding is a strategy critical to achieving wellbeing in both mothers and infants, there remains a lack of professional attention and related research into the effect of childbirth on breastfeeding. Promoting successful breastfeeding is a central component of childbirth-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> nursing care. Therefore, this paper introduces the origin and concepts of mother-and-infant-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> childbirth, then analyzes the influences on breastfeeding of medicalized birth practices and suggests how to implement childbirth-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> interventions. This paper was written to help nurses better understand how the childbirth process affects breastfeeding and provide a reference for creating conditions during childbirth that encourage successful breastfeeding practices. PMID:23386519</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Ya-Wen; Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Ya-Ling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10109574"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User`s</span> guide and physics manual for the SCATPlus circuit code</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ScatPlus is a <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> circuit code and an expandable library of circuit models for electrical components and devices; it can be used to predict the transient behavior in electric circuits. The heart of ScatPlus is the transient circuit solver SCAT written in 1986 by R.F. Gribble. This manual includes system requirements, physics manual, ScatPlus component library, tutorial, ScatPlus screen, menus and toolbar, ScatPlus tool bar, procedures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yapuncich, M.L.; Deninger, W.J.; Gribble, R.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22competence%22&pg=2&id=EJ963723"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competence, Problem Behavior, and the Effects of Having No <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, Aggressive <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, or Nonaggressive <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This study examined the longitudinal relations between competence (academic achievement and social preference) and problem behavior (loneliness and aggression) in 741 elementary school boys and girls in the Netherlands (Grades 1-5). Also, we examined the moderation effects of having no <span class="hlt">friends</span>, aggressive <span class="hlt">friends</span>, or nonaggressive <span class="hlt">friends</span> on the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Palmen, Hanneke; Vermande, Marjolijn M.; Dekovic, Maja; van Aken, Marcel A. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46473575"> <span id="translatedtitle">Periodate Titration of Fe(II) in Acid Aqueous Solutions: An Environmentally <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Redox Reaction for the Undergraduate Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> redox laboratory for the determination of Fe(II) in an acid aqueous medium is presented. This laboratory exercise is an appropriate substitute for the traditional dichromate titration, which is environmentally problematic. This titration method uses the periodate ion as the oxidizing agent and yields results which are as <span class="hlt">accurate</span> as the dichromate titration. Student success rate in quantitative</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">THOMAS G. DRUMMOND; WILLIAM L. LOCKHART; SPENCER J. SLATTERY; FAROOQ A. KHAN; ANDREW J. LEAVITT</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB90186420"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geostatistics for Waste Management: A <span class="hlt">User</span>'s Manual for the GEOPACK (Version 1.0) Geostatistical Software System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A comprehensive, <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> geostatistical software system called GEOPACK has been developed. The purpose of the software is to make available the programs necessary to undertake a geostatistical analysis of spatially correlated data. The programs were...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. R. Yates M. V. Yates</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=124878"> <span id="translatedtitle">GEOSTATISTICS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT: A <span class="hlt">USER</span>'S MANUAL FOR THE GEOPACK (VERSION 1.0) GEOSTATISTICAL SOFTWARE SYSTEM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GEOPACK, a comprehensive <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> geostatistical software system, was developed to help in the analysis of spatially correlated data. The software system was developed to be used by scientists, engineers, regulators, etc., with little experience in geostatistical techniques...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50806239"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optimizing social life using online <span class="hlt">friend</span> networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents an online application which ties to the popular social network Facebook. It aggregates data from other systems, including Yahoo! Local and Google Maps, to provide relevant information to <span class="hlt">users</span>. This system of systems functions as an add-on to each <span class="hlt">user</span>'s Facebook profile. The <span class="hlt">user</span> is able to store ratings, reviews, and places where he likes to go.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sebastian Echegaray; Jafet Morales; Wenbin Luo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13275456"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying Key <span class="hlt">Users</span> for Targeted Marketing by Mining Online Social Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The popularity of online shopping highlights the need for targeted marketing. Instead of broadcasting advertisement to an entire online community, targeted marketing aims at key <span class="hlt">users</span>, namely, influential reviewers whose reviews may affect a large group of his <span class="hlt">friends</span>, acquaintances or other online customers to buy the product. This paper proposes a method for identifying key <span class="hlt">users</span>, based on mining</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu Zhang; Zhaoqing Wang; Chaolun Xia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=90420"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">USER</span>'S GUIDE FOR GLOED VERSION 1.0 - THE GLOBAL EMISSIONS DATABASE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The document is a <span class="hlt">user</span>'s guide for the EPA-developed, powerful software package, Global Emissions Database (GloED). GloED is a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>, menu-driven tool for storing and retrieving emissions factors and activity data on a country-specific basis. Data can be selected from dat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4417187"> <span id="translatedtitle">Incremental Learning of Tasks From <span class="hlt">User</span> Demonstrations, Past Experiences, and Vocal Comments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since many years the robotics community is envisioning robot assistants sharing the same environment with humans. It became obvious that they have to interact with humans and should adapt to individual <span class="hlt">user</span> needs. Especially the high variety of tasks robot assistants will be facing requires a highly adaptive and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> programming interface. One possible solution to this programming problem is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Pardowitz; Steffen Knoop; Ruediger Dillmann; Raoul D. Zollner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57742770"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substance <span class="hlt">Users</span>' Perspectives on Helpful and Unhelpful Confrontation: Implications for Recovery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Substance <span class="hlt">users</span> commonly face confrontations about their use from family, <span class="hlt">friends</span>, peers, and professionals. Yet confrontation is controversial and not well understood. To better understand the effects of confrontation we conducted qualitative interviews with 38 substance <span class="hlt">users</span> (82% male and 79% White) about their experiences of being confronted. Confrontation was defined as warnings about potential harm related to substance use.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Douglas L. Polcin; Nina Mulia; Laura Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56909010"> <span id="translatedtitle">UltraScan gateway enhancements: in collaboration with TeraGrid advanced <span class="hlt">user</span> support</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ultrascan gateway provides a <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> web interface for evaluation of experimental analytical ultracentrifuge data using the UltraScan modeling software. The analysis tasks are executed on the TeraGrid and campus computational resources. The gateway is highly successful in providing the service to end <span class="hlt">users</span> and consistently listed among the top five gateway community account usage. This continued growth and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borries Demeler; Raminderjeet Singh; Marlon Pierce; Emre H. Brookes; Suresh Marru; Bruce Dubbs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/h5u40e4j5pnx03ah.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Awase-E: Image-Based Authentication for Mobile Phones Using <span class="hlt">User</span>'s Favorite Images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is a trade-o between security and usability in <span class="hlt">user</span> authentication for mobile phones. Since such devices have a poor input interfaces, 4-digit number passwords are widely used at present. There- fore, a more secure and <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> authentication is needed. This paper proposes a novel authentication method called \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tetsuji Takada; Hideki Koike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53642170"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurements in volume data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An algorithm for very <span class="hlt">accurate</span> visualization of an iso- surface in a 3D medical dataset has been developed in the past few years. This technique is extended in this paper to several kinds of measurements in which exact geometric information of a selected iso-surface is used to derive volume, length, curvature, connectivity and similar geometric information from an object of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Javier Olivan; Marco K. Bosma; Jaap Smit; S. K. Mun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60345951"> <span id="translatedtitle">Method of <span class="hlt">accurizing</span> rail guns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In space, projectiles with hypervelocity can deliver large amounts of energy to the target. Long range and high accuracy are essential. This report presents a method of improving the accuracy of hypervelocity vehicles by measuring the output velocity and correcting the direction by impulse from a laser beam normal to the projectile flight path. The <span class="hlt">accurizer</span> is described, trajectory-correction calculations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farnum</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52668945"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span>, inexpensive, thermal expansion microtranslator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed an <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, inexpensive translator utilizing the thermal expansion of an electrically heated wire. The resistance of the wire, measured in a Wheatstone bridge, provides a readout of the length of the wire based on its temperature coefficient of resistance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James J. Snyder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/120882"> <span id="translatedtitle">Justine <span class="hlt">user`s</span> manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Justine is the graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, S.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/425368"> <span id="translatedtitle">PST <span class="hlt">user`s</span> guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Parametric Source Term (PST) software allows estimation of radioactivity release fractions for Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). PST was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program. PST contains a framework of equations that model activity transport between volumes in the release pathway from the core, through the vessel, through the containment, and to the environment. PST quickly obtains exact solutions to differential equations for activity transport in each volume for each time interval. PST provides a superior method for source term estimation because it: ensures conservation of activity transported across various volumes in the release pathway; provides limited consideration of the time-dependent behavior of input parameter uncertainty distributions; allows input to be quantified using state-of-the-art severe accident analysis code results; increases modeling flexibility because linkage between volumes is specified by <span class="hlt">user</span> input; and allows other types of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plant designs to be evaluated with minimal modifications. PST is a microcomputer-based system that allows the analyst more flexibility than a mainframe system. PST has been developed to run with both MS DOS and MS Windows 95/NT operating systems. PST has the capability to load ASP Source Term Vector (STV) information, import pre-specified default input for the 6 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) initially analyzed in the NRC ASP program, allow input value modifications for release fraction sensitivity studies, export <span class="hlt">user</span>-specified default input for the LWR being modeled, report results of radioactivity release calculations at each time interval, and generate formatted results that can interface with other risk assessment codes. This report describes the PST model and provides guidelines for using PST.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rempe, J.L.; Cebull, M.J.; Gilbert, B.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/12068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elemental ABAREX -- a <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span>. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, A.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-05-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=the+AND+giver&pg=7&id=EJ771264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enabling Family-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cultural Change</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strategies to address the problem of work and family balance have begun emerging in recent years. Many American college and universities have begun to adopt this "family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> policies," such as tenure-clock extensions. Each of the policies to enable work and family balance, however, is situated within the broader academic culture. Departmental…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quinn, Kate; Yen, Joyce W.; Riskin, Eve A.; Lange, Sheila Edwards</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plants+AND+seeds&pg=3&id=EJ757403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Applying Brain-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Instructional Practices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|In this article, the author offers advice for principals on working with teachers to change the instructional climate and on how to apply brain-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> instructions to improve the effectiveness of one's teaching. To lead an entire district toward the use of brain-compatible instruction, the author suggests to start with a group of motivated…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erlauer-Myrah, Laura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22dyslexia%22&pg=6&id=EJ768738"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dyslexia <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Schools in the UK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This article starts by examining the background to dyslexia support within the context of the National Literacy Strategy in the United Kingdom. It then critically discusses some of the perceived shortcomings of current support for children with dyslexia, and how this has led to the development of a "dyslexia <span class="hlt">friendly</span>" schools movement in the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riddick, Barbara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cfids.org/resources/for-those-who-care.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: For Those Who Care</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... recover fully. For this reason, it's important for people with CFS to have the support of family and <span class="hlt">friends</span> as they ... lot. As CFS progresses, the sleep disorder changes. People with CFS (PWCs) may have difficulty falling or staying asleep. They awaken unrefreshed, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plant+AND+seeds&pg=3&id=EJ757403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Applying Brain-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Instructional Practices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article, the author offers advice for principals on working with teachers to change the instructional climate and on how to apply brain-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> instructions to improve the effectiveness of one's teaching. To lead an entire district toward the use of brain-compatible instruction, the author suggests to start with a group of motivated…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erlauer-Myrah, Laura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=electronic+AND+waste&id=EJ888631"> <span id="translatedtitle">Going Green: Environmentally <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Schools Pay Off</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The notion of campuses that are energy-efficient and ecologically <span class="hlt">friendly</span>, and that provide a healthy, productive, comfortable environment for students and staff has been around for some time. But for many educators, green schools have remained more good intention than proven approach, a huge risk that few school leaders could--or would--take.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaFee, Scott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22love+AND+relationship%22&pg=2&id=ED287145"> <span id="translatedtitle">Homosexual and Heterosexual Love and <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Relationships.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This study explored homosexual and heterosexual <span class="hlt">friend</span> and love relationships as measured by Wright's (1984) Acquaintance Description Form-Final (ADF-F). It was hypothesized that homosexual relationships would vary from heterosexual relationships on certain aspects of the relationships. Homosexual subjects (N=78) responded toward a target person…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorman, Nanette M.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sarin&id=ED458325"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kid-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities Report Card, 2001.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This report examines the health and wellbeing of children in the United States' largest cities, covering every city with a population of 100,000 or more, as well as the largest cities in states without any cities of this size. Research shows that many cities are becoming more child-<span class="hlt">friendly</span>, with better access to good education, jobs, and health…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polansky, Lee S., Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57486317"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social capital: the benefit of Facebook ‘<span class="hlt">friends</span>’</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research investigated the role Facebook use plays in the creation or maintenance of social capital among university students in South Africa. Data were collected using questionnaires completed by over 800 students from 7 universities. The questionnaire was obtained from a study conducted in Michigan State University (Ellison N.B., Steinfield, C., and Lampe, C., 2007. The benefits of Facebook “<span class="hlt">Friends</span>”:</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kevin Johnston; Maureen Tanner; Nishant Lalla; Dori Kawalski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Sarin&id=ED458325"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kid-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cities Report Card, 2001.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report examines the health and wellbeing of children in the United States' largest cities, covering every city with a population of 100,000 or more, as well as the largest cities in states without any cities of this size. Research shows that many cities are becoming more child-<span class="hlt">friendly</span>, with better access to good education, jobs, and health…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polansky, Lee S., Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+security+AND+benefit&pg=5&id=EJ816877"> <span id="translatedtitle">Participants in "<span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits" Relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Analysis of survey data from 1013 undergraduates at a large southeastern university revealed that over half (51%) reported experience in a "<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits" relationship. In comparing the background characteristics of participants with nonpartipants in a FWBR, ten statistically significant findings emerged. Findings included that…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puentes, Jennifer; Knox, David; Zusman, Marty E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1018358"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higgs <span class="hlt">friends</span> and counterfeits at hadron colliders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the possibility of 'Higgs counterfeits' - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving 'Higgs <span class="hlt">friends</span>,' fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW,ZZ,{gamma}{gamma}, or even {gamma}Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs <span class="hlt">friend</span> or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs <span class="hlt">friend</span>). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with 'effective Z's,' where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and associated charged fields at the LHC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fox, Patrick J.; /Fermilab; Tucker-Smith, David; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Williams Coll. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Weiner, Neal; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=value+AND+computers+AND+communication&pg=7&id=EJ955120"> <span id="translatedtitle">Class List [not equal to] <span class="hlt">Friend</span> List</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The Amy Hestir Student Protection Act, also known as the Missouri Facebook Law, forbids exclusive or private conversations between teachers and students on Facebook. A judge has granted an injunction against it, but this issue has sparked a debate among teachers about whether they should be Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> with current students and in what ways…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunter, Eileen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23666555"> <span id="translatedtitle">Best <span class="hlt">Friends</span>' Discussions of Social Dilemmas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best <span class="hlt">friends</span> (191 dyads; 53.4 % female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad members completed a self-report measure of friendship quality. Dyadic data analyses guided by the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model indicated that adolescent and <span class="hlt">friend</span> reports of friendship qualities were related to the forms of reasoning used during discussion. <span class="hlt">Friends</span> who both reported that they could resolve conflicts in a constructive way were more likely to use moral reasoning than <span class="hlt">friends</span> who reported that their conflict resolution was poor or disagreed on the quality of their conflict resolution. The findings provide evidence for the important role that friendship interaction may play in adolescents' social and moral development. PMID:23666555</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McDonald, Kristina L; Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Rubin, Kenneth H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.thehelpgroup.org/pdf/HelpLine_fall_08_web.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CONTENTS A MESSAGE TO OUR <span class="hlt">FRIENDS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">So here is a brief overview of the news that reflects the efforts of the incredible partnership that The Help Group comprises - a partnership of our Board of Directors, administration, faculty, governmental colleagues, philanthropic <span class="hlt">friends</span> working together to support our mission to serve children with special needs and their families. Although this is just a snapshot, we hope that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garth Ancier; Bruce Berman; Janice Berman; Danny Bramson; James L. Brooks; Amy Brenneman; Brad Silberling; Victor Coleman; Bruce C. Corwin; Dick Costello; Greg Daniels; Robert Davidow; Sharon Davis; Michael Eisner; Mel Elias; Lee Gabler; Jim Gianopulos; Jonathan Glaser; Brian Grazer; Dean Schramm; Sandy Grushow; Sam Haskell; Robert Hertzberg; Andy Heyward; Quincy Jones; Michael Kassan; Brian Kennedy; Arnie Kleiner; Stuart Liner; Margaret Loesch; Marlee Matlin; Chris McGurk; Ron Meyer; Barry M. Meyer; Michael Milken; Lowell Milken; Sandra Milken; Dawn Ostroff; Richard J. Riordan; Fredric D. Rosen; Bruce Rosenblum; Haim Saban; Gary H. Carmona; Barbara Firestone; Susan Berk; Robert Dorman; David Firestone; Perry Katz; Martin Lasky; Jerrold Monkarsh; Chair Elect; Joy Monkarsh; Barry N. Nagoshiner; Judd Swarzman; Howard Tenenbaum; Richard M. Zelle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/574750"> <span id="translatedtitle">NEEM: Network-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Epidemic Multicast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Epidemic, or probabilistic, multicast protocols have emerged as a viable mech- anism to circumvent the scalability problems of reliable multicast protocols. How- ever, most existing epidemic approaches use connectionless transport protocols to exchange messages and rely on the intrinsic robustness of the epidemic dissemina- tion to mask network omissions. Unfortunately, such an approach is not network- <span class="hlt">friendly</span>, since the epidemic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jose Pereira; Luís Rodrigues; M. Joăo Monteiro; Rui Carlos Oliveira; Anne-marie Kermarrec; A.-M. Kermarrec</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/635767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Making radiosity usable: automatic preprocessing and meshing techniques for the generation of <span class="hlt">accurate</span> radiosity solutions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Generating <span class="hlt">accurate</span> radiosity solutions of real world environments is <span class="hlt">user</span>-intensive and requires significant knowledge of the method. As a result, few end-<span class="hlt">users</span> such as architects and designers use it. The output of most commercial modeling packages must be substantially \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel R. Baum; Stephen Mann; Kevin P. Smith; James M. Winget</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5785413"> <span id="translatedtitle">FASTR3D: a fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> search tool for similar RNA 3D structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">FASTR3D is a web-based search tool that allows the <span class="hlt">user</span> to fast and <span class="hlt">accurately</span> search the PDB data- base for structurally similar RNAs. Currently, it allows the <span class="hlt">user</span> to input three types of queries: (i) a PDB code of an RNA tertiary structure (default), optionally with specified residue range, (ii) an RNA secondary structure, optionally with primary sequence, in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chin-en Lai; Ming-yuan Tsai; Yun-chen Liu; Chih-wei Wang; Kun-tze Chen; Chin Lung Lu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1847952"> <span id="translatedtitle">The migratory cursor: <span class="hlt">accurate</span> speech-based cursor movement by moving multiple ghost cursors using non-verbal vocalizations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the migratory cursor, which is an interactive interface that enables <span class="hlt">users</span> to move a cursor to any desired position quickly and <span class="hlt">accurately</span> using voice alone. The migratory cursor combines discrete specification that allows a <span class="hlt">user</span> to specify a location quickly, but approximately, with continuous specification that allows the <span class="hlt">user</span> to specify a location more precisely, but slowly. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshiyuki Mihara; Etsuya Shibayama; Shin Takahashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sandia.gov/wind/asme/AIAA-2000-0052.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hardware and Software Developments for the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Time-Linked Data Acquisition System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wind-energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new, light-weight, modular data acquisition system capable of acquiring long-term, continuous, multi-channel time-series data from operating wind-turbines. New hardware features have been added to this system to make it more flexible and permit programming via telemetry. <span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> Windows-based software has been developed for programming the hardware and acquiring, storing, analyzing, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DALE E. BERG; MARK A. RUMSEY; JOSE R. ZAYAS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48819065"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Accident Reconstruction in VANET</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a We propose a forensic VANET application to aid an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> accident reconstruction. Our application provides a new source\\u000a of objective real-time data impossible to collect using existing methods. By leveraging inter-vehicle communications, we compile\\u000a digital evidence describing events before, during, and after an accident in its entirety. In addition to sensors data and\\u000a major components’ status, we provide relative positions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuliya Kopylova; Csilla Farkas; Wenyuan Xu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1012499"> <span id="translatedtitle">JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: <span class="hlt">User</span> Reference Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK <span class="hlt">User</span> Reference Guide was developed to assist <span class="hlt">users</span> in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009CNSNS..14.1766Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis for an environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> seedling breeding system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most seedlings of crops are produced in solar greenhouse or nursery, from which some problems about energy waste and environment pollution arise. This study aims at investigating the characteristics and effect of an environmental <span class="hlt">friendly</span> type seedling breeding system. The results demonstrate that crops can grow with a short period and little pollution in the new seedling breeding system with total manpower controllable environment that is not influenced by geography, climate and other natural conditions. By multilayer, nonplanar seedling breeding and annual batches arrangement, utilization ratio of unit area land and seedlings yield can be improved for several times and even more than 10 times. Conclusions can be obtained from the tomato seedling breeding experiments: (1) each growth index of tomato seedlings that are under the conditions of 291 ?mol/m2 s artificial illumination intensity is remarkably better than those produced in greenhouse with natural lights. (2) The environment of the seedling breeding system can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> controlled. The segmented temperature changed management can be applied according to the photosynthetic characteristics of plants, and not affected by the outside environment, which makes each growth index of tomato seedling constant in different seasons. The seedlings thus grow strong and can achieve the level of commodity seedlings after 20-30 days. (3) The temperature and humidity environment of the seedling breeding system can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> controlled according to plants growth demands.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qu, Y. H.; Wei, X. M.; Hou, Y. F.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.; Lin, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57863684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can We Be (and Stay) <span class="hlt">Friends</span>? Remaining <span class="hlt">Friends</span> After Dissolution of a Romantic Relationship</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although many individuals report being <span class="hlt">friends</span> with their ex-romantic partners (Wilmot, Carbaugh, & Baxter, 1985), the literature regarding post-romantic friendships is very limited. We investigated whether satisfaction in the dissolved romantic relationship could predict post-romantic friendships and friendship maintenance. We found that the more satisfied individuals were during the dissolved romance, the more likely they were to remain <span class="hlt">friends</span> and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Melinda Bullock; Jana Hackathorn; Eddie M. Clark; Brent A. Mattingly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_140955.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span>, Family Often the Suppliers in Underage Drinking, Smoking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, Family Often the Suppliers in Underage Drinking, Smoking: ... get their cigarettes and alcohol from family or <span class="hlt">friends</span>, according to a Canadian study released Tuesday. Researchers ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/fall09/articles/fall09pg26.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, <span class="hlt">Friend</span> of NIH</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, <span class="hlt">Friend</span> of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, <span class="hlt">Friend</span> of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986PASP...98..520T"> <span id="translatedtitle">More <span class="hlt">accurate</span> time from the Heathkit most <span class="hlt">accurate</span> clock</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The addition of an auxiliary circuit to the Heathkit GC-1000 clock is described. The circuit, which consists of two integrated circuits, two resistors, and three capacitors, will supply a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> timing pulse to the computer. The circuit contains two input signals and produces one output; the inputs are multiplexed seven-digit displays (two digits for hour, minute, and second, and one for tenths of a second) and the output appears as a string of about 10 low-going pulses about 1.25 ms in duration. Low pass filters (R1 and C1) are utilized to eliminate extraneous pulses. The materials and procedures for attaching the circuit to the clock are examined. The software for the data set ready signal, and the method for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> timing of data collection are discussed. The accuracy of the clock is evaluated and it is observed that the circuit improves the correct time provided by the clock from + or - 29 ms to + or - 5 ms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tollefson, M. V.; Bloomer, R. H., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48156448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Deviant <span class="hlt">Friends</span> on Delinquency: Searching for Moderator Variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three categories of potential moderators of the link between best <span class="hlt">friend</span>'s deviancy and boys' delinquency during early adolescence were investigated: personal (i.e., disruptiveneness profile during childhood, attitude toward delinquency), familial (i.e., parental monitoring, attachment to parents), and social (i.e., characteristics of other <span class="hlt">friends</span>). Best <span class="hlt">friend</span>'s and other <span class="hlt">friends</span>' deviancy were assessed during preadolescence through the use of peer ratings. Potential</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frank Vitaro; Mara Brendgen; Richard E. Tremblay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10193366"> <span id="translatedtitle">Xwake 1.0 <span class="hlt">user`s</span> manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Xwake is a <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) code for wake potential and impedance calculations of rotationally symmetric structures. Geometry boundaries are automatically meshed, or modeled, by a choice of either of two approximations, the typical {open_quotes}stepped edge{close_quotes} modeling, or the new {open_quotes}contour{close_quotes} modeling. Contouring means geometry boundaries described with curves and angles are not distorted to follow the rectangular grid; rather, the grid is adjusted to follow the contour of the geometry boundaries. It offers computer run time savings for large problems or intricate geometries for a given mesh compared with stepped edge modeling. Using stepped approximations with Xwake, on the other hand, one is able to model materials of any linear media type. Ultimately, three solutions are computed, wake potential versus wake length, wake spectrum versus frequency - a Fourier transform (FFT) of the wake potential, and wake impedance versus frequency. Xwake is an OSF/Motif application providing a graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface (GUI) for ease of use. It is written in ANSI C for portability and currently runs on UNIX platforms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saewert, G.; Jurgens, T.; Harfoush, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement...examinations conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs. Muscle atrophy must also be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measured and reported....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13293340"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Study on <span class="hlt">User</span> Perception of Personality-Based Recommender Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Our previous research indicates that using personality quizzes is a viable and promising way to build <span class="hlt">user</span> profiles to recommend\\u000a entertainment products. Based on these findings, our current research further investigates the feasibility of using personality\\u000a quizzes to build <span class="hlt">user</span> profiles not only for an active <span class="hlt">user</span> but also his or her <span class="hlt">friends</span>. We first propose a general method\\u000a that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rong Hu; Pearl Pu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/q11553085673n786.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new territory of multi-<span class="hlt">user</span> variable remote control for interactive TV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unlike passive analog TV, interactive TV (iTV) is the next step toward interactivity that offers <span class="hlt">users</span> a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> interactive\\u000a experience. As there are fewer studies focused on multi-<span class="hlt">user</span> interaction in a local environment, we concentrate on multi-<span class="hlt">user</span>\\u000a interaction with families, especially within a home information system. Therefore, we propose a control service framework\\u000a “MVC-iTV,” based on distributed computing and Machine-to-Machine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. C. Wang; T. C. Chung; K. Q. Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eie.polyu.edu.hk/~ensmall/pdf/NOLTA05-4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traffic Analysis of a Mobile Communication System Based on a Scale-Free <span class="hlt">User</span> Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract—In the traditional study of mobile cellular systems, all <span class="hlt">users</span> are assumed,to have the same behaviour. They have the same probability of making\\/receiving a call and they will move around the network with identical mobility. Moreover, the underlying <span class="hlt">user</span> network is assumed,to be fully connected. In a practical environment, each <span class="hlt">user</span> has a different list of acquaintances including relatives, <span class="hlt">friends</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wai M. Tam; Francis C. M. Lau; Chi K. Tse; Yongxiang Xia; Michael Small</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1820245"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remote <span class="hlt">User</span> Authentication Scheme with <span class="hlt">User</span> Anonymity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper proposes a scheme allowing a <span class="hlt">user</span> to log into the server with a dynamic pseudonym. No one can trace the specified <span class="hlt">user</span> except the service provider, which protects the <span class="hlt">user</span> privacy from outsiders in this way. Besides, the scheme provides the following merits: (1) no verification table; (2) mutual authentication; (3) low communication and computation cost; (4) free</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei-bin Lee; Hsing-bai Chen; Chyi-ren Dow</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36993733"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beneficial Impression Management: Strategically Controlling Information to Help <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It was hypothesized that people will strategically regulate information about the identities of <span class="hlt">friends</span> to help them create desired impressions on audiences. Experiment 1 demonstrated that participants described a <span class="hlt">friend</span> consistently with the qualities preferred by an attractive, opposite-sex individual but inconsistently with the qualities preferred by an unattractive, opposite-sex individual. Experiment 2 showed that a <span class="hlt">friend</span> who had a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barry R. Schlenker; Thomas W. Britt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56943945"> <span id="translatedtitle">IntRank: Interaction Ranking-Based Trustworthy <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Recommendation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Social networks are fundamental to virtual communities (e.g., forums, blogs) and virtual communities benefit from well-established social networks. As making <span class="hlt">friends</span> with other members is a common way to establish social relationships and people need to decide whom they should trust when making <span class="hlt">friends</span>, <span class="hlt">friend</span> recommendation has received considerable attention in virtual communities. Towards this goal, we first formulate hypotheses</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lizi Zhang; Hui Fang; Wee Keong Ng; Jie Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ann+AND+arbor&pg=3&id=EJ806119"> <span id="translatedtitle">More Colleges Are Adding Family-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Benefits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Results of a new survey of family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> benefits by the Center for the Education of Women at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor show that stopping the tenure clock has become the most common family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> benefit in higher education, following paid maternity leave. Other family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> policies that top the list in academe allow…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, Robin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22target+AND+children%22&pg=2&id=EJ572378"> <span id="translatedtitle">Similarities between <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Nonfriends in Middle Childhood.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Assessed similarities between 192 target children and their <span class="hlt">friends</span> and nonfriends. Found that children and <span class="hlt">friends</span> were more similar to one another than nonfriends across the dataset. Friendship similarities were greater in antisocial behavior than in other domains. Similarities between <span class="hlt">friends</span> in sociometric status and size of the friendship…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haselager, Gerbert J. T.; Hartup, Willard W.; van Lieshout, Cornelis F. M.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=facebook&pg=2&id=EJ922436"> <span id="translatedtitle">"<span class="hlt">Friending</span>" Professors, Parents and Bosses: A Facebook Connection Conundrum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The ever-growing popularity of Facebook has led some educators to ponder what role social networking might have in education. The authors examined student reactions to <span class="hlt">friend</span> requests from people outside their regular network of <span class="hlt">friends</span> including professors, parents, and employers. We found students have the most positive reactions to <span class="hlt">friend</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karl, Katherine A.; Peluchette, Joy V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://thequantizedquark.com/papers/fb.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">How many girls will accept your <span class="hlt">friend</span> request on Facebook?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this short note we try to find an approximate answer as to how many girls will accept your <span class="hlt">friend</span> request sent on Facebook. We assume that the total <span class="hlt">friend</span> requests sent is n and use basic statistics theory to find an approximate formula to the number of girls who will accept your <span class="hlt">friend</span> request.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manjil P. Saikia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pancreasfoundation.org/Docs/patient_info/FactSheetForFamilyandFriends.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">For Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: How Can I Help?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fact Sheet - For Family and <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: How Can I Help? What Can I Do? It is often difficult for family and <span class="hlt">friends</span> to know what to do to help a ... say them. This uncertainty can cause family and <span class="hlt">friends</span> to withdraw and distance themselves, leaving the patient ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acquaintances+AND+friends&pg=4&id=EJ444925"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavior State Matching during Interactions of Preadolescent <span class="hlt">Friends</span> versus Acquaintances.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Studied pairs of preadolescents who were close <span class="hlt">friends</span> and pairs who were acquaintances. Coherence in <span class="hlt">friends</span>' behavior states and in acquaintances' vocal activity suggested that <span class="hlt">friends</span> more often shared the same behavior state and acquaintances more often paid attention to turn-taking signals. (GLR)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Field, Tiffany; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57915402"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perceptions of <span class="hlt">friendly</span> insult greetings in interpersonal relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the effects of relationship development level and sexual composition within the relationship upon perceptions of the demand relevance (acceptability and frequency) of a devious communication demand (<span class="hlt">friendly</span> insult greetings). Acceptability and frequency increased through stranger, acquaintance, and <span class="hlt">friend</span> levels under same?sex conditions and increased between acquaintance and <span class="hlt">friend</span> levels under opposite?sex conditions. No differences were indicated between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William G. Powers; Robert B. Glenn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38566516"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-Presentation when Sharing with <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Nonfriends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of past studies of sharing among <span class="hlt">friends</span> and nonfriends have been mixed, with some studies finding that children share more with nonfriends than <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and others finding either the reverse or no difference. This study examined the effects of self-presentational concerns on sharing with peers. Kindergartners, fourth- and eighth-graders shared with a peer (<span class="hlt">friend</span>, acquaintance, or disliked peer)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duane Buhrmester; Jaime Goldfarb; Deborah Cantrell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23010337"> <span id="translatedtitle">Associations between <span class="hlt">friends</span>' disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dieting, unhealthy weight control and muscle-enhancing behaviors are common among adolescents: <span class="hlt">friends</span> are a probable source of influence on these behaviors. The present study uses data provided by nominated <span class="hlt">friends</span> to examine associations between <span class="hlt">friends</span>' disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors and participants' own behaviors in a diverse sample of American youth. Male and female adolescents (mean age = 14.4) completed surveys and identified their <span class="hlt">friends</span> from a class roster; <span class="hlt">friends</span>' survey data were then linked to each participant. Participants (N = 2126) who had at least one nominated <span class="hlt">friend</span> were included in the analytic sample. Independent variables were created using the same weight control and muscle-enhancing behaviors reported by nominated <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and were used in logistic regression models to test associations between participants' and their <span class="hlt">friends</span>' behaviors, stratified by gender. Results indicated that dieting, disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors were common in this sample, and selected <span class="hlt">friends</span>' behaviors were associated with the same behaviors in participants. For example, girls whose <span class="hlt">friends</span> reported extreme weight control behaviors had significantly greater odds of using these behaviors than girls whose <span class="hlt">friends</span> did not report these same behaviors (OR = 2.39). This research suggests that <span class="hlt">friends</span>' weight- and shape-related behaviors are a feature of social relationships, and is the first report demonstrating these associations for muscle-enhancing behaviors. Capitalizing on the social element may be important to the development of increasingly effective intervention and prevention programs. PMID:23010337</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eisenberg, Marla E; Wall, Melanie; Shim, Jin Joo; Bruening, Meg; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17851750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Negotiating a <span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits relationship.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> with benefits (FWB) refers to "<span class="hlt">friends</span>" who have sex. Study 1 (N = 125) investigated the prevalence of these relationships and why individuals engaged in this relationship. Results indicated that 60% of the individuals surveyed have had this type of relationship, that a common concern was that sex might complicate friendships by bringing forth unreciprocated desires for romantic commitment, and ironically that these relationships were desirable because they incorporated trust and comfort while avoiding romantic commitment. Study 2 (N = 90) assessed the relational negotiation strategies used by participants in these relationships. The results indicated that people in FWB relationships most often avoided explicit relational negotiation. Thus, although common, FWB relationships are often problematic for the same reasons that they are attractive. PMID:17851750</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bisson, Melissa A; Levine, Timothy R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22waste%22&pg=3&id=EJ1004605"> <span id="translatedtitle">CAD Instructor Designs Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Shed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwendau, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40348526"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dimethylcarbonate for eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> methylation reactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dimethylcarbonate (DMC), an environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> substitute for dimethylsulfate and methyl halides in methylation reactions, is a very selective reagent. Both under gas–liquid phase transfer catalysis (GL-PTC) and under batch conditions, with potassium carbonate as the catalyst, the reactions of DMC with methylene-active compounds (arylacetonitriles and arylacetoesters, aroxyacetonitriles and methyl aroxyacetates, benzylaryl- and alkylarylsulphones) produce monomethylated derivatives, with a selectivity not</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Memoli; M. Selva; P. Tundo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22wastes%22&pg=3&id=EJ1004605"> <span id="translatedtitle">CAD Instructor Designs Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Shed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwendau, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1653507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Playing it safe [human-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> robots</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have presented a new actuation concept for human-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> robot design, referred to as DM2. The new concept of DM2 was demonstrated on a two-degree-of-freedom prototype robot arm that we designed and built to validate our approach. The new actuation approach substantially reduces the impact loads associated with uncontrolled manipulator collision by relocating the major source of actuation effort from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MICHAEL ZINN; OUSSAMA KHATIB; BERNARD ROTH; J. KENNETH SALISBURY</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23790356"> <span id="translatedtitle">Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> with (health) benefits? Exploring social network site use and perceptions of social support, stress, and well-being.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract There is clear evidence that interpersonal social support impacts stress levels and, in turn, degree of physical illness and psychological well-being. This study examines whether mediated social networks serve the same palliative function. A survey of 401 undergraduate Facebook <span class="hlt">users</span> revealed that, as predicted, number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> associated with stronger perceptions of social support, which in turn associated with reduced stress, and in turn less physical illness and greater well-being. This effect was minimized when interpersonal network size was taken into consideration. However, for those who have experienced many objective life stressors, the number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> emerged as the stronger predictor of perceived social support. The "more-<span class="hlt">friends</span>-the-better" heuristic is proposed as the most likely explanation for these findings. PMID:23790356</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nabi, Robin L; Prestin, Abby; So, Jiyeon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApJS..195....4M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Overdensity and Masses of the <span class="hlt">Friends-of-friends</span> Halos and Universality of Halo Mass Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">friends-of-friends</span> algorithm (hereafter FOF) is a percolation algorithm which is routinely used to identify dark matter halos from N-body simulations. We use results from percolation theory to show that the boundary of FOF halos does not correspond to a single density threshold but to a range of densities close to a critical value that depends upon the linking length parameter, b. We show that for the commonly used choice of b = 0.2, this critical density is equal to 81.62 times the mean matter density. Consequently, halos identified by the FOF algorithm enclose an average overdensity which depends on their density profile (concentration) and therefore changes with halo mass, contrary to the popular belief that the average overdensity is ~180. We derive an analytical expression for the overdensity as a function of the linking length parameter b and the concentration of the halo. Results of tests carried out using simulated and actual FOF halos identified in cosmological simulations show excellent agreement with our analytical prediction. We also find that the mass of the halo that the FOF algorithm selects crucially depends upon mass resolution. We find a percolation-theory-motivated formula that is able to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> correct for the dependence on number of particles for the mock realizations of spherical and triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White halos. However, we show that this correction breaks down when applied to the real cosmological FOF halos due to the presence of substructures. Given that abundance of substructure depends on redshift and cosmology, we expect that the resolution effects due to substructure on the FOF mass and halo mass function will also depend on redshift and cosmology and will be difficult to correct for in general. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the universality of the mass function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">More, Surhud; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Dalal, Neal; Gottlöber, Stefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21560356"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE OVERDENSITY AND MASSES OF THE <span class="hlt">FRIENDS-OF-FRIENDS</span> HALOS AND UNIVERSALITY OF HALO MASS FUNCTION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">friends-of-friends</span> algorithm (hereafter FOF) is a percolation algorithm which is routinely used to identify dark matter halos from N-body simulations. We use results from percolation theory to show that the boundary of FOF halos does not correspond to a single density threshold but to a range of densities close to a critical value that depends upon the linking length parameter, b. We show that for the commonly used choice of b = 0.2, this critical density is equal to 81.62 times the mean matter density. Consequently, halos identified by the FOF algorithm enclose an average overdensity which depends on their density profile (concentration) and therefore changes with halo mass, contrary to the popular belief that the average overdensity is {approx}180. We derive an analytical expression for the overdensity as a function of the linking length parameter b and the concentration of the halo. Results of tests carried out using simulated and actual FOF halos identified in cosmological simulations show excellent agreement with our analytical prediction. We also find that the mass of the halo that the FOF algorithm selects crucially depends upon mass resolution. We find a percolation-theory-motivated formula that is able to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> correct for the dependence on number of particles for the mock realizations of spherical and triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White halos. However, we show that this correction breaks down when applied to the real cosmological FOF halos due to the presence of substructures. Given that abundance of substructure depends on redshift and cosmology, we expect that the resolution effects due to substructure on the FOF mass and halo mass function will also depend on redshift and cosmology and will be difficult to correct for in general. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the universality of the mass function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">More, Surhud; Kravtsov, Andrey V. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dalal, Neal [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Gottloeber, Stefan, E-mail: surhud@kicp.uchicago.edu [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50719409"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traffic analysis of a mobile cellular system based on a scale-free <span class="hlt">user</span> network and a power-law-distributed mobility model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the traditional study of mobile cellular systems, all <span class="hlt">users</span> are assumed to have the same behavior. They have the same probability of making\\/receiving a call and they will move around the network with identical mobility. In a practical environment, each <span class="hlt">user</span> has a different list of acquaintances including relatives, <span class="hlt">friends</span> and colleagues, with whom the <span class="hlt">user</span> will make contact.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wai M. Tam; F. C. M. Lau; C. K. Tse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ewia.book..169S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Profiles Modeling in Information Retrieval Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The requirements imposed on information retrieval systems are increasing steadily. The vast number of documents in today's large databases and especially on the World Wide Web causes problems when searching for concrete information. It is difficult to find satisfactory information that <span class="hlt">accurately</span> matches <span class="hlt">user</span> information needs even if it is present in the database. One of the key elements when searching the web is proper formulation of <span class="hlt">user</span> queries. Search effectiveness can be seen as the accuracy of matching <span class="hlt">user</span> information needs against the retrieved information. As step towards better search systems represents personalized search based on <span class="hlt">user</span> profiles. Personalized search applications can notably contribute to the improvement of web search effectiveness. This chapter presents design and experiments with an information retrieval system utilizing <span class="hlt">user</span> profiles, fuzzy information retrieval and genetic algorithms for improvement of web search.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Owais, Suhail; Platoš, Jan; Krömer, Pavel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21117983"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Facebook paths to happiness: effects of the number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> and self-presentation on subjective well-being.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current study investigates whether and how Facebook increases college-age <span class="hlt">users</span>' subjective well-being by focusing on the number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> and self-presentation strategies (positive vs. honest). A structural equation modeling analysis of cross-sectional survey data of college student Facebook <span class="hlt">users</span> (N=391) revealed that the number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> had a positive association with subjective well-being, but this association was not mediated by perceived social support. Additionally, we found that there was a negative curvilinear (inverted U-shape curve) relationship between Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> and perceived social support. As for self-presentation strategies, whereas positive self-presentation had a direct effect on subjective well-being, honest self-presentation had a significant indirect effect on subjective well-being through perceived social support. Our study suggests that the number of Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span> and positive self-presentation may enhance <span class="hlt">users</span>' subjective well-being, but this portion of happiness may not be grounded in perceived social support. On the other hand, honest self-presentation may enhance happiness rooted in social support provided by Facebook <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Implications of our findings are discussed in light of affirmation of self-worth, time and effort required for building and maintaining friendships, and the important role played by self-disclosure in signaling one's need for social support. PMID:21117983</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Jong-Eun Roselyn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m762284512315125.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">‘The <span class="hlt">friend</span> of my enemy is my enemy’: Modeling triadic internation relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The evolution of internation relationships is studied by means of a mathematical model based on a popular rule of triadic interaction: “the <span class="hlt">friend</span> of my <span class="hlt">friend</span> is my <span class="hlt">friend</span>, the <span class="hlt">friend</span> of my enemy is my enemy, the enemy of my enemy is my <span class="hlt">friend</span>, the enemy of my <span class="hlt">friend</span> is my enemy”. The rule is shown to lead to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. C. Lee; R. G. Muncaster; D. A. Zinnes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA506296"> <span id="translatedtitle">CAMUS: Automatically Mapping Cyber Assets to Mission and <span class="hlt">Users</span> (PREPRINT).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research advances Cyber Situation Management by proposing methods for automated mapping of Cyber Assets to Missions and <span class="hlt">Users</span> (CAMUS). To enable <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and efficient cyber incident mission impact assessment, a CAMUS ontology that defines entities, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. K. Kopylec J. R. Goodall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=user+AND+experience&id=EJ924422"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">User</span> Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">User</span> experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience and discusses the design of <span class="hlt">user</span> experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience design: (1)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Aaron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22user%22&id=EJ924422"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">User</span> Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">User</span> experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience and discusses the design of <span class="hlt">user</span> experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of <span class="hlt">user</span> experience design: (1)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Aaron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22017080"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can we be (and stay) <span class="hlt">friends</span>? Remaining <span class="hlt">friends</span> after dissolution of a romantic relationship.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although many individuals report being <span class="hlt">friends</span> with their ex-romantic partners (Wilmot, Carbaugh, & Baxter, 1985), the literature regarding post-romantic friendships is very limited. We investigated whether satisfaction in the dissolved romantic relationship could predict post-romantic friendships and friendship maintenance. We found that the more satisfied individuals were during the dissolved romance, the more likely they were to remain <span class="hlt">friends</span> and the more likely they were to engage in friendship maintenance behaviors. We also found that friendship maintenance fully mediated the association between past romantic satisfaction and current friendship satisfaction. PMID:22017080</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bullock, Melinda; Hackathorn, Jana; Clark, Eddie M; Mattingly, Brent A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3373140"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> ab Initio Spin Densities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of ? and ? electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21123695"> <span id="translatedtitle">How <span class="hlt">accurate</span> is peer grading?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously we showed that weekly, written, timed, and peer-graded practice exams help increase student performance on written exams and decrease failure rates in an introductory biology course. Here we analyze the accuracy of peer grading, based on a comparison of student scores to those assigned by a professional grader. When students graded practice exams by themselves, they were significantly easier graders than a professional; overall, students awarded ?25% more points than the professional did. This difference represented ?1.33 points on a 10-point exercise, or 0.27 points on each of the five 2-point questions posed. When students graded practice exams as a group of four, the same student-expert difference occurred. The student-professional gap was wider for questions that demanded higher-order versus lower-order cognitive skills. Thus, students not only have a harder time answering questions on the upper levels of Bloom's taxonomy, they have a harder time grading them. Our results suggest that peer grading may be <span class="hlt">accurate</span> enough for low-risk assessments in introductory biology. Peer grading can help relieve the burden on instructional staff posed by grading written answers-making it possible to add practice opportunities that increase student performance on actual exams. PMID:21123695</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeman, Scott; Parks, John W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2995766"> <span id="translatedtitle">How <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Is Peer Grading?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously we showed that weekly, written, timed, and peer-graded practice exams help increase student performance on written exams and decrease failure rates in an introductory biology course. Here we analyze the accuracy of peer grading, based on a comparison of student scores to those assigned by a professional grader. When students graded practice exams by themselves, they were significantly easier graders than a professional; overall, students awarded ?25% more points than the professional did. This difference represented ?1.33 points on a 10-point exercise, or 0.27 points on each of the five 2-point questions posed. When students graded practice exams as a group of four, the same student-expert difference occurred. The student-professional gap was wider for questions that demanded higher-order versus lower-order cognitive skills. Thus, students not only have a harder time answering questions on the upper levels of Bloom's taxonomy, they have a harder time grading them. Our results suggest that peer grading may be <span class="hlt">accurate</span> enough for low-risk assessments in introductory biology. Peer grading can help relieve the burden on instructional staff posed by grading written answers—making it possible to add practice opportunities that increase student performance on actual exams.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parks, John W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5638..387T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultrahighly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> 3D profilometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed an Ultrahigh-<span class="hlt">Accurate</span> 3-D Profilometer (UA3P), which, using a new, in-house-developed atomic force probe, has an accuracy of 10 nm. It is capable of measuring corners as small as 2 micro meter in radius and can cover an area up to 400 x 400 x 90 (mm), providing a powerful boost to nano-level processing. A commercial product was introduced in 1994. Examples of the key components made possible by this technology include aspherical lenses (used for a Blu-ray Disc device, a next-generation DVD, digital cameras, cellular phones, optical communications), free form lenses (used for frennel lens common to CD and DVD, laser printer lens, multi focus glass lens, cubic phase plate to extend depth of focus), gigabit semiconductor wafers, hard discs, air conditioner scroll vanes, DVC cylinders. The premiere ultra high-precision three-dimensional profilometer delivers superb performance using a variety of micro-measurements for a wide range of applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsutsumi, Hideki; Yoshizumi, Keiichi; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010fgt..book...91W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design of Energy-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Glass Fibers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Incumbent fiberglass compositions rely on decades of commercial experience. From a compositional point of view, many of these melts require more energy than needed in their production, or emit toxic effluents into the environment. This chapter reviews the design of energy- and/or environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> E-glass, HT-glass, ECR-glass, A-glass, and C-glass compositions, which have lower viscosities or fiber-forming temperatures and therefore require less energy in a commercial furnace than the respective incumbent compositions and/or do not contain ingredients which are of environmental concern.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wallenberger, Frederick T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18998524"> <span id="translatedtitle">Workplace lactation program: a nursing <span class="hlt">friendly</span> initiative.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The U.S. is experiencing a nursing shortage that is threatening its quality of healthcare. One contributing factor that has been identified is the level of dissatisfaction that nurses have with their working conditions. Health Services Organizations can use female and family <span class="hlt">friendly</span> initiatives, such as workplace lactation programs to demonstrate that they are willing to support a female employee's task of balancing familial and profession roles. By meeting the needs of breastfeeding mothers, organizations can have a positive impact on employees' levels of satisfaction, which can positively impact recruitment efforts, productivity and retention. PMID:18998524</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Angeletti, Michelle A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.colobustrust.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wakuzulu: <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of the Colobus Trust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wakuzulu: <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of the Colobus Trust is a not-for-profit organization based in Kenya dedicated to the "conservation, preservation, and protection of primates, in particular the Angolan Black and White Colobus monkey." Wakuzulu's extensive homepage features the latest updates on the Colobus population in the Diani area, as well as detailed information about the organization's projects and initiatives. First time visitors may wish to check out the section titled Diani's Primates, which offers an excellent introduction to Colobus monkeys and other species in the area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5814..335C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bayesian Auctions with <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Foes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study auctions whose bidders are embedded in a social or economic network. As a result, even bidders who do not win the auction themselves might derive utility from the auction, namely, when a <span class="hlt">friend</span> wins. On the other hand, when an enemy or competitor wins, a bidder might derive negative utility. Such spite and altruism will alter the bidding strategies. A simple and natural model for bidders’ utilities in these settings posits that the utility of a losing bidder i as a result of bidder j winning is a constant (positive or negative) fraction of bidder j’s utility.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Po-An; Kempe, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17907643"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Natural, normal, and <span class="hlt">friendly</span>, childbirth: homonymous terms].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This qualitative investigation discusses homonymy of the terms natural, normal, and <span class="hlt">friendly</span> childbirth and their effects on childbirth care. Under the perspective of the contemporary cultural theories and gender studies, the Program for Humanizing labor and delivery are analyzed, based on the contents of semi-structured interviews with physicians and nurses of a training hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This article highlights and explores convergences, ambiguities, overlaps, and conflicts among these three delivery types, indicating polysemies, and blurring of boundaries among terms and inside each term, which influence care. PMID:17907643</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dutra, Ivete Lourdes; Meyer, Dagmar Estermann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50900468"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exploring the Social Implications of Location Based Social Networking: An Inquiry into the Perceived Positive and Negative Impacts of Using LBSN between <span class="hlt">Friends</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Location based social networking (LBSN) applications are part of a new suite of emerging social networking tools that run on the Web 2.0 platform. LBSN is the convergence between location based services (LBS) and online social networking (OSN). LBSN applications offer <span class="hlt">users</span> the ability to look up the location of another “<span class="hlt">friend</span>” remotely using a smart phone, desktop or other</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarah Jean Fusco; Katina Michael; M. G. Michael; Roba Abbas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1240244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some thoughts on emulating jitter for <span class="hlt">user</span> experience trials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is usually hard to control the network conditions affecting public online game servers when studying the impact of latency, loss and jitter on <span class="hlt">user</span> experience. This leads to a natural desire for running <span class="hlt">user</span>-experience trials under controlled network conditions, and hence a requirement for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> (or at least predictable) emulation of IP level latency, loss and jitter on a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grenville J. Armitage; Lawrence Stewart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56901095"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulating simple <span class="hlt">user</span> behavior for system effectiveness evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Information retrieval effectiveness evaluation typically takes one of two forms: batch experiments based on static test collections, or lab studies measuring actual <span class="hlt">users</span> interacting with a system. Test collection experiments are sometimes viewed as introducing too many simplifying assumptions to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predict the usefulness of a system to its <span class="hlt">users</span>. As a result, there is great interest in creating test</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben Carterette; Evangelos Kanoulas; Emine Yilmaz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27080729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic energy exposure of simulated <span class="hlt">users</span> of portable cellular telephones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes a method to quantify the RF exposure of the <span class="hlt">users</span> of portable cellular phones in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR). The method involves a robotic system to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> position an isotropic E-field probe within equivalent biological tissue. The <span class="hlt">user</span> of cellular phones is simulated by a simple human model (a phantom) consisting of a thin shell of fibreglass</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quirino Balzano; Oscar Garay; Thomas J. Manning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic&pg=4&id=EJ864859"> <span id="translatedtitle">Organic Foods: Do Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Attitudes Predict Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Behaviors?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether student awareness and attitudes about organic foods would predict their behaviors with regard to organic food consumption and other healthy lifestyle practices. A secondary purpose was to determine whether attitudes about similar eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> practices would result in socially conscious…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dahm, Molly J.; Samonte, Aurelia V.; Shows, Amy R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic+AND+food&id=EJ864859"> <span id="translatedtitle">Organic Foods: Do Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Attitudes Predict Eco-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Behaviors?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether student awareness and attitudes about organic foods would predict their behaviors with regard to organic food consumption and other healthy lifestyle practices. A secondary purpose was to determine whether attitudes about similar eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> practices would result in socially…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dahm, Molly J.; Samonte, Aurelia V.; Shows, Amy R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Bros%22&id=EJ542918"> <span id="translatedtitle">"<span class="hlt">Friends</span> Aren't <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, Homes": A Working Vocabulary for Referring to "Rolldogs" and "Chuchos."</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Analyzes various apparently synonymous words for "<span class="hlt">friend</span>" (e.g., "homes,""bro") as they are used by one former gang-member to persuade two current gang-members to stop "gangbanging." The article's analysis shows how the meanings of these disparate reference terms are made and remade through talk as conversationalists use these words to express…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rymes, Betsy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36836972"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competition Between <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: The Joint Influence of the Perceived Power of Self, <span class="hlt">Friends</span>, and Parents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prior research has shown that parents who have low perceived social power make exaggerated use of power-oriented interaction strategies with children. In this study, the authors made predictions regarding (a) the presence of equivalent effects with children and (b) the intergenerational transmission of perceived power. The interactions of children (ages 6–10) and their <span class="hlt">friends</span> were observed following a potentially competitive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daphne Blunt Bugental; Gabriela Martorell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/690194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fuzzy Matching of <span class="hlt">User</span> Profiles for a Banner Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Most advertisement systems widely used in Internet try to improve advertisement process by targeting specific groups of potential\\u000a customers. Many systems exploit the information directly provided by the <span class="hlt">user</span> and the data collected by monitoring <span class="hlt">user</span> activities\\u000a in order to built <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">user</span> profiles, which determines the success of the advertisement process.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a This paper presents a solution to the problem</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alfredo Milani; Chiara Morici; Radoslaw Niewiadomski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4511302P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of Hot Jupiters: NIRSPEC Survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous surveys have shown that half of all stars occur in binary systems. Although most exoplanet surveys exclude systems with known binary companions, it is likely that many known planetary systems contain distant, low-mass stellar companions that went unnoticed in the initial survey selection. Such companions may have important effects on the formation and migration of planets (and especially hot Jupiters) around the primary star via three-body interactions such as Kozai-driven migration. The Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span> project uses three observing techniques to make a robust determination of the occurrence rate of exoplanets in binary systems: radial velocity monitoring, adaptive optics imaging (see presentation on the AO Survey by H. Ngo et al.), and near-infrared spectroscopy. In this presentation, we focus on the results of the spectroscopy portion of the Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span> project. Using NIRSPEC at Keck Observatory, we have obtained high-resolution spectra of roughly fifty exoplanet-hosting stars near 2.3 microns, where low-mass companions will show deep CO absorption features superimposed on the primary stellar spectrum. This method allows for the detection of binary companions located within 50 to 200 AU of the host star. At this location, such a binary companion could conceivably influence the formation and migration of exoplanets orbiting the main star. We describe our method for removing the signal due to the main-sequence FGK host stars and searching for the distinctive spectral features of a low-mass stellar companion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piskorz, Danielle; Knutson, H. A.; Muirhead, P. S.; Batygin, K.; Crepp, J. R.; Hinkley, S.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Morton, T. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5727..838R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social Circles: A 3D <span class="hlt">User</span> Interface for Facebook</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Online social network services are increasingly popular web applications which display large amounts of rich multimedia content: contacts, status updates, photos and event information. Arguing that this quantity of information overwhelms conventional <span class="hlt">user</span> interfaces, this paper presents Social Circles, a rich interactive visualization designed to support real world <span class="hlt">users</span> of social network services in everyday tasks such as keeping up with <span class="hlt">friends</span> and organizing their network. It achieves this by using 3D UIs, fluid animations and a spatial metaphor to enable direct manipulation of a social network.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodrigues, Diego; Oakley, Ian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23743351"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of receiving a rape disclosure: college <span class="hlt">friends</span>' stories.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Research suggests that college women are at greater risk for rape and sexual assault than women in the general population or in a comparable age group. College women, away from home and family, may turn to <span class="hlt">friends</span> for support. <span class="hlt">Friends</span> may experience emotional reactions that affect their own functioning and may not feel they have anywhere to turn. In this study, we interviewed male and female college students who had received a rape disclosure from a <span class="hlt">friend</span>. Their unique stories provide insight into the secondary effects of rape disclosure on <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Implications of these findings for college campuses are discussed. PMID:23743351</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Branch, Kathryn A; Richards, Tara N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4436002"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span>-Generated Content</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pervasive <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated content takes the traditional idea of <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated content and expands it off the desktop into our everyday world. The six articles in this special issue give innovative examples of gathering and using such content.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Krumm; Nigel Davies; Chandra Narayanaswami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N9621456"> <span id="translatedtitle">TIA Software <span class="hlt">User</span>'s Manual.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual describes the installation and operation of TIA, the Thermal-Imaging acquisition and processing Application, developed by the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. TIA is a <span class="hlt">user</span> fr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. E. Cramer H. I. Syed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23374563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Viscosity and thermal conductivity of some refrigerants at moderate and high densities on the basis of Rainwater–<span class="hlt">Friend</span> theory and the corresponding states principle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The initial density dependence of viscosity and thermal conductivity was formulated on the basis of Rainwater–<span class="hlt">Friend</span> (RF) theory. In this work, we have first focused on the calculation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of moderately dense argon by using RF theory and an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> ab initio potential function. This theory which was originally presented for spherical potentials have been adapted</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tayebeh Hosseinnejad; Hassan Behnejad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21677055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> techniques for assessment of biomarkers of nutrition for development.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whereas cost-effective interventions exist for the control of micronutrient malnutrition (MN), in low-resource settings field-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> tools to assess the effect of these interventions are underutilized or not readily available where they are most needed. Conventional approaches for MN measurement are expensive and require relatively sophisticated laboratory instrumentation, skilled technicians, good infrastructure, and reliable sources of clean water and electricity. Consequently, there is a need to develop and introduce innovative tools that are appropriate for MN assessment in low-resource settings. These diagnostics should be cost-effective, simple to perform, robust, <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, and capable of being performed with basic laboratory equipment. Currently, such technologies either do not exist or have been applied to the assessment of a few micronutrients. In the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), a few such examples for which "biomarkers" of nutrition development have been assessed in low-resource settings using field-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> approaches are hemoglobin (anemia), retinol-binding protein (vitamin A), and iron (transferrin receptor). In all of these examples, samples were collected mainly by nonmedical staff and analyses were conducted in the survey country by technicians from the local health or research facilities. This article provides information on how the DHS has been able to successfully adapt field-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> techniques in challenging environments in population-based surveys for the assessment of micronutrient deficiencies. Special emphasis is placed on sample collection, processing, and testing in relation to the availability of local technology, resources, and capacity. PMID:21677055</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garrett, Dean A; Sangha, Jasbir K; Kothari, Monica T; Boyle, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48140916"> <span id="translatedtitle">Working with <span class="hlt">Users</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a <span class="hlt">Users</span> are the reason for using Drupal. Drupal can help <span class="hlt">users</span> create, collaborate, communicate, and form an online community.\\u000a In this chapter, we look behind the scenes and see how <span class="hlt">users</span> are authenticated, logged in, and represented internally. We\\u000a start with an examination of what the $<span class="hlt">user</span> object is and how it’s constructed. Then we walk through the process of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John K. VanDyk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/302029"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aztec <span class="hlt">User</span>'s Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aztec is an iterative library that greatly simplifies the parallelization process whensolving the linear systems of equations Ax = b where A is a <span class="hlt">user</span> supplied n \\\\Theta n sparsematrix, b is a <span class="hlt">user</span> supplied vector of length n and x is a vector of length n to becomputed. Aztec is intended as a software tool for <span class="hlt">users</span> who want</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John N. Shadid; Ray S. Tuminaro; Scott A. Hutchinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12867755"> <span id="translatedtitle">End <span class="hlt">User</span> Software Engineering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, researchers have been working to bring the benefits of rigorous software engineering meth- odologies to end <span class="hlt">users</span> who find themselves in pro- gramming situations, to try to make their software more reliable. End <span class="hlt">users</span> create software whenever they write, for instance, educational simulations, spreadsheets, or dynamic e-business web applica- tions. Unfortunately, errors are pervasive in end- <span class="hlt">user</span> software, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrew J. Ko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23386521"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Fostering a breastfeeding-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> workplace].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creating supportive environments that encourage mothers to breastfeed their children has emerged in recent years as a key health issue for women and children. Taiwan has a large and still growing number of new mothers in the workplace. Early postpartum return to work and inconvenient workplace conditions often discourage women from breastfeeding or cause early discontinuation. This study describes the current status of worksite breastfeeding-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> policies in Taiwan and selected other countries and assesses the effects of work-related factors on working mother breastfeeding behavior. Although maternity leave has been positively correlated with breastfeeding duration, maternity leave in Taiwan remains significantly shorter than in other countries. Flexible working conditions, the provision of lactation rooms, and support from colleagues are critical components of promoting breastfeeding in the workplace. PMID:23386521</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23472605"> <span id="translatedtitle">Christian Raetz: scientist and <span class="hlt">friend</span> extraordinaire.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chris Raetz passed away on August 16, 2011, still at the height of his productive years. His seminal contributions to biomedical research were in the genetics, biochemistry, and structural biology of phospholipid and lipid A biosynthesis in Escherichia coli and other gram-negative bacteria. He defined the catalytic properties and structures of many of the enzymes responsible for the "Raetz pathway for lipid A biosynthesis." His deep understanding of chemistry, coupled with knowledge of medicine, biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology, formed the underpinnings for his contributions to the lipid field. He displayed an intense passion for science and a broad interest that came from a strong commitment to curiosity-driven research, a commitment he imparted to his mentees and colleagues. What follows is a testament to both Chris's science and humanity from his <span class="hlt">friends</span> and colleagues. PMID:23472605</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dowhan, William; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Stubbe, JoAnne; Kozarich, John W; Wickner, William T; Russell, David W; Garrett, Teresa A; Brozek, Kathryn; Modrich, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11233818"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dimethylcarbonate for eco-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> methylation reactions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dimethylcarbonate (DMC), an environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> substitute for dimethylsulfate and methyl halides in methylation reactions, is a very selective reagent. Both under gas-liquid phase transfer catalysis (GL-PTC) and under batch conditions, with potassium carbonate as the catalyst, the reactions of DMC with methylene-active compounds (arylacetonitriles and arylacetoesters, aroxyacetonitriles and methyl aroxyacetates, benzylaryl- and alkylarylsulphones) produce monomethylated derivatives, with a selectivity not previously observed (i.e., >99%). The highly selective O-methylation of phenols and p-cresols by DMC is also attained by a new methodology using a continuous fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) filled with a catalytic bed of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) and potassium carbonate. PMID:11233818</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Memoli, S; Selva, M; Tundo, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.oandplibrary.org/poi/pdf/1987_02_098.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technical note Splinting for CDH—initial impressions of a '<span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>' alternative</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A lightweight, washable, and easily adjusted splint for the congenitally dislocated hip, designed to improve maternal compliance, is described. Observations are currently scientifi­ cally uncontrolled, though initial impressions are favourable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. N. VILLAR; P. M. SCOTT; A. RONEN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3658656"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splinting for CDH--initial impressions of a '<span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>' alternative.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A lightweight, washable, and easily adjusted splint for the congenitally dislocated hip, designed to improve maternal compliance, is described. Observations are currently scientifically uncontrolled, though initial impressions are favourable. PMID:3658656</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Villar, R N; Scott, P M; Ronen, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14608609"> <span id="translatedtitle">A practical and <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> toxicity classification system with microbiotests for natural waters and wastewaters.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various types of toxicity classification systems have been elaborated by scientists in different countries, with the aim of attributing a hazard score to polluted environments or toxic wastewaters or of ranking them in accordance with increasing levels of toxicity. All these systems are based on batteries of standard acute toxicity tests (several of them including chronic assays as well) and are therefore dependent on the culturing and maintenance of live stocks of test organisms. Most systems require performance of the bioassays on dilution series of the original samples, for subsequent calculation of L(E)C50 or threshold toxicity values. Given the complexity and costs of these toxicity measurements, they can only be applied in well-equipped and highly specialized laboratories, and none of the classification methods so far has found general acceptance at the international level. The development of microbiotests that are independent of continuous culturing of live organisms has stimulated international collaboration. Coordinated at Ghent University, Belgium, collaboration by research groups from 10 countries in central and eastern Europe resulted in an alternative toxicity classification system that was easier to apply and substantially more cost effective than any of the earlier methods. This new system was developed and applied in the framework of a cooperation agreement between the Flemish community in Belgium and central and eastern Europe. The toxicity classification system is based on a battery of (culture-independent) microbiotests and is particularly suited for routine monitoring. It indeed only requires testing on undiluted samples of natural waters or wastewaters discharged into the aquatic environment, except for wastewaters that demonstrate more than 50% effect. The scoring system ranks the waters or wastewaters in 5 classes of increasing hazard/toxicity, with calculation of a weight factor for the concerned hazard/toxicity class. The new classification system was applied during 2000 by the participating laboratories on samples of river water, groundwaters, drinking waters, mine waters, sediment pore waters, industrial effluents, soil leachates, and waste dump leachates and was found to be easy to apply and reliable. PMID:14608609</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Persoone, Guido; Marsalek, Blahoslav; Blinova, Irina; Törökne, Andrea; Zarina, Dzidra; Manusadzianas, Levonas; Nalecz-Jawecki, Grzegorz; Tofan, Lucica; Stepanova, Nadejda; Tothova, Livia; Kolar, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39318985"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> web mapping: lessons from a citizen science website</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Citizen science websites are emerging as a common way for volunteers to collect and report geographic ecological data. Engaging the public in citizen science is challenging and, when involving online participation, data entry, and map use, becomes even more daunting. Given these new challenges, citizen science websites must be easy to use, result in positive overall satisfaction for many different</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greg Newman; Don Zimmerman; Alycia Crall; Melinda Laituri; Jim Graham; Linda Stapel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=RHO+AND+factor&pg=3&id=ED355281"> <span id="translatedtitle">Scale-Free Nonparametric Factor Analysis: A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Introduction with Concrete Heuristic Examples.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Most researchers using factor analysis extract factors from a matrix of Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. A method is presented for extracting factors in a non-parametric way, by extracting factors from a matrix of Spearman rho (rank correlation) coefficients. It is possible to factor analyze a matrix of association such that…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mittag, Kathleen Cage</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+AND+intervention&pg=6&id=EJ820545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early Intervention Evaluation Reports: Guidelines for Writing <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> and Strength-Based Assessments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Assessment and evaluation activities are an integral part of early intervention services. These activities culminate in written evaluation reports that include information such as observations of skills and deficits, diagnosis, and recommendations for intervention. However, few guidelines exist to help guide early intervention providers in writing…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Towle, Patricia; Farrell, Anne F.; Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..DFDS12006G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development and testing of a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> Matlab interface for the JHU turbulence database system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the challenges that faces researchers today is the ability to store large scale data sets in a way that promotes easy access to the data and sharing among the research community. A public turbulence database cluster has been constructed in which 27 terabytes of a direct numerical simulation of isotropic turbulence is stored (Li et al., 2008, JoT). The public database provides researchers the ability to retrieve subsets of the spatiotemporal data remotely from a client machine anywhere over the internet. In addition to C and Fortran client interfaces, we now present a new Matlab interface based on Matlab's intrinsic SOAP functions. The Matlab interface provides the benefit of a high-level programming language with a plethora of intrinsic functions and toolboxes. In this talk, we will discuss several aspects of the Matlab interface including its development, optimization, usage, and application to the isotropic turbulence data. We will demonstrate several examples (visualizations, statistical analysis, etc) which illustrate the tool.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graham, Jason; Frederix, Edo; Meneveau, Charles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/36071000/Publications/Zhu170812_2004_Driftsim.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">DRIFTSIM -- A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Computer Program to Predict Drift Distances of Droplets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Visual BASIC language computer program (DRIFTSIM) in Windows Version was developed to rapidly estimate the mean drift distances of discrete sizes of water droplets discharged from atomizers on field sprayers. This program interpolates values from a large data base of drift distances originally calculated for single droplets with a flow simulation program (FLUENT). The simulations of drift distances up</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heping Zhu; Robert D. Fox; H. Erdal Ozkan; Richard C. Derksen; Charles R. Krause</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27342488"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> calibration system for bicycle ergometers, home trainers and bicycle power monitoring devices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, a new system for the calibration of bicycle ergometers, home trainers and bicycle power monitoring devices\\u000a is described. This system contains a portable calibration rig as well as a specialised calibration software and is designed\\u000a for easy and efficient use directly on-site by non-expert personnel. Key features of the calibration rig include a cradle\\u000a used to implement</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jean-Marc Drouet; Yvan Champoux; François Bergeron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2832254"> <span id="translatedtitle">CORNET: A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Tool for Data Mining and Integration1[W</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As an overwhelming amount of functional genomics data have been generated, the retrieval, integration, and interpretation of these data need to be facilitated to enable the advance of (systems) biological research. For example, gathering and processing microarray data that are related to a particular biological process is not straightforward, nor is the compilation of protein-protein interactions from numerous partially overlapping databases identified through diverse approaches. However, these tasks are inevitable to address the following questions. Does a group of differentially expressed genes show similar expression in diverse microarray experiments? Was an identified protein-protein interaction previously detected by other approaches? Are the interacting proteins encoded by genes with similar expression profiles and localization? We developed CORNET (for CORrelation NETworks) as an access point to transcriptome, protein interactome, and localization data and functional information on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). It consists of two flexible and versatile tools, namely the coexpression tool and the protein-protein interaction tool. The ability to browse and search microarray experiments using ontology terms and the incorporation of personal microarray data are distinctive features of the microarray repository. The coexpression tool enables either the alternate or simultaneous use of diverse expression compendia, whereas the protein-protein interaction tool searches experimentally and computationally identified protein-protein interactions. Different search options are implemented to enable the construction of coexpression and/or protein-protein interaction networks centered around multiple input genes or proteins. Moreover, networks and associated evidence are visualized in Cytoscape. Localization is visualized in pie charts, thereby allowing multiple localizations per protein. CORNET is available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/cornet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Bodt, Stefanie; Carvajal, Diana; Hollunder, Jens; Van den Cruyce, Joost; Movahedi, Sara; Inze, Dirk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA548186"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Tool for Evaluationg the Thermal Response of High Power Battery Packaging Alternatives.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Latest generation of high power battery cells are often comprised of multiple alternating layers of anode, cathode, separator and electrolyte. Macroscopically, battery cores represent an orthotropic material subject to a time variant heat source. Safety a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Frazier J. Mendoza S. Jones S. Zanardelli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14576137"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developing <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> spatial statistical analysis modules for GIS: An example using ArcView</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although it is generally agreed that geographic information systems (GIS) should include more statistical analysis functionalities, the issues of which functionalities should be included and how to integrate statistical analysis with GIS are still widely debated. This paper, based on a brief review of what has been done in this area, points out that it is necessary and worthwhile to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhiqiang Zhang; Daniel A. Griffith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053712"> <span id="translatedtitle">CORNET: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> tool for data mining and integration.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As an overwhelming amount of functional genomics data have been generated, the retrieval, integration, and interpretation of these data need to be facilitated to enable the advance of (systems) biological research. For example, gathering and processing microarray data that are related to a particular biological process is not straightforward, nor is the compilation of protein-protein interactions from numerous partially overlapping databases identified through diverse approaches. However, these tasks are inevitable to address the following questions. Does a group of differentially expressed genes show similar expression in diverse microarray experiments? Was an identified protein-protein interaction previously detected by other approaches? Are the interacting proteins encoded by genes with similar expression profiles and localization? We developed CORNET (for CORrelation NETworks) as an access point to transcriptome, protein interactome, and localization data and functional information on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). It consists of two flexible and versatile tools, namely the coexpression tool and the protein-protein interaction tool. The ability to browse and search microarray experiments using ontology terms and the incorporation of personal microarray data are distinctive features of the microarray repository. The coexpression tool enables either the alternate or simultaneous use of diverse expression compendia, whereas the protein-protein interaction tool searches experimentally and computationally identified protein-protein interactions. Different search options are implemented to enable the construction of coexpression and/or protein-protein interaction networks centered around multiple input genes or proteins. Moreover, networks and associated evidence are visualized in Cytoscape. Localization is visualized in pie charts, thereby allowing multiple localizations per protein. CORNET is available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/cornet. PMID:20053712</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Bodt, Stefanie; Carvajal, Diana; Hollunder, Jens; Van den Cruyce, Joost; Movahedi, Sara; Inzé, Dirk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22832412"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creating staff confidence in distinguishing between performance improvement and research studies: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> worksheet.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an era when emphasis is placed on implementing quality improvement and research initiatives promoting quality patient care, confusion often exists about the differences between research and performance improvement. The authors discuss the construction of a performance improvement/research differentiation form, a decision-making tool designed to assist nurses distinguish between these processes and inform them about the regulatory requirements to protect the rights and interests of patients. PMID:22832412</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryan, Marybeth; Rosario, Roxanne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4754746"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inferring population history with DIY ABC: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> approach to approximate Bayesian computation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary: Genetic data obtained on population samples convey information about their evolutionary history. Inference methods can extract part of this information but they require sophisticated sta- tistical techniques that have been made available to the biologist community (through computer programs) only for simple and stan- dard situations typically involving a small number of samples. We propose here a computer program</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jean-Marie Cornuet; Filipe Santos; Mark A. Beaumont; Christian P. Robert; Jean-Michel Marin; David J. Balding; Thomas Guillemaud; Arnaud Estoup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fda.gov/food/newsevents/constituentupdates/ucm213116.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Reportable Food Registry Now Part of FDA ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://google2.fda.gov/search?client=FDAgov&site=FDAgov&lr=&proxystylesheet=FDAgov&output=xml_no_dtd&&proxycustom=%3CADVANCED/%3E">Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... is a reasonable probability that an article of food or animal feed will cause serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals; ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/newsevents/constituentupdates</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50402207"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental approaches to <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> audio visual contents for the elderly people</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent digital media technologies have especially promoted remarkable growth in the home environment that makes new pleasure of audio and visual contents in our life. We can watch and enjoy the various kinds of audio and visual contents in our home. However, for the elderly people, there are some difficulties, based on aging effect of human sensory mechanism, in perceiving</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yohei Sugawara; Mie Sato; Toshiaki Sugihara; Masao Kasuga</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35073864"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-friendly</span>, miniature biosensor flow cell for fragile high fundamental frequency quartz crystal resonators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the application of high fundamental frequency (HFF) quartz crystal resonators as ultra sensitive acoustic biosensors, a tailor-made quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) flow cell has been fabricated and tested. The cell permits an equally fast and easy installation and replacement of small and fragile HFF sensors. Usability and simple fabrication are two central features of the HFF-QCM flow cell. Mechanical,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brigitte P. Sagmeister; Ingrid M. Graz; Reinhard Schwödiauer; Hermann Gruber; Siegfried Bauer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/896224"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> End Station at the ALS for Nanostructure Characterization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a construction project for an end station at the ALS, which is optimized for measuring NEXAFS of nanostructures with fluorescence detection. Compared to the usual electron yield detection, fluorescence is able to probe buried structures and is sensitive to dilute species, such as nanostructures supported on a substrate. Since the quantum yield for fluorescence is 10{sup -4}-10{sup -5} times smaller than for electrons in the soft x-ray regime, such an end station requires bright undulator beamlines at the ALS. In order to optimize the setup for a wide range of applications, two end stations were built: (1) A simple, mobile chamber with efficient photon detection (>10{sup 4} times the solid angle collection of fluorescence spectrographs) and a built-in magnet for MCD measurements at EPU beamlines (Fig. 1 left). It allows rapid mapping the electronic states of nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanowires, tailored magnetic materials, buried interfaces, biologically-functionalized surfaces). It was used with BL 8.0 (linear polarized undulator) and BL 4.0 (variable polarization). (2) A sophisticated, stationary end station operating at Beamline 8.0 (Fig. 1 right). It contains an array of surface characterization instruments and a micro-focus capability for scanning across graded samples (wedges for thickness variation, stoichiometry gradients, and general variations of the sample preparation conditions for optimizing nanostructures).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. J. Himpsel; P. Alivisatos; T. Callcott; J. Carlisle; J. D. Denlinger; D. E. Eastman; D. Ederer; Z. Hussain; L.J. Terminello; T. Van Buuren; R. S. Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Plasmid+AND+DNA&id=EJ569347"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Time-Efficient and <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Method for Plasmid DNA Restriction Analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes an experiment in which plasmid DNA is digested with restriction enzymes that cleave the plasmid either once or twice. The DNA is stained, loaded on a gel, electrophoresed, and viewed under normal laboratory conditions during electrophoresis. (DDR)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaBanca, Frank; Berg, Claire M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/672061"> <span id="translatedtitle">In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As more and more Intelligent Transportation System in-vehicle equipment enters the general consumer market, the authors are about to find out how different design engineers are from ordinary drivers. Driver information systems are being developed and installed in vehicles at an ever-increasing rate. These systems provide information on diverse topics of concern and convenience to the driver, such as routing and navigation, emergency and collision warnings, and a variety of motorists services, or yellow pages functions. Most of these systems are being developed and installed in isolation from each other, with separate means of gathering the information and of displaying it to the driver. The current lack of coordination among on-board systems threatens to create a situation in which different messages on separate displays will be competing with each other for the drivers attention. Urgent messages may go unnoticed, and the number of messages may distract the driver from the most critical task of controlling the vehicle. Thus, without good human factors design and engineering for integrating multiple systems in the vehicle, consumers may find ITS systems confusing and frustrating to use. The current state of the art in human factors research and design for in-vehicle systems has a number of fundamental gaps. Some of these gaps were identified during the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative Human Factors Technology Workshop, sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, in Troy, Michigan, December 10--11, 1997. One task for workshop participants was to identify needed research areas or topics relating to in-vehicle human factors. The top ten unmet research needs from this workshop are presented. Many of these gaps in human factors research knowledge indicate the need for standardization in the functioning of interfaces for safety-related devices such as collision avoidance systems (CAS) and adaptive cruise controls (ACC). Such standards and guidelines will serve to make the safety-critical aspects of these systems consistent across different manufacturers, thereby reducing the likelihood of driver surprise. A second area to emerge from the Workshop concerns research into techniques for integrating multiple devices in vehicles. This type of research is needed to support the development and validation of standards and guidelines, and is discussed in the second section. The majority of the top ten research types identified in the Workshop fall under the need for a Science of Driving, which is discussed in the last section of this paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spelt, P.F.; Scott, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/crumpet/docs/papers/3g2001-crumpet.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CRUMPET: CREATION OF <span class="hlt">USER-FRIENDLY</span> MOBILE SERVICES PERSONALISED FOR TOURISM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">More and more people combine several purposes with travelling, such as business, leisure, entertainment, and education. Such people may not have time to pre-plan a travel schedule in detail. They need location-aware in- formation about the destination domain and expect in- dividualised information and services. The EU funded research project CRUMPET addresses these factors and will provide new information delivery</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefan Poslad; Heimo Laamanen; Rainer Malaka; Achim Nick; Phil Buckle; Alexander Zipf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+education+AND+toys&pg=6&id=EJ473197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Games Children Play: Playthings as <span class="hlt">User</span> <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Aids for Learning in Art Appreciation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Elementary school art history lessons may be aided by the use of everyday games and playthings, such as jigsaw puzzles, board games, card games, puppets, and dolls, that have been altered to include an art history overlay. Such activities should help children better understand art and encourage them to talk about art. Specific examples of such…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Payne, Margaret</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lang&pg=6&id=EJ369047"> <span id="translatedtitle">UNH Project DISCovery: A <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Narrative of the Journey from Angst to Author.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes the development and implementation of computer software for use in the University of New Hampshire's foreign language programs, covering the evaluation of commercial software and faculty members' use of the MacLang authoring program to create their own software. (CB)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trufant, Laurie; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27113490"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPSLIFE: A <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> approach to the structural design and life assessment of ceramic components</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to expedite the structural analysis of ceramic components, Sundstrand Power Systems has developed a proprietary computer code called SPSLIFE, which can substantially reduce the time spent on the design assessment of ceramic components. The life assessment computations for the various failure modes are performed using the structural analysis and materials files as input data. A number of menus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Bornemisza; A. Saith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE96050541"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conceptual design for a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we present a conceptual design for a general-purpose adaptive optics system, usable with all Cassegrain facility instruments on the 3 meter Shane telescope at the University of California's Lick Observatory located on Mt. Hamilton near San ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. D. Bissinger S. Olivier C. Max</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=physical+AND+therapy+AND+motivations&pg=2&id=ED408529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tough Kids, Cool Counseling: <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Approaches with Challenging Youth.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|All too frequently, young people resist counseling efforts. Some ways to foster a positive therapeutic relationship with young, resistant clients are described in this book. The text promotes a relationship-oriented approach, exploring ways in which counselors can capture the interest, attention, and motivation of these clients. The volume is…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sommers-Flanagan, John; Sommers-Flanagan, Rita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=law&pg=4&id=EJ875239"> <span id="translatedtitle">Copyright Renewal for Libraries: Seven Steps toward a <span class="hlt">User-Friendly</span> Law</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Copyright law is a source of a great deal of bewilderment and frustration to academic librarians. Beyond the basics of copyright protection and fair use, most librarians struggle to grasp the complexity of the law and the roadblocks it presents to access and use. This article attempts to elucidate some of those complexities by suggesting seven…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, Kevin L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/481045"> <span id="translatedtitle">LibGA: a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> workbench for order-based genetic algorithm research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the years there haa been several packages developed that provide a workbench for genetic algorithm (GA) research. Most of these packages use the generational model inspired by GEN ESIS. A few have adopted the steady-state model used in Genitor. Unfortunately, they have some deficiencies when working with orderhsed problems such as packing, routing, and scheduling. This paper describes LibGA,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arthur L. Corcoran; Roger L. Wainwright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1542.1027P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preparation and characterisation of <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> PMMA microcapsules for consumer care</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A flat membrane combined with a mechanical stirrer has been used to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microcapsules containing an oil-based active ingredient. A florescence dye pyrromethene 546 was added in the liquid core in order to measure the shell thickness of microcapsules using confocal laser scanning microscopy under a fluorescence condition. The size distribution of the formed microcapsules was measured by a static light scattering (SLS) technique. The mechanical properties of the microcapsules were studied using a micromanipulation technique based on compression of single microcapsules between two parallel surfaces and finite element modelling (FEM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, Xuemiao; Mercade-prieto, Ruben; York, David; Preece, Jon A.; Zhang, Zhibing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/565626"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOSFAC2 <span class="hlt">user`s</span> guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes the DOSFAC2 code, which is used for generating dose-to-source conversion factors for the MACCS2 code. DOSFAC2 is a revised and updated version of the DOSFAC code that was distributed with version 1.5.11 of the MACCS code. included are (1) an overview and background of DOSFAC2, (2) a summary of two new functional capabilities, and (3) a <span class="hlt">user`s</span> guide. 20 refs., 5 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, M.L.; Chanin, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22957942"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relocating from out-of-area treatments: service <span class="hlt">users</span>' perspective.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Asylum closures over recent decades resulted in mental health services being increasingly sited in the community. However, under provision of highly supported accommodation led to service <span class="hlt">users</span> being placed away from their local area in 'out-of-area treatments' (OATs). OATs have raised major concerns in relation to enabling service <span class="hlt">users</span>' recovery, owing to limitations in promoting autonomy, social dislocation and costs. In 2004, an OATs project was set up in a London Borough to address these concerns. In the first 4 years, the project succeeded in relocating 22 service <span class="hlt">users</span> to less restrictive environments locally. This study aims to explore the outcome of relocation from service <span class="hlt">users</span>' perspective. A qualitative methodology was utilized. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with seven service <span class="hlt">users</span> who relocated. All seven service <span class="hlt">users</span> shared a strong aspiration for independent living but there was associated loneliness. Five welcomed increased contact with family and <span class="hlt">friends</span>, but lacked social confidence, inhibiting social inclusion. Service <span class="hlt">users</span> with long-term and consistent care managers were more able to address fears. Five out of seven service <span class="hlt">users</span> concluded that relocation increased their autonomy thus enhanced their quality of life. PMID:22957942</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rambarran, D D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prosocial+AND+effects+AND+on+AND+children&pg=3&id=EJ991786"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Little Help from My <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: Creating Socially Supportive Schools</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Students get by with a little help from their <span class="hlt">friends</span>; students try with a little help from their <span class="hlt">friends</span>. When their social needs are met, students tend to be better adjusted and perform more effectively in school. A strong social network serves to protect students and mitigates the effects of a variety of risk factors. Due to the rich empirical…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sulkowski, Michael L.; Demaray, Michelle K.; Lazarus, Philip J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36091542"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shopping with <span class="hlt">friends</span> and teens’ susceptibility to peer influence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">While some retailers may discourage groups of teenagers from shopping in their stores, there is reason to believe that peer groups may affect teen behaviors and evaluations in ways that could benefit retailers. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of teenagers’ shopping with <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and, in particular, whether shopping with <span class="hlt">friends</span> might enhance teens’ attitudes toward retailing and their</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamara F Mangleburg; Patricia M Doney; Terry Bristol</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57714094"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying and Explicating Variation among <span class="hlt">Friends</span> with Benefits Relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This two-study report identifies and validates a typology containing seven types of “<span class="hlt">friends</span> with benefits relationships” (FWBRs). Study 1 asked heterosexual students to define the term FWBR and to describe their experience with the relationship type. Qualitative analysis of these data identified seven types of FWBRs (true <span class="hlt">friends</span>, network opportunism, just sex, three types of transition in [successful, failed, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul A. Mongeau; Kendra Knight; Jade Williams; Jennifer Eden; Christina Shaw</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=evolution+AND+important&pg=7&id=EJ954064"> <span id="translatedtitle">Academic Achievement and Its Impact on <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Academic achievement in adolescence is a key determinant of future educational and occupational success. <span class="hlt">Friends</span> play an important role in the educational process. They provide support and resources and can both encourage and discourage academic achievement. As a result, the <span class="hlt">friends</span> adolescents make may help to maintain and exacerbate inequality…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Flashman, Jennifer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acquaintances+AND+friends&pg=4&id=EJ324263"> <span id="translatedtitle">Persuasive Appeals and Responses to Appeals among <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Acquaintances.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Examined persuasive appeals and responses to appeals among kindergarten, second-, and fourth-grade <span class="hlt">friends</span> and acquaintances. Also evaluated social perspective-taking, friendship, and self-interest reasoning as predictors of appeals and responses. Children, paired with a <span class="hlt">friend</span> or an acquaintance, participated in a task designed to examine…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jones, Diane Carlson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acquaintances+AND+friends&pg=4&id=EJ458113"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preschoolers' Differential Conflict Behavior with <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Acquaintances.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Examined social conflict in preschoolers' play. When children resolved conflicts, they behaved differently with <span class="hlt">friends</span> than with acquaintances. Conciliatory gestures were used more often with <span class="hlt">friends</span> than with acquaintances. The overwhelming majority of conflicts were resolved by children yielding to other children. (BG)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vespo, Jo Ellen; Caplan, Marlene</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=twitter&pg=5&id=EJ850543"> <span id="translatedtitle">Working the Social: Twitter and <span class="hlt">Friend</span>Feed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Information overload is so five years ago, but the problem it describes is all too real. Fortunately, there's hope yet for the savvy librarian: Twitter and <span class="hlt">Friend</span>Feed turn information dissemination on its head, using <span class="hlt">friends</span> and subscribers as a filter for the best, most credible, and most engaging information out there. Like other social media…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carscaddon, Laura; Harris, Colleen S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ifla.queenslibrary.org/iv/ifla74/papers/093-macnaughton_haaften-en.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Friends</span> of Libraries Supporting Public Libraries - Best Practices and Leadership</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper explains the concept of <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of Library groups and highlights the many services and programs <span class="hlt">Friends</span> can support and sponsor in their libraries throughout Canada, the U.S., and the U.K. Best practices are demonstrated in advocacy efforts, support of literacy programs, funding for alternative format materials and access technologies for people with disabilities, and sponsorship of aboriginal programming</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dorothy Macnaughton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=geographical+AND+proximity&id=EJ779312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Support between Siblings and between <span class="hlt">Friends</span>: Two Worlds Apart?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research examines whether siblings and <span class="hlt">friends</span> resemble each other in supportive behavior. Using a Dutch national sample of 6,289 individuals containing 12,578 relationships with siblings and <span class="hlt">friends</span>, we investigated the relative importance of gender composition, geographical proximity, relationship quality, and contact frequency for support…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Voorpostel, Marieke; van der Lippe, Tanja</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=smart+AND+drugs+AND+in+AND+education&pg=2&id=EJ559243"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interventions by Students in <span class="hlt">Friends</span>' Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigated students' (N=1,184) self-reported interventions in the alcohol-, tobacco-, illicit-drug use, and drinking-driving of their <span class="hlt">friends</span>. Results indicate that almost one-third of students intervened in <span class="hlt">friends</span>' illegal drug use and drinking-driving, whereas about one-half intervened with smoking. Intervenors were usually older and worked…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smart, Reginald G.; Stoduto, Gina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6866835"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span>: The construct and measurement of singles-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> work culture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees’ family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees’ perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with families. A multi-dimensional scale is developed assessing five dimensions of singles-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> culture: social inclusion, equal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wendy J. Casper; David Weltman; Eileen Kwesiga</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19865686"> <span id="translatedtitle">A graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A software graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J C L Chow; M K K Leung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6042467"> <span id="translatedtitle">GRASP <span class="hlt">user</span> manual: a computer program for pressure analysis. Version 1. 0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The GRASP computer code (Graphic Analyzer and Shell Shock Preprocessor) is an interactive tool for analyzing large amounts of pressure data on a conical shell. With GRASP, the <span class="hlt">user</span> can visualize the complex pressure distributions on an aeroshell at any time step. Pressure data from multiple sources can be compared, and load data for structural analysis may be generated. GRASP is extremely <span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span> and is written to use the Sandia, Virtual Device Interface. 4 refs., 3 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mills-Curran, W.C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15209"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hardware and Software Developments for the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Time-Linked Data Acquisition System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wind-energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new, light-weight, modular data acquisition system capable of acquiring long-term, continuous, multi-channel time-series data from operating wind-turbines. New hardware features have been added to this system to make it more flexible and permit programming via telemetry. <span class="hlt">User-friendly</span> Windows-based software has been developed for programming the hardware and acquiring, storing, analyzing, and archiving the data. This paper briefly reviews the major components of the system, summarizes the recent hardware enhancements and operating experiences, and discusses the features and capabilities of the software programs that have been developed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">BERG,DALE E.; RUMSEY,MARK A.; ZAYAS,JOSE R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-11-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13584453"> <span id="translatedtitle">Joint data detection and channel estimation for two dominant <span class="hlt">users</span> in the asynchronous GMAC with memory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we consider the situation of two strongly interfering signals, superimposed over a background of AWGN. We consider the situation where <span class="hlt">User</span> 2psilas packet arrives initially and we are able to estimate <span class="hlt">accurately</span> this userpsilas channel impulse response. Then a packet from <span class="hlt">User</span> 1 arrives during the data portion of <span class="hlt">User</span> 2psilas packet. We propose an algorithm for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher Pladdy; Robert M. Taylor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ece.ncsu.edu/netwis/papers/02wa-gb.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the estimation of <span class="hlt">user</span> mobility pattern for location tracking in wireless networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a new scheme to estimate the <span class="hlt">user</span> mobility by incorporating the aggregate history of mobile <span class="hlt">users</span> and system parameters. With this approach, each <span class="hlt">user</span>'s position within the location area is differentiated by zone partition for more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction. In order to provide the flexibility of tradeoff between quality demand and computation complexity, the estimation is adjusted dynamically</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wenye Wang; I. F. A. Yildiz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=279761"> <span id="translatedtitle">imDEV: a graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface to R multivariate analysis tools in Microsoft Excel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interactive modules for data exploration and visualization (imDEV) is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet embedded application providing an integrated environment for the analysis of omics data sets with a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> interface. Individual modules were designed to provide toolsets to enable interactive ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/622945"> <span id="translatedtitle">The design of a <span class="hlt">user</span> interface to a computer algebra system for introductory calculus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We are developing a unique computational environment for use in conjunction with the two-semester introductory calculus sequence. Our system, called Newton (formerly The Calculus Companion), runs on Macintosh computers and consists of a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> interface to the symbolic mathematics package Maple, supplemented by an extensive library of our own Maple code. Formulas are easily constructed and modified, appearing exactly as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edmund A. Lamagna; Michael B. Hayden; Catherine W. Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=34444"> <span id="translatedtitle">IAQPC: INDOOR AIR QUALITY SIMULATOR FOR PERSONAL COMPUTERS: VOLUME 2. <span class="hlt">USER</span>'S GUIDE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The two-volume report describes the development of an indoor air quality simulator for personal computers (IAQPC), a program that addresses the problems of indoor air contamination. The program-- systematic, <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span>, and computer-based--can be used by administrators and eng...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36835865"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perceived Marijuana Norms and Social Expectancies Among Entering College Student Marijuana <span class="hlt">Users</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research examined the relationships among perceived social norms, social outcome expectancies, and marijuana use and related consequences among entering college freshman marijuana <span class="hlt">users</span>. Students (N = 312, 55% female) completed online assessments of their marijuana use, related consequences, perceived norms, and social expectancies related to marijuana use. Results suggested that perceptions of <span class="hlt">friends</span>' marijuana use were most strongly associated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton Neighbors; Irene M. Geisner; Christine M. Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=124897"> <span id="translatedtitle">ESPVI 4.0 ELECTROSTATIS PRECIPITATOR V-1 AND PERFORMANCE MODEL: <span class="hlt">USER</span>'S MANUAL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The manual is the companion document for the microcomputer program ESPVI 4.0, Electrostatic Precipitation VI and Performance Model. The program was developed to provide a <span class="hlt">user</span>- <span class="hlt">friendly</span> interface to an advanced model of electrostatic precipitation (ESP) performance. The program i...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22%22&id=ED537888"> <span id="translatedtitle">Professional Learning in the Digital Age: The Educator's Guide to <span class="hlt">User</span>-Generated Learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Discover how to transform your professional development and become a truly connected educator with <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated learning! This book shows educators how to enhance their professional learning using practical tools, strategies, and online resources. With beginner-<span class="hlt">friendly</span>, real-world examples and simple steps to get started, the author shows how…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swanson, Kristen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6101496"> <span id="translatedtitle">Casing shoe depths <span class="hlt">accurately</span> and quickly selected with computer assistance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A computer-aided support system for casing design and shoe depth selection improves the reliability of solutions, reduces total project time, and helps reduce costs. This system is part of ADIS (Advanced Drilling Information System), an integrated environment developed by three companies of the ENI group (Agip SpA, Enidata, and Saipem). The ADIS project focuses on the on site planning and control of drilling operations. The first version of the computer-aided support for casing design (Cascade) was experimentally introduced by Agip SpA in July 1991. After several modifications, the system was introduced to field operations in December 1991 and is now used in Agip's district locations and headquarters. The results from the validation process and practical uses indicated it has several pluses: the reliability of the casing shoe depths proposed by the system helps reduce the project errors and improve the economic feasibility of the proposed solutions; the system has helped spread the use of the best engineering practices concerning shoe depth selection and casing design; the Cascade system finds numerous solutions rapidly, thereby reducing project time compared to previous methods of casing design; the system finds or verifies solutions efficiently, allowing the engineer to analyze several alternatives simultaneously rather than to concentrate only on the analysis of a single solution; the system is flexible by means of a <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> integration with the other software packages in the ADIS project. The paper describes the design methodology, validation cases, shoe depths, casing design, hardware and software, and results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mattiello, D.; Piantanida, M.; Schenato, A.; Tomada, L. (Agip SpA, Milan (Italy))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4511301N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span> of Hot Jupiters: AO Survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">“Hot Jupiters” are a class of gas giant planets found in extrasolar systems at very small orbital distances (?0.05 AU). We know that these planets could not have formed at their present locations, but must instead have migrated in from beyond the ice line. One class of proposed migration mechanisms for these planets involve gravitational perturbations from a distant stellar companion. These same processes also provide a natural explanation for the existence of a subset of hot Jupiters that have been observed to have orbits that are highly misaligned with respect to their star's spin axis and/or have large orbital eccentricities. In the "Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span>" survey, we search for stellar companions around 51 stars known to host hot Jupiters in order to determine whether stellar companions play an important role in hot Jupiter migration. Our survey consists of a population of stars with planets that have eccentric and/or misaligned orbits as well as a control population of planets with well-aligned and circular orbits. This project searches for companion stars (the "Cold <span class="hlt">Friends</span>") in three detection modes: radial velocity monitoring, high resolution IR spectroscopy (presented by D. Piskorz et al. at this meeting), and adaptive optics (AO) imaging at infrared wavelengths (presented here). The AO mode is sensitive to the most distant companions (separations of 50-200 AU and beyond) while the other modes are effective at finding companions at smaller separations. We present the results of our AO survey and discuss the binary fraction found in our sample. Out of our total sample of 51 stars, 19 candidate companions (many of which have not been observed before) were directly imaged around 17 stars. We also describe follow-up photometry and astrometry of all detected companions to determine whether or not they are gravitationally bound to the primary planet-hosting star. If such companions are common, it would suggest that perturbations from stellar companions may play a significant role in the evolution of hot Jupiter systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ngo, Henry; Knutson, H. A.; Hinkley, S.; Crepp, J. R.; Batygin, K.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Morton, T. D.; Muirhead, P. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47856470"> <span id="translatedtitle">Working with <span class="hlt">Users</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a After reading this chapter, you should be able to\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Understand how <span class="hlt">users</span> are represented internally in Drupal.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Understand how to store information associated with a <span class="hlt">user</span> in several ways.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Hook into the <span class="hlt">user</span> registration process to obtain more information from a registering <span class="hlt">user</span>.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Hook into the <span class="hlt">user</span> login process to run your own code at <span class="hlt">user</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Todd Tomlinson; John K. VanDyk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LNCS.6283..316P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trajectory Based Behavior Analysis for <span class="hlt">User</span> Verification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many of our activities on computer need a verification step for authorized access. The goal of verification is to tell apart the true account owner from intruders. We propose a general approach for <span class="hlt">user</span> verification based on <span class="hlt">user</span> trajectory inputs. The approach is labor-free for <span class="hlt">users</span> and is likely to avoid the possible copy or simulation from other non-authorized <span class="hlt">users</span> or even automatic programs like bots. Our study focuses on finding the hidden patterns embedded in the trajectories produced by account <span class="hlt">users</span>. We employ a Markov chain model with Gaussian distribution in its transitions to describe the behavior in the trajectory. To distinguish between two trajectories, we propose a novel dissimilarity measure combined with a manifold learnt tuning for catching the pairwise relationship. Based on the pairwise relationship, we plug-in any effective classification or clustering methods for the detection of unauthorized access. The method can also be applied for the task of recognition, predicting the trajectory type without pre-defined identity. Given a trajectory input, the results show that the proposed method can <span class="hlt">accurately</span> verify the <span class="hlt">user</span> identity, or suggest whom owns the trajectory if the input identity is not provided.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pao, Hsing-Kuo; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Fadlil, Junaidillah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12276136"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Method for Measuring Activation Energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this letter, we present an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> method for the measurement of activation energy. This method combined the excitation power dependent photoluminescence and temperature dependent photoluminescence together to obtain activation energy. We found with increasing temperature, there is a step transition from one emission mechanism to another. This step transition gives us an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurement of activation energy. Using this</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiang-Bai Chen; Jesse Huso; John L. Morrison; Leah Bergman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/986336"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field Testing of Environmentally <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Drilling System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Environmentally <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Burnett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3625856"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Schistosoma Granuloma: <span class="hlt">Friend</span> or Foe?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infection of man with Schistosoma species of trematode parasite causes marked chronic morbidity. Individuals that become infected with Schistosomes may develop a spectrum of pathology ranging from mild cercarial dermatitis to severe tissue inflammation, in particular within the liver and intestines, which can lead to life threatening hepatosplenomegaly. It is well established that the etiopathology during schistosomiasis is primarily due to an excessive or unregulated inflammatory response to the parasite, in particular to eggs that become trapped in various tissue. The eggs forms the foci of a classical type 2 granulomatous inflammation, characterized by an eosinophil-rich, CD4+ T helper (Th) 2 cell dominated infiltrate with additional infiltration of alternatively activated macrophages (M2). Indeed the sequela of the type 2 perioval granuloma is marked fibroblast infiltration and development of fibrosis. Paradoxically, while the granuloma is the cause of pathology it also can afford some protection, whereby the granuloma minimizes collateral tissue damage in the liver and intestines. Furthermore, the parasite is exquisitely reliant on the host to mount a granulomatous reaction to the eggs as this inflammatory response facilitates the successful excretion of the eggs from the host. In this focused review we will address the conundrum of the S. mansoni granuloma acting as both <span class="hlt">friend</span> and foe in inflammation during infection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hams, Emily; Aviello, Gabriella; Fallon, Padraic G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PJMPE..15..177S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Maria Sklodowska-Curie - scientist, <span class="hlt">friend</span>, manager</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Great names in science represent an inexhaustible source and richness of inspiration, satisfaction and consolation, a moving and victorious force. Throughout her exemplifying life, Maria Sklodowska remained modest but with a keen sense of humor, of an outstanding style, a mine of knowledge and experience, of innovative ideas and a rich inner life. Full of love, of passion to give and to share, of natural optimism, mixed with a light melancholy, so typical for sages. She vehemently defended the love of scientific research, of the spirit of adventure and entrepreneurship and fought for international culture, for the protection of personality and talent. Maria Sklodowska left her passion to science, her dedication to work including education and training of young people, her passionate adherence to her family, her belief in her <span class="hlt">friends</span>, her pure and profound humanity and warmth! The paper should be a homage to her, an appreciation of her work over the years, but not less a correspondence, a conversation with her! On the other hand, the present solemn occasion resuscitates the personalities of Maria and Pierre Curie and their work, in particular of Maria Sklodowska in her own native land! In this manner, it truly contributes to her immortality!</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slavchev, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19364750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ants recognize foes and not <span class="hlt">friends</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discriminating among individuals and rejecting non-group members is essential for the evolution and stability of animal societies. Ants are good models for studying recognition mechanisms, because they are typically very efficient in discriminating '<span class="hlt">friends</span>' (nest-mates) from 'foes' (non-nest-mates). Recognition in ants involves multicomponent cues encoded in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. Here, we tested whether workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus herculeanus use the presence and/or absence of cuticular hydrocarbons to discriminate between nest-mates and non-nest-mates. We supplemented the cuticular profile with synthetic hydrocarbons mixed to liquid food and then assessed behavioural responses using two different bioassays. Our results show that (i) the presence, but not the absence, of an additional hydrocarbon elicited aggression and that (ii) among the three classes of hydrocarbons tested (unbranched, mono-methylated and dimethylated alkanes; for mono-methylated alkanes, we present a new synthetic pathway), only the dimethylated alkane was effective in eliciting aggression. Our results suggest that carpenter ants use a fundamentally different mechanism for nest-mate recognition than previously thought. They do not specifically recognize nest-mates, but rather recognize and reject non-nest-mates bearing odour cues that are novel to their own colony cuticular hydrocarbon profile. This begs for a reappraisal of the mechanisms underlying recognition systems in social insects. PMID:19364750</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guerrieri, Fernando J; Nehring, Volker; Jřrgensen, Charlotte G; Nielsen, John; Galizia, C Giovanni; d'Ettorre, Patrizia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47821895"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Profiles Modeling in Information Retrieval Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a The requirements imposed on information retrieval systems are increasing steadily. The vast number of documents in today’s\\u000a large databases and especially on the World Wide Web causes problems when searching for concrete information. It is difficult\\u000a to find satisfactory information that <span class="hlt">accurately</span> matches <span class="hlt">user</span> information needs even if it is present in the database. One\\u000a of the key elements when</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Václav Snásel; Ajith Abraham; Suhail Owais; Jan Platos; Pavel Krömer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10173377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system. <span class="hlt">User`s</span> manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system is designed to assist US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)licensees in meeting the reporting requirements of the revised 10 CFR 20 and in agreement with the guidance contained in R.G. 8.7, Rev. 1, ``Instructions for Recording and Reporting Occupational Exposure Data.`` REMIT is a personal computer (PC) based menu driven system that facilitates the manipulation of data base files to record and report radiation exposure information. REMIT is designed to be <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> and contains the full text of R. G. 8.7, Rev. 1, on-line as well as context-sensitive help throughout the program. The <span class="hlt">user</span> can enter data directly from NRC Forms 4 or 5, REMIT allows the <span class="hlt">user</span> to view the individual`s exposure in relation to regulatory or administrative limits and alerts the <span class="hlt">user</span> to exposures in excess of these limits. The system also provides for the calculation and summation of dose from intakes and the determination of the dose to the maximally exposed extremity for the monitoring year. REMIT can produce NRC Forms 4 and 5 in paper and electronic format and can import/export data from ASCII and data base files.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cale, R.; Clark, T.; Dixson, R.; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21397405"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparing injunctive marijuana use norms of salient reference groups among college student marijuana <span class="hlt">users</span> and nonusers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug among college students and has the potential for various negative outcomes. Perceptions of what constitutes typical approval/acceptability of a reference group (i.e. injunctive social norms) have been shown to have strong utility as predictors of health-risk behaviors in the college context, yet this construct remains significantly understudied for marijuana use despite its potential for use in social norms-based interventions. The current research evaluated individuals' marijuana approval level and their perceptions of others' marijuana approval level (i.e. injunctive norms) for various reference groups (typical student on campus, one's close <span class="hlt">friends</span>, and one's parents) as a function of individual <span class="hlt">user</span> status (abstainers, experimenters, occasional <span class="hlt">users</span>, and regular <span class="hlt">users</span>). A diverse sample of 3553 college students from two universities completed an online survey. Among all <span class="hlt">user</span> status groups, individual approval yielded mean scores paralleling that of perceived close <span class="hlt">friends</span>' approval and all groups were relatively uniform in their perception of typical students' approval. Higher levels of marijuana use tended to produce higher endorsements of individual approval, perceived close <span class="hlt">friends</span>' approval, and perceived parental approval. Among occasional and regular <span class="hlt">users</span>, there were no differences between one's own approval level for use and the perceptions of close <span class="hlt">friends</span>' approval, nor did they think the typical student was more approving than themselves. Abstainers and experimenters, however, perceived typical students and close <span class="hlt">friends</span> to have more permissive attitudes than themselves. Implications and future directions for research regarding the role of injunctive marijuana use norms in the development of social norms intervention are discussed. PMID:21397405</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaBrie, Joseph W; Hummer, Justin F; Lac, Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6204679"> <span id="translatedtitle">PEDRO (Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option) <span class="hlt">user</span> guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PEDRO is an electronic data communications product that simplifies filing and transmission of petroleum survey data. Your burden is significantly reduced as PEDRO eliminates paperwork, provides immediate onsite correction of data errors, and reduces the need for followup calls and survey resubmission. PEDRO provides an online error-checking process that highlights discrepancies. This permits you to enter and check data before transmitting to EIA. EIA then combines and reformats the data from different <span class="hlt">users</span> for use by analytical and reporting programs. PEDRO is available at no cost to the <span class="hlt">user</span>. Formal training is not required since installation, data processing, and transmission are done by interactive, <span class="hlt">user-friendly</span> menu options. The PEDRO system is divided into three functions: (1) data processing, (2) transmitting data to EIA, and (3) EIA processing. 28 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10190706"> <span id="translatedtitle">Top ten list of <span class="hlt">user</span>-hostile interface design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes ten of the most frequent ergonomic problems found in human-computer interfaces (HCIs) associated with complex industrial machines. In contrast with being thought of as ``<span class="hlt">user</span> <span class="hlt">friendly</span>,`` many of these machines are seen as exhibiting ``<span class="hlt">user</span>-hostile`` attributes by the author. The historical lack of consistent application of ergonomic principles in the HCIs has led to a breed of very sophisticated, complex manufacturing equipment that few people can operate without extensive orientation, training, or experience. This design oversight has produced the need for extensive training programs and help documentation, unnecessary machine downtime, and reduced productivity resulting from operator stress and confusion. Ergonomic considerations affect industrial machines in at least three important areas: (1) the physical package including CRT and keyboard, maintenance access areas, and dedicated hardware selection, layout, and labeling; (2) the software by which the <span class="hlt">user</span> interacts with the computer that controls the equipment; and (3) the supporting documentation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, D.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6363358"> <span id="translatedtitle">KDYNA <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is a complete <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual for KDYNA, the Earth Sciences version of DYNA2D. Because most features of DYNA2D have been retained in KDYNA much of this manual is identical to the DYNA2D <span class="hlt">user</span>'s manual.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levatin, J.A.L.; Attia, A.V.; Hallquist, J.O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-09-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA225362"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distributed <span class="hlt">User</span> Information System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current <span class="hlt">user</span> information database technology within the DARPA/NSF Internet is adequate to deal with hundreds of hosts and a few thousand <span class="hlt">users</span>. However, recent size estimates of the Internet indicate that its host population is now closer to one hundred t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Mark S. Carson S. D. Miller</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1330615"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Modeling via Stereotypes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper addresses the problems that must be considered if computers are going to treat their <span class="hlt">users</span> as individuals with distinct personalities, goals, and so forth. It first outlines the issues, and then proposes stereotypes as a useful mechanism for building models of individual <span class="hlt">users</span> on the basis of a small amount of information about them. In order to build</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elaine Rich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.idemployee.id.tue.nl/g.w.m.rauterberg/conferences/CD_doNotOpen/ADC/final_paper/293.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Experience: Beyond Usability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interface is a communication tool between man-made machines and humans. The interaction that takes place in this interface is a personalized experience for each individual. The interaction occurs in different ways depending on how <span class="hlt">users</span> interpret or understand the interface. Immediately clicking an icon or menu without hesitation does not always mean that the <span class="hlt">user</span> understands the interface. Also,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sunghyun Ryoo KANG</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+experimentation&pg=6&id=EJ276739"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fighting for the <span class="hlt">User</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Redesign of human-computer interface for <span class="hlt">users</span> of computerized information systems can make substantial difference in training time, performance speed, error rates, and <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction. Information and computer scientists are using controlled psychologically oriented experimentation, and evaluations during system development and active use to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shneiderman, Ben</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12774970"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span>-interface design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary. <span class="hlt">User</span> interface design is a central issue for the usability of a software product. In this chapter, general requirements referring to the international software ergonomics stan- dardization and specific design features for the <span class="hlt">user</span> interface of learning systems are pre- sented. Orientation and feedback for the learner are the most relevant issues of interface design of learning systems. Information</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reinhard Oppermann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2267860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do adolescent Ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> have different attitudes towards drugs when compared to Marijuana <span class="hlt">users</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Perceived risk and attitudes about the consequences of drug use, perceptions of others expectations and self-efficacy influence the intent to try drugs and continue drug use once use has started. We examine associations between adolescents’ attitudes and beliefs towards ecstasy use; because most ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> have a history of marijuana use, we estimate the association for three groups of adolescents: non-marijuana/ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span>, marijuana <span class="hlt">users</span> (used marijuana at least once but never used ecstasy) and ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> (used ecstasy at least once). Methods Data from 5,049 adolescents aged 12–18 years old who had complete weighted data information in Round 2 of the Restricted Use Files (RUF) of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY). Data were analyzed using jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Results Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> were more likely to approve of marijuana and ecstasy use as compared to non-drug using youth. Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span> were more likely to have close <span class="hlt">friends</span> who approved of ecstasy as compared to non-drug using youth. The magnitudes of these two associations were stronger for ecstasy use than for marijuana use in the final adjusted model. Our final adjusted model shows that approval of marijuana and ecstasy use was more strongly associated with marijuana and ecstasy use in adolescence than perceived risk in using both drugs. Conclusion Information about the risks and consequences of ecstasy use need to be presented to adolescents in order to attempt to reduce adolescents’ approval of ecstasy use as well as ecstasy experimentation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martins, Silvia S.; Storr, Carla L.; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Chilcoat, Howard D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B11C0496B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Site-Specific, Climate-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Farming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> farming guidance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB96101258"> <span id="translatedtitle">Volunteer Senior Aides: The Pasadena Family <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Project.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This project matches senior volunteers, 55 years and older, with chronically ill or disabled children and their families. These volunteers act as surrogate grandparents to the children and become close, supportive <span class="hlt">friends</span> to the entire family. The goal is...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Forer-Dehrey S. Steinke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADP013486"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating the Impact of Environmentally <span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Cleaners on System Readiness.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Federal, state and local regulations limiting the use, storage and disposal of hydrocarbon-based cleaning solvents have led to the uncontrolled replacement of solvents with environmentally <span class="hlt">friendly</span> products. The Army and other defense agencies rely on the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. Walker W. Ziegler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overcoming barriers to Baby-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> status: one hospital's experience.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The journey toward Baby-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> status at Jersey Shore University Medical Center in Neptune, NJ began with a desire to improve overall breastfeeding rates at the hospital. Although evidence showed that hospitals that incorporated some or all of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding had improved breastfeeding rates, it was difficult to overcome barriers that prevented the hospital physicians and nursing staff from seeing the value in adopting this quality initiative. Long-standing practices combined with misinformation compounded the problem. That situation changed when several factors nationally and statewide came together to create a prime environment for implementation of the Baby-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Hospital Initiative. This article will discuss the barriers that one hospital encountered and the strategies used to overcome these common barriers to achieving Baby-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> status. This hospital is not yet designated as Baby-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> but is awaiting the outcome of a site visit in 2012. PMID:22596059</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKeever, Joyce; Fleur, Rose St</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB99130239"> <span id="translatedtitle">Review of Federal Family-<span class="hlt">Friendly</span> Workplace Arrangements.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is Office of Personnel Management's (OPM's) response to a Congressional request for an update on the implementation of family-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> workplace arrangements. The report presents: (1) survey data collected from 61 agency personnel offices; and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3053125"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contextual profiles of young adult Ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span>: a multisite study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These analyses assess contextual profiles of 612 young adult Ecstasy <span class="hlt">users</span>, 18–30 years of age, from St. Louis (USA), Miami (USA) and Sydney (Australia). Bivariate analyses revealed different contextual factors influencing Ecstasy use. <span class="hlt">Friends</span> were the most common sources of Ecstasy at all sites and most used with <span class="hlt">friends</span>. St. Louis and Miami use mostly occurred in residences, whereas in Sydney use was mostly at clubs, bars or restaurants. Ecstasy consumption at public places and in cars, trains or ferries was significantly higher in Miami (89% and 77%) than in St. Louis (67% and 65%) and Sydney (67% and 61%). At all sites, simultaneous use of LSD/mushroom and nitrous oxide with Ecstasy was common; concurrent amphetamines predominated in Sydney and heroin/opiates in St. Louis Contextual factors influencing Ecstasy use among young adults vary by geographic region. Their inclusion may help tailor effective prevention programs to reduce or ameliorate Ecstasy use.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramtekkar, Ujjwal P.; Striley, Catherine W; Cottler, Linda B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50814172"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Remote <span class="hlt">User</span> Authentication Scheme Preserving <span class="hlt">User</span> Anonymity and Traceability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many smart card based remote authentication schemes have been proposed to preserve <span class="hlt">user</span> privacy against eavesdropper. However, none of the exiting scheme provides both <span class="hlt">users</span>' anonymity to server and traceability to the malicious <span class="hlt">user</span>. In this paper, we present a scheme that preserve <span class="hlt">user</span> anonymity not only against outside attackers, but also against the remote server. When a malicious <span class="hlt">user</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shuai Shao; Hui Li; Xinxi Niu; Yixian Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2422943"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved Remote <span class="hlt">User</span> Authentication Scheme Preserving <span class="hlt">User</span> Anonymity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most of smart card-based remote authentication schemes proposed didn 't protect the <span class="hlt">users</span>' identities while authenticating the <span class="hlt">users</span>, even though <span class="hlt">user</span> anonymity is an important issue in many e-commerce applications. In 2004, Das et al. proposed a remote authentication scheme to authenticate <span class="hlt">users</span> while preserving the <span class="hlt">users</span>' anonymity. Their scheme adopted dynamic identification to achieve this function. Then in 2005,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lanlan Hu; Yixian Yang; Xinxin Niu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.frank-hartung.com/publications/p18-huang.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proxy-based TCP-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> streaming over mobile networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mobile media streaming is envisioned to become an important service over packet-switched 2.5G and 3G wireless networks. At the same time, TCP-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> rate-adaptation behavior for streaming will become an important IETF requirement. In this paper we investigate TCP-<span class="hlt">friendly</span> on-demand streaming over wired and wireless links. We consider two approaches for achieving TCP-friendliness: first, by tunneling RTP packets over TCP and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lei Huang; Uwe Horn; Frank Hartung; Markus Kampmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57829453"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactions of Preschool and Kindergarten <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Acquaintances</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interactions of 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old <span class="hlt">friends</span> and acquaintances in a peer teaching and game-playing situation were examined. The sample consisted of 102 children who were divided into pairs of same-age, same-sex <span class="hlt">friends</span> or acquaintances using sociometrics. One child in each pair was randomly chosen to be the teacher and the other the learner. The teachers taught a novel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sheila Brachfeld-Child; R. Steven Schiavo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36859817"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavior State Matching During Interactions of Preadolescent <span class="hlt">Friends</span> Versus Acquaintances</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Face-to-face interactions of 56 sixth-grade <span class="hlt">friend</span> and acquaintance pairs were videotaped, heart rate was recorded, and saliva cortisol was sampled. During interactions the <span class="hlt">friend</span> dyads were more attentive, affectively positive, vocal, active, involved, relaxed, and playful, and their cortisol values suggested lower stress levels. They also spent more time together in mutually interested and animated states, and they assigned higher</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tiffany M. Field; Paul Greenwald; Connie J. Morrow; Brian T. Healy; Tamar Foster; Moshe Guthertz; Patricia Frost</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29224019"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pubertal Timing, <span class="hlt">Friend</span> Smoking, and Substance Use in Adolescent Girls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of <span class="hlt">friend</span> substance use on the association between pubertal timing and substance use has received little consideration\\u000a in the literature. With a sample of 264 female adolescents (11–17 years), this study examined (a) the relationship between\\u000a pubertal timing and substance use, (b) the impact of number of <span class="hlt">friends</span> that smoke cigarettes on adolescents’ use of three\\u000a substances (cigarettes, alcohol,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elizabeth Marklein; Sonya Negriff; Lorah D. Dorn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AcAau..51..405H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Service on demand for ISS <span class="hlt">users</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since the ISS started its operational phase, the need of logistics scenarios and solutions, supporting the utilisation of the station and its facilities, becomes increasingly important. Our contribution to this challenge is a SERVICE On DEMAND for ISS <span class="hlt">users</span>, which offers a business <span class="hlt">friendly</span> engineering and logistics support for the resupply of the station. Especially the utilisation by commercial and industrial <span class="hlt">users</span> is supported and simplified by this service. Our industrial team, consisting of OHB-System and BEOS, provides experience and development support for space dedicated hard- and software elements, their transportation and operation. Furthermore, we operate as the interface between customer and the envisaged space authorities. Due to a variety of tailored service elements and the ongoing servicing, customers can concentrate on their payload content or mission objectives and don't have to deal with space-specific techniques and regulations. The SERVICE On DEMAND includes the following elements: ITR is our in-orbit platform service. ITR is a transport rack, used in the SPACEHAB logistics double module, for active and passive payloads on subrack- and drawer level of different standards. Due to its unique late access and early retrieval capability, ITR increases the flexibility concerning transport capabilities to and from the ISS. RIST is our multi-functional test facility for ISPR-based experiment drawer and locker payloads. The test program concentrates on physical and functional interface and performance testing at the payload developers site prior to the shipment to the integration and launch. The RIST service program comprises consulting, planning and engineering as well. The RIST test suitcase is planned to be available for lease or rent to <span class="hlt">users</span>, too. AMTSS is an advanced multimedia terminal consulting service for communication with the space station scientific facilities, as part of the <span class="hlt">user</span> home-base. This unique ISS multimedia kit combines communication technologies, software tools and hardware to provide a simple and cost-efficient access to data from the station, using the interconnection ground subnetwork. BEOLOG is our efficient ground logistics service for the transportation of payload hardware and support equipment from the <span class="hlt">user</span> location to the launch/landing sites for the ISS service flights and back home. The main function of this service is the planning and organisation of all packaging, handling, storage & transportation tasks according to international rules. In conclusion, we offer novel service elements for logistics ground- and flight-infrastructure, dedicated for ISS <span class="hlt">users</span>. These services can be easily adapted to the needs of <span class="hlt">users</span> and are suitable for other ?g- platforms as well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hüser, Detlev; Berg, Marco; Körtge, Nicole; Mildner, Wolfgang; Salmen, Frank; Strauch, Karsten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22954879"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FRIEND</span>: a brain-monitoring agent for adaptive and assistive systems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents an architectural design for adaptive-systems agents (<span class="hlt">FRIEND</span>) that use brain state information to make more effective decisions on behalf of a <span class="hlt">user</span>; measuring brain context versus situational demands. These systems could be useful for alerting <span class="hlt">users</span> to cognitive workload levels or fatigue, and could attempt to compensate for higher cognitive activity by filtering noise information. In some cases such systems could also share control of devices, such as pulling over in an automated vehicle. These aim to assist people in everyday systems to perform tasks better and be more aware of internal states. Achieving a functioning system of this sort is a challenge, involving a unification of brain- computer-interfaces, human-computer-interaction, soft-computin deliberative multi-agent systems disciplines. Until recently, these were not able to be combined into a usable platform due largely to technological limitations (e.g., size, cost, and processing speed), insufficient research on extracting behavioral states from EEG signals, and lack of low-cost wireless sensing headsets. We aim to surpass these limitations and develop control architectures for making sense of brain state in applications by realizing an agent architecture for adaptive (human-aware) technology. In this paper we present an early, high-level design towards implementing a multi-purpose brain-monitoring agent system to improve <span class="hlt">user</span> quality of life through the assistive applications of psycho-physiological monitoring, noise-filtering, and shared system control. PMID:22954879</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morris, Alexis; Ulieru, Mihaela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/221028"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User`s</span> guide to MIDAS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Welcome to the MIDAS <span class="hlt">User`s</span> Guide. This document describes the goals of the Munitions Items Disposition Action System (MIDAS) program and documents the MIDAS software. The main text first describes the equipment and software you need to run MIDAS and tells how to install and start it. It lists the contents of the database and explains how it is organized. Finally, it tells how to perform various functions, such as locating, entering, viewing, deleting, changing, transferring, and printing both textual and graphical data. Images of the actual computer screens accompany these explanations and guidelines. Appendix A contains a glossary of names for the various abbreviations, codes, and chemicals; Appendix B is a list of modem names; Appendix C provides a database dictionary and rules for entering data; and Appendix D describes procedures for troubleshooting problems associated with connecting to the MIDAS server and using MIDAS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tisue, S.A.; Williams, N.B.; Huber, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.; Chun, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21799833"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> and rapid estimation of phosphene thresholds (REPT).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To calibrate the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at the occipital pole, the phosphene threshold is used as a measure of cortical excitability. The phosphene threshold (PT) refers to the intensity of magnetic stimulation that induces illusory flashes of light (phosphenes) on a proportion of trials. The existing PT estimation procedures lack the accuracy and mathematical rigour of modern threshold estimation methods. We present an improved and automatic procedure for estimating the PT which is based on the well-established ? Bayesian adaptive staircase approach. To validate the new procedure, we compared it with another commonly used procedure for estimating the PT. We found that our procedure is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, reliable, and rapid when compared with an existing PT measurement procedure. The new procedure is implemented in Matlab and works automatically with the Magstim Rapid(2) stimulator using a convenient graphical <span class="hlt">user</span> interface. The Matlab program is freely available for download. PMID:21799833</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abrahamyan, Arman; Clifford, Colin W G; Ruzzoli, Manuela; Phillips, Dan; Arabzadeh, Ehsan; Harris, Justin A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NatSR...3E2266A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> automated cell boundary determination for fluorescence microscopy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed measurement of cell phenotype information from digital fluorescence images has the potential to greatly advance biomedicine in various disciplines such as patient diagnostics or drug screening. Yet, the complexity of cell conformations presents a major barrier preventing effective determination of cell boundaries, and introduces measurement error that propagates throughout subsequent assessment of cellular parameters and statistical analysis. State-of-the-art image segmentation techniques that require <span class="hlt">user</span>-interaction, prolonged computation time and specialized training cannot adequately provide the support for high content platforms, which often sacrifice resolution to foster the speedy collection of massive amounts of cellular data. This work introduces a strategy that allows us to rapidly obtain <span class="hlt">accurate</span> cell boundaries from digital fluorescent images in an automated format. Hence, this new method has broad applicability to promote biotechnology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arce, Stephen Hugo; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Tseng, Yiider</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">471</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/135550"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aztec <span class="hlt">user`s</span> guide. Version 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aztec is an iterative library that greatly simplifies the parallelization process when solving the linear systems of equations Ax = b where A is a <span class="hlt">user</span> supplied n x n sparse matrix, b is a <span class="hlt">user</span> supplied vector of length n and x is a vector of length n to be computed. Aztec is intended as a software tool for <span class="hlt">users</span> who want to avoid cumbersome parallel programming details but who have large sparse linear systems which require an efficiently utilized parallel processing system. A collection of data transformation tools are provided that allow for easy creation of distributed sparse unstructured matrices for parallel solution. Once the distributed matrix is created, computation can be performed on any of the parallel machines running Aztec: nCUBE 2, IBM SP2 and Intel Paragon, MPI platforms as well as standard serial and vector platforms. Aztec includes a number of Krylov iterative methods such as conjugate gradient (CG), generalized minimum residual (GMRES) and stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) to solve systems of equations. These Krylov methods are used in conjunction with various preconditioners such as polynomial or domain decomposition methods using LU or incomplete LU factorizations within subdomains. Although the matrix A can be general, the package has been designed for matrices arising from the approximation of partial differential equations (PDEs). In particular, the Aztec package is oriented toward systems arising from PDE applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hutchinson, S.A.; Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">472</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22servqual%22&pg=2&id=EJ633211"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perspectives on <span class="hlt">User</span> Satisfaction Surveys.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction, and <span class="hlt">user</span> surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and <span class="hlt">user</span> satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between <span class="hlt">user</span> expectations and managers' perceptions of <span class="hlt">user</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cullen, Rowena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">473</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.dfki.de/~wahlster/Publications/User_Models_in_Dialog_Systems.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Models in Dialog Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This chapter surveys the field of <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling in artificial intelligence dialog systems. First, reasons why <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling has become so important in the last few years are pointed out, and definitions are proposed for the terms '<span class="hlt">user</span> model' and '<span class="hlt">user</span> modeling component'. Research within and outside of artificial intelligence which is related to <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling in dialog systems is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wolfgang Wahlster; Alfred Kobsa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">474</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://verbmobil.dfki.de/~wahlster/Publications/Dialog-Based_User_Models.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dialogue-based <span class="hlt">user</span> models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper investigates several approaches to <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling in natural-language dialogue systems. First, reasons are pointed out why <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling has become so important in the last few years, and definitions are proposed for the notions of ''<span class="hlt">user</span> model'' and ''<span class="hlt">user</span> modeling component.'' Then, techniques for constructing <span class="hlt">user</span> models in the course of a dialogue are presented and recent proposals</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Wahlster; A. Kobsa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">475</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51292"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">User</span> Modeling in Dialog Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper the definitions of and approaches to <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling in natural language dialog systems have been reviewed. The contents of <span class="hlt">user</span> models are discussed; how <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling in different research areas relates to <span class="hlt">user</span> modeling are reviewed; examples of some techniques for building <span class="hlt">user</span> models through natural language interaction and observed behavior in other media channels are given.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pontus Johansson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">476</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24085859"> <span id="translatedtitle">A2-3: Pass this Message Along: Self-Edited Email Messages Promoting Colon Cancer Screening Among <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Family.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background/Aims Encouraging communication within a social network may promote uptake of desired medical services or health behaviors. Little is known about the use of this approach to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We conducted in-person interviews with 438 insured adults ages 42-73 in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia. Methods Participants were shown a sample message in which the sender shares that he has completed a colonoscopy and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. We asked participants to edit the message to create one they would be willing to send to <span class="hlt">friends</span> and family via email or postcard. Changes to the message were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. Results The majority of participants (61.6% [270/434]) modified the message; 14.2% added to or reframed the existing personalizing words (e.g., adding "because I love you"), 10.3% (45/434) added urgency to the message (e.g., "please don't delay") and 8% (35/434) added reassurance (e.g., "It's really not that bad"). Almost one in five (18.3%; 80/434) deleted a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks. In 46.5% (195/434) of cases, the meaning of at least one sentence was changed but only 2.7% (12/434) created messages with factual inaccuracies. Conclusions Modifiable messages transmitted within a social network offer a way for screened individuals to promote CRC screening. Further study is needed to identify the optimal combination of <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated content and pre-written text, allowing for creation of messages that are acceptable to senders, persuasive, and factually <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. PMID:24085859</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cutrona, Sarah; Roblin, Douglas; Wagner, Joann; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, Andrew; Stone, Rosalie Torres; Mazor, Kathleen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">477</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3788452"> <span id="translatedtitle">A2-3: Pass this Message Along: Self-Edited Email Messages Promoting Colon Cancer Screening Among <span class="hlt">Friends</span> and Family</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background/Aims Encouraging communication within a social network may promote uptake of desired medical services or health behaviors. Little is known about the use of this approach to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We conducted in-person interviews with 438 insured adults ages 42–73 in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia. Methods Participants were shown a sample message in which the sender shares that he has completed a colonoscopy and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. We asked participants to edit the message to create one they would be willing to send to <span class="hlt">friends</span> and family via email or postcard. Changes to the message were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. Results The majority of participants (61.6% [270/434]) modified the message; 14.2% added to or reframed the existing personalizing words (e.g., adding “because I love you”), 10.3% (45/434) added urgency to the message (e.g., “please don’t delay”) and 8% (35/434) added reassurance (e.g., “It’s really not that bad”). Almost one in five (18.3%; 80/434) deleted a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks. In 46.5% (195/434) of cases, the meaning of at least one sentence was changed but only 2.7% (12/434) created messages with factual inaccuracies. Conclusions Modifiable messages transmitted within a social network offer a way for screened individuals to promote CRC screening. Further study is needed to identify the optimal combination of <span class="hlt">user</span>-generated content and pre-written text, allowing for creation of messages that are acceptable to senders, persuasive, and factually <span class="hlt">accurate</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cutrona, Sarah; Roblin, Douglas; Wagner, Joann; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, Andrew; Stone, Rosalie Torres; Mazor, Kathleen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">478</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/885634"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiological Toolbox <span class="hlt">User</span>'s Manual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide <span class="hlt">users</span> access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides <span class="hlt">users</span>, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the <span class="hlt">user</span> can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eckerman, KF</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">479</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17236478"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anthropometry of a <span class="hlt">friendly</span> rest room.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of common anthropometric tables often is not of any help when designing them for disabled people. This article addresses the advantage of first doing an observational study on the use of similar aids by disabled people. From that study, the relevant variables and critical areas can be learned. When <span class="hlt">users</span> participate in the design process, the newly developed item probably will be innovative in comparison to just a desk research and development project. This means that a large sample is not necessary to find the potential for improvement. The study also delivers a better understanding of the fit of a particular product. This article discusses tools in anthropometry can help the designer understand the relation between dimensions and decide what should be adjustable and what should be fixed or produced in different sizes. PMID:17236478</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Molenbroek, Johan F M; de Bruin, Renate</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">480</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/NSDL/MET/2003/met-030425#TopicInDepth"> <span id="translatedtitle">Online Multi-<span class="hlt">User</span> Environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Online communities have existed since the inception of the World Wide Web, and before that, in the form of bulletin board systems. New technologies are making them much more advanced than the original text interfaces, creating virtual meeting places where <span class="hlt">users</span> can congregate in a more personal atmosphere. These developments are popularizing online multi-<span class="hlt">user</span> environments for business, entertainment, education, and recreation.An article that defines multi-<span class="hlt">user</span> virtual environments (MUVEs) is provided by the Education and Development Center (1). Although it is a bit dated, the information is still <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and does a good job of explaining the uses of MUVEs, especially in educational settings. Microsoft Research's Social Computing Group (2) lists several implementations of three dimensional virtual worlds. With a wide range of applications in research and academia, the projects are briefly described, and links to most of their homepages are also given. An interesting perspective on the virtual economies of online games is given in a research paper from California State University (3). The author considers whether these games will effect real-world economies, since <span class="hlt">users</span> can buy items in the virtual world with real money. A research project at Georgia Tech, called AquaMOOSE 3D (4), is a system that allows math students to interactively participate in a virtual world by experimenting with mathematical concepts. The software is freely available for download, as well as three research papers about the software's development and results. In a March 2003 interview with a Harvard professor of learning technology (5), the professor specifically addressed his work with Multi-<span class="hlt">User</span> Virtual Environment Experimental Simulators (MUVEES). This technology allows students to collaboratively explore a virtual world and answer scientific questions based on what they observe. A link to the MUVEES project Web site is also given. The potential for using online virtual communities in business applications is explored in this issue of Release 1.0 (6). The author notes that advancements to multiplayer games are happening so quickly due, in part, to development done by the <span class="hlt">users</span> of those games, which is essentially free to the company. This trend of open source cooperation could possibly be extended to the business world as well. A professor at Chicago's Loyola University is researching the social interactions of multiplayer games, and his viewpoints are expressed in this article from the BBC (7). He asserts that, despite the mindlessness that is often attributed to such games, there is a very complex process of communication and teamwork that is often ignored. Rather than simply being an entertaining retreat, the games could possibly have a positive effect on <span class="hlt">users</span>. Lastly, a short research paper from Wichita State University (8) provides another look at conceptual learning via Collaborative Virtual Environments. The peer-to-peer dynamic of these worlds mimics in-person communication, but the author states that current systems are a long way from being perfect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leske, Cavin.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">481</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5823..585S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Actively Learning Ontology Matching via <span class="hlt">User</span> Interaction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ontology matching plays a key role for semantic interoperability. Many methods have been proposed for automatically finding the alignment between heterogeneous ontologies. However, in many real-world applications, finding the alignment in a completely automatic way is highly infeasible. Ideally, an ontology matching system would have an interactive interface to allow <span class="hlt">users</span> to provide feedbacks to guide the automatic algorithm. Fundamentally, we need answer the following questions: How can a system perform an efficiently interactive process with the <span class="hlt">user</span>? How many interactions are sufficient for finding a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> matching? To address these questions, we propose an active learning framework for ontology matching, which tries to find the most informative candidate matches to query the <span class="hlt">user</span>. The <span class="hlt">user</span>'s feedbacks are used to: 1) correct the mistake matching and 2) propagate the supervise information to help the entire matching process. Three measures are proposed to estimate the confidence of each matching candidate. A correct propagation algorithm is further proposed to maximize the spread of the <span class="hlt">user</span>'s "guidance". Experimental results on several public data sets show that the proposed approach can significantly improve the matching accuracy (+8.0% better than the baseline methods).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shi, Feng; Li, Juanzi; Tang, Jie; Xie, Guotong; Li, Hanyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">482</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20049921"> <span id="translatedtitle">Harm reduction therapy with families and <span class="hlt">friends</span> of people with drug problems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article describes and illustrates the ongoing development of a treatment for working with families and <span class="hlt">friends</span> of drug <span class="hlt">users</span> using harm reduction principles. The author was instrumental in applying harm reduction principles to substance abuse and has used these same principles to help families deal with the pessimism, pain, and grief that accompany their relationship to a person with an active substance abuse problem. The treatment involves learning decision-making processes based on both self-care and love for the substance abuser and is based on the values of harm reduction, caring, and incrementalism, rather than those of codependency, tough love, and abrupt behavior change. A long-term family therapy group and two family consultations illustrate the treatment and its applications. PMID:20049921</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Denning, Patt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">483</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=information+AND+processing&pg=4&id=EJ1004003"> <span id="translatedtitle">Similarity between <span class="hlt">Friends</span> in Social Information Processing and Associations with Positive Friendship Quality and Conflict</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This study of 166 best <span class="hlt">friend</span> dyads (M = 10.88 years) examined (a) whether children and their best <span class="hlt">friends</span> were similar in social information processing (SIP) that pertained to two relationship contexts (unfamiliar peer, <span class="hlt">friend</span>); (b) the associations between children's and their best <span class="hlt">friends</span>' SIP and friendship quality and conflict ratings; and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spencer, Sarah V.; Bowker, Julie C.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Laursen, Brett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">484</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6813895"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bevalac <span class="hlt">user</span>'s handbook</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is a <span class="hlt">users</span> manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">485</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA010278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Directory of Transducer <span class="hlt">Users</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Directory of Transducer <span class="hlt">Users</span> is a compilation of knowledgeable transducer personnel at various government activities, aerospace contractors, and universities. The Directory has been published to promote the exchange of information between transducer ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result "